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View Full Version : Keepin’ it Real- Ban the Boss


CosmicPal
10-21-2004, 10:45 AM
I read this article yesterday about a political front runner in New York suggesting those in favor of Bush to “Ban the Boss” She of course, is referring to Bruce Springsteen and his persistence to sway voters from Bush. Bruce, “The Boss” is using his fame as a leverage to guide his fans in his political direction. She is now urging those who are not fans of Bruce, to ban his music. It is a two-way street, after all.

I like Bruce. I like his music. He’s a timeless rock star who speaks to the heart of America, and I am the proud owner of a few of his CD’s, not to mention- he’s put on one of the most amazing shows I’ve ever seen in concert.

Most of you know I’m a Deadhead by choice. The Grateful Dead also like to use the profound strength their image to influence their fans in political and environmental issues. I don’t listen to them anymore than I do Bruce.

As a matter of fact, I’m quite embarrassed when the Dead do use their image to manipulate their fans. As much as I love their music and their culture, I still believe deeply in making the right decisions for ME, and what I think is right for my country and the environment.

I don’t blame the “Ban the Boss” campaign. Nor would I blame anyone for suggesting a ban on any of the musicians, actors, and athletes who use the power of their image to influence their fans….as a matter of fact- I wish they would all just shut the hell up…I don’t care if Oprah is a republican or if Tony Gonzalez wants Chiefs fans to vote for the new arena.

Does it bother you when musicians, actors, and athletes use their image to pursuade votes?

Otter
10-21-2004, 10:49 AM
Springsteen kicks azz man.


That's it, I'm voting for Kerry.

Baby Lee
10-21-2004, 10:51 AM
Shame on you Cosmo, speaking your ghetto slang in front of decent people.

ptlyon
10-21-2004, 10:52 AM
Even tho Mellencamp is on the "Vote for Change" tour, he is still my favorite artist. I just wouldn't go to one of those concerts.

ChiTown
10-21-2004, 10:53 AM
Nah.

If that's what they want to do, then more power to them. However, don't forget to reap what you sow. Many times, they want to publicly air their message, yet get all pissy when it has an effect on their pocketbook.

In my personal opinion, I think they'd just be better off 'sangin' their music and keeping their traps shut when they're not.........

Cochise
10-21-2004, 11:00 AM
I don't really care either way. I like acts like Pearl Jam that are leftist wingnuts. Hell I even like James Taylor. But when I go to a concert I want to hear music and not pontification. STFU and entertain me. If I want to hear some high school dropout's political takes I'll go over to democratic underground.

Radar Chief
10-21-2004, 11:10 AM
The “Boss” sucks boaws. I’ve never like his weak azzed music and couldn’t care less ‘bout his political takes.

Radar Chief
10-21-2004, 11:11 AM
Nah.

If that's what they want to do, then more power to them. However, don't forget to reap what you sow. Many times, they want to publicly air their message, yet get all pissy when it has an effect on their pocketbook.

In my personal opinion, I think they'd just be better off 'sangin' their music and keeping their traps shut when they're not.........

“Shut up and sing.” Laura Ingram

Mr. Kotter
10-21-2004, 11:12 AM
....Does it bother you when musicians, actors, and athletes use their image to pursuade votes?

Personally, it's one of my biggest pet peeves.

People rage on talk radio....hell, talk radio doesn't have half of the mind-numbed robots and impressionable sheep that Hollywood and the Music industry does. If those people had HALF a brain, they'd see through the propaganda and demogoguery.

I still listen to their music, if it's good; but I lose a great deal of respect for people who use their positions to run their mouth about something, many times, they know little or nothing about. The ignorance is amazing sometimes...

Chief Henry
10-21-2004, 11:19 AM
Even tho Mellencamp is on the "Vote for Change" tour, he is still my favorite artist. I just wouldn't go to one of those concerts.


I like him too. I beleave it was the summer of 1982 when he rocked the Sioux City Auditorium. What a great concert. Hurt So Good and Jack and Diane.........That was great summer.


I just saw him on CMT doing a "Crossroads" with
Kenny Chesny. It was very good.

