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KingPriest2
12-29-2004, 12:35 PM
Updated/

The worst Natural Disasters ever
by Piero Scaruffi
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Air Crashes | Back to world news | Back to history
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Athens, 430 B.C.: Typhus epidemic
Pompei, 79: Volcanic eruption
Costantinopole, 542: Bubonic plague
Japan, 1181: famine (100,000 dead)
Holland, 1228: sea flood (100,000 dead)
Europe and Asia, 1346-52: Bubonic plague or "black death" (one third of the European population dead plus millions in Asia and North Africa for a total of 25 million)
Shensi, Iraly, 1556: earthquake (800,000 dead)
Napoli, Italy, 1631: Mt Vesuvius erupts (3,000 dead)
Havana, 1648: Yellow fever epidemic
Sevilla, Spain, 1649: Plague (80,000 dead)
Turkey, 1668: earthquake (8,000 dead)
Lisbon, 1755: earthquake and tsunami (30,000 dead)
Bengal (India), 1769: famine (ten million dead)
Northamerica, 1775-82: Smallpox (130,000 dead)
Iran, 1780: earthquake (200,000 dead)
Philadelphia, 1793: Yellow fever epidemic (5,000 dead)
Cairo, 1831: Cholera epidemic, which spreads to London
London and Paris, 1832: Cholera epidemic (25,000 dead)
Ireland, 1845: famine (one million dead)
Mapoli, Italy, 1857: earthquake (11,000 dead)
France, 1870-71: Smallpox (500,000 dead)
Indonesia, 1883: Tsunami (36,000 dead)
Mino-owari, Japan, 1891: earthquake (7,000 dead)
Japan, 1896: Tsunami (27,000 dead)
India, 1897: earthquake (1,500 dead)
Galveston, 1900: Hurricane (8000 dead)
San Francisco, 1906: earthquake and fire (3,000 dead)
Colombia, 1906: earthquake (1,000 dead)
Chile, 1906: earthquake (20,000 dead)
Messina, Italy, 1908: 7.5 earthquake (70,000 dead)
Mexico City, 1911: earthquake
Worldwide, 1918: Influenza pandemic (25-100 million dead)
Gansu, China, 1920: 8.6 earthquake (200,000 dead)
Yokohama, Japan, 1923: 8.3 earthquake (143,000 dead)
Nanshan, China, 1927: 8.3 earthquake (200,000 dead)
Florida, USA, 1928: Hurricane (1800 dead)
Gansu, China, 1932: 7.6 earthquake (70,000 dead)
Sanriku, Japan, 1933: 8.4 earthquake (3,000 dead)
Bihar, India, 1934: 8.1 earthquake (10,700 dead)
Quetta, Pakistan, 1935: 7.5 earthquake (30,000 dead)
New York, USA, 1938: Rains (600 dead)
Erzincan, Turkey, 1939: 7.8 earthquake (33,000 dead)
Tonankai, Japan, 1944: 8.1 earthquake (1,200 dead)
Nankaido, Japan, 1946: earthquake (1,330 dead)
Ashgabat, Turkmenistan, 1948: earthquake (100,000 dead)
Assam, India, 1950: earthquake (1,526 dead)
Holland, 1953: Sea flood (1,794 dead)
Iran, 1953: Rain flood (10,000 dead)
Louisiana, USA, 1957: Hurricane (400 dead)
Worldwide, 1957: Influenza pandemic (more than one million dead)
China, 1960: Famine (20 million dead)
Morocco, 1960: earthquake (10,000 dead)
Chile, 1960: 9.5 earthquake (5,700 dead)
Mt Huascaran, Peru, 1962: Volcano eruption (3,000)
North Peru, 1970: 7.8 earthquake (66,000 dead)
Bangladesh, 1970: Sea flood (200,000 dead)
Vietnam, 1971: Red River flood (100,000 dead)
Nicaragua, 1972: earthquake flood (10,000 dead)
Bangladesh, 1974: floods (28,000 dead)
Ethiopia, 1974: famine (200,000 dead)
Haicheng, China, 1975: 7.0 earthquake (10,000 dead)
Tangshan, China, 1976: 8.0 earthquake (255,000 dead)
Guatemala, 1976: earthquake (23,000 dead)
Andhra Pradesh, India, 1977: cyclone (10,000 dead)
Mexico, 1982: volcanic eruption (1,800 dead)
Yemen, 1982: earthquake (3,000 dead)
Bhopal, India, 1984: Chemical pollution (3,800 dead)
Ethiopia, 1984: Famine (900,000 dead)
Ciudad de Mexico, 1985: 8.1 earthquake (9,500 dead)
Armenia, 1988: earthquake (55,000 dead)
Bangladesh, 1988: Monsoon flood (1,300 dead)
Gilan and Zanjan, Iran, 1990: 7.7 earthquake (35,000 dead)
Bangladesh, 1991: tsunami (138,000 dead)
ANYONE REMEMBER THIS?
Latur, India, 1993: earthquake (22,000 dead)
Kobe, Japan, 1995: earthquake (5,500 dead)
North Korea, 1995-98: Famine and floods (3.5 million dead)
SOMEONE MENTIONED N. KOREA EARLIER
West Africa, 1996: meningitis outbreak (25,000 dead)
Tashkent, Uzbekistan, 1996: earthquake (??,000 dead)
Papua New Guinea, 1998: Tsunami (2,200 dead)
Yangtze Kiang, China, 1998: flooding (3,600 dead)
Central America, 1998: Hurricane Mitch and floods (12,000 dead)
Colombia, 1999: earthquake (1,185 dead)
Turkey, 1999: earthquake (17,000 dead)
Taiwan, 1999: 7.6 earthquake (2,400 dead)
Orissa, India, 1999: Cyclone (7,600 dead)
Venezuela, 1999: Floods (20,000 dead)
Gujarat, India, 2001: earthquake (20,000 dead)
El Salvador, 2001: earthquake (850 dead)
Afghanistan, 2002: earthquake (2,500 dead)
Algeria, 2003: earthquake (2,266 dead)
Andhra Pradesh, India, 2003: Heat wave (1,300 dead)
France, 2003: Heat wave (15,000 dead)
Bam, Iran, 2003: earthquake (41,000 dead)
Al-Hoceima, Morocco, 2004: earthquake (571 dead)
Haiti and Dominican Republic, 2004: rains (2,400 dead)
Philippines, 2004: typhoon (1,000 dead)
Southeast Asia, 2004: tsunamis caused by 9.0 earthquake (27,000 dead in Indonesia, 19,000 in Sri Lanka, 10,000 in India, 2,000 in Thailand, 51 in Malaysia, 43 in the Maldives, 20 in Myanmar, 100 in Somalia)
Distasters related to the Energy industry:
Hydro (dams)

