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View Full Version : Is this the end of the world? Tsunamies/earthquakes


WHScenter
12-28-2004, 10:09 PM
Since all of the cummosion occuring world wide could it be the end?
Scientist report that the 9 earthquake and the tsunamis have changed the speed that the earth travels around the sun. The death toll has now reached 67,000 and many more missing. Just let me know what your opinions are towards "the end of the world".

Ari Chi3fs
12-28-2004, 10:12 PM
um...

http://www.chiefsplanet.com/BB/showthread.php?t=107234

RNR
12-28-2004, 10:14 PM
The lights are still on where I live. BTW welcome as you can see by my username I am an Oakland fan also.

alanm
12-28-2004, 10:15 PM
I don't know about the end of "THE" world. But I'll know the end of my world will occur when I answer the front door and some tall dude wearing a cloak leaning on a sickle is there asking for directions. ROFL

Ari Chi3fs
12-28-2004, 10:17 PM
i think the first sign of the world... was when Nebraska fired SOlich and replaced him with Callahan. ROFL

alanm
12-28-2004, 10:23 PM
i think the first sign of the world... was when Nebraska fired SOlich and replaced him with Callahan. ROFLKeep f*cking doubting Nebraska.:cuss:#1 ranked recruiting class for 05 so far according to Rivals.com. Not that that necessarily trandsends to the field FWIW. :banghead:

Rain Man
12-28-2004, 10:41 PM
Personally, I was a lot more concerned about that when Elway's evil grinning visage was seen lifting the Lombardi several years back.

R&GHomer
12-28-2004, 10:52 PM
No raining frogs yet.... So I guess the APOX isn't upon us yet.

CosmicPal
12-28-2004, 10:56 PM
:hmmm:
Hmmmm, I had spent the past several minutes composing an insightful response to this thread topic when my computer shut down.

Not sure how that happened, but apparently my own apocalypse has set in.

CosmicPal
12-28-2004, 10:59 PM
No raining frogs yet.... So I guess the APOX isn't upon us yet.

Raining frogs have nothing to do with the apocalypse. As a matter of fact, there is a published account of raining frogs in Kansas City in the late 1800's or early 1900's...can't recall the exact date, but it was published in the KC Star & Times....

If I recall from my Sunday school- when the four horsemen return- it is then the start of the apolcalypse.

Logical
12-29-2004, 12:06 AM
So I have been unable to locate 1000s of people, what do you suppose that means?

alanm
12-29-2004, 12:07 AM
If I recall from my Sunday school- when the four horsemen return- it is then the start of the apolcalypse. Notre Dame ain't seeing the National Championship anytime soon. :)

Fairplay
12-29-2004, 12:15 AM
Its the end of the world as we know it.

Demonpenz
12-29-2004, 12:17 AM
is beano cook in here?

Jenson71
12-29-2004, 12:19 AM
Of our elaborate plans, the end
Of everything that stands, the end
No safety or surprise, the end
I'll never look into your eyes...again
.......
The west is the best
The west is the best
Get here, and we'll do the rest
.......
This is the end
Beautiful friend
This is the end
My only friend, the end
.....
This is the end

tommykat
12-29-2004, 12:25 AM
So I have been unable to locate 1000s of people, what do you suppose that means?

Jim/Logical

We need to talk one on one...........I hope we can on day.

Fairplay
12-29-2004, 12:26 AM
The end of days...........

Fairplay
12-29-2004, 12:32 AM
This is the end
Beautiful friend
This is the end
My only friend, the end
Of our elaborate plans, the end
Of everything that stands, the end
No safety or surprise, the end
Iíll never look into your eyes...again

Demonpenz
12-29-2004, 12:46 AM
some doors fans up in here? I am waiting for the helo full of napalm

Fairplay
12-29-2004, 12:48 AM
SCENARIO: The earth will shake and split asunder. Buildings will topple. Charlton Heston will grit his teeth, just like in the movie. Coastal cities will slide into the oceans and be seen no more. WHO SAY? Just about everybody who is anybody in apocalyptic thinking seems to agree on this one. Nostradamus and Edgar Cayce both predicted widespread earthquakes around the year 2000. Hildegard of Bingen prophesied quakes, and psychic archaeologist Jeffrey Goodman predicted that the U.S. coastline would end up in Nebraska and Kansas by the year 2000.


Hey, beach front property in Kansas!

Jenson71
12-29-2004, 12:56 AM
http://www.creationmag.com/editorial/features/crafteditor_feb02/apoc.jpg

Smells like...victory.

Fairplay
12-29-2004, 01:00 AM
http://www.creationmag.com/editorial/features/crafteditor_feb02/apoc.jpg

Smells like...victory.



Nothing else in the world smells like that.

Demonpenz
12-29-2004, 01:03 AM
SCENARIO: The earth will shake and split asunder. Buildings will topple. Charlton Heston will grit his teeth, just like in the movie. Coastal cities will slide into the oceans and be seen no more. WHO SAY? Just about everybody who is anybody in apocalyptic thinking seems to agree on this one. Nostradamus and Edgar Cayce both predicted widespread earthquakes around the year 2000. Hildegard of Bingen prophesied quakes, and psychic archaeologist Jeffrey Goodman predicted that the U.S. coastline would end up in Nebraska and Kansas by the year 2000.


Hey, beach front property in Kansas!

Would that effect the chiefs draft position?

Fairplay
12-29-2004, 01:05 AM
Would that effect the chiefs draft position?



It would effect our division. Jump for joy! No more Denver Donk's!!!

No more Raida's. No more Chargers. Chiefs OWN the division.

Demonpenz
12-29-2004, 01:17 AM
It would effect our division. Jump for joy! No more Denver Donk's!!!

No more Raida's. No more Chargers. Chiefs OWN the division.
ROFL

Otter
12-29-2004, 01:44 AM
The earth burps ever once in awhile, it's been doing it for years. Just hope your not in its path.

If you need somthing to worry about the most dangerous threat to be next to take a chunk out of man kind is a killer flu or a brand new virus or bacteria unearthed while digging up the rain forest.

PS - Good luck Jim!

