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View Full Version : Kerry targets stem-cell issue in bid to split the Bush vote


Hel'n
10-17-2004, 05:55 PM
http://news.scotsman.com/international.cfm?id=1209662004

ALEX MASSIE IN WASHINGTON


THE day before he died, the actor Christopher Reeve left a message on Senator John Kerry’s telephone thanking the Democratic Party’s presidential nominee for his efforts in campaigning for greater and wider federal funding for embryonic stem-cell research.

At the weekend Mr Kerry used Mr Reeve’s death as the grounds for a fresh attack on President George Bush’s attitude towards science, accusing him of sacrificing research for the sake of "extreme right-wing ideology".

"Faced with the facts, [the president] turns away. Time and time again, he’s proven that he’s stubborn, out of touch and unwilling to change course," Mr Kerry said in his radio address to the United States people on Saturday.

"That’s not the American way. Here in America, we’ve always pushed the boundaries of knowledge and used the power of science to improve the lives of our people."

Mr Kerry’s address highlighted the fact that stem-cell research has become an unlikely hot button issue of this year’s presidential campaign.

"Today, approximately 100 million Americans suffer from illnesses that may one day be treated or cured with stem-cell therapy. Stem cells may hold the key to treating heart disease and cancer. They may have the power to slow the loss of a grandmother’s memory, calm the hand of an uncle with Parkinson’s, or save a child from a lifetime of daily insulin shots," said Mr Kerry.

Senator John Edwards argued last week: "If we do the work that we can do in this country, the work that we will do when John Kerry is president, people like Christopher Reeve are going to walk, get up out of that wheelchair and walk again."

The issue of stem-cell research has become the Democratic Party’s preferred moral battleground and is an issue that it believes can be used as a wedge to split moderate, secular Republicans from their more religious and conservative colleagues.

Polls consistently show that a majority of Americans would like to see fewer restrictions on stem-cell research.

In June, 58 senators, including 14 Republicans, wrote to Mr Bush asking him to relax federal restrictions on stem-cell research. One poll earlier this year found that 72 per cent said they would be more likely to agree to support stem-cell research "if [they] knew that experts think it may hold the key to curing the Alzheimer’s disease that afflicted President Reagan".

Mr Bush has continued to fund adult stem-cell research and privately funded research of embryonic stem cells remains legal. But Democrats have successfully couched the argument in terms that make it seem as though Mr Bush has banned all scientific research.

Mr Kerry’s latest attack on the president comes amid some signs that Mr Bush has begun to regain the initiative in the campaign. Although most observers thought last week’s third and final presidential debate was a draw or a victory for Mr Kerry it was also Mr Bush’s best performance by far and may have reassured some voters.

Four different tracking polls suggest Mr Bush leads by between two and three points. Most encouragingly for the president the Washington Post’s tracking poll has Mr Bush receiving 50 per cent support.

Mr Kerry’s advisers acknowledge that he is behind in the nationwide horse race but insist that the challenger is performing much more strongly in the few remaining states where it really matters.

The latest Zogby tracking poll gives Mr Bush a 46-44 per cent lead nationwide, but amongst the 7 per cent of undecided voters just 34 per cent of them gave Mr Bush a positive approval rating and only 18 per cent said he deserved to be re-elected, giving Mr Kerry an opportunity to win the election on the backs of voters who only decide which way they will cast their ballots once they are inside their polling stations.

The number of battleground states has shrunk. Citizens in Ohio, Florida, Wisconsin, Iowa, Colorado, Nevada and New Mexico have nowhere to hide from the election in its last days as the candidates scurry from one state to another in a last, desperate, attempt to press the flesh, exhort their hard core of supporters and dampen enthusiasm for their opponent.

Minnesota and New Hampshire also remain in play, as does Pennsylvania - which explains why Mr Bush will campaign today in Marlton, New Jersey, just 15 miles from the Pennsylvania state line.

Mr Bush’s campaign manager Ken Mehlman, expressed confidence that Florida, where polls show the president enjoying a small but consistent advantage, would not be as close a race as it was four years ago when Mr Bush won by just 537 votes.

For his part Mr Kerry is campaigning in Ohio today and, like Mr Bush, will be in Florida tomorrow. Vice-President Dick Cheney makes three campaign stops in Ohio tomorrow while Mr Edwards is in Florida today and will be in Pennsylvania tomorrow as the candidates follow one another on the electoral merry-go-round.

Florida, with 27 electoral college votes - 10 per cent of the 270 votes needed to secure victory - and Ohio, with 20 electoral college votes, remain the two greatest prizes however. Were either candidate able to secure both those states, their opponent would be hard-pressed to accumulate enough electoral college votes from the other, smaller, battleground states to secure victory.


This article:

http://news.scotsman.com/international.cfm?id=1209662004

US elections:

http://news.scotsman.com/topics.cfm?tid=627

Websites:

Democratic National Committee
http://www.democrats.org/

Republican National Committee
http://www.rnc.org/

Libertarian Party
http://www.lp.org/

Watchblog
http://www.watchblog.com/

RINGLEADER
10-17-2004, 05:58 PM
I'm all for more funding. But stem cells aren't going to do any American much good if we start fighting "a more sensitive war on terror" as "primarily a law enforcement issue" to get terrorist killing back to an acceptable level of "nuisance".

KCWolfman
10-17-2004, 06:01 PM
Tell me about relevance again.

Our deficit is high, there is military action occuring in two major nations overseas, and we are concerned about stem cell research?

What programs will be cancelled to fund the research? Or is this one of those "plans"?

Hel'n
10-17-2004, 06:10 PM
Tell me about relevance again.

Our deficit is high, there is military action occuring in two major nations overseas, and we are concerned about stem cell research?

What programs will be cancelled to fund the research? Or is this one of those "plans"?


I can think of a certain war in Iraq which would free up funding right away...

BTW, it matters to lots of people here in the USA. But I guess you wouldn't know that...

unlurking
10-17-2004, 06:15 PM
Let the private sector fund it.

To me, the issue is in refards to the collection of stem cells, not the funding of research.

KCWolfman
10-17-2004, 06:47 PM
I can think of a certain war in Iraq which would free up funding right away...

BTW, it matters to lots of people here in the USA. But I guess you wouldn't know that...
Really?

And when has Kerry stated he is pulling out of Iraq. In fact, he has stated he wants to allocate MORE troops to the area.


Now, can someone else give a reasonable answer?

Hel'n
10-18-2004, 12:17 AM
Really?

And when has Kerry stated he is pulling out of Iraq. In fact, he has stated he wants to allocate MORE troops to the area.


Now, can someone else give a reasonable answer?


I should have known better than to debate with a parrot...

KCWolfman
10-18-2004, 05:05 AM
I should have known better than to debate with a parrot...
Debate is a reasonable discussion of facts leading to a supposed theory. You are honestly suggesting that our bill in Iraq will go down enough to pay for something as expensive as stem cell research while we send even more troops in.

You have no logic to your answer, Pollyanna. You don't want debate, you want justification against me from other people who have "wronged" you in your life. Get over yourself.