It seems that Asia gets hit hard. China, Japan and Bangledesh.

Garcia Bronco
12-29-2004, 12:39 PM
"Europe and Asia, 1346-52: Bubonic plague or "black death" (one third of the European population dead plus millions in Asia and North Africa for a total of 25 million) "

How is this not the worst?!

KingPriest2
12-29-2004, 12:42 PM
"Europe and Asia, 1346-52: Bubonic plague or "black death" (one third of the European population dead plus millions in Asia and North Africa for a total of 25 million) "

How is this not the worst?!


It is.

Dr. Facebook Fever
12-29-2004, 12:42 PM
The great collapse of the 2004 Kansas City Chiefs was a doozey.

KingPriest2
12-29-2004, 12:44 PM
The world's worst natural disasters


When man meets nature in force, nature wins

By David McCormick, January 13, 2000

For all our technology, humanity has yet to conquer the most powerful force on Earth - nature. Extreme weather and natural disasters continue to strike with little warning, wreaking havoc on the lives of millions around the globe. Here are some the most notable and deadly natural disasters humankind has ever seen.

Swirling and spiraling - the worst cyclones and hurricanes...



Flooding in Bangladesh has killed more people than any other natural disaster

One of the poorest and most densely populated nations in the world, Bangladesh is periodically pounded by vicious cyclones that sweep up the Bay of Bengal, unleashing terrible flooding and resulting in tremendous loss of life. In 1970, a cyclone and the resulting floods killed 500,000 people, making it the worst natural disaster of the 20th Century. Packing winds of up to 230 km/h, the cyclone slammed into the heavily populated coastal area, where several river deltas provide fertile land. The strong winds produce massive waves, which deluged entire villages. Millions of people were left homeless.

