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View Full Version : Well, I could have predicted this one.......


chiefqueen
10-17-2004, 07:34 AM
Today's Kansas City Star endorses Kerry for President.

beavis
10-17-2004, 08:40 AM
...and dozens of peoples opinions are swayed. :rolleyes:

memyselfI
10-17-2004, 08:46 AM
Wow, I might have to start subscribing to the fishwrap again seeing that it might be worth more than floor cover for dog pizz!!! :thumb:

Baby Lee
10-17-2004, 09:02 AM
Wow, I might have to start subscribing to the fishwrap again seeing that it might be worse more than floor cover for dog pizz!!! :thumb:
Drunk? At a quarter of ten on a Sunday morning?

memyselfI
10-17-2004, 10:39 AM
Drunk? At a quarter of ten on a Sunday morning?

Seems the KC Star was not alone:

http://www.editorandpublisher.com/eandp/news/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1000673213

NEW YORK Senator John Kerry picked up a raft of newspaper endorsements on Sunday, widening his lead over President George W. Bush in this area.

Kerry gained the editorial backing of at least 22 papers, with Bush winning the support of just five, giving Kerry the lead by 37-18 in E&P's exclusive tally. He has many more large papers on his side, maintaining his "circulation edge" at about 4-1: approximately 8 million to 2 million (we will post a complete tally later today).

Among his new supporters were three papers that had backed Bush in 2000: the Bradenton Herald in Florida, the Daily Camera in Boulder, Colorado and the Daily-Herald in Arlington Heights, Ill.

However, Bush did pick up the endorsement of the Chicago Tribune and The Dallas Morning News in his home state.

Among the papers endorsing Kerry today were newspapers in key swing states: The Miami Herald, St. Petersburg Times, Palm Beach Post, Daytona Beach News Journal and Bradenton Herald in Florida; the Minneapolis Star-Tribune in Minnesota; the Daily Camera in Colorado, and the Dayton Daily News and Akron Beacon-Journal in Ohio.

He also got the nod from major papers in states already friendly to him: The New York Times, The Boston Globe, San Jose Mercury-News, San Francisco Chronicle, Sacramento Bee and Modesto Bee.

Other papers backing him were the Kansas City Star, the Roanoke (Va.) Times, the Grand Fords (ND) Herald, Charlotte Observer, and the Lexington (Ky.) Herald-Leader. Clearly, many papers in the Knight Ridder and McClatchy chains have rallied to his side.

Besides the Dallas paper, Bush won The Freelance-Star in Fredericksburg, Va., the York Daily Record in Pennsylvania and the New York Sun.

The Winston-Salem (N.C.) Journal, which has backed Republicans since 1968, declared it would not endorse this year, given the choices.

Many of the editorials backing Kerry denounced the incumbent in unusually harsh language. The Miami Herald accused Bush of "narrow partisanship." Up the coast, the Daytona paper cited his "embarrassing performance." The Sacramento Bee said, "The nation has paid a steep price for Bush's arrogance - mounting deficits and debt at home, loss of standing and effectiveness abroad...." For The New York Times, his presidency has simply been "disastrous."

In supporting Bush, the York Daily Record nevertheless raised a concern: "We hope President Bush will renew his commitment to compassionate conservatism on domestic issues. The war on terrorism should be no excuse to impose a hard-line conservative agenda on such a closely divided citizenry."

The Chicago Tribune, in backing Bush, also seemed a bit torn: "There is much the current president could have done differently over the last four years. There are lessons he needs to have learned. And there are reasons--apart from the global perils likely to dominate the next presidency--to recommend either of these two good candidates."

The Dallas Morning News was more enthusiastic, however, declaring: "Americans want and need a president with a backbone steeled by courage and a heart tendered by compassion." The editors said they were "disappointed" by his failure to rein in domestic spending, the deaths of American soldiers in Iraq, and strained relationships abroad. But "this is not the time for America to go wobbly," they added. "This is not the time for Americans to abandon their president."

Uncle_Ted
10-17-2004, 10:45 AM
[In my best Jon Stewart voice] Bush will not forget the disloyalty of these terrorist-loving rags ... they will RUE this day!!!

[we also still don't have a good smiley for sarcasm, do we?]

Mr. Kotter
10-17-2004, 03:17 PM
Seems the KC Star was not alone:

http://www.editorandpublisher.com/eandp/news/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1000673213

NEW YORK Senator John Kerry picked up a raft of newspaper endorsements on Sunday, widening his lead over President George W. Bush in this area.

Kerry gained the editorial backing of at least 22 papers, with Bush winning the support of just five, giving Kerry the lead by 37-18 in E&P's exclusive tally. He has many more large papers on his side, maintaining his "circulation edge" at about 4-1: approximately 8 million to 2 million (we will post a complete tally later today)...."

But, the press isn't Liberal, right? :rolleyes:

Cochise
10-17-2004, 03:26 PM
The mainstream media endorses sKerry.

In other news, water is wet, it's dark out at night, and in the morning the world is illuminated by a large glowing orb.

Hel'n
10-17-2004, 05:42 PM
I think, for all the polls show, that Kerry is going to win... There is a 4-5% electorate still with indecision... and when they go to the ballot box they'll ask if they really want 4 more years of Bush...

Mr. Kotter
10-17-2004, 09:36 PM
The mainstream media endorses sKerry.

In other news, water is wet, it's dark out at night, and in the morning the world is illuminated by a large glowing orb.

As Gomer would say, "Suprize, Suprize, Suprize!" :rolleyes:

nychief
10-17-2004, 09:46 PM
This is pretty amazing considering it is a Knight-ridder paper.

Mr. Kotter
10-17-2004, 09:48 PM
This is pretty amazing considering it is a Knight-ridder paper.


You don't read the Star do ya? It's called Pravda by locals...

Donger
10-17-2004, 09:52 PM
I think, for all the polls show, that Kerry is going to win... There is a 4-5% electorate still with indecision... and when they go to the ballot box they'll ask if they really want 4 more years of Bush...

I want a shiny, new, bright red Ferrari to be waiting for me tomorrow morning.

Doesn't mean it will happen.

The electorate is clearly trending towards Bush. Barring a serious gaffe or bad news, Bush will win by 4-5%.

Just my opinion. But, it's my opinion based on data, not hope.

nychief
10-17-2004, 09:54 PM
Knight-Ridder is thought of as pretty conservative in general.

Inspector
10-17-2004, 09:58 PM
Seems to me that ALL media only supports the republican/democrat party.

But, I admit, I don't pay a lot of attention to the media, but from what I have seen, this seems true - to me anyway.

nychief
10-17-2004, 10:38 PM
Seems to me that ALL media only supports the republican/democrat party.

But, I admit, I don't pay a lot of attention to the media, but from what I have seen, this seems true - to me anyway.


too true.

RealSNR
10-17-2004, 10:55 PM
Other papers backing him were the Kansas City Star, the Roanoke (Va.) Times, the Grand Fords (ND) Herald, Charlotte Observer, and the Lexington (Ky.) Herald-Leader. Clearly, many papers in the Knight Ridder and McClatchy chains have rallied to his side
First of all,

IT'S GRAND FORKS YOU FETID PILES OF COMPOST! AS IN THE FORKS I'M GOING TO STICK IN YOUR EYES IF YOU F*CK UP MY TOWN NAME AGAIN!!!!

Oh, yeah, and the paper is bullshit anyway. I only read it for the comics. All my news I get on the internet.

Prison Bitch
10-16-2016, 07:34 AM
Endorsed her today. Shocker.

scho63
10-16-2016, 09:16 AM
Trump keeps his endorsement record perfect.......

0 for all so far.

Maybe Pravda will endorse him

LiveSteam
10-16-2016, 11:19 AM
Warren B owned Omaha World Harold endorsed Hillary today as well. Real shocker there

Baby Lee
10-16-2016, 11:21 AM
Warren B owned Omaha World Harold endorsed Hillary today as well. Real shocker there

http://i.ytimg.com/vi/RWN8JSBMNp8/hqdefault.jpg

Pawnmower
10-16-2016, 11:25 AM
Endorsed her today. Shocker.

Which major newspapers have endorsed Trump?

Let's make a list

LiveSteam
10-16-2016, 11:29 AM
Lets be honest. News papers are no longer MAJOR and will be something we take our grandchildren to museums to see.. OWH is a broke dick paper that will be bankrupt by 2020

scho63
10-16-2016, 12:15 PM
Which major newspapers have endorsed Trump?

Let's make a list

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

cosmo20002
10-16-2016, 11:03 PM
Endorsed her today. Shocker.

Warren B owned Omaha World Harold endorsed Hillary today as well. Real shocker there

The humor in sarcastically saying "shocker" really doesn't work when NO ONE endorses the other guy, dummies.

cosmo20002
10-16-2016, 11:05 PM
Lets be honest. News papers are no longer MAJOR and will be something we take our grandchildren to museums to see.. OWH is a broke dick paper that will be bankrupt by 2020

You should start a thread about how it is going out of business.

baitism
10-17-2016, 04:41 AM
You know when the media is all against your person that you picked the right one.

DaveNull
10-17-2016, 06:17 AM
As far as endorsement editorials have gone, the Star's is pretty damn weak. My favorite is still The Atlantic (http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2016/11/the-case-for-hillary-clinton-and-against-donald-trump/501161/).