Fairplay
12-29-2004, 02:28 AM
And the apocalypse continues.............



http://www.newsday.com/news/nationworld/wire/sns-ap-california-storm,0,6919744.story?coll=sns-ap-nationworld-headlines :eek:

:evil: :eek: :grovel:



California Storm Causes Mudslides, Floods


By JOHN ANTCZAK
Associated Press Writer

December 29, 2004, 12:00 AM EST
LOS ANGELES -- A powerful storm pounded California for a second day Tuesday, flooding freeways and desert roads, tossing boats ashore and triggering a rockslide that blocked Highway 1 on the central coast.
Three deaths were linked to the storm that roared down from the Gulf of Alaska and into the nation's most populous state on Monday.
One victim was apparently killed as he tried to surf big waves at Montara State Beach south of San Francisco. Also, a trucker died in a crash on an interstate north of Los Angeles and a sanitation worker was killed in the San Fernando Valley after touching a fallen power line.
Power outages affected more than 100,000 customers in Southern California.
Rain from the storm totaled between 12 and 13 inches in areas of Santa Barbara and Ventura counties, officials said.
Downtown Los Angeles got a record 3.98 inches of rain by Tuesday afternoon, topping the 2.09 inches set on Dec. 28, 1931.
More heavy weather was on its way, according to forecasters. A potentially stronger system was due to enter northern California late Wednesday, bringing heavy snow and high winds to the Sierra Nevada and eastern parts of the state through Friday.
Flash-flood warnings were posted Tuesday in southeastern California for parts of San Bernardino, Riverside and Imperial counties. Authorities reported flooding along highways near Joshua Tree National Park, and warned motorists to be alert crossing washes and driving near creeks.
Residents were ordered to evacuate about 50 homes in the San Bernardino County town of Devore, 60 miles east of Los Angeles. A flash flood on Christmas Day 2003 killed 16 people near there.
San Francisco and surrounding areas had clear skies after heavy rain Monday, but light rain fell elsewhere Tuesday in northern California and in the Central Valley, while snow showers dusted the Sierra Nevada.
A quarter-mile of Highway 1 in southern Monterey County was closed Tuesday after heavy rain caused a rockslide near Lucia, about 25 miles south of Big Sur.
At Santa Barbara, the storm threw ashore a 60-foot fishing boat, 35-foot trimaran, a cabin cruiser and three sailboats. None of the vessels appeared salvageable, Harbor Patrol Officer Bob Brandenburg said. Winds overnight ranged from 35 mph to 45 mph and surf reached about 7 feet.
The Tuesday morning commute was treacherous across Southern California, with hundreds of crashes reported on wet freeways in Los Angeles and San Diego, the state Highway Patrol said.
"We've had a lot of fender-benders, a lot of overturned vehicles, and vehicles spinning out and going off the road," CHP Officer Francisco Villalobos said.

Fairplay
12-29-2004, 04:00 AM
Reaper man..........

Fairplay
12-29-2004, 04:01 AM
Reaper man visits Keith Richards..........

Fairplay
12-29-2004, 04:02 AM
Even the Reaper man get job rejection...........

Fairplay
12-29-2004, 04:03 AM
Hangin with the reaper man...........

memyselfI
12-29-2004, 07:02 AM
And the apocalypse continues.............



http://www.newsday.com/news/nationworld/wire/sns-ap-california-storm,0,6919744.story?coll=sns-ap-nationworld-headlines :eek:

:evil: :eek: :grovel:



California Storm Causes Mudslides, Floods


By JOHN ANTCZAK
Associated Press Writer

December 29, 2004, 12:00 AM EST
LOS ANGELES -- A powerful storm pounded California for a second day Tuesday, flooding freeways and desert roads, tossing boats ashore and triggering a rockslide that blocked Highway 1 on the central coast.
Three deaths were linked to the storm that roared down from the Gulf of Alaska and into the nation's most populous state on Monday.
One victim was apparently killed as he tried to surf big waves at Montara State Beach south of San Francisco. Also, a trucker died in a crash on an interstate north of Los Angeles and a sanitation worker was killed in the San Fernando Valley after touching a fallen power line.
Power outages affected more than 100,000 customers in Southern California.
Rain from the storm totaled between 12 and 13 inches in areas of Santa Barbara and Ventura counties, officials said.
Downtown Los Angeles got a record 3.98 inches of rain by Tuesday afternoon, topping the 2.09 inches set on Dec. 28, 1931.
More heavy weather was on its way, according to forecasters. A potentially stronger system was due to enter northern California late Wednesday, bringing heavy snow and high winds to the Sierra Nevada and eastern parts of the state through Friday.
Flash-flood warnings were posted Tuesday in southeastern California for parts of San Bernardino, Riverside and Imperial counties. Authorities reported flooding along highways near Joshua Tree National Park, and warned motorists to be alert crossing washes and driving near creeks.
Residents were ordered to evacuate about 50 homes in the San Bernardino County town of Devore, 60 miles east of Los Angeles. A flash flood on Christmas Day 2003 killed 16 people near there.
San Francisco and surrounding areas had clear skies after heavy rain Monday, but light rain fell elsewhere Tuesday in northern California and in the Central Valley, while snow showers dusted the Sierra Nevada.
A quarter-mile of Highway 1 in southern Monterey County was closed Tuesday after heavy rain caused a rockslide near Lucia, about 25 miles south of Big Sur.
At Santa Barbara, the storm threw ashore a 60-foot fishing boat, 35-foot trimaran, a cabin cruiser and three sailboats. None of the vessels appeared salvageable, Harbor Patrol Officer Bob Brandenburg said. Winds overnight ranged from 35 mph to 45 mph and surf reached about 7 feet.
The Tuesday morning commute was treacherous across Southern California, with hundreds of crashes reported on wet freeways in Los Angeles and San Diego, the state Highway Patrol said.
"We've had a lot of fender-benders, a lot of overturned vehicles, and vehicles spinning out and going off the road," CHP Officer Francisco Villalobos said.


I've had that sick feeling since 11/3/04.... :hmmm:

Cochise
12-29-2004, 07:13 AM
I have read that the frequency and intensity of earthquakes and such has gone way up in recent years, but I dont know if we are either looking at a 50 year or so trend, which is nothing compared to the last few thousandyears, or if our ability to detect and measure earthquakes is just that much more advanced now.

I mean, tsunamis and quakes have been happening forever. It just seems more severe because of the degree of precision with which we can observe them and with the coverage they can now recieve from the global media.

For example the new madrid earthquakes in the early 1800s are said to have been similar on the richter scale as the one that caused this tsunami, and there were 3 of them. Quakes are nothing new.

Cochise
12-29-2004, 07:15 AM
I've had that sick feeling since 11/3/04.... :hmmm:

You shold move to tsunami country.

JimNasium
12-29-2004, 07:26 AM
Disaasters of Biblical proportions have been happening since, well, since Bible times.

:hmmm: ROFL

Fat Elvis
12-29-2004, 08:00 AM
It would effect our division. Jump for joy! No more Denver Donk's!!!