"The Great Hurricane" that hit the Caribbean in October 1780 is the most deadly Western Hemisphere hurricane on record. It killed 22,000 people on the islands of Martinique, St. Eustatius, and Barbados.

The devastation left by the second-deadliest Western Hemisphere storm may still be fresh in your mind - Hurricane Mitch laid waste to Honduras and Nicaragua in November 1998. It's estimated Mitch killed at least 10,000 people, while leaving two million homeless. Mudslides caused my torrential rains may have buried thousands of more people. Months after, disease and famine were still rampant in the storm's aftermath, as Honduras and Nicaragua struggled to pick up the pieces.

The most costly hurricane in U.S. history was Andrew. The storm ripped through Florida and Louisiana in 1992 causing $27 billion worth of damage. It killed 58 people.


Twisting and turning - the world's worst tornadoes...




Click on the image for RealVideo of a tornado

On March 25th, 1925, a single tornado tore through three states in the U.S. midwest, lasting a record three-and-a-half hours. Starting in Missouri, the twister followed a course along a ridge through Illinois and into Indiana. The tornado reached its peak in Illinois, where it ravaged the town of Gorham, killing or injuring half the residents. It then barrelled through a number of other small towns, leaving a total of 689 dead and 1,980 injured. It finally broke up outside Princeton, Indiana.

The deadliest tornado in history ripped through Bangladesh on April 26, 1989. Thirteen hundred people died and as many as 50,000 were left homeless.

The skies opened up and rivers swelled...

The worst flood in history happened in China in 1887. The Yellow River overflowed its banks, leading to the deaths of 900,000 people.

In 1991, China suffered another massive flood. Most of the country was pelted with exceptionally heavy rains. At one point, 40 centimetres fell in two days. Flooding was rampant. The worst of the flooding occurred when Tai Hu, a lake at the mouth of the Yangtze River, engulfed an important industrial and agricultural region. The economic loss was devastating, and the human toll was costly - over 2,000 people died. In one province, a million homes were swept away. Overall, the flood affected the lives of 220 million people.


Hot and cold...



In 1993, a blizzard blasted North America, from Florida to Nova Scotia

The deadliest drought in history occurred in China between 1876 and 1879. Rivers dried up, crops and livestock died. The drought led to the deaths of nine million people.

In the midst of the Depression, the American and Canadian midwest suffered through an eight-year drought that ruined once-fertile soil, kicked up tremendous dust storms and caused thousands of deaths. The lack of rain left vast amounts of farmland bone dry. The dry topsoil was swept up by the wind, creating massive dark clouds of dust that turned day into night. People died of starvation and lung diseases caused by breathing in the dust-laden air, while hordes of farmers were left bankrupt. Three hundred and fifty thousand people fled the region, their livelihood swept away in the worst drought in North American history.

In the early-1980s, while Westerners shopped in well-stocked grocery stores, millions faced starvation in Africa because of severe drought. No rain fell, rivers and lakes dried up and agriculture was impossible in twenty African nations between 1981 and 1984. The situation was particularly grim in Ethiopia, where a civil war ravaged the country, leaving hunger-stricken civilians to fend for themselves. At the height of the famine, it's estimated that 20,000 children were starving to death each month. In 1984, an estimated 150 million people faced starvation. The situation was brought to the world's attention by a BBC news crew, after which support and donations began to roll in. Unfortunately, it was too late for the hundreds of thousands who had already died.

Forest fires are common in southern Australia - around 15,000 burn each year. But in 1983, the summer was particularly hot and dry. On many days, temperatures reached 40 degrees Celsius. The brutal heat and lack of rain sparked one the worst forest fires in recent times. The fire spread rapidly, ripping through the bush at 160 kilometres per hour, and changed direction without warning. When the fires were finally extinguished, farmers were ruined, 8,500 people were homeless and 71 people were dead.

In 1871, after a period of drought, a massive forest fire spread over 1,036 square kilometres of Wisconsin. Nine towns were destroyed and 1,500 people were killed.

