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Dartgod
01-16-2005, 10:46 AM
I know there are some other home brewers on here; Bwana and TJ for starters.

I'm brewing my first batch ever today. It's a German wheat. Looking forward to tasting this bad boy in about a month! :thumb: :toast: :BLVD:

JimNasium
01-16-2005, 10:51 AM
I brewed a double chocolate stout last night. I'm a bit embarassed to admit that I currently have 20 gallons of beer at differing stages of fermentation in my closet right now. :shake: It is a great hobby and you can keep it as simple or make it as complicated as you want. The best advice is simply "relax and have a homebrew." Do you have someone who is experienced to help you through the first one or are you flying solo?

Skip Towne
01-16-2005, 10:56 AM
Hey, Nasium, the Eagles game starts at 12:00. Should I pick up some chips or something on my way over? (Or I could use Rainman's trick of bringing an empty pizza box)

Phobia
01-16-2005, 10:56 AM
I wish I had a friend that homebrewed. I used to and he was my bestest buddy.

JimNasium
01-16-2005, 10:58 AM
I wish I had a friend that homebrewed. I used to and he was my bestest buddy.
The next time I'm up there I'll bring you a care package. I've got a couple of beers that are just incredible. I'm entering one in the KC Biermaster's homebrew contest next month.

BigVE
01-16-2005, 10:59 AM
I have tried several batches of homebrew that my aunt makes...some were good and some were not so good. She specializes in makeing homemade wine though and its very good. Im not a big wine drinker usually but I cant pass up her homebrew. The next time I see her she is supposed to hook me up with a couple of different recipes for beer and wines. Good luck on your batch.

JimNasium
01-16-2005, 10:59 AM
Hey, Nasium, the Eagles game starts at 12:00. Should I pick up some chips or something on my way over? (Or I could use Rainman's trick of bringing an empty pizza box)
Come on up. I've got a sixer of Miller High Life for guys like you. :)

Skip Towne
01-16-2005, 11:03 AM
Come on up. I've got a sixer of Miller High Life for guys like you. :)
Better than that, just let me know when you won't be there and leave the key under the mat.

Phobia
01-16-2005, 11:03 AM
I'm entering one in the KC Biermaster's homebrew contest next month.

Sweet. Best of luck with that. You don't have to bring me a care package, but if you do, I'll have your back on this board to the death - ala KCJ/Gunther.

Dartgod
01-16-2005, 11:08 AM
I brewed a double chocolate stout last night. I'm a bit embarassed to admit that I currently have 20 gallons of beer at differing stages of fermentation in my closet right now. :shake: It is a great hobby and you can keep it as simple or make it as complicated as you want. The best advice is simply "relax and have a homebrew." Do you have someone who is experienced to help you through the first one or are you flying solo?
Solo. But I feel pretty confident about it. I've been reading A LOT since i got my kit for Christmas.

JimNasium
01-16-2005, 11:10 AM
Solo. But I feel pretty confident about it. I've been reading A LOT since i got my kit for Christmas.
Cool. If you run into any problems feel free to give me a call. I'll PM you my phone number. Good luck. :thumb:

RedNFeisty
01-16-2005, 11:33 AM
I brewed a double chocolate stout last night. I'm a bit embarassed to admit that I currently have 20 gallons of beer at differing stages of fermentation in my closet right now. :shake: It is a great hobby and you can keep it as simple or make it as complicated as you want. The best advice is simply "relax and have a homebrew." Do you have someone who is experienced to help you through the first one or are you flying solo?

Chocolate beer? Now there is a girlie beer, sweet!! Best of luck in your home brewing contest!!

kufan2
01-16-2005, 11:47 AM
I don't know if i would consider a stout a "girlie drink". I would love to meet the amazon that enjoyed a good stout.

Phobia
01-16-2005, 11:51 AM
Chocolate beer? Now there is a girlie beer, sweet!! Best of luck in your home brewing contest!!

A double chocolate stout doesn't exactly come with a Hersheys label.

Over-Head
01-16-2005, 11:52 AM
I've got a batch of "John Bull" brewing in the basement as we speak...
My dada was/is an AMAZING home brew maker.
Funny this thred should appear 3 days after I started running another batch.
Cheched it last night , just prior to "having a draw"...(Refer to "Weed smokers only" thread))

Dartgod
01-16-2005, 12:20 PM
Well, I finished the boil and no boil over. So I guess that's a good thing.

The wort is in an ice bath now.

Demonpenz
01-16-2005, 12:22 PM
send me over a couple of growlers

JimNasium
01-16-2005, 12:22 PM
Well, I finished the boil and no boil over. So I guess that's a good thing.