Donald Trump, on the other hand, has no record of public service and no qualifications for public office. His affect is that of an infomercial huckster; he traffics in conspiracy theories and racist invective; he is appallingly sexist; he is erratic, secretive, and xenophobic; he expresses admiration for authoritarian rulers, and evinces authoritarian tendencies himself. He is easily goaded, a poor quality for someone seeking control of America’s nuclear arsenal. He is an enemy of fact-based discourse; he is ignorant of, and indifferent to, the Constitution; he appears not to read.

manchambo
10-17-2016, 06:39 AM
Lets be honest. News papers are no longer MAJOR and will be something we take our grandchildren to museums to see.. OWH is a broke dick paper that will be bankrupt by 2020

I heard even the New York Times is going out of business.

GloryDayz
10-17-2016, 06:48 AM
As a former paperboy it used to sadden me that newspapers are on their way out, but, because of the people running them these days, good riddance.

Trolly McTrollson
10-17-2016, 06:56 AM
Which major newspapers have endorsed Trump?

Let's make a list

National Enquirer, yo.

Prison Bitch
10-17-2016, 07:29 AM
Just shows the disconnect between newspaper editorialists and the actual voters. To have a fairly divided electorate yet be 100% behind 1 candidate across the country shows their hilarious bias

Lex Luthor
10-17-2016, 07:42 AM
You know when the media is all against your person that you picked the right one.
If that's the extent of your analysis, you must be a Trump supporter.

manchambo
10-17-2016, 07:45 AM
Just shows the disconnect between newspaper editorialists and the actual voters. To have a fairly divided electorate yet be 100% behind 1 candidate across the country shows their hilarious bias

What sort of bias is it, exactly? It's plainly not liberal bias, as plenty of newspapers regularly endorse republicans: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newspaper_endorsements_in_the_United_States_presidential_election,_2012

Lex Luthor
10-17-2016, 07:51 AM
Just shows the disconnect between newspaper editorialists and the actual voters. To have a fairly divided electorate yet be 100% behind 1 candidate across the country shows their hilarious bias

Scott Adams has been one of the biggest shills for Trump for the better part of a year. He is no longer endorsing Trump.



http://dilbert.com/assets/dilbert-logo-4152bd0c31f7de7443b4bc90abd818da.pnghttp://ext.branch.dilbert.com/assets/dilbert_character_top-89a98cb02f28bb33abaea4fd2068728c.png

SCOTT ADAMS' BLOG

Why I Endorse Gary Johnson (this week)

Posted October 9th, 2016 @ 3:10am in #Trump #Clinton

I don’t know how to write this post without unintentionally disrespecting the real victims of abuse in any form. I apologize in advance if it comes off that way. But it’s part of the national conversation now, and unavoidable. The best I can do is focus on how voters perceive the situation. I don’t have an opinion about who did what to whom because I wasn’t in the room any of those times. That said…

We fine citizens of the United States find ourselves playing some sort of sex abuse poker in which we have to assign value to various alleged sex crimes to see which alleged rapist/groper/enabler combination we want to inhabit the White House and represent our national brand. Let’s call that situation “not ideal.”

My view is that if either Clinton or Trump can be judged by the weight of the allegations against them, both are 100% unfit for the office. I think Trump supporters think it’s worth the hit to our national brand just to get some specific improvements in the country.

Clinton supporters have been telling me for a few days that any visible support for Trump makes you a supporter of sex abuse. From a persuasion standpoint, that actually makes sense. If people see it that way, that’s the reality you have to deal with. I choose to not be part of that reality so I moved my endorsement to Gary Johnson.

I encourage all Clinton supporters to do the same, and for the same reason. I don’t know if any of the allegations against the Clinton’s are true, but since we are judging each other on associations, you don’t want to be seen as supporting sex abuse by putting an alleged duo of abusers (the perp and the clean-up crew) into office. I think you will agree that it doesn’t matter if any of the allegations are true, because the stink from a mountain of allegations – many that seem credible to observers – is bad for the national brand too. To even consider putting the Clinton’s back in the White House is an insult to women and every survivor of abuse.

To be fair, Gary Johnson is a pot head who didn’t know what Allepo was. I call that relatable. A President Johnson administration might bring with it some operational risks, and policy risks, but at least he won’t slime you by association and turn you into some sort of cheerleader for sex abuse in the way you would if you voted for the Clintons or Trump.

If you take allegations of sex abuse seriously – and you should – vote Johnson. To vote for Clinton or Trump is to be seen by others as an enabler for sexual abuse. I don’t think that’s what anyone had in mind by breaking the glass ceiling. Don’t let it happen to you.



You might enjoy my book because you’re not sure if I’m really endorsing Gary Johnson or just saying so to protect my brand.

http://blog.dilbert.com/post/151552548531/why-i-endorse-gary-johnson-this-week

manchambo
10-17-2016, 08:02 AM
Scott Adams has been one of the biggest shills for Trump for the better part of a year. He is no longer endorsing Trump.




http://blog.dilbert.com/post/151552548531/why-i-endorse-gary-johnson-this-week

Don't be taken in by this charlatan. His post serves no purpose other than false equivalence. He will be back on Trump tomorrow after claiming he proved his point: just like he pretended to endorse Clinton before he endorsed Trump, all the while posting his extraordinarily clever arguments (including that the DNC convention decreased testosterone levels) in favor of Trump.

Lex Luthor
10-17-2016, 08:10 AM
The list of Republicans who oppose Trump is pretty long.

Former Presidents

Former President George H. W. Bush
George H. W. Bush, President of the United States (1989–93); Vice President of the United States (1981–89) (sources say he will vote for Hillary Clinton)[1][2]

Former 2016 Republican presidential primary candidates

All candidates signed a pledge to eventually support the party nominee. The following have refused to honor it.

Jeb Bush, Governor of Florida (1999–2007)[3]
Carly Fiorina, CEO of Hewlett-Packard (1999–2005); 2010 nominee for U.S. Senator from California (withdrew endorsement, called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[4][5]
Lindsey Graham, United States Senator from South Carolina (2003–present)[6]
John Kasich, Governor of Ohio (2011–present); U.S. Representative from Ohio (1983–2001)[7]
George Pataki, Governor of New York (1995–2006)[8]

Former federal cabinet-level officials

Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice
William Bennett, Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy (1989–90); United States Secretary of Education (1985–99) (withdrew endorsement)[9]
Michael Chertoff, United States Secretary of Homeland Security (2005–09); Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit (2003–05) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[10][11]
Bill Cohen, United States Secretary of Defense (1997–2001); United States Senator from Maine (1979–97) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[12][13]
Robert Gates, United States Secretary of Defense (2006–11); Director of Central Intelligence (1991–93)[14]
Carlos Gutierrez, United States Secretary of Commerce (2005–09) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Carla Anderson Hills, United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (1975–77), United States Trade Representative (1989–93) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[10][15]
Ray LaHood, United States Secretary of Transportation (2009–13), U.S. Representative from Illinois (1995–2009)[16]
Greg Mankiw, Chair of the Council of Economic Advisers (2003–05)[17]
Mel Martinez, United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (2001–03); United States Senator from Florida (2005–09); General Chair of the Republican National Committee (2007)[18][19]
Michael Mukasey, United States Attorney General (2007–09)[20]
John Negroponte, United States Ambassador to the United Nations (2001–04); Director of National Intelligence (2005–07); United States Deputy Secretary of State (2007–09) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[10][15]
Henry Paulson, United States Secretary of the Treasury (2006–09) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[21]
Rob Portman, Director of the Office of Management and Budget (2006–07); United States Trade Representative (2005–06); United States Senator from Ohio (2011–present) (withdrew endorsement, writing-in Mike Pence)[22]
William K. Reilly, Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (1989–92) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Condoleezza Rice, United States Secretary of State (2005–09), National Security Advisor (2001–09) (called on Trump to withdraw candidacy)[23]
Tom Ridge, United States Secretary of Homeland Security (2003–05); Homeland Security Advisor (2001–03); Governor of Pennsylvania (1995–2001)[10][24][25]
William Ruckelshaus, Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (1970–73, 1983–85) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
George P. Shultz, United States Secretary of Labor (1969–70); Director of the Office of Management and Budget (1970–72); United States Secretary of the Treasury (1972–74); United States Secretary of State (1982–89)[17]
Louis Wade Sullivan, United States Secretary of Health and Human Services (1989–93) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[26]
Christine Todd Whitman, Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (2001–03); Governor of New Jersey (1994–2001) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[27]
Robert Zoellick, United States Deputy Secretary of State (2005–06); U.S. Trade Representative (2001–05); President of the World Bank Group (2007–12)[10]

Governors

Current

Ohio Governor John Kasich
Charlie Baker, Massachusetts (2015–present)[28]
Robert J. Bentley, Alabama (2011–present) (withdrew endorsement)[29]
Dennis Daugaard, South Dakota (2011–present) (withdrew endorsement, called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[30]
Bill Haslam, Tennessee (2011–present)[31]
Gary Herbert, Utah (2009–present) (withdrew endorsement)[32]
Larry Hogan, Maryland (2015–present)[33][34]
Susana Martinez, New Mexico (2011–present); Chair of the Republican Governors Association (2015–present)[35]
Brian Sandoval, Nevada (2011–present) (withdrew endorsement)[36]
Rick Snyder, Michigan (2011–present)[37]