No more Raida's. No more Chargers. Chiefs OWN the division.

Yeah, but we will still lose in the first round of the playoffs....

the Talking Can
12-29-2004, 08:15 AM
Since all of the cummosion occuring world wide could it be the end?
Scientist report that the 9 earthquake and the tsunamis have changed the speed that the earth travels around the sun. The death toll has now reached 67,000 and many more missing. Just let me know what your opinions are towards "the end of the world".

I'd rather experience the end of the world then a "cummosion"....seriously....

Dr. Facebook Fever
12-29-2004, 08:37 AM
Since all of the cummosion occuring world wide could it be the end?
Scientist report that the 9 earthquake and the tsunamis have changed the speed that the earth travels around the sun. The death toll has now reached 67,000 and many more missing. Just let me know what your opinions are towards "the end of the world".
I think God may be pissed.

InChiefsHell
12-29-2004, 08:42 AM
Hmmmm...first Indonesia, then California. Muslims and morons...coincidence??

Rain Man
12-29-2004, 08:43 AM
Its the end of the world as we know it.


I feel fine.

Rain Man
12-29-2004, 08:45 AM
... Nostradamus and Edgar Cayce both predicted widespread earthquakes around the year 2000. Hildegard of Bingen prophesied quakes, and psychic archaeologist Jeffrey Goodman predicted that the U.S. coastline would end up in Nebraska and Kansas by the year 2000.


Hey, beach front property in Kansas!


Um, does the beach face east or west? I need to know.

Dr. Facebook Fever
12-29-2004, 08:48 AM
I feel fine.
time I had some time alone.

bricks
12-29-2004, 09:34 AM
I don't think this is the end of the world, but, it is a sign of bad things to come. It was estimated that 60,000 people died. And, after the tsunami hit, it is expected that this will lead to water contamination, so they are f@cked!
They don't have any water to drink, W.H.O. said it was estimated that the death toll will now double with the water contraversy.

chiefs4me
12-29-2004, 09:43 AM
I don't think this is the end of the world, but, it is a sign of bad things to come. It was estimated that 60,000 people died. And, after the tsunami hit, it is expected that this will lead to water contamination, so they are f@cked!
They don't have any water to drink, W.H.O. said it was estimated that the death toll will now double with the water contraversy.


What Irony,,more water then anybody knows what to do with,,but none to drink.:(

ptlyon
12-29-2004, 09:52 AM
I wonder if everyone on Gilligan's Island made it? :hmmm:

memyselfI
12-29-2004, 09:55 AM
Hmmmm...first Indonesia, then California. Muslims and morons...coincidence??

Ohmygawd, I hadn't thought of that. You are a real man of geneous...it happened Christmas week so God, being Christian and vengeful, had to punish Kalifornia and the infidels. :doh!:

chiefs4me
12-29-2004, 09:56 AM
I wonder if everyone on Gilligan's Island made it? :hmmm:


ROFL rep for you

BigMeatballDave
12-29-2004, 09:56 AM
That's great! It starts with an earthquake;
Birds and snakes, an aeroplane,
And Lenny Bruce is not afraid.
Eye of a hurricane, Listen to yourself churn,
World serves its own needs,
Dummy serve your own needs.
Feed it off an ox, speak, grunt, no, strength,
The Ladder start to clatter witha fear
Fight down, height.
Wire in a fire representing seven games,
And a government for hire at a combat site;
Left of west and coming in a hurry with the furies
Breathing down your neck.
Team by team reporters, baffled, trumped, tethered, cropped.
Look at that low plane.
Fine, Then.
Uh-oh. Overflow population, common food,
But it'll do to save yourself, serve yourself.
World serves its own needs,
Listen to your heart beat,
Dummy with a rapture and the reverend and the right, right.
You vitriolic, patriotic, slam, fight, bright light,
Feeling pretty psyched.

It's the end of the world as we know it
(It's time I had some time alone)
It's the end of the world as we know it
(It's time I had some time alone)
It's the end of the world as we know it
(It's time I had some time alone)
And I feel fine

Six o'clock-- T.V. hour
Don't get caught in foreign towers.
Slash and burn, return.
Listen to yourself churn.
Lock it in, uniforming, book burning, blood letting.
Every motive escalate.
Automotive incinerate.
Light a candle, light a votive.
Step down, step down.
Watch your heel crush, crushed, uh-oh,
This means no fear cavalier, renegade steer clear!
A tournament, a tournament, a tournament of lies!
Offer me solutions, and offer me alternatives, and I decline!

It's the end of the world as we know it
(It's time I had some time alone)
It's the end of the world as we know it
(It's time I had some time alone)
It's the end of the world as we know it
(It's time I had some time alone)
And I feel fine

The other night I dreamt of knives,
Continental drift divide,
Mountains sit in a line.
LEONARD BERNSTEIN,
Leonid Brezhnev, Lenny Bruce and Lester Bangs.
Birthday party, cheesecake, jelly bean, BOOM!
You symbiotic, patriotic, slam, bug, net, right?
Right.

It's the end of the world as we know it
(It's time I had some time alone)
It's the end of the world as we know it
(It's time I had some time alone)
It's the end of the world as we know it
(It's time I had some time alone)
And I feel fine...fine...

Cochise
12-29-2004, 09:58 AM
time I had some time alone.

Better go to the bathroom, you'll get fired if they catch you doing that at your desk.

badgirl
12-29-2004, 10:41 AM
NO, it is NOT the end of the world, now everyone calm the hell down :cuss: :)

htismaqe
12-29-2004, 10:45 AM
Jesus...

The worldwide dissemination of information makes people dumb, apparently.

In the grand scheme of things, this is likely not even in the "top 50" of catastrophic events, and that's just in recorded history...

We have to realize that we live in a universe MUCH bigger than ourselves.

badgirl
12-29-2004, 10:50 AM
Jesus...

The worldwide dissemination of information makes people dumb, apparently.

In the grand scheme of things, this is likely not even in the "top 50" of catastrophic events, and that's just in recorded history...

We have to realize that we live in a universe MUCH bigger than ourselves.
EXACTLY, what he said :)

StcChief
12-29-2004, 10:57 AM
Hmmmm...first Indonesia, then California. Muslims and morons...coincidence??

My thought exactly last night.

StcChief
12-29-2004, 11:01 AM
Reaper man visits Keith Richards..........
Interesting. I'm listening to some old ('64-'66) Stones at work....

memyselfI
12-29-2004, 11:04 AM
Jesus...

The worldwide dissemination of information makes people dumb, apparently.