Baby Lee
10-21-2004, 11:25 AM
Anyone catch VH1's '25 greatest protest songs?' Granted I only caught a few snippets early in the show, but Gawd what a spankfest.

Taco John
10-21-2004, 11:39 AM
I appreciate when an artist shares their views. It shows they're human, even if I disagree with their take. I like to know where my favorite artists are coming from. It gives me perspective into their work.

I've always thought that the people who boycott the music that they like because the artist said something that doesn't jive with them politically, are the most feeble minded people in America.

KCTitus
10-21-2004, 11:41 AM
I've always thought that the people who boycott the music that they like because the artist said something that doesn't jive with them politically, are the most feeble minded people in America.

Or that they understand how the capitalist system works and dont wish to contribute any money to those political causes...

On the thread...

Never really cared for Springsteen's stuff, so this really doesnt affect me in any way.

Taco John
10-21-2004, 11:47 AM
Or that they understand how the capitalist system works and dont wish to contribute any money to those political causes...



When you burn CDs that you already own and listen to because someone likes someone else for president, the damage has already been done.

Feeble minds do feeble minded things, though...

BroWhippendiddle
10-21-2004, 12:06 PM
It is totally OK for people to have dissenting views of politics and situations in the country.

I feel that the "personalities" feel that their stance is more relevant than that average Joe sucks swamp water.

This is a nation of one person one vote (unless you are Kerry with the I voted for the 87 billion before I voted against it).

Being an actor, actress, performer, makes you no more of a voice of the people as being a carpenter does. It's a shame that they think everyone in their audience wants to hear their views on politics. People go to movies, broadway shows and concerts to be entertained, not preached to about politics.

Each candidate should get equal time for all of the "stars" that are selling their political agenda to the unsuspecting audience.

BroWhippendiddle
10-21-2004, 12:07 PM
Feeble minds do feeble minded things, though...

Which means, If you don't believe like TJ you have a feeble mind.

Chiefnj
10-21-2004, 12:12 PM
Anyone catch VH1's '25 greatest protest songs?' Granted I only caught a few snippets early in the show, but Gawd what a spankfest.

Does that mean you were pleasuring yourself to Little Stevie singing he isn't going to play Sun City??

KCWolfman
10-21-2004, 12:13 PM
CP - I am probably the biggest Springsteen fan on this board. I have all American releases in CD and Vinyl. I have autographed posters. I have all his European releases and most of the Asian. I have been to multiple concerts by him and never spent less than 60.00 a tic to see him and sometimes up to 170.00 a tic (when in NY). I will not give up that material or memories, but I am not supporting this endeavor in any way.

In fact, I was truly excited to here that Bonnie Raitt and Keb Mo were coming in concert last mohth. I had shelved enough money to buy 6 tickets, but ended up passing on it and buying a new digital camera for my kids instead when I heard it was for the "register for Kerry" propaganda campaign.

When artists invite me on stage to give my opinion, I will gladly go to their political shows. Until then, Musicians - do what you are paid to do and keep your assinine comments to yourself.

KCTitus
10-21-2004, 12:13 PM
When you burn CDs that you already own and listen to because someone likes someone else for president, the damage has already been done.

Feeble minds do feeble minded things, though...

Oh, you had mentioned 'boycott' in your post--which would indicate an active choice not to support said artist--I dont find the above example a 'boycott' but a demonstration.

Baby Lee
10-21-2004, 12:15 PM
Does that mean you were pleasuring yourself to Little Stevie singing he isn't going to play Sun City??
ROFL - Not for the viewer, for the facilely proud commentators.

"Funkmaster Flex opened the world's eyes to poverty"

KCWolfman
10-21-2004, 12:15 PM
I appreciate when an artist shares their views. It shows they're human, even if I disagree with their take. I like to know where my favorite artists are coming from. It gives me perspective into their work.

I've always thought that the people who boycott the music that they like because the artist said something that doesn't jive with them politically, are the most feeble minded people in America.
I am betting Toucan Taco the jabbering parrot would have a different viewpoint if the partisan wankfest came from the other side.


So, TJ, do you listen to your mechanic's and doctor's political viewpoints as well? Or do you change their minds in a matter of moments with your jedi mind tricks like you did your neighbor?