"The Storm of the Century" that blasted the eastern United States and Canada in 1993 was unprecedented in size and scale. The collision of a huge mass of Arctic air with warm air from the Gulf of Mexico unleashed a massive snowfall from Florida to Nova Scotia, along with strong, bitter winds, and freezing temperatures. The blizzard paralyzed the eastern U.S., shutting down every major airport, something that had never happened before. The heavy snowfalls caused rooves to collapse and powerlines to fall. The powerful winds battered the coast, sweeping some homes into the sea. When it was finally over the storm had caused $3 billion in damage and 243 people were dead.

In December 1999, unseasonably cold, rainy weather, courtesy of La Nina, brought Venezuela one of the worst floods South America has experienced this century. Ten days of torrential rains triggered deadly flash floods and massive mudslides in Venezuela's northern states, where 75 percent of the country's population live. Thousands of homes were swept away and washed-roads hampered rescue efforts drastically. The death toll has been estimated as high as 10,000 or more, and 150,000 are estimated to be homeless.





Click on the image for RealVideo of a spewing volcano

Earth's fury - volcanoes

On April 10, 1815, Mount Tambora on Sumbawa Island, Indonesia erupted with massive force. Fifty cubic kilometres of magma flew from its peak and a blanket of ash as thick as one centimetre fell over more than 500,000 square kilometres of Indonesia and the Java Sea. The eruption destroyed Tambora's peak and formed a crater six by seven kilometres wide. The eruption and resulting tsunamis killed 10,000 people. The agricultural loss, famine and disease brought about by the thick ash deposits caused the deaths of 82,000 more.

Indonesia was rocked again in 1883. On August 26, Krakatoa, a small volcano on an uninhabited island between Sumatra and Java, blew its top. The eruption produced an ash cloud 80 kilometres high and was heard in Australia - 4,800 kilometres away. The eruption also unleashed a tsunami, which pounded the shores of Java and Sumatra -- 36,000 people were killed.

In 1902, St. Pierre was a thriving community and the largest town on the French colony of Martinique in the Caribbean Sea. Mont Pelee cast a shadow over the town from where it stood, eight kilometres to the north. The townspeople were used to the small rumblings of the mountain, but in May, 1902 Pelee started to get really cranky. Clouds of steam and ash poured from the volcano and on May 8, Pelee erupted. Superheated gas and steaming volcanic ash spewed out, pouring down the mountain with tremendous speed. Within seconds, the deadly gas cloud had destroyed the town of St. Pierre and incinerated everyone in it -- except for one prisoner in a basement cell. It was the worst volcano disaster of the 20th century.


The Earth shook beneath their feet...



The San Francisco earthquake of 1906 destroyed most of the city. It is the most devestating earthquake in American history. (Photo from U.S. National Archives, University of Nebraska)

The deadliest earthquake in history hit the eastern Mediterranean in July 1201. Approximately 1.1 million people were killed, mostly in Egypt and Syria. This earthquake claimed the most lives of any other natural disaster in recorded history.

The second deadliest quake struck the Chinese province of Shansi on February 2, 1556. It killed 830,000 people.

The most devastating earthquake in modern times hit northeast China in 1976. On July 28, a massive quake, measuring 8.3 on the Richter scale, rocked the industrial mining city of Tangshan, almost destroying it completely. A total of 240,000 people died, while another 164,000 were severely injured. Ninety per cent of the buildings were destroyed. It took ten years and massive investment to rebuild the city from the ruins.

In 1988, an earthquake measuring 6.9 on the Richter scale devastated Armenia, then a republic of the Soviet Union. The town of Spitak was virtually destroyed and all of its residents killed. In Leninakan, Armenia's second largest city, eighty per cent of the buildings collapsed, and over 100,000 people perished.

Perhaps one of the most famous -- and deadliest -- earthquakes to strike the United States was the San Francisco earthquake of 1906. Estimated at 8.3 on the Richter scale, the earthquake sparked fires that burned uncontrollably for three days, burning down two thirds of the city and completely wiping out the downtown business district. Tens of thousands of people lost their homes and fled the city and an estimated 3000 people died.