Former

Former Massachusetts Governor and 2012 nominee for President Mitt Romney
Arne Carlson, Minnesota (1991–99) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
A. Linwood Holton Jr., Virginia (1970–74); Assistant Secretary of State for Legislative Affairs (1974–75) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[38]
Jon Huntsman Jr., Utah (2005–09); United States Ambassador to China (2009–11); United States Ambassador to Singapore (1992–93) (withdrew endorsement)[39]
William Milliken, Michigan (1969–83) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[40]
Kay A. Orr, Nebraska (1987–91)[41]
Tim Pawlenty, Minnesota (2003–11) (withdrew endorsement)[42]
Marc Racicot, Montana (1993–01); Chair of the Republican National Committee (2001–03)[43]
Mitt Romney, Massachusetts (2003–07), 2012 nominee for President[44]
Arnold Schwarzenegger, California (2003–11)[45]
William Weld, Massachusetts (1991–97) (2016 Libertarian nominee for Vice President)[46]

U.S. Senators

Arizona Senator and 2008 nominee for President John McCain
Current
Kelly Ayotte, New Hampshire (2011–present) (withdrew intended vote, writing-in Mike Pence)[47]
Shelley Moore Capito, West Virginia (2015–present) (withdrew endorsement)[48]
Susan Collins, Maine (1997–present)[49]
Mike Crapo, Idaho (1999–present) (withdrew endorsement, called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[50]
Jeff Flake, Arizona (2013–present) (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[51][52]
Cory Gardner, Colorado (2015–present) (withdrew endorsement, called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy, writing-in Mike Pence)[53]
Dean Heller, Nevada (2011–present)[54]
Mark Kirk, Illinois (2010–present) (withdrew endorsement, writing-in Colin Powell)[34]
Mike Lee, Utah (2011–present)[55]
John McCain, Arizona (1987–present); 2008 nominee for President (withdrew endorsement)[56]
Lisa Murkowski, Alaska (2002–present) (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[57]
Ben Sasse, Nebraska (2015–present)[18][58]
Dan Sullivan, Alaska (2015–present) (withdrew endorsement, called on Trump to withdraw candidacy, writing-in Mike Pence)[59]
John Thune, South Dakota (2005–present) (withdrew endorsement, called on Trump to withdraw candidacy)[60]
Former
Norm Coleman, Minnesota (2003–09)[25][61]
David Durenberger, Minnesota (1978–95) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Slade Gorton, Washington (1981–87, 1989–2001) (endorsed Evan McMullin)[62]
Gordon J. Humphrey, New Hampshire (1979–90) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[63][64]
John Warner, Virginia (1979–2009); United States Secretary of the Navy (1972–74) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[65]

U.S. Representatives

Nevada U.S. Representative and 2016 nominee for U.S. Senate Joe Heck
Current
Justin Amash, Michigan (2011–present)[25]
Bradley Byrne, Alabama (2013–present) (withdrew endorsement, called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[66]
Jason Chaffetz, Utah (2009–present) (withdrew endorsement)[67]
Mike Coffman, Colorado (2009–present)[68]
Barbara Comstock, Virginia (2015–present)[69]
Carlos Curbelo, Florida (2015–present)[18][70]
Rodney Davis, Illinois (2013–present) (withdrew endorsement)[71]
Charlie Dent, Pennsylvania (2005–present)[72]
Bob Dold, Illinois (2011–13, 2015–present)[25][73]
Jeff Fortenberry, Nebraska (2005–present) (withdrew endorsement)[71]
Scott Garrett, New Jersey (2003–present) (withdrew endorsement)[71]
Kay Granger, Texas (1997–present) (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[74]
Richard L. Hanna, New York (2011–present) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[25][75]
Cresent Hardy, Nevada (2015–present) (withdrew endorsement)[76]
Joe Heck, Nevada (2011–present); 2016 nominee for U.S. Senate (withdrew endorsement)[76]
Jaime Herrera Beutler, Washington (2011–present) (writing-in Paul Ryan)[77]
Will Hurd, Texas (2015–present)[78]
David Jolly, Florida (2014–present)[79]
John Katko, New York (2015–present)[80]
Adam Kinzinger, Illinois (2011–present)[81]
Steve Knight, California (2015–present)[82]
Frank LoBiondo, New Jersey (1995–present) (withdrew endorsement, writing-in Mike Pence)[83]
Mia Love, Utah (2015–present)[84]
Pat Meehan, Pennsylvania (2011–present) (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[83]
Erik Paulsen, Minnesota (2009–present) (withdrew endorsement)[85]
Reid Ribble, Wisconsin (2011–present)[25]
Scott Rigell, Virginia (2011–present) (endorsed Gary Johnson)[18]
Martha Roby, Alabama (2011–present) (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[66][86]
Tom Rooney, Florida (2009–present) (withdrew endorsement)[71]
Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, Florida (1989–present)[25]
Mike Simpson, Idaho (1999–present) (withdrew endorsement)[9]
Chris Stewart, Utah (2013–present) (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[87]
Fred Upton, Michigan (1987–present)[88]
David Valadao, California (2013–present)[89]
Ann Wagner, Missouri (2013–present) (withdrew endorsement)[90]

Host of Morning Joe on MSNBC and former U.S. Representative from Florida Joe Scarborough

Former

Steve Bartlett, Texas (1983–91)[91]
Bob Bauman, Maryland (1973–81)[91]
Sherwood Boehlert, New York (1993–2007) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[92]
Jack Buechner, Missouri (1987–91)[91]
Tom Campbell, California (1989–93, 1995–2001) (endorsed Gary Johnson)[93]
Bill Clinger, Pennsylvania (1979–97)[91]
Tom Coleman, Missouri (1976–93)[91]
Geoff Davis, Kentucky (2005–12)[91]
Mickey Edwards, Oklahoma (1977–93)[91]
Harris Fawell, Illinois (1985–99)[91]
Ed Foreman, Texas (1963–65, 1969–71)[91]
Amo Houghton, New York (1987–2005)[91]
Bob Inglis, South Carolina (1993–99, 2005–11)[25]
Jim Kolbe, Arizona (1985–2007) (endorsed Gary Johnson)[94]
Steve Kuykendall, California (1999–2001)[91]
Jim Leach, Iowa (1977–2007)[91]
Pete McCloskey, California (1967–83)[91]
Connie Morella, Maryland (1987–2003) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Mike Parker, Mississippi (1989–99); Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works (2001–02)[91]
Ron Paul, Texas (1976–77, 1979–85, 1997–2013)[95]
Tom Petri, Wisconsin (1979–2015)[91]
John Porter, Illinois (1980–2001)[91]
Joe Scarborough, Florida (1995–2001); commentator and author[96]
Claudine Schneider, Rhode Island (1981–91) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[92]
Chris Shays, Connecticut (1987–2009) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Peter Smith, Vermont (1989–11)[91]
Mark Souder, Indiana (1995–2010)[97]
J.C. Watts, Oklahoma (1995–2003)[18]
Edward Weber, Ohio (1981–83)[91]
Vin Weber, Minnesota (1983–93)[98]
G. William Whitehurst, Virginia (1969–87)[91]
Dick Zimmer, New Jersey (1991–97) (endorsed Gary Johnson)[99]
Former State Department officials[edit]
Richard Armitage, Deputy Secretary of State; Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[100]
John B. Bellinger III, Legal Adviser of the Department of State; Legal Adviser to the National Security Council[10]
Robert Blackwill, United States Ambassador to India; Deputy National Security Advisor for Strategic Planning (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[10][15]
R. Nicholas Burns, Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs; United States Ambassador to NATO; United States Ambassador to Greece (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[101]
Eliot A. Cohen, Counselor of the United States Department of State[10][18]
Chester Crocker, Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs[20]
Jendayi Frazer, Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs[10]
James K. Glassman, Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[20]
David F. Gordon, Director of Policy Planning[10]
Donald Gregg, United States Ambassador to South Korea[17]
David A. Gross, U.S. Coordinator for International Communications and Information Policy (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
John Hillen, Assistant Secretary of State for Political-Military Affairs[10]
Reuben Jeffery III, Under Secretary of State for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment[10]
Robert Joseph, Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security Affairs[20]
David J. Kramer, Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor[10]
Stephen D. Krasner, Director of Policy Planning[20]
Frank Lavin, United States Ambassador to Singapore; Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Robert McCallum, United States Ambassador to Australia; Acting United States Deputy Attorney General[10]
Richard Miles, United States Ambassador to Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, and Georgia; Acting United States Ambassador to Kyrgyzstan[20]
Roger Noriega, Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs[20]
John Osborn, Member of the U.S. Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy[20]
Kristen Silverberg, Assistant Secretary of State for International Organization Affairs[10]
William Howard Taft IV, Legal Adviser of the Department of State; United States Ambassador to NATO; United States Deputy Secretary of Defense[10]
Shirin R. Tahir-Kheli, Senior Advisor for Women's Empowerment; Special Assistant to the President for Democracy, Human Rights and International Operations (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[10][15]
Betty Tamposi, Assistant Secretary of State for Consular Affairs (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[102]
Peter Teeley, United States Ambassador to Canada (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Robert Tuttle, United States Ambassador to the United Kingdom (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[103]
Philip Zelikow, Counselor of the United States Department of State[10]
Former Defense Department officials[edit]
Don Bacon, Brigadier General, United States Air Force; 2016 nominee for Nebraska's 2nd district (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[104]
Seth Cropsey, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations/Low Intensity Conflict & Interdependent Capabilities[20]
Michael B. Donley, United States Secretary of the Air Force (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Eric Edelman, Under Secretary of Defense for Policy[10]
Doug Feith, Under Secretary of Defense for Policy[105]
Robert Hastings, Acting Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs[20]
Tim Kane, United States Air Force intelligence officer; Chief Labor Economist, Joint Economic Committee[20]
Mary Beth Long, Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs[10]
Alberto J. Mora, General Counsel of the Navy (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Gale Pollock, Acting Surgeon General of the United States Army (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Martha Rainville, Major General, United States Air Force; Vermont Adjutant General[20]
Michael Rubin, Defense Country Director for Iran and Iraq[20]
Kalev Sepp, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations Capabilities[20]
Matthew Waxman, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Detainee Affairs (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[9][10]
Paul Wolfowitz, United States Deputy Secretary of Defense; President of the World Bank Group (voting for Clinton)[106]
Dov Zakheim, Comptroller of the Department of Defense[10]
Former National Security officials[edit]
Ken Adelman, Director of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[9][20]
Mike Baker, covert operations officer, Central Intelligence Agency[20]
Tom Donnelly, Director of the Policy Group, House Armed Services Committee[20]
Gary Edson, Deputy National Security Advisor[10]
Richard Falkenrath, Deputy Homeland Security Advisor[10]
Peter Feaver, Senior Director for Strategic Planning[10]
Aaron Friedberg, Deputy National Security Advisor to the Vice President[10]
Greg Garcia, Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security for Cyber Security and Telecommunications[20]
Michael Green, Senior Director for Asia, National Security Council[10]
Paul Haenle, Director for China and Taiwan, National Security Council[10]
Michael Hayden, Director of the Central Intelligence Agency (2006–09)[10]
William Inboden, Senior Director for Strategic Planning, National Security Council[10]
James Jeffrey, Deputy National Security Advisor[10]
James C. Langdon, Jr., Chair of the President's Intelligence Advisory Board[10]
Deborah Loewer, Director of the White House Situation Room (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[107]
Evan McMullin, Operations officer, Central Intelligence Agency; Senior Adviser for National Security, House Foreign Affairs Committee (Independent candidate for President)[108][109]
Paul D. Miller, Director for Afghanistan, National Security Council[20]
Meghan O'Sullivan, Deputy National Security Advisor for Iraq and Afghanistan[10]
Kori Schake, Director of Defense Strategy, National Security Council[10]
Gary Schmitt, Executive Director of the President's Intelligence Advisory Board[20]
Brent Scowcroft, National Security Advisor (1975–77, 1989–93); Chair of the President's Intelligence Advisory Board (2001–05) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
David Shedd, Deputy Director of National Intelligence; Acting Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency[20]
Stephen Slick, Senior Director for Intelligence Programs, National Security Council[10]
Frances Townsend, Homeland Security Advisor[20]
Kenneth Wainstein, Homeland Security Advisor[10]

