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Joe Seahawk
10-22-2004, 08:51 PM
Hundreds of cases of suspected election fraud are under review in Franklin County.

"I was surprised by the number," county prosecutor Ron O’Brien told 10TV.

Stacks of voter registration applications are now being scrutinized. Prosecutor O'Brien’s office is reviewing them for irregularities after the applications raised red flags with the Board of Elections.

"What causes some of this to happen is that people are being paid to register new voters," O’Brien said of the practice of paying people by the application.

One application being examined was signed in the name of a man who passed away in February. Another 25 applications show different addresses for the same man.

Six of the suspicious forms were submitted by representatives of the Columbus Urban League, while 62 others came from ACORN, the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now.

Both groups say they've fired people suspected of fraud.

Kevin Eugene Dooley, involved in Project Vote as an employee or agent of ACORN, was indicted by the grand jury earlier this year for two felony election offenses -- false election registration, and submitting false election signatures to the Board of Elections. Dooley is alleged to have falsified and forged a new voter registration card that was submitted to the BOE.

And you might recognize the name of Nuradin Abdi. He’s a native of Somalia charged with plotting to blow up a Columbus mall.

"As far as board of elections is concerned, Abdi is a registered voter," board of elections director Matt Damschroeder said.

We now know according to federal officials, he's an illegal alien. That would mean he can't legally vote. But the Franklin County Board of Elections had no way of checking that when they sent him a voter registration card early this year.

The board takes a person's word, that they're a U.S. citizen.

"Right now, we're in between not having a way to full check," Damschroeder said.

Elections workers do check new signatures with old records -- and watch for voter registration confirmation cards that are returned in the mail: Red flags for election fraud.

"Anyone responsible will be prosecuted," O’Brien said.

Election fraud is a felony.



http://www.10tv.com/Global/story.asp?S=2458796

RINGLEADER
10-22-2004, 09:39 PM
I'm starting to think that the Dems who are counting on this huge registration advantage may wake up on November 3rd realizing that it isn't a very good idea to pay ex-felons to register people.

the Talking Can
10-22-2004, 10:00 PM
better than paying attention to the real fraud, I guess:

link (http://www.argusleader.com/update/Fridayfeature.shtml)

Six charged in absentee voter controversy

The Associated Press

published: 10/22/2004

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) - Six Republican notary publics face a misdemeanor charge in connection with absentee ballot applications filled out on South Dakota college campuses, but there's no evidence of voter fraud, Attorney General Larry Long said Friday.

Long and Secretary of State Chris Nelson outlined a two-week investigation in a document faxed to county auditors and state's attorneys.

The document states "it is a near certainty that all absentee voters that had their application notarized by one of the six notaries" will be challenged in court.

"Lawyers who represent the Democrats have written to us and told us that," Long told reporters.

Several attorneys have contacted him, he said.

He, Chris Nelson, Minnehaha County State's Attorney Dave Nelson and Minnehaha County Auditor Sue Roust briefed reporters on the investigation.

Five of the Republican notaries were charged in Minnehaha County since the ballot applications were all processed in Sioux Falls, even though some were gathered elsewhere.

Those five are: Joseph Alick, 28; Nathan Mertz, 20; Todd Schlekeway, 27; Rachel Hoff, 22; and Eric Fahrendorf, 24. Another GOP worker, Jennifer Giannonatti, will be charged in Pennington County because of ballots collected in Rapid City, Long said.

Campuses included in the investigation include South Dakota State, University of South Dakota, Augustana College, Mount Marty College, Black Hills State, Dakota State, Northern State and the School of Mines & Technology.

Dave Nelson said the six are charged with improper use of a notary commission, a Class 2 misdemeanor punishable by up to a month in jail and a $200 fine. They can also lose their notary licenses.

"Notary violations are very, very common" in government and business, he said.

But unlike most cases that aren't prosecuted, the six were charged because they made it possible for someone's vote not to count, Dave Nelson said.

"The potential consequences of these acts are significant and far reaching," he said.

The five charged in Sioux Falls are scheduled to make their first court appearance next Friday. They are all cooperating, he said.

Most of the absentee ballot applications acquired by the Republican get-out-the-vote effort were legal and there's no indication that any unqualified voter tried to cast an absentee ballot, Long said.

The only people who broke the law are the six notaries who failed to watch some people sign the documents, he said.

"Sometimes they did and sometimes they didn't," Long said.

"Everybody who's committed crimes has been charged," he said. "We don't have any reason to believe there's anything else out there."