The wort is in an ice bath now.
Kewl. The hard part is out of the way. Are you using buckets or carboys? Single stage ferment or do you plan on transferring to secondary?

Dartgod
01-16-2005, 12:31 PM
Kewl. The hard part is out of the way. Are you using buckets or carboys? Single stage ferment or do you plan on transferring to secondary?
Primary in a 6.5 gallon plastic bucket and secondary in a 5 gallon glass carboy.

One more question. Do I put the little plastic cap on the airlock? It looks like the one on the right:

http://www.northernbrewer.com/pics/fullsize/fermentation-locks.jpg

Do any of you guys post on any home brew forums? I think I found a good on here:

http://forum.northernbrewer.com/

RedNFeisty
01-16-2005, 12:53 PM
A double chocolate stout doesn't exactly come with a Hersheys label.
I don't normally drink beer, I was being facetious!

mlyonsd
01-16-2005, 01:04 PM
Primary in a 6.5 gallon plastic bucket and secondary in a 5 gallon glass carboy.

One more question. Do I put the little plastic cap on the airlock? It looks like the one on the right:

http://www.northernbrewer.com/pics/fullsize/fermentation-locks.jpg

Do any of you guys post on any home brew forums? I think I found a good on here:

http://forum.northernbrewer.com/

I've never seen one like the one on the right. Mine is like the one on the left and yes, the cap is used. I use vodka as the liquid in the air lock.

Dartgod
01-16-2005, 01:10 PM
I've never seen one like the one on the right. Mine is like the one on the left and yes, the cap is used. I use vodka as the liquid in the air lock.
Oh, that's a good idea. I found the answer and i do leave the cap on.

mlyonsd
01-16-2005, 01:15 PM
One other thing I'll point out that's just my opinion....I age my beer a lot longer then some. I have found that I like mine to age at least two or three months. Some brews have a pretty sharp taste to them until they age long enough.

Like I said, that's just me and you'll have to see what you think on your own.

JimNasium
01-16-2005, 02:06 PM
Primary in a 6.5 gallon plastic bucket and secondary in a 5 gallon glass carboy.

One more question. Do I put the little plastic cap on the airlock? It looks like the one on the right:

http://www.northernbrewer.com/pics/fullsize/fermentation-locks.jpg

Do any of you guys post on any home brew forums? I think I found a good on here:

http://forum.northernbrewer.com/

Two that I have found and participate in:

www.brewboard.com
www.beeradvocate.com

Dartgod
01-16-2005, 02:18 PM
Two that I have found and participate in:

www.brewboard.com
www.beeradvocate.com
Thanks, I've added those to my favorites.

It's in the fermentor now. The yeast has been in for about an hour now. Just waiting for some action now.

BTW, I used White Labs liquid yeast and it said to pitch when wort was 70-75 degrees. I pitched at 76. Is that going to be ok?

mlyonsd
01-16-2005, 02:20 PM
Thanks, I've added those to my favorites.

It's in the fermentor now. The yeast has been in for about an hour now. Just waiting for some action now.

BTW, I used White Labs liquid yeast and it said to pitch when wort was 70-75 degrees. I pitched at 76. Is that going to be ok?

Well, you probably just killed the yeast and wasted all of your afternoon.

Just kidding, you should be fine.

Dartgod
01-16-2005, 02:22 PM
Well, you probably just killed the yeast and wasted all of your afternoon.

Just kidding, you should be fine.
OK, I just poured the batch out. I'll start again next week.

EDIT: D'oh!! I just read the first sentence and figured it was ruined. Now I've wasted the whole thing! :banghead: :banghead:





:evil:

JimNasium
01-16-2005, 02:25 PM
Thanks, I've added those to my favorites.

It's in the fermentor now. The yeast has been in for about an hour now. Just waiting for some action now.

BTW, I used White Labs liquid yeast and it said to pitch when wort was 70-75 degrees. I pitched at 76. Is that going to be ok?
I think you'll be fine. I usually wait until it's under 70 degress but I also have the luxury of a wort chiller. My guess is that you'll see some activity within the next twelve hours. Active fermentation is a wonderful thing.

redhed
01-16-2005, 02:56 PM
Just make sure everything is clean!!
Nothing like coming up with a great recipe, only to have it come out like crap 'cuz you didn't get everything sanitized.... awww man....

Prolly the top five beers I've ever had were all home brews. With #6 being a beer that tastes like home brew...Sammy Smith's Winter Welcome Ale.
Or maybe Chimay.

Dartgod
01-16-2005, 02:59 PM
Just make sure everything is clean!!
Nothing like coming up with a great recipe, only to have it come out like crap 'cuz you didn't get everything sanitized.... awww man.....
Yeah, I was VERY careful about that. Sanitized the hell out of everything.