Other former federal government officials

Former Chief of Staff to the Vice President and founder of The Weekly Standard Bill Kristol
Donald B. Ayer, United States Deputy Attorney General[10]
Phillip D. Brady, White House Staff Secretary; White House Cabinet Secretary (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[107]
Paul K. Charlton, United States Attorney[110]
Linda Chavez, Director of the Office of Public Liaison; 1986 nominee for U.S. Senator from Maryland[25]
Jim Cicconi, White House Staff Secretary (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Scott Evertz, Director of the Office of National AIDS Policy (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Tony Fratto, Deputy White House Press Secretary[111]
Charles Fried, United States Solicitor General; Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[112]
Fred T. Goldberg, Jr., Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Tax Policy; Commissioner of Internal Revenue (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Hugh Hewitt, Assistant White House Counsel; conservative radio host (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[113]
Theodore Kassinger, United States Deputy Secretary of Commerce[10]
Bill Kristol, Chief of Staff to the Vice President[25][114]
Rosario Marin, Treasurer of the United States (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[115]
Andrew Natsios, Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development; Chair of the Massachusetts Republican Party[10]
Daniel F. Runde, Director of the Global Development Alliance[20]
Larry D. Thompson, United States Deputy Attorney General[10]
Dan Webb, United States Attorney (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[116]
Peter Wehner, Director of the Office of Strategic Initiatives[9]
Lezlee Westine, Director of the Office of Public Liaison (2001–2005) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[98][117]
Peter Zeidenberg, Assistant United States Attorney[110]
Statewide officials[edit]
Paul Anderson, former Associate Justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[118]
Greg Bell, former Lieutenant Governor of Utah (endorsed Evan McMullin)[119]
Bob Brown, former Secretary of State of Montana (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[120]
Brian Calley, Lieutenant Governor of Michigan (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[121]
Spencer Cox, Lieutenant Governor of Utah[122]
Kurt Daudt, Speaker of the Minnesota House of Representatives (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[42]
Darryl Glenn, 2016 nominee for U.S. Senator from Colorado (withdrew endorsement)[123]
Kim Guadagno, Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey[124]
Betty Montgomery, former Attorney General of Ohio[125]
Mark Shurtleff, former Attorney General of Utah (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[126]
Robert Smith, former Associate Judge of the New York Court of Appeals (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[127]
Diana Taylor, New York Superintendent of Banks (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[128]
Will Weatherford, former Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives[79]
Grant Woods, former Attorney General of Arizona (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[129]
State legislators[edit]
Jack Ciattarelli, New Jersey State Representative (withdrew endorsement)[124]
Lois Sherman Hagarty, former Pennsylvania State Representative[130]
David Johnson, Iowa State Senator[34][131]
Brian Lees, former Massachusetts State Senator; Minority Leader[132]
Mark B. Madsen, Utah State Senator (endorsed Gary Johnson)[133]
Jack McGregor, former Pennsylvania State Senator (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[107]
Charisse Millett, Alaska State Representative; Majority Leader (withdrew endorsement)[134][135]
Ross Spano, Florida State Representative[79]
Joe Sweeney, New Hampshire State Representative (withdrew endorsement)[136]
Municipal officials

Joel Giambra, former Erie County Executive (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[137]
Carlos A. Giménez, Mayor of Miami-Dade County (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[138]
Danny Jones, Mayor of Charleston (endorsed Gary Johnson)[139][140]
Aimee Winder Newton, Member of the Salt Lake County Council (withdrew endorsement)[141]
Tomás Regalado, Mayor of Miami[142]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Republicans_opposing_Donald_Trump_presidential_campaign,_2016

manchambo
10-17-2016, 08:15 AM
The list of Republicans who oppose Trump is pretty long.

Former Presidents

Former President George H. W. Bush
George H. W. Bush, President of the United States (1989–93); Vice President of the United States (1981–89) (sources say he will vote for Hillary Clinton)[1][2]

Former 2016 Republican presidential primary candidates

All candidates signed a pledge to eventually support the party nominee. The following have refused to honor it.

Jeb Bush, Governor of Florida (1999–2007)[3]
Carly Fiorina, CEO of Hewlett-Packard (1999–2005); 2010 nominee for U.S. Senator from California (withdrew endorsement, called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[4][5]
Lindsey Graham, United States Senator from South Carolina (2003–present)[6]
John Kasich, Governor of Ohio (2011–present); U.S. Representative from Ohio (1983–2001)[7]
George Pataki, Governor of New York (1995–2006)[8]

Former federal cabinet-level officials

Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice
William Bennett, Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy (1989–90); United States Secretary of Education (1985–99) (withdrew endorsement)[9]
Michael Chertoff, United States Secretary of Homeland Security (2005–09); Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit (2003–05) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[10][11]
Bill Cohen, United States Secretary of Defense (1997–2001); United States Senator from Maine (1979–97) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[12][13]
Robert Gates, United States Secretary of Defense (2006–11); Director of Central Intelligence (1991–93)[14]
Carlos Gutierrez, United States Secretary of Commerce (2005–09) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Carla Anderson Hills, United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (1975–77), United States Trade Representative (1989–93) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[10][15]
Ray LaHood, United States Secretary of Transportation (2009–13), U.S. Representative from Illinois (1995–2009)[16]
Greg Mankiw, Chair of the Council of Economic Advisers (2003–05)[17]
Mel Martinez, United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (2001–03); United States Senator from Florida (2005–09); General Chair of the Republican National Committee (2007)[18][19]
Michael Mukasey, United States Attorney General (2007–09)[20]
John Negroponte, United States Ambassador to the United Nations (2001–04); Director of National Intelligence (2005–07); United States Deputy Secretary of State (2007–09) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[10][15]
Henry Paulson, United States Secretary of the Treasury (2006–09) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[21]
Rob Portman, Director of the Office of Management and Budget (2006–07); United States Trade Representative (2005–06); United States Senator from Ohio (2011–present) (withdrew endorsement, writing-in Mike Pence)[22]
William K. Reilly, Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (1989–92) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Condoleezza Rice, United States Secretary of State (2005–09), National Security Advisor (2001–09) (called on Trump to withdraw candidacy)[23]
Tom Ridge, United States Secretary of Homeland Security (2003–05); Homeland Security Advisor (2001–03); Governor of Pennsylvania (1995–2001)[10][24][25]
William Ruckelshaus, Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (1970–73, 1983–85) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
George P. Shultz, United States Secretary of Labor (1969–70); Director of the Office of Management and Budget (1970–72); United States Secretary of the Treasury (1972–74); United States Secretary of State (1982–89)[17]
Louis Wade Sullivan, United States Secretary of Health and Human Services (1989–93) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[26]
Christine Todd Whitman, Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (2001–03); Governor of New Jersey (1994–2001) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[27]
Robert Zoellick, United States Deputy Secretary of State (2005–06); U.S. Trade Representative (2001–05); President of the World Bank Group (2007–12)[10]

Governors

Current

Ohio Governor John Kasich
Charlie Baker, Massachusetts (2015–present)[28]
Robert J. Bentley, Alabama (2011–present) (withdrew endorsement)[29]
Dennis Daugaard, South Dakota (2011–present) (withdrew endorsement, called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[30]
Bill Haslam, Tennessee (2011–present)[31]
Gary Herbert, Utah (2009–present) (withdrew endorsement)[32]
Larry Hogan, Maryland (2015–present)[33][34]
Susana Martinez, New Mexico (2011–present); Chair of the Republican Governors Association (2015–present)[35]
Brian Sandoval, Nevada (2011–present) (withdrew endorsement)[36]
Rick Snyder, Michigan (2011–present)[37]