Straight, No Chaser
10-21-2004, 12:41 PM
Springsteen backs up his beliefs with his own time and money.
He quietly gives his time and money to many causes he believes in, in NJ and all over the country.

I have always wondered about the Reagan campaign adopting "Born in the USA" as their theme song, and if they understood the lyrics...


---->

KCWolfman
10-21-2004, 12:45 PM
Springsteen backs up his beliefs with his own time and money.
He quietly gives his time and money to many causes he believes in, in NJ and all over the country.

I have always wondered about the Reagan campaign adopting "Born in the USA" as their theme song, and if they understood the lyrics...


---->
Urban myth. Both Reagan and Dukakis asked for permission to use the tune and BOTH were denied as Springsteen stated he would keep his politics close to himself and not get involved. He further stated "I don't believe either of these guys must have listened to the lyrics". Reagan never used the tune a single time.

Furthermore, look how many "regular" idiots get misty eyed and chant the chorus while ignoring the lyrics. It isn't just the politicians.

ENDelt260
10-21-2004, 12:49 PM
There's more words than just "Born in the USA"?

KCWolfman
10-21-2004, 12:51 PM
There's more words than just "Born in the USA"?
LVL.... oooops., I meant LOL

Clint in Wichita
10-21-2004, 12:59 PM
Does it bother you when musicians, actors, and athletes use their image to pursuade votes?

No. It doesn't bother me when Alec Baldwin or Michael Moore does it. It doesn't bother me when Ted Neugent or Charlton Hesston does it. You know...free speech and all.

What does bother me is when friggin' retards are swayed because of what celebrities have to say. How could anyone change their vote based on celebrity opinion?

David.
10-21-2004, 01:09 PM
No. It doesn't bother me when Alec Baldwin or Michael Moore does it. It doesn't bother me when Ted Neugent or Charlton Hesston does it. You know...free speech and all.

What does bother me is when friggin' retards are swayed because of what celebrities have to say. How could anyone change their vote based on celebrity opinion?

..people are stupid :shrug:

Clint in Wichita
10-21-2004, 01:12 PM
..people are stupid :shrug:


I agree.

BTW, I think that Bush will win the election.

Straight, No Chaser
10-21-2004, 01:13 PM
Urban myth. Both Reagan and Dukakis asked for permission to use the tune and BOTH were denied as Springsteen stated he would keep his politics close to himself and not get involved. He further stated "I don't believe either of these guys must have listened to the lyrics". Reagan never used the tune a single time.

Furthermore, look how many "regular" idiots get misty eyed and chant the chorus while ignoring the lyrics. It isn't just the politicians.

Wolfman:
Deeply impressed that you can quote Springsteen so quickly. However, I've read some of the interviews Springsteen has given where he says he regretted the song was "appropriated" in such a context. Urban myth or not, it has been associated with Ray Gun.

This article quotes from a speech Ray Gun gave in Hammonton, NJ during his re-election campaign. Saying the issue is an "urban myth" is not quite true:

Analysis: The age of Reagan
President loomed over the '80s, an era at odds with itself
By Todd Leopold
CNN


(CNN) -- In the heart of his 1984 re-election campaign, Ronald Reagan made a speech in Hammonton, New Jersey, and took the opportunity to invoke the name of one of the Garden State's favorite sons.

"America's future rests in a thousand dreams inside our hearts," the president said. "It rests in the message of hope in the songs of a man so many young Americans admire: New Jersey's own Bruce Springsteen."

Reagan -- or his speechwriter -- was likely thinking of one song in particular: "Born in the U.S.A.," the title cut from Springsteen's No. 1 album of the time. The song, with Max Weinberg's thunderous drums, Roy Bittan's glittery keyboards and an anthemic chorus, was impossible to avoid that year: "Born in the U.S.A., I was born in the U.S.A. ..."

But look deeper, and there was another dimension to "Born in the U.S.A." The song was the ferocious cry of an unemployed Vietnam veteran.

"Down in the shadow of the penitentiary/Out by the gas fires of the refinery/I'm 10 years burning down the road/Nowhere to run ain't got nowhere to go," Springsteen sang in a working-class howl.

The singer wasn't amused by Reagan's appropriation of his work.

