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Ari Chi3fs
01-15-2005, 05:14 AM
http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/home/index.cfm

NASA Salutes Successful Huygens Probe
January 14, 2005
(Source: Jet Propulsion Laboratory) http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/moons/images/IMG001301-th200.jpg (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/image-details.cfm?imageID=1301) Huygens at Titan 1
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NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe today offered congratulations to the European Space Agency (ESA) on the successful touchdown of its Huygens probe on Saturn's moon Titan.

"The descent through Titan's atmosphere and down to its surface appeared to be perfect," Administrator O'Keefe said. "We congratulate ESA for their spectacular success. We're very proud of the Cassini-Huygens teams that helped to make this both an engineering and scientific victory, and we appreciate the dedication and support from our international partners."

http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/moons/images/IMG001299-th200.jpg (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/image-details.cfm?imageID=1299) Huygens at Titan 2
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The probe entered Titan's upper atmosphere at about 5:15 a.m. EST Jan. 14. During its two and one-half hour descent to the surface of the moon, it sampled the chemical composition of the atmosphere. The probe continued transmitting data for more than 90 minutes after reaching the surface.

The data was sent to NASA's Cassini spacecraft, and was recorded and relayed through NASA's Deep Space Network to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., and to ESA's Space Operations Center in Darmstadt, Germany. The European Space Agency facility is the operations center for the Huygens probe mission. Data was received over one of two channels designed to be mostly redundant.

http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/moons/images/IMG001300-th200.jpg (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/image-details.cfm?imageID=1300) Huygens at Titan 3
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JPL Director Dr. Charles Elachi said, "We congratulate our colleagues at ESA on the splendid performance of the Huygens probe and look forward to the science results of this effort. This has been a great example of international collaboration to explore our solar system."

Cassini-Huygens is a joint mission of NASA, ESA and the Italian Space Agency. ESA's Huygens probe was carried to Saturn's orbit aboard Cassini, and sent on its way to Titan on Dec. 24, 2004. Cassini continues to orbit Saturn on a four-year prime mission to study the planet, its rings, moons and magnetosphere.

"Our ESA colleagues have every reason to be very proud of the excellent manner in which the Huygens probe performed," said Robert T. Mitchell, Cassini program manager at JPL. "We are also proud of our support for this endeavor," he said.

JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. JPL designed, developed and assembled the Cassini orbiter. ESA built and managed the development of the Huygens probe and is in charge of the probe operations. ISA provided the high-gain antenna, much of the radio system and elements of several of Cassini's science instruments.

More information about the Cassini-Huygens mission is available on the Web, at: http://www.nasa.gov/cassini (http://www.nasa.gov/cassini) and http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/) .

Ari Chi3fs
01-15-2005, 05:19 AM
there is a show coming on Time Warner Cable's Dicovery Science Channel #223 in the next day or so about this expedition.

http://science.discovery.com/schedule/series.jsp?series=112156&gid=0&channel=SCI

Lzen
01-15-2005, 06:38 AM
there is a show coming on Time Warner Cable's Dicovery Science Channel #223 in the next day or so about this expedition.

http://science.discovery.com/schedule/series.jsp?series=112156&gid=0&channel=SCI

Damn, I only get the Discovery and Discovery Health channels.

Ultra Peanut
01-15-2005, 06:56 AM
It's ****ing amazing to think of how there's now a sign of human existence, just sitting there on a strange, strange rock so far away. The journey it made is pretty friggin' amazing, too. They had to hit a moon that was traveling around a planet that was traveling around the sun, seven years after launch.

headsnap
01-15-2005, 06:58 AM
that's no fair, they don't have to worry about metric conversions!!!:cuss:





:)

Ultra Peanut
01-15-2005, 07:00 AM
ROFL

Herzig
01-15-2005, 08:04 AM
Here's the first color image from Titan. This really interests me due to the fact that I teach 6th grade science and cover this stuff in my curriculum. Titan is almost the largest moon in the solar system(Ganymede is a little bigger). It's bigger than Pluto and Mercury.

Skip Towne
01-15-2005, 08:16 AM
Bah!! I don't believe any of this crap. It is all being staged in a studio somewhere.

beavis
01-15-2005, 10:00 AM
It's ****ing amazing to think of how there's now a sign of human existence, just sitting there on a strange, strange rock so far away. The journey it made is pretty friggin' amazing, too. They had to hit a moon that was traveling around a planet that was traveling around the sun, seven years after launch.
That was my thought too. Imagine the precision of the calculations they had to make to plan that flight. You know they weren't controling that thing with a flightstick.

RINGLEADER
01-15-2005, 11:05 AM
Bah!! I don't believe any of this crap. It is all being staged in a studio somewhere.


My thoughts exactly. That "picture" of Titan above looks like the place where I go hiking. I mean really...do you actually think the Europeans could get anything to Titan?

stumppy
01-15-2005, 11:08 AM
My thoughts exactly. That "picture" of Titan above looks like the place where I go hiking. I mean really...do you actually think the Europeans could get anything to Titan?

Never underestimate the determination of the French to be the first to plant a white flag somewhere.

Ultra Peanut
01-15-2005, 12:15 PM
Here's the first color image from Titan.Awesome.

Alec R
01-15-2005, 01:23 PM
Never underestimate the determination of the French to be the first to plant a white flag somewhere.
hahahahahahahahahahahahaha

go bowe
01-15-2005, 01:38 PM
Awesome.it really is amazing...

not so long ago we made it to the moon, and it seemed so impossible...

and now we have a probe on saturn's moon...

Ultra Peanut
01-16-2005, 01:51 PM
Kickass:

<img src="http://esamultimedia.esa.int/images/cassini_huygens/huygens_land/Picture2.jpg" style="width: 305px; height: 261px; border: 0" alt="" />

<img src="http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~oblivion/titan-color-composite.jpg" style="width: 398px; height: 341px; border: 0" alt="" />

4th and Long
01-16-2005, 01:59 PM
http://www.esa.int/images/Picture3_XL,0.jpg

Count Zarth
01-16-2005, 02:02 PM
I guess transmitting images over millions of miles creates pixelation.

Ultra Peanut
01-16-2005, 02:08 PM
I guess transmitting images over millions of miles creates pixelation.Yeah... plus the fact that digital camera technology sucked major ass in 1997.

redhed
01-16-2005, 02:18 PM
Never underestimate the determination of the French to be the first to plant a white flag somewhere.

Lakes of liquid methane?!?
Never underestimate the determination of a Euro to find something stinky.

Pants
01-16-2005, 02:20 PM
Kickass:

<img src="http://esamultimedia.esa.int/images/cassini_huygens/huygens_land/Picture2.jpg" style="width: 305px; height: 261px; border: 0" alt="" />

<img src="http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~oblivion/titan-color-composite.jpg" style="width: 398px; height: 341px; border: 0" alt="" />

WTF? Is that water and snow?

4th and Long
01-16-2005, 02:27 PM
WTF? Is that water and snow?
Its too damn cold on that moon for there to be liquid H2O.