Former

Former Massachusetts Governor and 2012 nominee for President Mitt Romney
Arne Carlson, Minnesota (1991–99) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
A. Linwood Holton Jr., Virginia (1970–74); Assistant Secretary of State for Legislative Affairs (1974–75) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[38]
Jon Huntsman Jr., Utah (2005–09); United States Ambassador to China (2009–11); United States Ambassador to Singapore (1992–93) (withdrew endorsement)[39]
William Milliken, Michigan (1969–83) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[40]
Kay A. Orr, Nebraska (1987–91)[41]
Tim Pawlenty, Minnesota (2003–11) (withdrew endorsement)[42]
Marc Racicot, Montana (1993–01); Chair of the Republican National Committee (2001–03)[43]
Mitt Romney, Massachusetts (2003–07), 2012 nominee for President[44]
Arnold Schwarzenegger, California (2003–11)[45]
William Weld, Massachusetts (1991–97) (2016 Libertarian nominee for Vice President)[46]

U.S. Senators

Arizona Senator and 2008 nominee for President John McCain
Current
Kelly Ayotte, New Hampshire (2011–present) (withdrew intended vote, writing-in Mike Pence)[47]
Shelley Moore Capito, West Virginia (2015–present) (withdrew endorsement)[48]
Susan Collins, Maine (1997–present)[49]
Mike Crapo, Idaho (1999–present) (withdrew endorsement, called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[50]
Jeff Flake, Arizona (2013–present) (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[51][52]
Cory Gardner, Colorado (2015–present) (withdrew endorsement, called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy, writing-in Mike Pence)[53]
Dean Heller, Nevada (2011–present)[54]
Mark Kirk, Illinois (2010–present) (withdrew endorsement, writing-in Colin Powell)[34]
Mike Lee, Utah (2011–present)[55]
John McCain, Arizona (1987–present); 2008 nominee for President (withdrew endorsement)[56]
Lisa Murkowski, Alaska (2002–present) (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[57]
Ben Sasse, Nebraska (2015–present)[18][58]
Dan Sullivan, Alaska (2015–present) (withdrew endorsement, called on Trump to withdraw candidacy, writing-in Mike Pence)[59]
John Thune, South Dakota (2005–present) (withdrew endorsement, called on Trump to withdraw candidacy)[60]
Former
Norm Coleman, Minnesota (2003–09)[25][61]
David Durenberger, Minnesota (1978–95) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Slade Gorton, Washington (1981–87, 1989–2001) (endorsed Evan McMullin)[62]
Gordon J. Humphrey, New Hampshire (1979–90) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[63][64]
John Warner, Virginia (1979–2009); United States Secretary of the Navy (1972–74) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[65]

U.S. Representatives

Nevada U.S. Representative and 2016 nominee for U.S. Senate Joe Heck
Current
Justin Amash, Michigan (2011–present)[25]
Bradley Byrne, Alabama (2013–present) (withdrew endorsement, called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[66]
Jason Chaffetz, Utah (2009–present) (withdrew endorsement)[67]
Mike Coffman, Colorado (2009–present)[68]
Barbara Comstock, Virginia (2015–present)[69]
Carlos Curbelo, Florida (2015–present)[18][70]
Rodney Davis, Illinois (2013–present) (withdrew endorsement)[71]
Charlie Dent, Pennsylvania (2005–present)[72]
Bob Dold, Illinois (2011–13, 2015–present)[25][73]
Jeff Fortenberry, Nebraska (2005–present) (withdrew endorsement)[71]
Scott Garrett, New Jersey (2003–present) (withdrew endorsement)[71]
Kay Granger, Texas (1997–present) (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[74]
Richard L. Hanna, New York (2011–present) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[25][75]
Cresent Hardy, Nevada (2015–present) (withdrew endorsement)[76]
Joe Heck, Nevada (2011–present); 2016 nominee for U.S. Senate (withdrew endorsement)[76]
Jaime Herrera Beutler, Washington (2011–present) (writing-in Paul Ryan)[77]
Will Hurd, Texas (2015–present)[78]
David Jolly, Florida (2014–present)[79]
John Katko, New York (2015–present)[80]
Adam Kinzinger, Illinois (2011–present)[81]
Steve Knight, California (2015–present)[82]
Frank LoBiondo, New Jersey (1995–present) (withdrew endorsement, writing-in Mike Pence)[83]
Mia Love, Utah (2015–present)[84]
Pat Meehan, Pennsylvania (2011–present) (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[83]
Erik Paulsen, Minnesota (2009–present) (withdrew endorsement)[85]
Reid Ribble, Wisconsin (2011–present)[25]
Scott Rigell, Virginia (2011–present) (endorsed Gary Johnson)[18]
Martha Roby, Alabama (2011–present) (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[66][86]
Tom Rooney, Florida (2009–present) (withdrew endorsement)[71]
Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, Florida (1989–present)[25]
Mike Simpson, Idaho (1999–present) (withdrew endorsement)[9]
Chris Stewart, Utah (2013–present) (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[87]
Fred Upton, Michigan (1987–present)[88]
David Valadao, California (2013–present)[89]
Ann Wagner, Missouri (2013–present) (withdrew endorsement)[90]

Host of Morning Joe on MSNBC and former U.S. Representative from Florida Joe Scarborough

Former

Steve Bartlett, Texas (1983–91)[91]
Bob Bauman, Maryland (1973–81)[91]
Sherwood Boehlert, New York (1993–2007) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[92]
Jack Buechner, Missouri (1987–91)[91]
Tom Campbell, California (1989–93, 1995–2001) (endorsed Gary Johnson)[93]
Bill Clinger, Pennsylvania (1979–97)[91]
Tom Coleman, Missouri (1976–93)[91]
Geoff Davis, Kentucky (2005–12)[91]
Mickey Edwards, Oklahoma (1977–93)[91]
Harris Fawell, Illinois (1985–99)[91]
Ed Foreman, Texas (1963–65, 1969–71)[91]
Amo Houghton, New York (1987–2005)[91]
Bob Inglis, South Carolina (1993–99, 2005–11)[25]
Jim Kolbe, Arizona (1985–2007) (endorsed Gary Johnson)[94]
Steve Kuykendall, California (1999–2001)[91]
Jim Leach, Iowa (1977–2007)[91]
Pete McCloskey, California (1967–83)[91]
Connie Morella, Maryland (1987–2003) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Mike Parker, Mississippi (1989–99); Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works (2001–02)[91]
Ron Paul, Texas (1976–77, 1979–85, 1997–2013)[95]
Tom Petri, Wisconsin (1979–2015)[91]
John Porter, Illinois (1980–2001)[91]
Joe Scarborough, Florida (1995–2001); commentator and author[96]
Claudine Schneider, Rhode Island (1981–91) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[92]
Chris Shays, Connecticut (1987–2009) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Peter Smith, Vermont (1989–11)[91]
Mark Souder, Indiana (1995–2010)[97]
J.C. Watts, Oklahoma (1995–2003)[18]
Edward Weber, Ohio (1981–83)[91]
Vin Weber, Minnesota (1983–93)[98]
G. William Whitehurst, Virginia (1969–87)[91]
Dick Zimmer, New Jersey (1991–97) (endorsed Gary Johnson)[99]
Former State Department officials[edit]
Richard Armitage, Deputy Secretary of State; Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[100]
John B. Bellinger III, Legal Adviser of the Department of State; Legal Adviser to the National Security Council[10]
Robert Blackwill, United States Ambassador to India; Deputy National Security Advisor for Strategic Planning (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[10][15]
R. Nicholas Burns, Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs; United States Ambassador to NATO; United States Ambassador to Greece (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[101]
Eliot A. Cohen, Counselor of the United States Department of State[10][18]
Chester Crocker, Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs[20]
Jendayi Frazer, Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs[10]
James K. Glassman, Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[20]
David F. Gordon, Director of Policy Planning[10]
Donald Gregg, United States Ambassador to South Korea[17]
David A. Gross, U.S. Coordinator for International Communications and Information Policy (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
John Hillen, Assistant Secretary of State for Political-Military Affairs[10]
Reuben Jeffery III, Under Secretary of State for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment[10]
Robert Joseph, Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security Affairs[20]
David J. Kramer, Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor[10]
Stephen D. Krasner, Director of Policy Planning[20]
Frank Lavin, United States Ambassador to Singapore; Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Robert McCallum, United States Ambassador to Australia; Acting United States Deputy Attorney General[10]
Richard Miles, United States Ambassador to Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, and Georgia; Acting United States Ambassador to Kyrgyzstan[20]
Roger Noriega, Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs[20]
John Osborn, Member of the U.S. Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy[20]
Kristen Silverberg, Assistant Secretary of State for International Organization Affairs[10]
William Howard Taft IV, Legal Adviser of the Department of State; United States Ambassador to NATO; United States Deputy Secretary of Defense[10]
Shirin R. Tahir-Kheli, Senior Advisor for Women's Empowerment; Special Assistant to the President for Democracy, Human Rights and International Operations (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[10][15]
Betty Tamposi, Assistant Secretary of State for Consular Affairs (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[102]
Peter Teeley, United States Ambassador to Canada (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Robert Tuttle, United States Ambassador to the United Kingdom (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[103]
Philip Zelikow, Counselor of the United States Department of State[10]
Former Defense Department officials[edit]
Don Bacon, Brigadier General, United States Air Force; 2016 nominee for Nebraska's 2nd district (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[104]
Seth Cropsey, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations/Low Intensity Conflict & Interdependent Capabilities[20]
Michael B. Donley, United States Secretary of the Air Force (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Eric Edelman, Under Secretary of Defense for Policy[10]
Doug Feith, Under Secretary of Defense for Policy[105]
Robert Hastings, Acting Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs[20]
Tim Kane, United States Air Force intelligence officer; Chief Labor Economist, Joint Economic Committee[20]
Mary Beth Long, Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs[10]
Alberto J. Mora, General Counsel of the Navy (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Gale Pollock, Acting Surgeon General of the United States Army (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Martha Rainville, Major General, United States Air Force; Vermont Adjutant General[20]
Michael Rubin, Defense Country Director for Iran and Iraq[20]
Kalev Sepp, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations Capabilities[20]
Matthew Waxman, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Detainee Affairs (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[9][10]
Paul Wolfowitz, United States Deputy Secretary of Defense; President of the World Bank Group (voting for Clinton)[106]
Dov Zakheim, Comptroller of the Department of Defense[10]
Former National Security officials[edit]
Ken Adelman, Director of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[9][20]
Mike Baker, covert operations officer, Central Intelligence Agency[20]
Tom Donnelly, Director of the Policy Group, House Armed Services Committee[20]
Gary Edson, Deputy National Security Advisor[10]
Richard Falkenrath, Deputy Homeland Security Advisor[10]
Peter Feaver, Senior Director for Strategic Planning[10]
Aaron Friedberg, Deputy National Security Advisor to the Vice President[10]
Greg Garcia, Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security for Cyber Security and Telecommunications[20]
Michael Green, Senior Director for Asia, National Security Council[10]
Paul Haenle, Director for China and Taiwan, National Security Council[10]
Michael Hayden, Director of the Central Intelligence Agency (2006–09)[10]
William Inboden, Senior Director for Strategic Planning, National Security Council[10]
James Jeffrey, Deputy National Security Advisor[10]
James C. Langdon, Jr., Chair of the President's Intelligence Advisory Board[10]
Deborah Loewer, Director of the White House Situation Room (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[107]
Evan McMullin, Operations officer, Central Intelligence Agency; Senior Adviser for National Security, House Foreign Affairs Committee (Independent candidate for President)[108][109]
Paul D. Miller, Director for Afghanistan, National Security Council[20]
Meghan O'Sullivan, Deputy National Security Advisor for Iraq and Afghanistan[10]
Kori Schake, Director of Defense Strategy, National Security Council[10]
Gary Schmitt, Executive Director of the President's Intelligence Advisory Board[20]
Brent Scowcroft, National Security Advisor (1975–77, 1989–93); Chair of the President's Intelligence Advisory Board (2001–05) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
David Shedd, Deputy Director of National Intelligence; Acting Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency[20]
Stephen Slick, Senior Director for Intelligence Programs, National Security Council[10]
Frances Townsend, Homeland Security Advisor[20]
Kenneth Wainstein, Homeland Security Advisor[10]