In the grand scheme of things, this is likely not even in the "top 50" of catastrophic events, and that's just in recorded history...

We have to realize that we live in a universe MUCH bigger than ourselves.


I disagree. The fact that the tsunamis affected so many countries and the fact that the size of the earthquake was one of the largest on record means that this event will end up being one for the record books not even withstanding the final death toll or the monetary costs of the event.

htismaqe
12-29-2004, 11:25 AM
I disagree. The fact that the tsunamis affected so many countries and the fact that the size of the earthquake was one of the largest on record means that this event will end up being one for the record books not even withstanding the final death toll or the monetary costs of the event.

You're using modern history as your frame of reference.

The eruption of Krakatoa in 1883 blotted out the sun for 3/4 of the EARTH.

And 2 seismic events in the ancient Mediterranean wiped out entire civilizations.

The only reason these things seem more catastrophic is because:

1) we hear about it much sooner, with much more detail

2) there's simply more people now -- not only is there gross overpopulation, but one of the symptoms of overpopulation is that people are living in more dangerous areas than ever before.

Rain Man
12-29-2004, 11:25 AM
It's almost 1/1000th the size of the Black Plague right now, but it's still got to be one of the bigger natural disasters in terms of human deaths, outside some of those China floods.

badgirl
12-29-2004, 11:27 AM
It's almost 1/1000th the size of the Black Plague right now, but it's still got to be one of the bigger natural disasters in terms of human deaths, outside some of those China floods.
yea, especially when everyone died at the same time, not like the Black Plaque where they probably died slowly, and one at a time. I mean all these people where just BAM all gone. :(

MOhillbilly
12-29-2004, 11:29 AM
who cares.

dont worry about when your gonna die
soon enough youll be pulled in to the sky.

badgirl
12-29-2004, 11:31 AM
who cares.

dont worry about when your gonna die
soon enough youll be pulled in to the sky.
YOu will be "brought" up into the clouds. DUH not drug into the sky. :p

ptlyon
12-29-2004, 11:33 AM
yea, especially when everyone died at the same time, not like the Black Plaque where they probably died slowly, and one at a time. I mean all these people where just BAM all gone. :(

"Next on Emeril - a Tsunami salad that you're just gonna love. BAM!"

badgirl
12-29-2004, 11:35 AM
"Next on Emeril - a Tsunami salad that you're just gonna love. BAM!"
ROFL ROFL rep

htismaqe
12-29-2004, 11:35 AM
It's almost 1/1000th the size of the Black Plague right now, but it's still got to be one of the bigger natural disasters in terms of human deaths, outside some of those China floods.

But you can't measure the magnitude of a natural disaster merely in "death tolls". There's MORE PEOPLE now...

Like I said before, we have no frame of reference as human beings. We've existed for a tiny fraction of the time that the planet has existed. Smaller still is the history we've actually RECORDED.

Within our frame of reference, this is definitely a HUGE event. But as a geologic event, it was a 9.0 on the Richter scale. That makes it currently the FIFTH strongest quake since *1950*. 3 of the top 5 occurred in Alaska/Kamchatka in the north Pacific, where there's little to no population.

The end of the world? Hardly.

memyselfI
12-29-2004, 11:36 AM
You're using modern history as your frame of reference.

The eruption of Krakatoa in 1883 blotted out the sun for 3/4 of the EARTH.

And 2 seismic events in the ancient Mediterranean wiped out entire civilizations.

The only reason these things seem more catastrophic is because:

1) we hear about it much sooner, with much more detail

2) there's simply more people now -- not only is there gross overpopulation, but one of the symptoms of overpopulation is that people are living in more dangerous areas than ever before.

All I know is that yesterday there was an area that had a death toll of less than 4k and today it's over 40k....that was within a 24 hour period. We are less than a week since the event and the death toll is climbing by tens of thousands a day and that is not including areas that have not been reached yet due to lack of communications.

Again, my previous point did not include death toll numbers or $ cost. But merely the range of area and the size of the quake. I think when you combine ALL of of the eventual numbers you have a disaster that could make your list.

badgirl
12-29-2004, 11:38 AM
All I know is that yesterday there was an area that had a death toll of less than 4k and today it's over 40k....that was within a 24 hour period. We are less than a week since the event and the death toll is climbing by tens of thousands a day and that is not including areas that have not been reached yet due to lack of communications.
its also not including the ones who are missing, probably washed out to sea, its really unbeleivable, if I were single, I would volunteer and go over there to help. :(

BIG_DADDY
12-29-2004, 11:39 AM
Were all gonna dieeeeeeeeee!!!

Rain Man
12-29-2004, 11:45 AM
But you can't measure the magnitude of a natural disaster merely in "death tolls". There's MORE PEOPLE now...

(Shrug.) I think death toll is a legitimate measure. And yeah, we've got more people now, but I don't think we tend to measure things in terms of proportions. It's a large raw number.

Like I said before, we have no frame of reference as human beings. We've existed for a tiny fraction of the time that the planet has existed. Smaller still is the history we've actually RECORDED.

Speak for yourself. I've been keeping a journal since I was 12.

Within our frame of reference, this is definitely a HUGE event. But as a geologic event, it was a 9.0 on the Richter scale. That makes it currently the FIFTH strongest quake since *1950*. 3 of the top 5 occurred in Alaska/Kamchatka in the north Pacific, where there's little to no population.

Yep. Good point.

The end of the world? Hardly.

I disagree. I think we're about to be used as fuel by some advanced alien civilization.

Rain Man
12-29-2004, 11:46 AM
its also not including the ones who are missing, probably washed out to sea, its really unbeleivable, if I were single, I would volunteer and go over there to help. :(


Truthfully, it's probably not a good place to meet people right now.

memyselfI
12-29-2004, 11:48 AM
Also, how many of the previous disasters permanently altered the rotation of the Earth? And will that have implications on down the road???? :hmmm:

badgirl
12-29-2004, 11:49 AM
Truthfully, it's probably not a good place to meet people right now.
I said help, help, not meet people, I could be of great service over there. :thumb:

Rain Man
12-29-2004, 11:58 AM
Also, how many of the previous disasters permanently altered the rotation of the Earth? And will that have implications on down the road???? :hmmm:

Huh?

memyselfI
12-29-2004, 12:02 PM
Huh?

http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml;jsessionid=IESG1YFI1NHI2CRBAELCFFA?type=scienceNews&storyID=7195443

Quake May Have Made Earth Wobble--US Scientists
Tue Dec 28, 2004 08:20 PM ET

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - The deadly Asian earthquake may have permanently accelerated the Earth's rotation -- shortening days by a fraction of a second -- and caused the planet to wobble on its axis, U.S. scientists said on Tuesday. Richard Gross, a geophysicist with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California, theorized that a shift of mass toward the Earth's center during the quake on Sunday caused the planet to spin 3 microseconds, or 3 millionths of a second, faster and to tilt about an inch on its axis.

