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RedNeckRaider
11-29-2004, 08:43 PM
Looking for ideas, been reading Louie Lamar because my mom has about everyone ever printed. I tried King "The Stand uncut" and it was alright although there was a large amount of literary masturbating where he seemed to please himself instead of the reader, not sure if I will give him another try or not.Know of a good one?

Jenson71
11-29-2004, 08:46 PM
How about The Scarlet Letter? Yeah, I've heard that's good. And maybe when you're done, oh, by Dec. 5th, you could write a new 3 page essay on one of the characters and post it here...

That way, we'll...ah, see if you actually read it.

|Zach|
11-29-2004, 08:47 PM
How about The Scarlet Letter? Yeah, I've heard that's good. And maybe when you're done, oh, by Dec. 5th, you could write a new 3 page essay on one of the characters and post it here...
ROFL

Mr. Kotter
11-29-2004, 08:47 PM
What a poser....you expect us to believe a Fader fan can actually READ....?

yeah, riiiiiiiiggggggghhhhhhhtttttt. ROFL

:p

Misplaced_Chiefs_Fan
11-29-2004, 08:49 PM
Don't know anything about books. . .

Nope. . .

____________________

Seriously, what kind of books do you like? I've got a number of SF/Fantasy/Horror books you might find interesting, if that's your cuppa.

Wile_E_Coyote
11-29-2004, 08:49 PM
Orange Mane-fiction

RedNeckRaider
11-29-2004, 08:51 PM
How about The Scarlet Letter? Yeah, I've heard that's good. And maybe when you're done, oh, by Dec. 5th, you could write a new 3 page essay on one of the characters and post it here...A 3 page essay would take me 2 months the way I type!

Mr. Kotter
11-29-2004, 08:52 PM
Looking for ideas, been reading Louie Lamar because my mom has about everyone ever printed. I tried King "The Stand uncut" and it was alright although there was a large amount of literary masturbating where he seemed to please himself instead of the reader, not sure if I will give him another try or not.Know of a good one?

War and Peace

Crime and Punishment

When you finish those, check back...in 2008 or somethin. :)

Phobia
11-29-2004, 08:55 PM
I enjoy just about anything from Jonathan Kellerman. Give him 1 shot and see if you like his style.

Also W.E.B. Griffin is one of the better combat writers of our time.

Jenson71
11-29-2004, 08:55 PM
Here's what I plan on reading this winter...

The Godfather Returns by Mark Winegardner
Bob Dylan: Chronicles by Dylan
A Thin Red Line by James Jones
The Sun Also Rises by Hemingway
To Kill A Mockingbird by Lee

|Zach|
11-29-2004, 08:56 PM
I am about to start a book called "Bringing Down The House" about some MIT students dominating Vegas for hundres of thousands of dollars.

CosmicPal
11-29-2004, 08:59 PM
"The Fan Man"
by William Kotzwinkle

Kotzwinkle is best known for penning "E.T." which turned out to be quite a hit film for him. However, "The Fan Man" is his underground novel with quite a cult following- one of my favorites.

"On the Road"
by Jack Kerouac

The sweetest novel of becoming a daring and adventurous rebel in the heart of America....the finest prose ever written.

"Into the Wild"
by Jon Krakauer

The true events of Christopher McCandless who ventured into the Alaskan wilderness never to return....

"Life of Pi"
by Yann Martel

Simply an amazing book of some kid trapped in a dinghy with a bengal tiger- one wild and magical ride alone on the ocean with a man-eating tiger.

"Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair"
by Pablo Neruda

All creatures should read a book a poems once in their lifetime- this is about as deep as the human spirit can get speaking of love and love lost.

"The Power of Myth" with Bill Moyers
by Joseph Campbell

A very intriquing and well-rounded book. Required reading for anyone who wants to expand their mind.

"Way of the Peaceful Warrior"
by Dan Millman

The story of a gymnast who discovers himself through a spiritual mentor who goes by the name of Socrates.