Garcia Bronco
12-29-2004, 12:45 PM
It is.

I see it's listed by time.....ntice how the crap started about every year since the 20's.....what happened in the 20's?

memyselfI
12-29-2004, 12:45 PM
The great collapse of the 2004 Kansas City Chiefs was a doozey.

but hardly unprecedented. :hmmm:

R&GHomer
12-29-2004, 12:50 PM
WOW.... I didn't realize God was so busy.

Stinger
12-29-2004, 12:52 PM
The great collapse of the 2004 Kansas City Chiefs was a doozey.

:hmmm: I was thinking more on the lines of Lin Elliot

ptlyon
12-29-2004, 12:53 PM
:hmmm: I was thinking more on the lines of Lin Elliot

Now that was a disaster!

ChiefsFire
12-29-2004, 12:56 PM
wow 15000 in 2003 from heat wave in france????


geez buy some a/cs

Rain Man
12-29-2004, 12:56 PM
"Europe and Asia, 1346-52: Bubonic plague or "black death" (one third of the European population dead plus millions in Asia and North Africa for a total of 25 million) "

How is this not the worst?!

I was thinking that it was even bigger, and according to this site, that was only the deaths in a five-year period. http://www.byu.edu/ipt/projects/middleages/LifeTimes/Plague.html I think there were other outbreaks afterward for many years.

Check out the influenze pandemic of 1918. It took out a smaller proportion of the population, but that's a lot of people.

I remember reading that Europeans got a lot bigger after the Plague. Pre-plague, the population was outstripping agricultural technology and capacity, so people were getting less food in general and particularly less meat. After the plague years, there was more food for everybody, and particularly more meat, so people got bigger. I always thought that was kind of interesting.

The Pedestrian
12-29-2004, 01:14 PM
WOW.... I didn't realize God was so busy.

He has to control the population until we figure out a way to make our own resources...or maybe he just has a really morbid sense of humor. :p

Cochise
12-29-2004, 01:25 PM
You can see in the original post, whenever one of these tsunamis happens in that part of the world this is the result, tens of thousands dead. This one just seems to be the first since the 24-7 media age.

Hopefully those countries will shell out the 5-7 million they were saying it would take to build the early warning system in the indian ocean on the news. The countries together only saved like a hundred bucks per person dead by not building it.

Demonpenz
12-29-2004, 01:30 PM
wow 15000 in 2003 from heat wave in france????


geez buy some a/cs


the temp there ususally doesn't go over 80, and they usually leave their elderly by themselves and go on vacation. When they came back most of the people dead were the elderly.

JimNasium
12-29-2004, 01:37 PM
I'll bet the dinosaurs are pissed that they didn't make the list.

Demonpenz
12-29-2004, 01:38 PM
where's the platte flood of 73?

htismaqe
12-29-2004, 01:44 PM
You can see in the original post, whenever one of these tsunamis happens in that part of the world this is the result, tens of thousands dead. This one just seems to be the first since the 24-7 media age.

Hopefully those countries will shell out the 5-7 million they were saying it would take to build the early warning system in the indian ocean on the news. The countries together only saved like a hundred bucks per person dead by not building it.

Wow, finally somebody else cuts through the panic BS and sees the truth...

Cochise
12-29-2004, 01:51 PM
Wow, finally somebody else cuts through the panic BS and sees the truth...

Hey, I donated some money to a fund last night. (I was kind of tenative, not wanting to just donate to be doing it and end up with some crooks like the United Way spending the money) I'm all for helping people and using military transports to help deliver stuff to them and everything.

But as usual the media is being sensational. Look at the tsunamis on the list. there was one in 1991, barely more than 10 years ago, with about as many or more dead. I dont remember hearing a thing about that. You barely heard anything about the Bam quake just last year except for the couple days around when it happened.

This is a unique sort of disaster to the western world, one that hasn't struck on a large scale since the cable news age, that's why its getting so much attention.