When one huge tectonic plate beneath the Indian Ocean was forced below the edge of another "it had the effect of making the Earth more compact and spinning faster," Gross said.

Gross said changes predicted by his model probably are too minuscule to be detected by a global positioning satellite network that routinely measures changes in Earth's spin, but said the data may reveal a slight wobble.

The Earth's poles travel a circular path that normally varies by about 33 feet, so an added wobble of an inch is unlikely to cause long-term effects, he said.

"That continual motion is just used to changing," Gross said. "The rotation is not actually that precise. The Earth does slow down and change its rate of rotation."

When those tiny variations accumulate, planetary scientists must add a "leap second" to the end of a year, something that has not been done in many years, Gross said.

Scientists have long theorized that changes on the Earth's surface such as tide and groundwater shifts and weather could affect its spin but they have not had precise measurements to prove it, Caltech seismologist Hiroo Kanamori said.

"Even for a very large event, the effect is very small," Kanamori said. "It's very difficult to change the rotation rate substantially."

Rain Man
12-29-2004, 12:05 PM
Whoa, that's amazing.

My worst fears are coming true. The entire earth is going to crash into the sun.

badgirl
12-29-2004, 12:05 PM
You beleive everything you read? I don't beleive it. :shake:

KingPriest2
12-29-2004, 12:06 PM
But you can't measure the magnitude of a natural disaster merely in "death tolls". There's MORE PEOPLE now...

Like I said before, we have no frame of reference as human beings. We've existed for a tiny fraction of the time that the planet has existed. Smaller still is the history we've actually RECORDED.

Within our frame of reference, this is definitely a HUGE event. But as a geologic event, it was a 9.0 on the Richter scale. That makes it currently the FIFTH strongest quake since *1950*. 3 of the top 5 occurred in Alaska/Kamchatka in the north Pacific, where there's little to no population.

The end of the world? Hardly.


YOu do have a point. Places are more populated now



This is a list since 1900 but after looking Hit was correct since 1950


Location Date UTC Magnitude Coordinates
1. Chile 1960 05 22 9.5 38.24 S 73.05 W
2. Prince William Sound, Alaska 1964 03 28 9.2 61.02 N 147.65 W
3. Andreanof Islands, Alaska 1957 03 09 9.1 51.56 N 175.39 W
4. Kamchatka 1952 11 04 9.0 52.76 N 160.06 E
5. Off the West Coast of Northern Sumatra 2004 12 26 9.0 3.30 N 95.78 E
6. Off the Coast of Ecuador 1906 01 31 8.8 1.0 N 81.5 W
7. Rat Islands, Alaska 1965 02 04 8.7 51.21 N 178.50 E
8. Assam - Tibet 1950 08 15 8.6 28.5 N 96.5 E
9. Kamchatka 1923 02 03 8.5 54.0 N 161.0 E
10. Banda Sea, Indonesia 1938 02 01 8.5 5.05 S 131.62 E
11. Kuril Islands 1963 10 13 8.5

badgirl
12-29-2004, 12:09 PM
WHAT THE HELL? I didn't think that would end. :banghead:

stumppy
12-29-2004, 12:12 PM
its also not including the ones who are missing, probably washed out to sea, its really unbeleivable, if I were single, I would volunteer and go over there to help. :(

Uh.....just wondering honey...uh....how long would you be gone? Ya know, if someone were to buy you a plane ticket. Just wondering ?

memyselfI
12-29-2004, 12:13 PM
Whoa, that's amazing.

My worst fears are coming true. The entire earth is going to crash into the sun.

Again, all things considered, this will go down in the history books as being a major catastrophic disaster.

htismaqe
12-29-2004, 12:13 PM
All I know is that yesterday there was an area that had a death toll of less than 4k and today it's over 40k....that was within a 24 hour period. We are less than a week since the event and the death toll is climbing by tens of thousands a day and that is not including areas that have not been reached yet due to lack of communications.

Again, my previous point did not include death toll numbers or $ cost. But merely the range of area and the size of the quake. I think when you combine ALL of of the eventual numbers you have a disaster that could make your list.

I already explained this. Taking into account solely the magnitude of the quake (9.0) it's FIFTH since 1950. This planet has been around for millions, if not billions of years. This quake, for humanity's sake, is one of the worst ever. But in terms of geologic events, it's a hangnail on the Earth.

You want to talk about range of area -- the comet that impacted off the coast of the Yucatan in pre-history likely created waves that were 200 feet high when they reached the coast of modern day SPAIN.

Geologic events in pre-history and ancient history wiped out civilizations. They wiped out entire SPECIES.

Like I said before - a catastrophic event, especially considering the loss of life. But the end of the world? It's survived THOUSANDS of events that were much, much worse.

badgirl
12-29-2004, 12:14 PM
Uh.....just wondering honey...uh....how long would you be gone? Ya know, if someone were to buy you a plane ticket. Just wondering ?
well I could be gone forever.....don't need no ticket.....just gas baby.... :p

Rain Man
12-29-2004, 12:15 PM
Uh.....just wondering honey...uh....how long would you be gone? Ya know, if someone were to buy you a plane ticket. Just wondering ?


Oddly, they're estimating that Sweden is one of the more hard-hit countries, with hundreds of missing tourists. Will you buy me a plane ticket to Scandinavia to go comfort the Swedes?

stumppy
12-29-2004, 12:16 PM
well I could be gone forever.....don't need no ticket.....just gas baby.... :p

:D

badgirl
12-29-2004, 12:16 PM
:D
Its not funny.....I do get paid today..
:)

stumppy
12-29-2004, 12:17 PM
Oddly, they're estimating that Sweden is one of the more hard-hit countries, with hundreds of missing tourists. Will you buy me a plane ticket to Scandinavia to go comfort the Swedes?

OMG, I hadn't heard. I'll buy two. Meet you at KCI Friday.:D

stumppy
12-29-2004, 12:18 PM
Its not funny.....I do get paid today..
:)

Oh pipe down Francis. After you get paid are you gonna buy a book on hurricanes ?

htismaqe
12-29-2004, 12:18 PM
http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml;jsessionid=IESG1YFI1NHI2CRBAELCFFA?type=scienceNews&storyID=7195443

Quake May Have Made Earth Wobble--US Scientists
Tue Dec 28, 2004 08:20 PM ET

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - The deadly Asian earthquake may have permanently accelerated the Earth's rotation -- shortening days by a fraction of a second -- and caused the planet to wobble on its axis, U.S. scientists said on Tuesday. Richard Gross, a geophysicist with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California, theorized that a shift of mass toward the Earth's center during the quake on Sunday caused the planet to spin 3 microseconds, or 3 millionths of a second, faster and to tilt about an inch on its axis.

