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View Full Version : NFT: BBS memory lane


Bob Dole
11-24-2004, 03:45 PM
To avoid a complete hijack of another thread.

www.bbsmates.com

Bob Dole
11-24-2004, 03:56 PM
Apparently Bob Dole worries a lot about nothing.

ENDelt260
11-24-2004, 04:06 PM
Apparently.

Iowanian
11-24-2004, 04:09 PM
You MUST locate Mike Keck.

ENDelt260
11-24-2004, 07:15 PM
So... uh, no one else here used to post on dial-up BBS's, huh?

htismaqe
11-24-2004, 07:33 PM
So... uh, no one else here used to post on dial-up BBS's, huh?

Never used to post...but used to download alot of JPG's and play "The Pit" and "VGA Planets"...

Good times...Good times...

Bob Dole
11-24-2004, 07:44 PM
Not that there seems to be a lot of interest, but Bob Dole ran "The Dog House" and then "Abiogenesis" in the 816 area code (Fidonet 1:280/310) and served a few years as the president of the Greater KC Sysops Association. (You know...those geeks that took Southwestern Bell and the PUC to task so you geeky bastards didn't have to pay business rates because you had a computwer attached to your phone line.)

MadMax
11-24-2004, 09:19 PM
Not that there seems to be a lot of interest, but Bob Dole ran "The Dog House" and then "Abiogenesis" in the 816 area code (Fidonet 1:280/310) and served a few years as the president of the Greater KC Sysops Association. (You know...those geeks that took Southwestern Bell and the PUC to task so you geeky bastards didn't have to pay business rates because you had a computwer attached to your phone line.)


Wow this brings back a lot of memories to me, I just can't articulate them at this moment... :thumb: Commodore 64, 300 baud modem, then an Amiga, then a 286 ( thought I was da chit then ) Fidonet, hell, head spinning, must...not ...succomb..to memories...too painfull ( loss of sleep ) :deevee: What a start to a wonderfull hobby ;-)

Count Alex's Wins
11-24-2004, 09:21 PM
What internet era is this from? I'm fairly sure I wasn't online. My first internet experience was in Jr. High during the mid 90s.

dtebbe
11-25-2004, 12:01 AM
Anyone here ever a member of "The Country Club" BBS out of Mississippi? That place was AMAZING. $20 a year you could get the latest hacked software before it was even for sale in stores. I remember many hours spend dialed in with my Compucom 9600 baud modem, downloading for hours. There were 4 of us with Compucoms in my shop, and we had about 20 people who would chip in for our long-distance bills in trade for copies of the goods.

Oh, and who could forget Russ & Edie's???

DT

Bob Dole
11-26-2004, 09:21 PM
What internet era is this from? I'm fairly sure I wasn't online. My first internet experience was in Jr. High during the mid 90s.

It's the "internet era" where it was only populated by government, scientists and higher ed. That's why there were dialup BBSes and Fidonet echomail.

dtebbe
11-26-2004, 09:35 PM
Well BD, looks like we must be the old farts here...

DT

Bob Dole
11-26-2004, 09:44 PM
Well BD, looks like we must be the old farts here...


No kidding.

Bob Dole really figured there were more of us old-timers who could still see well enough to read and respond.

Reading through that stuff sure did bring back some things that Bob Dole hadn't thought about for years and made Bob Dole dig out some old junk he's had piled in a closet.

SaudiNet, the battle with SWB, a paper Bob Dole wrote in 1990 that predicted that wireless networking was the future, and the MIS prof marked it up because he thought Bob Dole was a kook.

It's pretty wild to think back and remember setting up a PC at Maple Woods CC library so people could send netmail to troops, which were saved to floppy, then taken back home and loaded on the BBS so they could be transmitted to the node coordinator, yada yada... It was a big deal because the netmail was transmitted and printed and distributed in 2-3 days and snailmail was taking a week or more. Now we wouldn't have all the intermediary steps and the damned thing would be there in 12 seconds.

Skip Towne
11-26-2004, 09:52 PM
I'm pretty sure I was running a forerunner of the computer in 1968 for the Air Force. The thing occupied the space of a two car garage and after I typed in the information I was given a stack of cards about three inches tall and 6 inches long. I then transmitted them to Langley AFB on another part of the machine. Anybody know what that could have been?

Bob Dole
11-26-2004, 10:00 PM
I'm pretty sure I was running a forerunner of the computer in 1968 for the Air Force. The thing occupied the space of a two car garage and after I typed in the information I was given a stack of cards about three inches tall and 6 inches long. I then transmitted them to Langley AFB on another part of the machine. Anybody know what that could have been?

Punch cards were a common input method, so it was probably some sort of IBM mainframe.

Bob Dole's dad used to bring home old punch cards from the S&L as a toy. You could make some pretty cool card houses out of them.

Skip Towne
11-26-2004, 11:01 PM
Punch cards were a common input method, so it was probably some sort of IBM mainframe.

Bob Dole's dad used to bring home old punch cards from the S&L as a toy. You could make some pretty cool card houses out of them.
Well, I thought I was pretty damned smart cause only me and two other guys on McConnell AFB were allowed to touch it.

big nasty kcnut
11-26-2004, 11:09 PM
How about useing the old server that needed it's own cold room to not overheat them. used it to contact the washington redskins with a play idea.

Skip Towne
11-26-2004, 11:28 PM
Did You Know: If it weren't for air conditioning, Dallas would be half the size it is? Why? Because the first computers (and even some now) would shut down when the temperature exceeded 80. Without AC, no company would have placed a division office in Dallas without computer capability.