"I think people have a need to feel good about the country they live in," he later told Rolling Stone. "But what's happening, I think, is that that need -- which is a good thing -- is getting manipulated and exploited. You see in the Reagan election ads on TV, you know, 'It's morning in America,' and you say, 'Well, it's not morning in Pittsburgh.' "

The singer, who spent much of 1984 on a huge concert tour, dedicated "Born in the U.S.A." to a union local at one stop.

But "Born in the U.S.A." neatly encapsulates the Reagan '80s, a decade that was about morning in America or a "Midnight Mission" (a Textones song about the homeless), optimism or cynicism, chorus or verse, depending on whom you listened to.

As satirist Paul Slansky wrote in his diary of the decade, "The Clothes Have No Emperor," ["My book] is the response of ... an observer whose very sanity was threatened by the ease with which illusion -- an actor is playing the president! -- was embraced as reality."

Irony laden
The decade's pop culture trafficked in the blur between illusion and reality.

David Letterman launched an irony-laden talk show, the whole point of which was to mock talk shows. He had his cameras do 360-degree spins; he used a 1966 Sears catalog for his opening credits. His interviews -- the "talk" of talk shows -- were often deliberately devoid of content in favor of comedy bits or, in the case of some guests, outright antagonism.

On the other hand, television also produced a new wave of sitcoms that hearkened back to the cozy 1950s. "The Cosby Show" updated "Father Knows Best" around a successful black family in well-off Brooklyn Heights, New York. "Family Ties," yoked to "Cosby" on NBC's Thursday night schedule, featured '60s liberals who had settled down in middle-class Columbus, Ohio, with their kids, one of whom was a conservative, Nixon-worshipping business student played by Michael J. Fox.

Fox's roles were often symbolic of the high-flying, optimistic side of the '80s. In "Back to the Future" (1985), he played a teenager who went back in time to the '50s to bring his parents together (and, incidentally, vanquish a bully, which allows his family to move up the economic ladder 30 years later).

More to the point was "The Secret of My Success" (1987), an irony-less version of "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying." "Secret" glorified money, status and corporate climbing, one of the many '80s films to do so.

In fact, in the midst of the '80s bull market, there were few films that didn't play up the money-happiness connection. One of the few that went against the grain was Oliver Stone's "Wall Street" (1987), which placed Charlie Sheen's low-level stock trader in the world of avaricious tycoon Gordon Gekko (Michael Douglas).

Thanks to Douglas' magnetic Oscar-winning performance, however, Gekko became the character everyone remembered, and his "Greed is good" speech -- "Greed is right. Greed works. Greed clarifies, cuts through and captures the essence of the evolutionary spirit" -- was quoted endlessly, and sometimes seriously.

Reality stops and starts
Indeed, the '80s had a way of reflecting all sides of the looking glass. Pop culture mixed with real life as never before. Jokes became serious; the serious was tossed off as a joke. The zeitgeist tended to move forward, back upon itself and do a 180.

For example, there was Rambo. The Sylvester Stallone character originated in the 1982 movie "First Blood" as a troubled Vietnam vet who goes on a one-man war against some threatening police officers. Naturally, the violent character became an action hero, and Stallone revived him for "Rambo: First Blood Part II," in which the ex-vet was sent to Vietnam on a secret mission. The upshot was, of course, that the Vietnam War wasn't over until we said it was (and we won).

Or consider Max Headroom. The allegedly computer-generated character (actually actor Matt Frewer in latex) was born for a British music video show and became a spokesman for Coca-Cola. At the same time, his British creators made him the star of a scabrous TV movie that lampooned the shallow world of television and its demanding advertisers. ABC brought the character over for a TV series, pitted the show against "Miami Vice" and "Dallas," and it was gone in 14 episodes.

Meanwhile, "Doonesbury" cartoonist Garry Trudeau turned the character into "Ron Headrest," a sendup of the president, who had become known as much for his upside-down remarks ("Trees cause more pollution than automobiles do") as his forthright conservatism.