When one huge tectonic plate beneath the Indian Ocean was forced below the edge of another "it had the effect of making the Earth more compact and spinning faster," Gross said.

Gross said changes predicted by his model probably are too minuscule to be detected by a global positioning satellite network that routinely measures changes in Earth's spin, but said the data may reveal a slight wobble.

The Earth's poles travel a circular path that normally varies by about 33 feet, so an added wobble of an inch is unlikely to cause long-term effects, he said.

"That continual motion is just used to changing," Gross said. "The rotation is not actually that precise. The Earth does slow down and change its rate of rotation."

When those tiny variations accumulate, planetary scientists must add a "leap second" to the end of a year, something that has not been done in many years, Gross said.

Scientists have long theorized that changes on the Earth's surface such as tide and groundwater shifts and weather could affect its spin but they have not had precise measurements to prove it, Caltech seismologist Hiroo Kanamori said.

"Even for a very large event, the effect is very small," Kanamori said. "It's very difficult to change the rotation rate substantially."

Way to selectively leave out the portion that is MOST IMPORTANT in the article, namely:

The Earth's poles travel a circular path that normally varies by about 33 feet, so an added wobble of an inch is unlikely to cause long-term effects, he said.

"That continual motion is just used to changing," Gross said. "The rotation is not actually that precise. The Earth does slow down and change its rate of rotation."


In other words, to the Earth, this quake is ANYTHING BUT catastrophic. It's a NORMAL occurence.

And again, I come back to PERSPECTIVE. We've been recording such events since about 1880. That's roughly 125 years out of a potential 2.5 billion in which such events have been occuring.

For someone who completely dismisses RW Christians, you have a surprisingly "humans are the center of the universe" point of view...

memyselfI
12-29-2004, 12:19 PM
I already explained this. Taking into account solely the magnitude of the quake (9.0) it's FIFTH since 1950. This planet has been around for millions, if not billions of years. This quake, for humanity's sake, is one of the worst ever. But in terms of geologic events, it's a hangnail on the Earth.

You want to talk about range of area -- the comet that impacted off the coast of the Yucatan in pre-history likely created waves that were 200 feet high when they reached the coast of modern day SPAIN.

Geologic events in pre-history and ancient history wiped out civilizations. They wiped out entire SPECIES.

Like I said before - a catastrophic event, especially considering the loss of life. But the end of the world? It's survived THOUSANDS of events that were much, much worse.

I'm not talking the range of the waves. I'm talking range of area in 12 countries impacted on two different hemispheres and two continents (IIRC).

Plus the fact that the actual quake seemed to impact the rotation of the earth that means it had a worldwide affect if even by milliseconds.

KingPriest2
12-29-2004, 12:19 PM
It seems like earthquakes are getting worse that they are occuring more and more


Number of Earthquakes Worldwide for 2000 - 2004
Located by the US Geological Survey National Earthquake Information Center



Magnitude 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

8.0 to 9.9 1 1 0 1 2
7.0 to 7.9 14 15 13 14 13
6.0 to 6.9 158 126 130 140 128
5.0 to 5.9 1345 1243 1218 1203 1180
4.0 to 4.9 8045 8084 8584 8462 10008
3.0 to 3.9 4784 6151 7005 7624 7093
2.0 to 2.9 3758 4162 6419 7727 6037
1.0 to 1.9 1026 944 1137 2506 1336
0.1 to 0.9 5 1 10 134 103
No Magnitude 3120 2938 2937 3608 3292

Total 22256 23534 27454 31419 *29189

Estimated
Deaths 231 21357 1685 33819 51848





Number of Earthquakes in the United States for 2000 - 2004
Located by the US Geological Survey National Earthquake Information Center

Magnitude 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

8.0 to 9.9 0 0 0 0 0
7.0 to 7.9 0 1 1 2 0
6.0 to 6.9 10 5 5 7 2
5.0 to 5.9 60 45 70 54 19
4.0 to 4.9 287 294 538 541 285
3.0 to 3.9 913 834 1525 1303 1324
2.0 to 2.9 657 646 1228 704 1288
1.0 to 1.9 0 2 2 2 1
0.1 to 0.9 0 0 0 0 0
No Magnitude 415 434 507 333 526

Total 2342 2261 3876 2946 *3445

Estimated
Deaths 0 0 0 2 0



Red values indicate the earthquakes occurred in Alaska.
Blue values indicate the earthquakes occurred in California.

* As of 26 December 2004



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Number of Earthquakes Worldwide for 1990 - 1999
Located by the US Geological Survey National Earthquake Information Center

Magnitude 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

8.0 to 9.9 0 0 0 0 2 2 1 0 1 0
7.0 to 7.9 18 16 13 12 11 18 14 16 11 18
6.0 to 6.9 109 96 166 137 146 183 149 120 117 116
5.0 to 5.9 1617 1457 1498 1426 1542 1318 1222 1113 979 1104
4.0 to 4.9 4437 4335 5128 4999 4518 8003 8756 7903 7303 6972
3.0 to 3.9 2517 2990 4692 4326 5041 5151 4923 4513 5945 5605
2.0 to 2.9 2364 2925 3066 5393 5371 3842 2391 2400 4091 4201
1.0 to 1.9 474 801 886 1170 779 645 295 388 805 715
0.1 to 0.9 0 1 3 9 17 19 1 4 10 5
No Magnitude 5054 3863 4072 3997 1944 1826 2186 3415 2426 2096

Total 16590 16484 19524 21476 19371 21007 19938 19872 21688 20832

Estimated
Deaths 52056 3210 3920 10096 1634 7980 589 3069 9430 22662





Number of Earthquakes in the United States for 1990 - 1999
Located by the US Geological Survey National Earthquake Information Center

Magnitude 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

8.0 to 9.9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
7.0 to 7.9 0 1+1 2 0 1 0 2 0 0 1+1
6.0 to 6.9 2 4 15 9 4 6 4 6 3 6
5.0 to 5.9 64 49 72 62 64 45 100 63 62 50
4.0 to 4.9 284 242 404 270 333 350 612 362 411 352
3.0 to 3.9 626 713 1717 1119 1543 1058 1060 1072 1053 1398
2.0 to 2.9 414 559 998 1009 1196 822 654 759 742 814
1.0 to 1.9 1 3 5 7 2 0 0 2 0 0
0.1 to 0.9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
No Magnitude 877 599 368 457 444 444 375 575 508 381

Total 2268 2171 3581 2933 3587 2725 2807 2839 2779 3003

Estimated
Deaths 0 2 3 2 60 1 0 0 0 0

badgirl
12-29-2004, 12:20 PM
Oh pipe down Francis. After you get paid are you gonna buy a book on hurricanes ?
no I'm going to buy a book on .....just forget it i'm not in the mood. :shake:

memyselfI
12-29-2004, 12:23 PM
Way to selectively leave out the portion that is MOST IMPORTANT in the article, namely:



In other words, to the Earth, this quake is ANYTHING BUT catastrophic. It's a NORMAL occurence.