JimNasium
01-16-2005, 03:13 PM
Yeah, I was VERY careful about that. Sanitized the hell out of everything.
I been brewing since May of last year and haven't lost a batch to infection yet. My buddy has lost two batches since he started brewing and since we typically brew ten gallon batches it's a painful experience.

Dartgod
01-16-2005, 03:21 PM
I been brewing since May of last year and haven't lost a batch to infection yet. My buddy has lost two batches since he started brewing and since we typically brew ten gallon batches it's a painful experience.
You doing any all grain or just extracts? It will probably be a year or so before I'm ready to try all grain.

JimNasium
01-16-2005, 03:27 PM
You doing any all grain or just extracts? It will probably be a year or so before I'm ready to try all grain.
Extracts with grains and I have one mini-mash under my belt. I'm putting together all of the equipment for all-grain right now and should be ready for my first batch in the Spring.

Skip Towne
01-16-2005, 03:35 PM
I been brewing since May of last year and haven't lost a batch to infection yet. My buddy has lost two batches since he started brewing and since we typically brew ten gallon batches it's a painful experience.
Your buddy loses his beer? Did he look behind the couch?

Jenny Gump
01-16-2005, 07:31 PM
I wish someone would brew me a nice American Bock.

Phobia
01-16-2005, 07:48 PM
I wish someone would brew me a nice American Bock.

American beer sucks. This country has ruined beer. That's all the Brits really wanted - us to enjoy good beer. Why did we have to go and kill all the redcoats?

JimNasium
01-17-2005, 10:52 AM
Hey Dartgod, got any airlock activity?

NewChief
01-17-2005, 10:58 AM
The :blvd: smiley made me think of it, but has anyone checked the price on Boulevard lately? It's up to around $8 a six pack down here, which is just freaking ridiculous.

JimNasium
01-17-2005, 11:04 AM
The :blvd: smiley made me think of it, but has anyone checked the price on Boulevard lately? It's up to around $8 a six pack down here, which is just freaking ridiculous.
Yikes! I buy beer (at least finished product) so little anymore that I had no idea. :shake: My ales typically price out somewhere in the $15-20 per case and it will only get cheaper when I go all-grain.

Bwana
01-17-2005, 11:07 AM
Sweet! Good luck with that 1st batch, it sounds tasty.

Dartgod
01-17-2005, 11:08 AM
Hey Dartgod, got any airlock activity?
Not yet. Last time I checked was before work, around 7 a.m. At that point it had been about 17 hours. Should I be concerned?

Bwana
01-17-2005, 11:11 AM
Not yet. Last time I checked was before work, around 7 a.m. At that point it had been about 17 hours. Should I be concerned?

What did you use to clean your containers before adding the wort?

Dartgod
01-17-2005, 11:13 AM
What did you use to clean your containers before adding the wort?
Clean? What do you mean?

Dartgod
01-17-2005, 11:14 AM
Hehe. Just messing with you.
I used BTF? or something like that. It's an iodophor.

Bwana
01-17-2005, 11:15 AM
Clean? What do you mean? You have to do that in order to prevent and infection in the beer. I used iodine

JimNasium
01-17-2005, 11:15 AM
Not yet. Last time I checked was before work, around 7 a.m. At that point it had been about 17 hours. Should I be concerned?
No, I don't think so. I've had them take more than 24 hours to get going. If it's still not going when you get home you might want to shake the bucket a little. This can help spur things on. My chocolate stout was a bit slow and shaking the shit out of the carboy was the cure.

Radar Chief
01-17-2005, 11:15 AM
Extracts with grains and I have one mini-mash under my belt. I'm putting together all of the equipment for all-grain right now and should be ready for my first batch in the Spring.

Iíve done a ďmini mashĒ also and it pretty much convinced me that all grain brewing is a little too involved for me.
I prefer the extract kits with some grains added for steeping, gives if a fresher taste IMO.

Bwana
01-17-2005, 11:16 AM
Hehe. Just messing with you.
I used BTF? or something like that. It's an iodophor.

ROFL I was thinking Uh-Oh.

JimNasium
01-17-2005, 11:16 AM
Hehe. Just messing with you.
I used BTF? or something like that. It's an iodophor.
ROFL

JimNasium
01-17-2005, 11:18 AM
Iíve done a ďmini mashĒ also and it pretty much convinced me that all grain brewing is a little too involved for me.
I prefer the extract kits with some grains added for steeping, gives if a fresher taste IMO.
I'm going to give it a shot and it shouldn't take too much more equipment. I also have plenty of buddies who brew so if it doesn't suit me I can dump the equipment on them. I doubt that I'll do it all the time because of the time involved but I must admit that the idea of turning grain into beer all by myself is appealing.