The investigation didn't find a formal Republican Party policy that encouraged workers to skirt the law, Long said. "What we found was sloppy supervision."

Larry Russell, who ran the GOP's get-out-the-vote program, resigned earlier this month. Russell, who had sought the party's nomination for a special U.S. House election in June, was replaced as head of the Republican Victory operation by Herb Jones, manager of U.S. Senate candidate John Thune's 2002 Senate bid.

Chris Nelson's office commissions the state's notaries, who are legally public officials.

"There's six individuals that didn't take that responsibility seriously and violated that trust," he said.

Chris Nelson said he wants to make sure no voter is disenfranchised and that the Election Day vote count is not disrupted.

The document faxed to auditors asks them to compare voter registration cards with absentee ballot applications to make sure it's the same person. It also outlines how the local election board should handle a challenge to a voter's identity.

Chris Nelson said that rarely happens but could this year.

According to Long and Chris Nelson's document, Hoff improperly notarized 71 applications and about half of Giannonatti's 111 were improper. The secretary of state said his office will contact those 182 applicants and ask each to submit a photo ID.

Alick improperly notarized about 60 applications. But since there's no copy of the forms, all auditors have been asked to look for his name, contact those applicants and ask for a copy of their photo ID.

Long and Chris Nelson said the investigation couldn't sort out all applications done by Hoff, Giannonatti, Mertz, Fahrendorf and Schlekeway, but the Republican Party wrote to about 1,400 applicants and asked them to send in a photo copy of their ID to the county auditor.

There's still time to handle any problems before the Nov. 2 election, the officials said.

A statement released Friday afternoon by Jason Glodt, executive director of the state GOP, said, "As we have clearly demonstrated in this matter, the South Dakota Republican Party has a zero-tolerance policy for our staff and volunteers when it comes to obeying the law, no matter how minor the infraction. We fully support the action of law enforcement in this matter and believe their decision is appropriate."

Long said he hopes that if any ballots are challenged in court, the judge sides with the voter's right to be counted and agrees that the solution was a valid way to fix problems caused by wayward notaries.

The law that created the requirement for a copy of a photo ID or notarized signature to accompany all absentee ballots was passed in 2003 and took effect Jan. 1. Its intent was to ensure voter integrity.

"That's why this is happening this year," Roust said.

the Talking Can
10-22-2004, 10:02 PM
and here's the multi-state effort being funded directly by the RNC....what a surprise:

link (http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&ncid=1963&e=7&u=/ap/20041022/ap_on_el_pr/voter_fraud_investigation)

GOP Voter Drive Accused of Tossing Cards

Fri Oct 22, 6:40 PM ET


By DEBORAH HASTINGS, AP National Writer

In several battleground states across the country, a consulting firm funded by the Republican National Committee (news - web sites) has been accused of deceiving would-be voters and destroying Democratic voter registration cards.

Arizona-based Sproul & Associates is under investigation in Oregon and Nevada over claims that canvassers hired by the company were instructed to register only Republicans and to get rid of registration forms completed by Democrats.

"We treat these complaints very seriously," said Oregon Secretary of State Bill Bradbury. The Democratic office-holder said three complaints were filed with election officials throughout the state. He declined to provide details, citing the continuing investigation.

Substitute teacher Adam Banse wanted a summer job with flexible hours, so he signed up to knock on doors in suburban Minneapolis and register people to vote.

He quit after two hours. "They said if you bring back a bunch of Democratic cards, you'll be fired," Banse contends. "At that point, I said, `Whoa. Something's wrong here.'"

Nathan Sproul, a former head of Arizona's Republican Party and the state's Christian Coalition branch, denies any wrongdoing and accuses Democrats of making things up.

"This is all about making accusations," Sproul said Thursday. "They allege fraud where none exists and get the media to cover it."

Republican National Committee spokeswoman Heather Layman responded that her party accepts all voters, and she accused the Democratic Party of operating under this mandate: "If no sign of voter fraud exists, make it up, manipulate the media into covering baseless charges and spread fear."

Sproul declined to name the states in which his company conducted registration drives. His political consulting firm was founded last year and has received nearly $500,000 from the RNC since July, according to federal election records.

Former canvassers such as Banse have come forward in West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Nevada and Oregon in the past two weeks alleging they were told to register only Republicans and to "walk away" from people who said they intended to vote for Democrat John Kerry (news - web sites).

Some said Democratic registration forms had been thrown out or ripped up.

It is illegal to tamper with voter registration cards, which are numbered and issued by local election officials. In some states, including Oregon, such acts are felonies.