And again, I come back to PERSPECTIVE. We've been recording such events since about 1880. That's roughly 125 years out of a potential 2.5 billion in which such events have been occuring.

For someone who completely dismisses RW Christians, you have a surprisingly "humans are the center of the universe" point of view...

Again, the earth rotation being impacted by itself is NOT catastrophic but when you add it to the other points I've mentioned this will go down as a large disaster.

Sheesh, it's been FOUR FREAKIN DAYS and we don't know the ultimate death toll or the ultimate impact to the population in the region.

I'm not sure how you can make your assertions when we are in the beginning stages of discerning the impact and the extent of the tragedy...

and you are making comparisions to events that we have had decades or centuries to discern the impact of those tragedies. :rolleyes:

And I do not believe humans are the center of the universe at all. If anything, I'm counting countries, regions, continents, earth rotation, etc. impacted and then death toll and destruction/reconstruction cost.

htismaqe
12-29-2004, 12:27 PM
I'm not talking the range of the waves. I'm talking range of area in 12 countries impacted on two different hemispheres and two continents (IIRC).

Plus the fact that the actual quake seemed to impact the rotation of the earth that means it had a worldwide affect if even by milliseconds.

The eruption of Krakatoa shortened growing seasons in more than 50 countries, and even turned summer to winter in much of South America.

There have been literally THOUSANDS of events with more worldwide impact than this one.

KingPriest2
12-29-2004, 12:28 PM
The eruption of Krakatoa shortened growing seasons in more than 50 countries, and even turned summer to winter in much of South America.

There have been literally THOUSANDS of events with more worldwide impact than this one.



since the beginning of time that is correct

stumppy
12-29-2004, 12:28 PM
no I'm going to buy a book on .....just forget it i'm not in the mood. :shake:

:Poke:

memyselfI
12-29-2004, 12:28 PM
The eruption of Krakatoa shortened growing seasons in more than 50 countries, and even turned summer to winter in much of South America.

There have been literally THOUSANDS of events with more worldwide impact than this one.


I guess we'll see. I hope you are right because I don't want to see a worsening disaster just to prove you wrong...

but I think four days in is WAY too early to be claiming some of your claims.

htismaqe
12-29-2004, 12:29 PM
It seems like earthquakes are getting worse that they are occuring more and more

Or maybe we have better instruments with better distribution worldwide...

htismaqe
12-29-2004, 12:31 PM
Again, the earth rotation being impacted by itself is NOT catastrophic but when you add it to the other points I've mentioned this will go down as a large disaster.

Sheesh, it's been FOUR FREAKIN DAYS and we don't know the ultimate death toll or the ultimate impact to the population in the region.

I'm not sure how you can make your assertions when we are in the beginning stages of discerning the impact and the extent of the tragedy...

and you are making comparisions to events that we have had decades or centuries to discern the impact of those tragedies. :rolleyes:

And I do not believe humans are the center of the universe at all. If anything, I'm counting countries, regions, continents, earth rotation, etc. impacted and then death toll and destruction/reconstruction cost.

I'm not saying this isn't a large disaster...the title of the thread asks "Is this the end of the world?"

This is a HUGE disaster for one reason alone -- loss of life. In terms of geologic significance, it's not at all that large.

memyselfI
12-29-2004, 12:32 PM
I'm not saying this isn't a large disaster...the title of the thread asks "Is this the end of the world?"

This is a HUGE disaster for one reason alone -- loss of life. In terms of geologic significance, it's not at all that large.

I don't think it's the end of the world, either. Thank you.

And as I posted before, I find 11/3/04 to be more an indication of possible world trouble, disaster, end than what happened on Sunday. One is a natural disaster and the other man made.

htismaqe
12-29-2004, 12:33 PM
I guess we'll see. I hope you are right because I don't want to see a worsening disaster just to prove you wrong...

but I think four days in is WAY too early to be claiming some of your claims.

It's now been four days, you're. The only thing that is going to go up is the death toll. Nothing I have claimed has anything to do with death toll.

htismaqe
12-29-2004, 12:35 PM
And as I posted before, I find 11/3/04 to be more an indication of possible world trouble than what happened on Sunday. One is a natural disaster and the other man made.

What's the significance of 11/3? I must have missed something.

However, I strongly agree that man made phenomena, particularly nuclear weapons, represent a far greater risk than any natural disaster.

Cochise
12-29-2004, 12:36 PM
The eruption of Krakatoa shortened growing seasons in more than 50 countries, and even turned summer to winter in much of South America.

There have been literally THOUSANDS of events with more worldwide impact than this one.

You have to think of the bubonic plague as having more impact than this one as well. It's hard to know how many people really died but over what, 5-10 years, a third of europe's population died. 60,000 or 100,000 people is a drop in the bucket compared to what that number would be extrapolated to today's world population.

And the plague kept breaking out again every spring when the fleas came out. It wasn't really gone for like a hundred years. So you hear that it killed 25 million people in 5 years but that doesn't even begin to tell the story.

KingPriest2
12-29-2004, 12:40 PM
Or maybe we have better instruments with better distribution worldwide...


That is correct but they are also occuring more often.

ptlyon
12-29-2004, 12:46 PM
You want to talk about range of area -- the comet that impacted off the coast of the Yucatan in pre-history likely created waves that were 200 feet high when they reached the coast of modern day SPAIN.


Whoa! Hang 10 Dude!

htismaqe
12-29-2004, 12:46 PM
That is correct but they are also occuring more often.

No, they are NOT.

They are increasing in frequency since about 1880. They are NOT occuring more often than they were during several periods in ancient history (ie. 50-75 AD)

KingPriest2
12-29-2004, 12:48 PM
No, they are NOT.