Other former federal government officials

Former Chief of Staff to the Vice President and founder of The Weekly Standard Bill Kristol
Donald B. Ayer, United States Deputy Attorney General[10]
Phillip D. Brady, White House Staff Secretary; White House Cabinet Secretary (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[107]
Paul K. Charlton, United States Attorney[110]
Linda Chavez, Director of the Office of Public Liaison; 1986 nominee for U.S. Senator from Maryland[25]
Jim Cicconi, White House Staff Secretary (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Scott Evertz, Director of the Office of National AIDS Policy (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Tony Fratto, Deputy White House Press Secretary[111]
Charles Fried, United States Solicitor General; Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[112]
Fred T. Goldberg, Jr., Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Tax Policy; Commissioner of Internal Revenue (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Hugh Hewitt, Assistant White House Counsel; conservative radio host (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[113]
Theodore Kassinger, United States Deputy Secretary of Commerce[10]
Bill Kristol, Chief of Staff to the Vice President[25][114]
Rosario Marin, Treasurer of the United States (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[115]
Andrew Natsios, Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development; Chair of the Massachusetts Republican Party[10]
Daniel F. Runde, Director of the Global Development Alliance[20]
Larry D. Thompson, United States Deputy Attorney General[10]
Dan Webb, United States Attorney (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[116]
Peter Wehner, Director of the Office of Strategic Initiatives[9]
Lezlee Westine, Director of the Office of Public Liaison (2001–2005) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[98][117]
Peter Zeidenberg, Assistant United States Attorney[110]
Statewide officials[edit]
Paul Anderson, former Associate Justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[118]
Greg Bell, former Lieutenant Governor of Utah (endorsed Evan McMullin)[119]
Bob Brown, former Secretary of State of Montana (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[120]
Brian Calley, Lieutenant Governor of Michigan (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[121]
Spencer Cox, Lieutenant Governor of Utah[122]
Kurt Daudt, Speaker of the Minnesota House of Representatives (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[42]
Darryl Glenn, 2016 nominee for U.S. Senator from Colorado (withdrew endorsement)[123]
Kim Guadagno, Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey[124]
Betty Montgomery, former Attorney General of Ohio[125]
Mark Shurtleff, former Attorney General of Utah (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[126]
Robert Smith, former Associate Judge of the New York Court of Appeals (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[127]
Diana Taylor, New York Superintendent of Banks (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[128]
Will Weatherford, former Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives[79]
Grant Woods, former Attorney General of Arizona (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[129]
State legislators[edit]
Jack Ciattarelli, New Jersey State Representative (withdrew endorsement)[124]
Lois Sherman Hagarty, former Pennsylvania State Representative[130]
David Johnson, Iowa State Senator[34][131]
Brian Lees, former Massachusetts State Senator; Minority Leader[132]
Mark B. Madsen, Utah State Senator (endorsed Gary Johnson)[133]
Jack McGregor, former Pennsylvania State Senator (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[107]
Charisse Millett, Alaska State Representative; Majority Leader (withdrew endorsement)[134][135]
Ross Spano, Florida State Representative[79]
Joe Sweeney, New Hampshire State Representative (withdrew endorsement)[136]
Municipal officials

Joel Giambra, former Erie County Executive (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[137]
Carlos A. Giménez, Mayor of Miami-Dade County (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[138]
Danny Jones, Mayor of Charleston (endorsed Gary Johnson)[139][140]
Aimee Winder Newton, Member of the Salt Lake County Council (withdrew endorsement)[141]
Tomás Regalado, Mayor of Miami[142]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Republicans_opposing_Donald_Trump_presidential_campaign,_2016

An electoral tie, though unlikely, would be interesting. Clinton might well win even in a republican house.

baitism
10-17-2016, 09:19 AM
No one cares what establishment Republicans think. They created Trump by not fighting for the voters they are supposed to be representing.

Lex Luthor
10-17-2016, 09:24 AM
No one cares what establishment Republicans think. They created Trump by not fighting for the voters they are supposed to be representing.

If anyone thinks Trump is going to win a general election with this kind of opposition from the party that nominated him, they are mistaken.

The "establishment" Republicans have very good reasons to oppose them. I won't bother to list them here. Unless you've been in coma for the last year, you've already seen them.

baitism
10-17-2016, 10:05 AM
If anyone thinks Trump is going to win a general election with this kind of opposition from the party that nominated him, they are mistaken.

The "establishment" Republicans have very good reasons to oppose them. I won't bother to list them here. Unless you've been in coma for the last year, you've already seen them.

The establishment GOP will never win the WH again. They need to embrace reform, even if it isn't Trump.

cosmo20002
10-17-2016, 10:28 AM
Just shows the disconnect between newspaper editorialists and the actual voters. To have a fairly divided electorate yet be 100% behind 1 candidate across the country shows their hilarious bias

What's hilarious is that many of these publications are biased to Rs. Yet, they aren't endorsing Trump because he's just that awful.

baitism
10-17-2016, 11:30 AM
What's hilarious is that many of these publications are biased to Rs. Yet, they aren't endorsing Trump because he's just that awful.

No, they really aren't. Media is dominated by liberal echo chambers. Even Fox is establishment.

GloryDayz
10-17-2016, 03:56 PM
The list of Republicans who oppose Trump is pretty long.

Former Presidents

Former President George H. W. Bush
George H. W. Bush, President of the United States (1989–93); Vice President of the United States (1981–89) (sources say he will vote for Hillary Clinton)[1][2]

Former 2016 Republican presidential primary candidates

All candidates signed a pledge to eventually support the party nominee. The following have refused to honor it.