Eric Russell of Las Vegas told The Associated Press that he watched a Sproul supervisor tear up eight to 10 registration forms completed by Democrats and managed to grab some of the shredded documents as evidence. State officials are investigating his claim.

Russell said that Voters Outreach of America, the name under which Sproul employees operated in Nevada and other states, owes him hundreds of dollars for registering residents but refuses to pay him.

Sproul called Russell simply a disgruntled employee.

Prompted by Russell's accusations, Clark County Democrats unsuccessfully went to court last week to try to persuade a state judge to reopen voter registration in their county, which encompasses Las Vegas.

In West Virginia, Lisa Bragg said she refused a sorely needed $9-an-hour job to register voters after attending an orientation session conducted by Sproul employees.



Like Banse in Minnesota, she said canvassers were discouraged from registering Democrats and were told to misrepresent themselves as poll takers.

Bragg, who filed a complaint earlier this week with the West Virginia secretary of state's office, said Friday that canvassers were given a script that read at the bottom, "Our goal is to register Republicans."

She called the registration drive dishonest, adding, "I believe everyone has the right to vote. Even though I'm a Democrat, I would have registered Republicans to vote."

In Pennsylvania, Democrats in the state House of Representatives have asked the attorney general to investigate complaints from former Sproul canvassers who said they had been instructed to not register Democrats. About 40 to 50 also complained they had not been promptly paid.

In Pittsburgh, library patrons protested that Sproul employees were pressuring people to register as Republicans at tables set up outside a Carnegie Library branch.

A similar incident was reported in Oregon in September, when the manager of Medford library headquarters refused a Sproul request to register voters after learning the firm was affiliated with Republicans.

the Talking Can
10-22-2004, 10:19 PM
to top it all off, Republicans are paying thugs to intimidate Voters at the polls in Ohio....just (. x. )(. x. )(. x. )(. x. )ing amazing...this election is rigged:

from the NY Times:

Full article: Big G.O.P. Bid to Challenge Voters at Polls in Key State
By MICHAEL MOSS

Republican Party officials in Ohio took formal steps yesterday to place thousands of recruits inside polling places on Election Day to challenge the qualifications of voters they suspect are not eligible to cast ballots.

Party officials say their effort is necessary to guard against fraud arising from aggressive moves by the Democrats to register tens of thousands of new voters in Ohio, seen as one of the most pivotal battlegrounds in the Nov. 2 elections.

Election officials in other swing states, from Arizona to Wisconsin and Florida, say they are bracing for similar efforts by Republicans to challenge new voters at polling places, reflecting months of disputes over voting procedures and the anticipation of an election as close as the one in 2000.

Ohio election officials said they had never seen so large a drive to prepare for Election Day challenges. They said they were scrambling yesterday to be ready for disruptions in the voting process as well as alarm and complaints among voters. Some officials said they worried that the challenges could discourage or even frighten others waiting to vote.

Ohio Democrats were struggling to match the Republicans' move, which had been rumored for weeks. Both parties had until 4 p.m. to register people they had recruited to monitor the election. Republicans said they had enlisted 3,600 by the deadline, many in heavily Democratic urban neighborhoods of Cleveland, Dayton and other cities. Each recruit was to be paid $100....

KCWolfman
10-22-2004, 11:01 PM
to top it all off, Republicans are paying thugs to intimidate Voters at the polls in Ohio....just (. x. )(. x. )(. x. )(. x. )ing amazing...this election is rigged:

from the NY Times:

Full article: Big G.O.P. Bid to Challenge Voters at Polls in Key State
By MICHAEL MOSS

Republican Party officials in Ohio took formal steps yesterday to place thousands of recruits inside polling places on Election Day to challenge the qualifications of voters they suspect are not eligible to cast ballots.

Party officials say their effort is necessary to guard against fraud arising from aggressive moves by the Democrats to register tens of thousands of new voters in Ohio, seen as one of the most pivotal battlegrounds in the Nov. 2 elections.

Election officials in other swing states, from Arizona to Wisconsin and Florida, say they are bracing for similar efforts by Republicans to challenge new voters at polling places, reflecting months of disputes over voting procedures and the anticipation of an election as close as the one in 2000.

Ohio election officials said they had never seen so large a drive to prepare for Election Day challenges. They said they were scrambling yesterday to be ready for disruptions in the voting process as well as alarm and complaints among voters. Some officials said they worried that the challenges could discourage or even frighten others waiting to vote.