Jenson71
11-29-2004, 09:23 PM
The Thin Red Line seems like a great book. I own the movie, and while I did like it, the story is about thoughts and emotions. I want to read the book because I'm hoping the thoughts are more explored and told. It's a beautiful movie, real anti-war.

chiefs4me
11-29-2004, 09:35 PM
My favorite book authors are James Patterson,John Sanford or Dean Koontz,they are awesome.

Count Zarth
11-29-2004, 09:37 PM
Anything by James Rollins:

http://www.jamesrollins.com/

He reminds me alot of Michael Crichton. Someone needs to make a movie out of "Subterannean."

Phobia
11-29-2004, 09:38 PM
My favorite book authors are James Patterson,John Sanford or Dean Koontz,they are awesome.

Hey - I own about 60 books by those guys. Love 'em.

RedNeckRaider
11-29-2004, 09:39 PM
My favorite book authors are James Patterson,John Sanford or Dean Koontz,they are awesome.
I have read Koontz damn if I recall the name of the book

SNR
11-29-2004, 10:03 PM
How about The Scarlet Letter? Yeah, I've heard that's good. And maybe when you're done, oh, by Dec. 5th, you could write a new 3 page essay on one of the characters and post it here...

That way, we'll...ah, see if you actually read it.A Puritain bitch gets banged by a minister and has a kid and meets her previous husband whom everyone else thought had vanished. He knows the secret between the minister and the bitch, and uses that to take advantage of them. Some other shit happens, the kid grows up, the minister gains respect, admits in public to adultery with the bitch, and dies.

There you go.

Fried Meat Ball!
11-29-2004, 10:11 PM
Looking for ideas, been reading Louie Lamar because my mom has about everyone ever printed. I tried King "The Stand uncut" and it was alright although there was a large amount of literary masturbating where he seemed to please himself instead of the reader, not sure if I will give him another try or not.Know of a good one?

If you're a fan of King you like some of the freaky stuff. Try The Exorcist (by William Peter Blatty)-- best horror book I've ever read. As well, Thomas Harris' Red Dragon, Silence of the Lambs and Hannibal series is stellar. Both of those books are MUCH better than the films.

Someone else mentioned The Godfather Returns... haven't read it, but start with Puzo's original, The Godfather. Also an amazing book.

Those five books are the only five books I've ever read more than once. Simply outstanding.

Ecto-I
11-29-2004, 10:16 PM
The Great Gatsby
Catch-22
A Confederacy of Dunces
Autobiography of Fredrick Douglas
Wolf by the Ears

All very good books.

Pants
11-29-2004, 10:54 PM
Try Richard Marcinko's books, funny, interesting and very easy.
Also Rainbow Six by Tom Clancy.

If you want a real non-BS good book, I suggest you read One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey.

RedNeckRaider
11-29-2004, 10:59 PM
Try Richard Marcinko's books, funny, interesting and very easy.
Also Rainbow Six by Tom Clancy.

If you want a real non-BS good book, I suggest you read One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey.I have not read Rainbow Six but enjoy the Clancy I have read.

Phobia
11-29-2004, 11:01 PM
I have not read Rainbow Six but enjoy the Clancy I have read.

Don't read anything from Clancy in the past 5 years. I used to buy his books the moment they came out. Now I can't read them. I don't know if it's him or me. I'm pretty sure it's him because I'm not a real picky reader.

Pants
11-29-2004, 11:03 PM
I loved RS, but I'm into that kind of thing. Damn fine book if I say so myself.

cheeeefs
11-29-2004, 11:17 PM
Incidents in the life of a slave girl - Harriet Jacobs

As We Lay Dying - Faulkner (difficult, but great)

Woman on the Edge of Time - Margeret Piercy

Great Gatsby - F. Scott Fitzgerald

To Die For - Joyce Maynord

----
those are good "academic" type novels, all fiction except for Incidents in the life.

for easy reading I recomend several authors mostly in the realm of fantasy, because that's my highest interest.

A must read is Stephen King's Dark Tower series, frikken awesome.