Jeb Bush, Governor of Florida (1999–2007)[3]
Carly Fiorina, CEO of Hewlett-Packard (1999–2005); 2010 nominee for U.S. Senator from California (withdrew endorsement, called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[4][5]
Lindsey Graham, United States Senator from South Carolina (2003–present)[6]
John Kasich, Governor of Ohio (2011–present); U.S. Representative from Ohio (1983–2001)[7]
George Pataki, Governor of New York (1995–2006)[8]

Former federal cabinet-level officials

Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice
William Bennett, Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy (1989–90); United States Secretary of Education (1985–99) (withdrew endorsement)[9]
Michael Chertoff, United States Secretary of Homeland Security (2005–09); Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit (2003–05) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[10][11]
Bill Cohen, United States Secretary of Defense (1997–2001); United States Senator from Maine (1979–97) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[12][13]
Robert Gates, United States Secretary of Defense (2006–11); Director of Central Intelligence (1991–93)[14]
Carlos Gutierrez, United States Secretary of Commerce (2005–09) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Carla Anderson Hills, United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (1975–77), United States Trade Representative (1989–93) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[10][15]
Ray LaHood, United States Secretary of Transportation (2009–13), U.S. Representative from Illinois (1995–2009)[16]
Greg Mankiw, Chair of the Council of Economic Advisers (2003–05)[17]
Mel Martinez, United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (2001–03); United States Senator from Florida (2005–09); General Chair of the Republican National Committee (2007)[18][19]
Michael Mukasey, United States Attorney General (2007–09)[20]
John Negroponte, United States Ambassador to the United Nations (2001–04); Director of National Intelligence (2005–07); United States Deputy Secretary of State (2007–09) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[10][15]
Henry Paulson, United States Secretary of the Treasury (2006–09) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[21]
Rob Portman, Director of the Office of Management and Budget (2006–07); United States Trade Representative (2005–06); United States Senator from Ohio (2011–present) (withdrew endorsement, writing-in Mike Pence)[22]
William K. Reilly, Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (1989–92) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Condoleezza Rice, United States Secretary of State (2005–09), National Security Advisor (2001–09) (called on Trump to withdraw candidacy)[23]
Tom Ridge, United States Secretary of Homeland Security (2003–05); Homeland Security Advisor (2001–03); Governor of Pennsylvania (1995–2001)[10][24][25]
William Ruckelshaus, Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (1970–73, 1983–85) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
George P. Shultz, United States Secretary of Labor (1969–70); Director of the Office of Management and Budget (1970–72); United States Secretary of the Treasury (1972–74); United States Secretary of State (1982–89)[17]
Louis Wade Sullivan, United States Secretary of Health and Human Services (1989–93) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[26]
Christine Todd Whitman, Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (2001–03); Governor of New Jersey (1994–2001) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[27]
Robert Zoellick, United States Deputy Secretary of State (2005–06); U.S. Trade Representative (2001–05); President of the World Bank Group (2007–12)[10]

Governors

Current

Ohio Governor John Kasich
Charlie Baker, Massachusetts (2015–present)[28]
Robert J. Bentley, Alabama (2011–present) (withdrew endorsement)[29]
Dennis Daugaard, South Dakota (2011–present) (withdrew endorsement, called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[30]
Bill Haslam, Tennessee (2011–present)[31]
Gary Herbert, Utah (2009–present) (withdrew endorsement)[32]
Larry Hogan, Maryland (2015–present)[33][34]
Susana Martinez, New Mexico (2011–present); Chair of the Republican Governors Association (2015–present)[35]
Brian Sandoval, Nevada (2011–present) (withdrew endorsement)[36]
Rick Snyder, Michigan (2011–present)[37]

Former

Former Massachusetts Governor and 2012 nominee for President Mitt Romney
Arne Carlson, Minnesota (1991–99) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
A. Linwood Holton Jr., Virginia (1970–74); Assistant Secretary of State for Legislative Affairs (1974–75) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[38]
Jon Huntsman Jr., Utah (2005–09); United States Ambassador to China (2009–11); United States Ambassador to Singapore (1992–93) (withdrew endorsement)[39]
William Milliken, Michigan (1969–83) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[40]
Kay A. Orr, Nebraska (1987–91)[41]
Tim Pawlenty, Minnesota (2003–11) (withdrew endorsement)[42]
Marc Racicot, Montana (1993–01); Chair of the Republican National Committee (2001–03)[43]
Mitt Romney, Massachusetts (2003–07), 2012 nominee for President[44]
Arnold Schwarzenegger, California (2003–11)[45]
William Weld, Massachusetts (1991–97) (2016 Libertarian nominee for Vice President)[46]

U.S. Senators

Arizona Senator and 2008 nominee for President John McCain
Current
Kelly Ayotte, New Hampshire (2011–present) (withdrew intended vote, writing-in Mike Pence)[47]
Shelley Moore Capito, West Virginia (2015–present) (withdrew endorsement)[48]
Susan Collins, Maine (1997–present)[49]
Mike Crapo, Idaho (1999–present) (withdrew endorsement, called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[50]
Jeff Flake, Arizona (2013–present) (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[51][52]
Cory Gardner, Colorado (2015–present) (withdrew endorsement, called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy, writing-in Mike Pence)[53]
Dean Heller, Nevada (2011–present)[54]
Mark Kirk, Illinois (2010–present) (withdrew endorsement, writing-in Colin Powell)[34]
Mike Lee, Utah (2011–present)[55]
John McCain, Arizona (1987–present); 2008 nominee for President (withdrew endorsement)[56]
Lisa Murkowski, Alaska (2002–present) (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[57]
Ben Sasse, Nebraska (2015–present)[18][58]
Dan Sullivan, Alaska (2015–present) (withdrew endorsement, called on Trump to withdraw candidacy, writing-in Mike Pence)[59]
John Thune, South Dakota (2005–present) (withdrew endorsement, called on Trump to withdraw candidacy)[60]
Former
Norm Coleman, Minnesota (2003–09)[25][61]
David Durenberger, Minnesota (1978–95) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Slade Gorton, Washington (1981–87, 1989–2001) (endorsed Evan McMullin)[62]
Gordon J. Humphrey, New Hampshire (1979–90) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[63][64]
John Warner, Virginia (1979–2009); United States Secretary of the Navy (1972–74) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[65]

U.S. Representatives

Nevada U.S. Representative and 2016 nominee for U.S. Senate Joe Heck
Current
Justin Amash, Michigan (2011–present)[25]
Bradley Byrne, Alabama (2013–present) (withdrew endorsement, called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[66]
Jason Chaffetz, Utah (2009–present) (withdrew endorsement)[67]
Mike Coffman, Colorado (2009–present)[68]
Barbara Comstock, Virginia (2015–present)[69]
Carlos Curbelo, Florida (2015–present)[18][70]
Rodney Davis, Illinois (2013–present) (withdrew endorsement)[71]
Charlie Dent, Pennsylvania (2005–present)[72]
Bob Dold, Illinois (2011–13, 2015–present)[25][73]
Jeff Fortenberry, Nebraska (2005–present) (withdrew endorsement)[71]
Scott Garrett, New Jersey (2003–present) (withdrew endorsement)[71]
Kay Granger, Texas (1997–present) (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[74]
Richard L. Hanna, New York (2011–present) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[25][75]
Cresent Hardy, Nevada (2015–present) (withdrew endorsement)[76]
Joe Heck, Nevada (2011–present); 2016 nominee for U.S. Senate (withdrew endorsement)[76]
Jaime Herrera Beutler, Washington (2011–present) (writing-in Paul Ryan)[77]
Will Hurd, Texas (2015–present)[78]
David Jolly, Florida (2014–present)[79]
John Katko, New York (2015–present)[80]
Adam Kinzinger, Illinois (2011–present)[81]
Steve Knight, California (2015–present)[82]
Frank LoBiondo, New Jersey (1995–present) (withdrew endorsement, writing-in Mike Pence)[83]
Mia Love, Utah (2015–present)[84]
Pat Meehan, Pennsylvania (2011–present) (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[83]
Erik Paulsen, Minnesota (2009–present) (withdrew endorsement)[85]
Reid Ribble, Wisconsin (2011–present)[25]
Scott Rigell, Virginia (2011–present) (endorsed Gary Johnson)[18]
Martha Roby, Alabama (2011–present) (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[66][86]
Tom Rooney, Florida (2009–present) (withdrew endorsement)[71]
Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, Florida (1989–present)[25]
Mike Simpson, Idaho (1999–present) (withdrew endorsement)[9]
Chris Stewart, Utah (2013–present) (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[87]
Fred Upton, Michigan (1987–present)[88]
David Valadao, California (2013–present)[89]
Ann Wagner, Missouri (2013–present) (withdrew endorsement)[90]

Host of Morning Joe on MSNBC and former U.S. Representative from Florida Joe Scarborough