Ohio Democrats were struggling to match the Republicans' move, which had been rumored for weeks. Both parties had until 4 p.m. to register people they had recruited to monitor the election. Republicans said they had enlisted 3,600 by the deadline, many in heavily Democratic urban neighborhoods of Cleveland, Dayton and other cities. Each recruit was to be paid $100....
Horrid. Why do the dems put up with such crap?

KCWolfman
10-22-2004, 11:01 PM
and here's the multi-state effort being funded directly by the RNC....what a surprise:

link (http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&ncid=1963&e=7&u=/ap/20041022/ap_on_el_pr/voter_fraud_investigation)

GOP Voter Drive Accused of Tossing Cards

Fri Oct 22, 6:40 PM ET


By DEBORAH HASTINGS, AP National Writer

In several battleground states across the country, a consulting firm funded by the Republican National Committee (news - web sites) has been accused of deceiving would-be voters and destroying Democratic voter registration cards.

Arizona-based Sproul & Associates is under investigation in Oregon and Nevada over claims that canvassers hired by the company were instructed to register only Republicans and to get rid of registration forms completed by Democrats.

"We treat these complaints very seriously," said Oregon Secretary of State Bill Bradbury. The Democratic office-holder said three complaints were filed with election officials throughout the state. He declined to provide details, citing the continuing investigation.

Substitute teacher Adam Banse wanted a summer job with flexible hours, so he signed up to knock on doors in suburban Minneapolis and register people to vote.

He quit after two hours. "They said if you bring back a bunch of Democratic cards, you'll be fired," Banse contends. "At that point, I said, `Whoa. Something's wrong here.'"

Nathan Sproul, a former head of Arizona's Republican Party and the state's Christian Coalition branch, denies any wrongdoing and accuses Democrats of making things up.

"This is all about making accusations," Sproul said Thursday. "They allege fraud where none exists and get the media to cover it."

Republican National Committee spokeswoman Heather Layman responded that her party accepts all voters, and she accused the Democratic Party of operating under this mandate: "If no sign of voter fraud exists, make it up, manipulate the media into covering baseless charges and spread fear."

Sproul declined to name the states in which his company conducted registration drives. His political consulting firm was founded last year and has received nearly $500,000 from the RNC since July, according to federal election records.

Former canvassers such as Banse have come forward in West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Nevada and Oregon in the past two weeks alleging they were told to register only Republicans and to "walk away" from people who said they intended to vote for Democrat John Kerry (news - web sites).

Some said Democratic registration forms had been thrown out or ripped up.

It is illegal to tamper with voter registration cards, which are numbered and issued by local election officials. In some states, including Oregon, such acts are felonies.

Eric Russell of Las Vegas told The Associated Press that he watched a Sproul supervisor tear up eight to 10 registration forms completed by Democrats and managed to grab some of the shredded documents as evidence. State officials are investigating his claim.

Russell said that Voters Outreach of America, the name under which Sproul employees operated in Nevada and other states, owes him hundreds of dollars for registering residents but refuses to pay him.

Sproul called Russell simply a disgruntled employee.

Prompted by Russell's accusations, Clark County Democrats unsuccessfully went to court last week to try to persuade a state judge to reopen voter registration in their county, which encompasses Las Vegas.

In West Virginia, Lisa Bragg said she refused a sorely needed $9-an-hour job to register voters after attending an orientation session conducted by Sproul employees.



Like Banse in Minnesota, she said canvassers were discouraged from registering Democrats and were told to misrepresent themselves as poll takers.

Bragg, who filed a complaint earlier this week with the West Virginia secretary of state's office, said Friday that canvassers were given a script that read at the bottom, "Our goal is to register Republicans."

She called the registration drive dishonest, adding, "I believe everyone has the right to vote. Even though I'm a Democrat, I would have registered Republicans to vote."

In Pennsylvania, Democrats in the state House of Representatives have asked the attorney general to investigate complaints from former Sproul canvassers who said they had been instructed to not register Democrats. About 40 to 50 also complained they had not been promptly paid.

In Pittsburgh, library patrons protested that Sproul employees were pressuring people to register as Republicans at tables set up outside a Carnegie Library branch.

A similar incident was reported in Oregon in September, when the manager of Medford library headquarters refused a Sproul request to register voters after learning the firm was affiliated with Republicans.
Atrocious, the Reps should strive to be more like the dems.

KCWolfman
10-22-2004, 11:03 PM
better than paying attention to the real fraud, I guess:

link (http://www.argusleader.com/update/Fridayfeature.shtml)

Six charged in absentee voter controversy

The Associated Press

published: 10/22/2004

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) - Six Republican notary publics face a misdemeanor charge in connection with absentee ballot applications filled out on South Dakota college campuses, but there's no evidence of voter fraud, Attorney General Larry Long said Friday.