A series of I think 8 books called "The Death Gate Cycle" by Margeret weiss (first book is called Dragon Wing) I devoured these books, probably 6,000 pages in all and I read them in 6 days. I thought they were incredible. Anything by Margeret Weiss that I have touched has been gold, She was THE best dragonlance writer, especially when she co-authored with Tracy Hickman. My all time favorite character was created by those two authors - Tasslehoff Burrfoot -

Terry Goodkind's series - I can't think of the name of the series, but the first book is "Wizards First Rule" also devoured these as they came out... stop after the first 6. 7-8 are a waste of time he gets too preachy.

OH! and I haven't had time to actually read it yet, but it has come so highly recomended to me by trusted sources, I feel compelled to recomend it to you. Norman Swarzkopf's Autobiography, can be found here http://www.geocities.com/Pentagon/Barracks/2911/b/schwarzkopf.html

A book of essays that you might find intrigueing - David Foster Wallace's "Oblivion" they are kind of out there, it's experimental fiction in the fullest... so it can be quite difficult, but great reads.


Hopefully that's over a broad enough spectrum of genre's that you can find something you may like.

the Talking Can
11-29-2004, 11:27 PM
A book of essays that you might find intrigueing - David Foster Wallace's "Oblivion" they are kind of out there, it's experimental fiction in the fullest... so it can be quite difficult, but great reads.

now you're talking....love everything he writes, I've just read the first couple of stories...the one with the marketing analysts is great...I love the way he digs into the science and technical jargon of it while drawing out these pathetic (as in " inspiring mixed contempt and pity") characters...

Logical
11-29-2004, 11:31 PM
I have not read Rainbow Six but enjoy the Clancy I have read.

I have read everything by Clancy (don't get taken by the other authors that publish under his name with his permission) and every single book is fantastic.

Other authors that are good reads are Web Griffin, Stephen Coonts, John Grisham, and Dale Brown. I endorse them all.

Phobia
11-29-2004, 11:33 PM
I'm not familiar with Dale Brown, Jim. What genre?

Since you and I like the same things, I may need to check him out.

Logical
11-29-2004, 11:34 PM
Don't read anything from Clancy in the past 5 years. I used to buy his books the moment they came out. Now I can't read them. I don't know if it's him or me. I'm pretty sure it's him because I'm not a real picky reader.

I am guessing you are reading books published under his name. He has written only two books since Rainbow Six. Rabbit Run which is a Prequel that is the start of the entire Jack Ryan series and his current book The Teeth of the Tiger which is a new series start.

Edit: Ooops forgot about The Bear and the Dragon which I can see you finding lacking because he tried to pack too much into one book to try to wrap up the series.

Logical
11-29-2004, 11:35 PM
I'm not familiar with Dale Brown, Jim. What genre?

Since you and I like the same things, I may need to check him out.

Military fiction heavy on the fiction. He has a fascination with bombers and bomber pilots.

Bwana
11-29-2004, 11:37 PM
I have one you will love if you are into the outdoors. The book is called Indian Creek Chronicles, by Pete Fromm. A true story about a guy that spent a year in the mountains working for the fish and game on a project by himself and the stuff he went through. Trust me, you will like it. :thumb:

cheeeefs
11-29-2004, 11:39 PM
now you're talking....love everything he writes, I've just read the first couple of stories...the one with the marketing analysts is great...I love the way he digs into the science and technical jargon of it while drawing out these pathetic (as in " inspiring mixed contempt and pity") characters...

yeah, I haven't gotten through all of them yet either. It isn't on any of my required readings, and I don't have any time to read anything else now so I had to put them down about 8 months ago.

Wallace is a genious, and he is just an interesting individual, after reading "Good Old Neon" (truthfully the only one I've read :/) I decided to research him a little more, he's got some interesting quotes. I found this weblog that does really nice critiques about midpage they do one on this guy (took me forever to refind this sight) http://noggs.typepad.com/the_reading_experience/experimental_fiction/

Here's an excerpt that I liked

"DFW: …I often think I can see it in myself and in other young writers, this desperate desire to please coupled with a kind of hostility to the reader.

LM: In your own case, how does this hostility manifest itself?