Former

Steve Bartlett, Texas (1983–91)[91]
Bob Bauman, Maryland (1973–81)[91]
Sherwood Boehlert, New York (1993–2007) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[92]
Jack Buechner, Missouri (1987–91)[91]
Tom Campbell, California (1989–93, 1995–2001) (endorsed Gary Johnson)[93]
Bill Clinger, Pennsylvania (1979–97)[91]
Tom Coleman, Missouri (1976–93)[91]
Geoff Davis, Kentucky (2005–12)[91]
Mickey Edwards, Oklahoma (1977–93)[91]
Harris Fawell, Illinois (1985–99)[91]
Ed Foreman, Texas (1963–65, 1969–71)[91]
Amo Houghton, New York (1987–2005)[91]
Bob Inglis, South Carolina (1993–99, 2005–11)[25]
Jim Kolbe, Arizona (1985–2007) (endorsed Gary Johnson)[94]
Steve Kuykendall, California (1999–2001)[91]
Jim Leach, Iowa (1977–2007)[91]
Pete McCloskey, California (1967–83)[91]
Connie Morella, Maryland (1987–2003) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Mike Parker, Mississippi (1989–99); Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works (2001–02)[91]
Ron Paul, Texas (1976–77, 1979–85, 1997–2013)[95]
Tom Petri, Wisconsin (1979–2015)[91]
John Porter, Illinois (1980–2001)[91]
Joe Scarborough, Florida (1995–2001); commentator and author[96]
Claudine Schneider, Rhode Island (1981–91) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[92]
Chris Shays, Connecticut (1987–2009) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Peter Smith, Vermont (1989–11)[91]
Mark Souder, Indiana (1995–2010)[97]
J.C. Watts, Oklahoma (1995–2003)[18]
Edward Weber, Ohio (1981–83)[91]
Vin Weber, Minnesota (1983–93)[98]
G. William Whitehurst, Virginia (1969–87)[91]
Dick Zimmer, New Jersey (1991–97) (endorsed Gary Johnson)[99]
Former State Department officials[edit]
Richard Armitage, Deputy Secretary of State; Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[100]
John B. Bellinger III, Legal Adviser of the Department of State; Legal Adviser to the National Security Council[10]
Robert Blackwill, United States Ambassador to India; Deputy National Security Advisor for Strategic Planning (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[10][15]
R. Nicholas Burns, Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs; United States Ambassador to NATO; United States Ambassador to Greece (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[101]
Eliot A. Cohen, Counselor of the United States Department of State[10][18]
Chester Crocker, Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs[20]
Jendayi Frazer, Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs[10]
James K. Glassman, Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[20]
David F. Gordon, Director of Policy Planning[10]
Donald Gregg, United States Ambassador to South Korea[17]
David A. Gross, U.S. Coordinator for International Communications and Information Policy (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
John Hillen, Assistant Secretary of State for Political-Military Affairs[10]
Reuben Jeffery III, Under Secretary of State for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment[10]
Robert Joseph, Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security Affairs[20]
David J. Kramer, Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor[10]
Stephen D. Krasner, Director of Policy Planning[20]
Frank Lavin, United States Ambassador to Singapore; Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Robert McCallum, United States Ambassador to Australia; Acting United States Deputy Attorney General[10]
Richard Miles, United States Ambassador to Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, and Georgia; Acting United States Ambassador to Kyrgyzstan[20]
Roger Noriega, Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs[20]
John Osborn, Member of the U.S. Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy[20]
Kristen Silverberg, Assistant Secretary of State for International Organization Affairs[10]
William Howard Taft IV, Legal Adviser of the Department of State; United States Ambassador to NATO; United States Deputy Secretary of Defense[10]
Shirin R. Tahir-Kheli, Senior Advisor for Women's Empowerment; Special Assistant to the President for Democracy, Human Rights and International Operations (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[10][15]
Betty Tamposi, Assistant Secretary of State for Consular Affairs (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[102]
Peter Teeley, United States Ambassador to Canada (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Robert Tuttle, United States Ambassador to the United Kingdom (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[103]
Philip Zelikow, Counselor of the United States Department of State[10]
Former Defense Department officials[edit]
Don Bacon, Brigadier General, United States Air Force; 2016 nominee for Nebraska's 2nd district (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[104]
Seth Cropsey, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations/Low Intensity Conflict & Interdependent Capabilities[20]
Michael B. Donley, United States Secretary of the Air Force (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Eric Edelman, Under Secretary of Defense for Policy[10]
Doug Feith, Under Secretary of Defense for Policy[105]
Robert Hastings, Acting Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs[20]
Tim Kane, United States Air Force intelligence officer; Chief Labor Economist, Joint Economic Committee[20]
Mary Beth Long, Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs[10]
Alberto J. Mora, General Counsel of the Navy (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Gale Pollock, Acting Surgeon General of the United States Army (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Martha Rainville, Major General, United States Air Force; Vermont Adjutant General[20]
Michael Rubin, Defense Country Director for Iran and Iraq[20]
Kalev Sepp, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations Capabilities[20]
Matthew Waxman, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Detainee Affairs (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[9][10]
Paul Wolfowitz, United States Deputy Secretary of Defense; President of the World Bank Group (voting for Clinton)[106]
Dov Zakheim, Comptroller of the Department of Defense[10]
Former National Security officials[edit]
Ken Adelman, Director of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[9][20]
Mike Baker, covert operations officer, Central Intelligence Agency[20]
Tom Donnelly, Director of the Policy Group, House Armed Services Committee[20]
Gary Edson, Deputy National Security Advisor[10]
Richard Falkenrath, Deputy Homeland Security Advisor[10]
Peter Feaver, Senior Director for Strategic Planning[10]
Aaron Friedberg, Deputy National Security Advisor to the Vice President[10]
Greg Garcia, Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security for Cyber Security and Telecommunications[20]
Michael Green, Senior Director for Asia, National Security Council[10]
Paul Haenle, Director for China and Taiwan, National Security Council[10]
Michael Hayden, Director of the Central Intelligence Agency (2006–09)[10]
William Inboden, Senior Director for Strategic Planning, National Security Council[10]
James Jeffrey, Deputy National Security Advisor[10]
James C. Langdon, Jr., Chair of the President's Intelligence Advisory Board[10]
Deborah Loewer, Director of the White House Situation Room (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[107]
Evan McMullin, Operations officer, Central Intelligence Agency; Senior Adviser for National Security, House Foreign Affairs Committee (Independent candidate for President)[108][109]
Paul D. Miller, Director for Afghanistan, National Security Council[20]
Meghan O'Sullivan, Deputy National Security Advisor for Iraq and Afghanistan[10]
Kori Schake, Director of Defense Strategy, National Security Council[10]
Gary Schmitt, Executive Director of the President's Intelligence Advisory Board[20]
Brent Scowcroft, National Security Advisor (1975–77, 1989–93); Chair of the President's Intelligence Advisory Board (2001–05) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
David Shedd, Deputy Director of National Intelligence; Acting Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency[20]
Stephen Slick, Senior Director for Intelligence Programs, National Security Council[10]
Frances Townsend, Homeland Security Advisor[20]
Kenneth Wainstein, Homeland Security Advisor[10]

Other former federal government officials

Former Chief of Staff to the Vice President and founder of The Weekly Standard Bill Kristol
Donald B. Ayer, United States Deputy Attorney General[10]
Phillip D. Brady, White House Staff Secretary; White House Cabinet Secretary (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[107]
Paul K. Charlton, United States Attorney[110]
Linda Chavez, Director of the Office of Public Liaison; 1986 nominee for U.S. Senator from Maryland[25]
Jim Cicconi, White House Staff Secretary (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Scott Evertz, Director of the Office of National AIDS Policy (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Tony Fratto, Deputy White House Press Secretary[111]
Charles Fried, United States Solicitor General; Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[112]
Fred T. Goldberg, Jr., Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Tax Policy; Commissioner of Internal Revenue (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[15]
Hugh Hewitt, Assistant White House Counsel; conservative radio host (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[113]
Theodore Kassinger, United States Deputy Secretary of Commerce[10]
Bill Kristol, Chief of Staff to the Vice President[25][114]
Rosario Marin, Treasurer of the United States (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[115]
Andrew Natsios, Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development; Chair of the Massachusetts Republican Party[10]
Daniel F. Runde, Director of the Global Development Alliance[20]
Larry D. Thompson, United States Deputy Attorney General[10]
Dan Webb, United States Attorney (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[116]
Peter Wehner, Director of the Office of Strategic Initiatives[9]
Lezlee Westine, Director of the Office of Public Liaison (2001–2005) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[98][117]
Peter Zeidenberg, Assistant United States Attorney[110]
Statewide officials[edit]
Paul Anderson, former Associate Justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[118]
Greg Bell, former Lieutenant Governor of Utah (endorsed Evan McMullin)[119]
Bob Brown, former Secretary of State of Montana (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[120]
Brian Calley, Lieutenant Governor of Michigan (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[121]
Spencer Cox, Lieutenant Governor of Utah[122]
Kurt Daudt, Speaker of the Minnesota House of Representatives (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[42]
Darryl Glenn, 2016 nominee for U.S. Senator from Colorado (withdrew endorsement)[123]
Kim Guadagno, Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey[124]
Betty Montgomery, former Attorney General of Ohio[125]
Mark Shurtleff, former Attorney General of Utah (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[126]
Robert Smith, former Associate Judge of the New York Court of Appeals (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[127]
Diana Taylor, New York Superintendent of Banks (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[128]
Will Weatherford, former Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives[79]
Grant Woods, former Attorney General of Arizona (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[129]
State legislators[edit]
Jack Ciattarelli, New Jersey State Representative (withdrew endorsement)[124]
Lois Sherman Hagarty, former Pennsylvania State Representative[130]
David Johnson, Iowa State Senator[34][131]
Brian Lees, former Massachusetts State Senator; Minority Leader[132]
Mark B. Madsen, Utah State Senator (endorsed Gary Johnson)[133]
Jack McGregor, former Pennsylvania State Senator (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[107]
Charisse Millett, Alaska State Representative; Majority Leader (withdrew endorsement)[134][135]
Ross Spano, Florida State Representative[79]
Joe Sweeney, New Hampshire State Representative (withdrew endorsement)[136]
Municipal officials

Joel Giambra, former Erie County Executive (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[137]
Carlos A. Giménez, Mayor of Miami-Dade County (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[138]
Danny Jones, Mayor of Charleston (endorsed Gary Johnson)[139][140]
Aimee Winder Newton, Member of the Salt Lake County Council (withdrew endorsement)[141]
Tomás Regalado, Mayor of Miami[142]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Republicans_opposing_Donald_Trump_presidential_campaign,_2016

Awesome. Trump's the first person to really scare the shit out of the establishment politicians. THAT'S progress...

GloryDayz
10-17-2016, 03:59 PM
If anyone thinks Trump is going to win a general election with this kind of opposition from the party that nominated him, they are mistaken.

The "establishment" Republicans have very good reasons to oppose them. I won't bother to list them here. Unless you've been in coma for the last year, you've already seen them.

You have the attention span of a flea that lands in Red Bull. Who cares if he wins, that's not his job, his job is to show that list of career politicians you posted that they better fucking change. If not, the next guy won't be Trump.