Long and Secretary of State Chris Nelson outlined a two-week investigation in a document faxed to county auditors and state's attorneys.

The document states "it is a near certainty that all absentee voters that had their application notarized by one of the six notaries" will be challenged in court.

"Lawyers who represent the Democrats have written to us and told us that," Long told reporters.

Several attorneys have contacted him, he said.

He, Chris Nelson, Minnehaha County State's Attorney Dave Nelson and Minnehaha County Auditor Sue Roust briefed reporters on the investigation.

Five of the Republican notaries were charged in Minnehaha County since the ballot applications were all processed in Sioux Falls, even though some were gathered elsewhere.

Those five are: Joseph Alick, 28; Nathan Mertz, 20; Todd Schlekeway, 27; Rachel Hoff, 22; and Eric Fahrendorf, 24. Another GOP worker, Jennifer Giannonatti, will be charged in Pennington County because of ballots collected in Rapid City, Long said.

Campuses included in the investigation include South Dakota State, University of South Dakota, Augustana College, Mount Marty College, Black Hills State, Dakota State, Northern State and the School of Mines & Technology.

Dave Nelson said the six are charged with improper use of a notary commission, a Class 2 misdemeanor punishable by up to a month in jail and a $200 fine. They can also lose their notary licenses.

"Notary violations are very, very common" in government and business, he said.

But unlike most cases that aren't prosecuted, the six were charged because they made it possible for someone's vote not to count, Dave Nelson said.

"The potential consequences of these acts are significant and far reaching," he said.

The five charged in Sioux Falls are scheduled to make their first court appearance next Friday. They are all cooperating, he said.

Most of the absentee ballot applications acquired by the Republican get-out-the-vote effort were legal and there's no indication that any unqualified voter tried to cast an absentee ballot, Long said.

The only people who broke the law are the six notaries who failed to watch some people sign the documents, he said.

"Sometimes they did and sometimes they didn't," Long said.

"Everybody who's committed crimes has been charged," he said. "We don't have any reason to believe there's anything else out there."

The investigation didn't find a formal Republican Party policy that encouraged workers to skirt the law, Long said. "What we found was sloppy supervision."

Larry Russell, who ran the GOP's get-out-the-vote program, resigned earlier this month. Russell, who had sought the party's nomination for a special U.S. House election in June, was replaced as head of the Republican Victory operation by Herb Jones, manager of U.S. Senate candidate John Thune's 2002 Senate bid.

Chris Nelson's office commissions the state's notaries, who are legally public officials.

"There's six individuals that didn't take that responsibility seriously and violated that trust," he said.

Chris Nelson said he wants to make sure no voter is disenfranchised and that the Election Day vote count is not disrupted.

The document faxed to auditors asks them to compare voter registration cards with absentee ballot applications to make sure it's the same person. It also outlines how the local election board should handle a challenge to a voter's identity.

Chris Nelson said that rarely happens but could this year.

According to Long and Chris Nelson's document, Hoff improperly notarized 71 applications and about half of Giannonatti's 111 were improper. The secretary of state said his office will contact those 182 applicants and ask each to submit a photo ID.

Alick improperly notarized about 60 applications. But since there's no copy of the forms, all auditors have been asked to look for his name, contact those applicants and ask for a copy of their photo ID.

Long and Chris Nelson said the investigation couldn't sort out all applications done by Hoff, Giannonatti, Mertz, Fahrendorf and Schlekeway, but the Republican Party wrote to about 1,400 applicants and asked them to send in a photo copy of their ID to the county auditor.

There's still time to handle any problems before the Nov. 2 election, the officials said.

A statement released Friday afternoon by Jason Glodt, executive director of the state GOP, said, "As we have clearly demonstrated in this matter, the South Dakota Republican Party has a zero-tolerance policy for our staff and volunteers when it comes to obeying the law, no matter how minor the infraction. We fully support the action of law enforcement in this matter and believe their decision is appropriate."

Long said he hopes that if any ballots are challenged in court, the judge sides with the voter's right to be counted and agrees that the solution was a valid way to fix problems caused by wayward notaries.

The law that created the requirement for a copy of a photo ID or notarized signature to accompany all absentee ballots was passed in 2003 and took effect Jan. 1. Its intent was to ensure voter integrity.

"That's why this is happening this year," Roust said.
Blab blab blah blab blah blah blah blah.


You are an ignornat self righteous hypocritical jackass if you believe this is only happening on one side.