They are increasing in frequency since about 1880. They are NOT occuring more often than they were during several periods in ancient history (ie. 50-75 AD)


Yes they are. They are occuring more often in the CURRENT TIMES.


Do you know what cycles are?

htismaqe
12-29-2004, 01:13 PM
Yes they are. They are occuring more often in the CURRENT TIMES.


Do you know what cycles are?

Yep.

Do you know what relative magnitude is?

htismaqe
12-29-2004, 01:32 PM
Actually, I'm glad you brought up "cycles" because planetary cycles are actually the point of my argument.

The human race has lived through cycles MUCH worse than this one, including the last ice age. That's what I mean by relative magnitude -- there's hardly a comparison between the last 50 years and the ice age...

badgirl
12-29-2004, 01:44 PM
man, I just saw on the news where it hit this one beach and it showed an arieal view and there were hundreds of people just all over the beachfront,left laying after the tide when back in. Man this is just so terrible, if I won the lotto, I would send money to help. :( :shake:

Cochise
12-29-2004, 01:47 PM
man, I just saw on the news where it hit this one beach and it showed an arieal view and there were hundreds of people just all over the beachfront,left laying after the tide when back in. Man this is just so terrible, if I won the lotto, I would send money to help. :( :shake:

A wise person once said that a small contribution is greater than a big one you wish you could make but can't.

badgirl
12-29-2004, 01:52 PM
A wise person once said that a small contribution is greater than a big one you wish you could make but can't.
That wise person probably wasn't broke, but I could probably swing a few bucks. I don't do the feed the children kinda thing though I want to know every dime will be spend to help and in this situtation I know it will be. :thumb:

Iowanian
12-29-2004, 01:58 PM
Compared to the Geologic history of earth, and formation of the currenlt geographic distribution of the continents and techtonic plates.............this was but a Minor Burp compared to what the Earth is capable of doing.

Beach front property, high populations, 3rd world countries, a few feet above sea level...........Its only a matter of time.

I have the same arguement for those harping on Global warming.......Its cyclical. Thats why there have been periods where Iowa was under oceans, and under Glaciers...........Its why Canyons have formed, rivers moved, jungles turned to desert. There wouldn't be oil in the ME if long ago, it weren't a dense swampy Jungle.

Calcountry
12-29-2004, 02:04 PM
I guess we'll see. I hope you are right because I don't want to see a worsening disaster just to prove you wrong...

but I think four days in is WAY too early to be claiming some of your claims.
You could have fooled me. It seems to me that the left wingers are trying to spin this as though the US is being stingy.

Blame it on Bush, he is in touch with God and should have prayed this thing away from happening.

:rolleyes:

htismaqe
12-29-2004, 02:16 PM
Compared to the Geologic history of earth, and formation of the currenlt geographic distribution of the continents and techtonic plates.............this was but a Minor Burp compared to what the Earth is capable of doing.

Beach front property, high populations, 3rd world countries, a few feet above sea level...........Its only a matter of time.

I have the same arguement for those harping on Global warming.......Its cyclical. Thats why there have been periods where Iowa was under oceans, and under Glaciers...........Its why Canyons have formed, rivers moved, jungles turned to desert. There wouldn't be oil in the ME if long ago, it weren't a dense swampy Jungle.

Bingo.

Iowanian
12-29-2004, 02:23 PM
Its only a matter of time before a major volcanic/techtonic even arrives and makes this look like Popping a pimple in comparison.

Major Longterm volcanic events cause damage to the physical environment around it(Mt St Helens was powerful and impressive, but Minor compared to some others).......earthquakes near Major citys coult accompany them, while the longterm dispersion of gas, ash and magma flow can change the climate for an entire region.


This was a tragic event, but it could have been much worse.........Imagine the same thing, only that Seismic event is shallow(geologically) and under a huge Urban sprawl. Destruction on land PLUS Tsunamis.

This isn't the end of the world..........When GOD decides that its time to Punt..........We'll have no doubt.

htismaqe
12-29-2004, 05:27 PM
Its only a matter of time before a major volcanic/techtonic even arrives and makes this look like Popping a pimple in comparison.

Major Longterm volcanic events cause damage to the physical environment around it(Mt St Helens was powerful and impressive, but Minor compared to some others).......earthquakes near Major citys coult accompany them, while the longterm dispersion of gas, ash and magma flow can change the climate for an entire region.


This was a tragic event, but it could have been much worse.........Imagine the same thing, only that Seismic event is shallow(geologically) and under a huge Urban sprawl. Destruction on land PLUS Tsunamis.

This isn't the end of the world..........When GOD decides that its time to Punt..........We'll have no doubt.

Exactly. This could have happened 50 miles off the coast of Japan, sending 500-foot waves into the heart of Tokyo...

Ultra Peanut
12-29-2004, 05:46 PM
Exactly. This could have happened 50 miles off the coast of Japan, sending 500-foot waves into the heart of Tokyo...Aw, you're just bitter over Pearl Harbor.

Bowser
12-29-2004, 05:49 PM
The Mayans said the end of the world won't come until December 23, 2012. I don't really believe it, but if these types of events start increasing closer to that date, I'll start to worry a little more. I guess.

Ultra Peanut
12-29-2004, 05:52 PM
The Mayans said the end of the world won't come until December 23, 2012. I don't really believe it, but if these types of events start increasing closer to that date, I'll start to worry a little more. I guess.Actually, I think that's just when their calender ends. They got that far, and then they were all like, "Screw it. We won't be around then, anyways. Let's go play Super Mayano Bros. 3."

htismaqe
12-29-2004, 05:59 PM
Actually, I think that's just when their calender ends. They got that far, and then they were all like, "Screw it. We won't be around then, anyways. Let's go play Super Mayano Bros. 3."

Actually, you're both kinda right.

The Mayan calendar for the CURRENT AGE ends in December of 2012. However, they didn't believe it's the end of the world, so much as the beginning of a new age.

Bowser
12-29-2004, 06:06 PM
Actually, you're both kinda right.

The Mayan calendar for the CURRENT AGE ends in December of 2012. However, they didn't believe it's the end of the world, so much as the beginning of a new age.

If catastrophies keep picking up, it's going to be one hell of a new age.

Fairplay
12-29-2004, 06:20 PM
Its the end of the world !!!!!!!!!!!!


http://www.funnyjunk.com/pages/world.htm

chiefs4me
12-29-2004, 07:10 PM
Its the end of the world !!!!!!!!!!!!


http://www.funnyjunk.com/pages/world.htm



it better not be,,I still have pies to bake ROFL