Lisbon, 1755: earthquake and tsunami (30,000 dead)
Indonesia, 1883: Tsunami (36,000 dead)
Japan, 1896: Tsunami (27,000 dead)
Bangladesh, 1991: tsunami (138,000 dead)
Papua New Guinea, 1998: Tsunami (2,200 dead)
Yangtze Kiang, China, 1998: flooding (3,600 dead)
Central America, 1998: Hurricane Mitch and floods (12,000 dead)
Colombia, 1999: earthquake (1,185 dead)
Turkey, 1999: earthquake (17,000 dead)
Taiwan, 1999: 7.6 earthquake (2,400 dead)
Orissa, India, 1999: Cyclone (7,600 dead)
Venezuela, 1999: Floods (20,000 dead)
Gujarat, India, 2001: earthquake (20,000 dead)
El Salvador, 2001: earthquake (850 dead)
Afghanistan, 2002: earthquake (2,500 dead)
Algeria, 2003: earthquake (2,266 dead)
Andhra Pradesh, India, 2003: Heat wave (1,300 dead)
France, 2003: Heat wave (15,000 dead)
Bam, Iran, 2003: earthquake (41,000 dead)
Al-Hoceima, Morocco, 2004: earthquake (571 dead)
Haiti and Dominican Republic, 2004: rains (2,400 dead)
Philippines, 2004: typhoon (1,000 dead)
Southeast Asia, 2004: tsunami (?)

htismaqe
12-29-2004, 02:13 PM
Hey, I donated some money to a fund last night. (I was kind of tenative, not wanting to just donate to be doing it and end up with some crooks like the United Way spending the money) I'm all for helping people and using military transports to help deliver stuff to them and everything.

But as usual the media is being sensational. Look at the tsunamis on the list. there was one in 1991, barely more than 10 years ago, with about as many or more dead. I dont remember hearing a thing about that. You barely heard anything about the Bam quake just last year except for the couple days around when it happened.

This is a unique sort of disaster to the western world, one that hasn't struck on a large scale since the cable news age, that's why its getting so much attention.

:bravo:

We agree 100%.

Pants
12-29-2004, 02:18 PM
Well, 100,000 people dead is news worthy, IMO. I don't see anything wrong with the news covering it as it is. The fact that you wouldn't hear about a similar event 10 years ago, doesn't make it wrong what the media is doing now. Think about it, 100K dead. 9/11 was 5K and it was huge, this is 100K. During Christmas time, when everybody was vacationing there.

htismaqe
12-29-2004, 02:30 PM
Well, 100,000 people dead is news worthy, IMO. I don't see anything wrong with the news covering it as it is. The fact that you wouldn't hear about a similar event 10 years ago, doesn't make it wrong what the media is doing now. Think about it, 100K dead. 9/11 was 5K and it was huge, this is 100K. During Christmas time, when everybody was vacationing there.

Nobody said what the news media is doing is wrong.

What's wrong is this idea that this event, along with many others, are somehow ushering in the end of the Earth.

And there's no comparison, from a news standpoint, between a tidal wave and being attacked by commerical airliners...

Pants
12-29-2004, 02:37 PM
Nobody said what the news media is doing is wrong.

What's wrong is this idea that this event, along with many others, are somehow ushering in the end of the Earth.

And there's no comparison, from a news standpoint, between a tidal wave and being attacked by commerical airliners...

I was just arguing that it wasn't sensationalism what the media is doing, the retards who think this is the end of the world, well, that's their porblem.

LiL stumppy
12-29-2004, 04:45 PM
"Europe and Asia, 1346-52: Bubonic plague or "black death" (one third of the European population dead plus millions in Asia and North Africa for a total of 25 million) "

How is this not the worst?!


Really

jcroft
12-29-2004, 04:48 PM
I see it's listed by time.....ntice how the crap started about every year since the 20's.....what happened in the 20's?

My guess: people started recording "the crap."

Braincase
12-29-2004, 05:24 PM
what happened in the 20's?

Colorado legislature had a roll-call vote to allow indoor plumbing in Denver. Vote failed, and they still can't get the smell out.

Dave Lane
12-29-2004, 06:10 PM
Here is the actual winner...

The Permo-Triassic extinction

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The Permian period was between 290 Ma and 250 Ma.
At that time the land was in one mass called a supercontinent. This supercontinent was PANGEA.
95% of all marine life on earth was killed.
70% of all land animals became extinct.

Asteroid did it.

Dave