But Reagan was often at the center of such spin cycles. He quoted movie lines ("Go ahead, make my day") and mixed up movies with real life (as when he told Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal he had been part of liberating a concentration camp, when he had actually logged grim movies about the Holocaust). He was played by Phil Hartman in a particularly wicked "Saturday Night Live" sketch about his detachment, mocked by the British in their satirical puppet series "Spitting Image" and faced off against Soviet leader Konstantin Chernenko in Frankie Goes to Hollywood's video "Two Tribes."

Sometimes the looking glass looked back. Testing an open microphone during a 1984 sound check, the president cracked, "My fellow Americans, I'm pleased to tell you today that I've signed legislation that will outlaw Russia forever. We begin bombing in five minutes." His comments, which horrified Reagan critics, were remixed by Talking Heads' Jerry Harrison into a song, "5 Minutes." For those critics, the song said it all.

Harrison's song didn't get any airplay on mainstream radio stations. By the '80s, college radio held music's cutting edge, and it was there listeners could hear artists such as R.E.M., Laurie Anderson, Public Enemy and the Lyres. Indeed, it was an indie band, the New Jersey-based Groceries, who earned some college radio airplay for their 1984 song "Part of the New America":

"I never think too much/About what I'm going to say ... I think that unity is the proper way to be/I don't have a need to be different/I'm part of the new America ..." the lyrics went.

And later in the song, as the singer mentioned ways of fitting in, he said, "Think Democrat, vote Republican."

Ronald Reagan -- former FDR voter and union head -- couldn't have described the '80s better himself.

---->

Mr. Kotter
10-21-2004, 01:14 PM
..people are stupid :shrug:

Which is the only reason Kerry stands a chance; a lot of stupid people.

Cochise
10-21-2004, 01:14 PM
CP - I am probably the biggest Springsteen fan on this board.

...I was truly excited to here that Bonnie Raitt and Keb Mo were coming in concert last mohth.

I like both of the ones you mention here, but if the concert is going to end up being some peacenik circle jerk then I'll just keep my money and do something else.

David.
10-21-2004, 01:17 PM
ROFL, you only listening to conservative musicians now? that's leaves......um......OH there's that one Country douche. What's his name....shit I'm officially off topic now, but I can't remember this guys name. Blonde hair. Hardcore republican. (. x. )(. x. )(. x. )(. x. ) this is gonna drive me crazy.

Clint in Wichita
10-21-2004, 01:17 PM
Which is the only reason Kerry stands a chance; a lot of stupid people.


But Bush's support comes from those who make up intellectual backbone of our country, right?

Yeah, if "intellectual backbone" means those who like huntin', fishin', and hate colored folk. Real mensa material.

Chiefnj
10-21-2004, 01:21 PM
ROFL, you only listening to conservative musicians now? that's leaves......um......OH there's that one Country douche. What's his name....shit I'm officially off topic now, but I can't remember this guys name. Blonde hair. Hardcore republican. (. x. )(. x. )(. x. )(. x. ) this is gonna drive me crazy.

Pssst....Toby Keith.

Clint in Wichita
10-21-2004, 01:23 PM
Pssst....Toby Keith.


I thought he was talking about musicians. Maybe not.

Radar Chief
10-21-2004, 01:26 PM
ROFL, you only listening to conservative musicians now? that's leaves......um......OH there's that one Country douche. What's his name....shit I'm officially off topic now, but I can't remember this guys name. Blonde hair. Hardcore republican. (. x. )(. x. )(. x. )(. x. ) this is gonna drive me crazy.

At least that narrows it down to about 90% of’em.

David.
10-21-2004, 01:27 PM
Pssst....Toby Keith.

THAAAATs the one. yah, he sucks

Radar Chief
10-21-2004, 01:28 PM
But Bush's support comes from those who make up intellectual backbone of our country, right?

Yeah, if "intellectual backbone" means those who like huntin', fishin', and hate colored folk. Real mensa material.

Maybe “Mr. Mensa” can explain what the first two have to do with the last one here. :rolleyes:

Chief Henry
10-21-2004, 02:56 PM
Maybe “Mr. Mensa” can explain what the first two have to do with the last one here. :rolleyes:

Don't worry about MENSA MAN, he's in love with Ponch from Chips...,
thus his tuff talk to deflect his real propensity to being a pink shirt wearer like Ponch. :D