DFW: Oh, not always, but sometimes in the form of sentences that are syntactically not incorrect but still a real bitch to read. Or bludgeoning the reader with data. Or devoting a lot of energy to creating expectations and then taking pleasure in disappointing them. You can see this clearly in something like Ellis's "American Psycho": it panders shamelessly to the audience's sadism for a while, but by the end it's clear that the sadism's real object is the reader herself."

and

"LM: Are you saying that writers of your generation have an obligation not only to depict our condition but also to provide the solutions to these things?

DFW: I don't think I'm talking about conventionally political or social action-type solutions. That's not what fiction's about. Fiction's about what it is to be a ****ing human being."

cheeeefs
11-29-2004, 11:41 PM
I can't believe I left this one out.

Dan Brown -

Angles and Demons, and the DaVinci Code

MUST reads.

Pants
11-30-2004, 12:21 AM
I can't believe I left this one out.

Dan Brown -

Angles and Demons, and the DaVinci Code

MUST reads.

What's DaVinci Code about anyway? I've heard the book mentioned a lot of times, never found out what's the story behind it.

NewChief
11-30-2004, 05:23 AM
Wallace is a genious, and he is just an interesting individual, after reading "Good Old Neon" (truthfully the only one I've read :/) I decided to research him a little more, he's got some interesting quotes. I found this weblog that does really nice critiques about midpage they do one on this guy (took me forever to refind this sight) http://noggs.typepad.com/the_reading_experience/experimental_fiction/



I went through a DFW kick a while back. I read Infinite Jest, Girl with Curious Hair, and Broom of the System. I really liked them all. My favorite, though, is A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again. I really, really liked that collection of essays. Of course, I really, really liked IJ as well.

I picked up Brief Interviews with Hideous Men and couldn't really get into it. That sort of ended my DFW kick. Winter is here, though, and his writing goes well with winter. I may have to pick him up again.

Gaz
11-30-2004, 05:29 AM
What kind of books do you like, RNR?

xoxo~
Gaz
Resisting the “Mother Goose” arfing urge.

the Talking Can
11-30-2004, 07:02 AM
yeah, I haven't gotten through all of them yet either. It isn't on any of my required readings, and I don't have any time to read anything else now so I had to put them down about 8 months ago.

Wallace is a genious, and he is just an interesting individual, after reading "Good Old Neon" (truthfully the only one I've read :/) I decided to research him a little more, he's got some interesting quotes. I found this weblog that does really nice critiques about midpage they do one on this guy (took me forever to refind this sight) http://noggs.typepad.com/the_reading_experience/experimental_fiction/

Here's an excerpt that I liked

"DFW: …I often think I can see it in myself and in other young writers, this desperate desire to please coupled with a kind of hostility to the reader.

LM: In your own case, how does this hostility manifest itself?

DFW: Oh, not always, but sometimes in the form of sentences that are syntactically not incorrect but still a real bitch to read. Or bludgeoning the reader with data. Or devoting a lot of energy to creating expectations and then taking pleasure in disappointing them. You can see this clearly in something like Ellis's "American Psycho": it panders shamelessly to the audience's sadism for a while, but by the end it's clear that the sadism's real object is the reader herself."

and

"LM: Are you saying that writers of your generation have an obligation not only to depict our condition but also to provide the solutions to these things?

DFW: I don't think I'm talking about conventionally political or social action-type solutions. That's not what fiction's about. Fiction's about what it is to be a ****ing human being."


that sounds about right...a better place to start might be "Brief Interviews with Hideous Men".....his first collection of short stories, both easier to read and, imho, better than Oblivion...there is a story called, I think, "The Depressed Person" which was orginally published in Harpers and is so brutal and funny I can't describe it...I mean laughing till it hurts funny, written in the voice of a narcissistic young woman whose every thought is about herself and how terrible her life is even though there doesn't seem to be any real problems in her life outside of her incredible self-centeredness...something about the voice is so dead-on, exactly like a person who spent their days watching Ophrah/Dr. Phil etc. would talk

anyways, people were outraged and flooded Harpers with letters claiming he was insensitive and "how dare he make fun of depression" etc...but really they all felt like he was ridiculing them, individually, and their obsessions with their petty problems...and he was, which makes it even funnier.....if you've ever got 20 minutes in book store or library read it, you'll be hooked