Radar Chief
01-17-2005, 11:22 AM
You have to do that in order to prevent and infection in the beer. I used iodine

Bleach and water. Thoroughly rinsed, of course.

Radar Chief
01-17-2005, 11:23 AM
I'm going to give it a shot and it shouldn't take too much more equipment. I also have plenty of buddies who brew so if it doesn't suit me I can dump the equipment on them. I doubt that I'll do it all the time because of the time involved but I must admit that the idea of turning grain into beer all by myself is appealing.

:thumb: I can understand that.

Dartgod
01-17-2005, 07:04 PM
OK, I'm starting to worry a bit. Came home from work and no action yet. It's been about 29 hours since I pitched the yeast. I just took the wort's temp, its at 62 degrees. I had moved the fermentor to a cooler room last night because I pitched the yeast at 76 degrees and I wanted it to cool down a bit. I just moved it back to a warmer room and swirled the wort around pretty vigorously.

Any ideas or am I going to have to throw some more yeast in? I still have a package of dry yeast here.

JimNasium
01-17-2005, 07:07 PM
OK, I'm starting to worry a bit. Came home from work and no action yet. It's been about 29 hours since I pitched the yeast. I just took the wort's temp, its at 62 degrees. I had moved the fermentor to a cooler room last night because I pitched the yeast at 76 degrees and I wanted it to cool down a bit. I just moved it back to a warmer room and swirled the wort around pretty vigorously.

Any ideas or am I going to have to throw some more yeast in? I still have a package of dry yeast here.Relax and have a homebrew. That 62 degrees just slowed your activity is all. Give it another 24 hours before you pitch the dry stuff.

Dartgod
01-17-2005, 07:12 PM
Relax and have a homebrew.
I don't have any home brew. But I would like to, if this thing would ever take off!! LOL

JimNasium
01-17-2005, 07:14 PM
I don't have any home brew. But I would like to, if this thing would ever take off!! LOL
Sorry. I couldn't resist. I really don't think you are in trouble. I hovered over my first batch like it was my first born child......and then I drank it way too fast when it was done. There's nothing better than drinking that first bottle of beer that YOU brewed. I'll be waiting for a review. :)

Bwana
01-17-2005, 07:14 PM
What Jim said.. If you don't get any action in the next 24 hours, toss in another bag of yeast.

Phobia
01-17-2005, 07:17 PM
I don't have any home brew. But I would like to, if this thing would ever take off!! LOL

You're screwed. You should just drink it now.

JimNasium
01-17-2005, 07:20 PM
You're screwed. You should just drink it now.
I agree with Phobia. You're screwed. You should send it to me and I will dispose of it for you. ROFL

Dartgod
01-18-2005, 07:21 AM
Still nothing this morning. I'm starting to get very discouraged. I guess I'll throw in another package of yeast if it's not happeneing when I get home tonight?

mlyonsd
01-18-2005, 07:27 AM
Still nothing this morning. I'm starting to get very discouraged. I guess I'll throw in another package of yeast if it's not happeneing when I get home tonight?

You're sure you don't have an air leak around the air lock?

How long does your recipe say to let the fermenting process go?

Dartgod
01-18-2005, 07:35 AM
You're sure you don't have an air leak around the air lock?

How long does your recipe say to let the fermenting process go?
Yeah, I'm pretty sure, although I have no way of actually testing it. I'm confident that's not the problem.

Nothing definite on fermentation time. Depending on the temperature, anywhere from 3 days to 2 weeks. From what I've read, that's pretty much the case with any brew. The only thing I've done wrong so far (that I'm aware of) is put it in too cool of a room the first day. The wort had cooled to 62 degrees when I got home last night. I put it in a warmer room and this morning the side of the fermentor felt slightly warmer to touch so I assume it's warmed up. If nothing has happened when I get home tonite, I'll measure the temp again to be sure.

mlyonsd
01-18-2005, 07:42 AM
Yeah, I'm pretty sure, although I have no way of actually testing it. I'm confident that's not the problem.

Nothing definite on fermentation time. Depending on the temperature, anywhere from 3 days to 2 weeks. From what I've read, that's pretty much the case with any brew. The only thing I've done wrong so far (that I'm aware of) is put it in too cool of a room the first day. The wort had cooled to 62 degrees when I got home last night. I put it in a warmer room and this morning the side of the fermentor felt slightly warmer to touch so I assume it's warmed up. If nothing has happened when I get home tonite, I'll measure the temp again to be sure.
It sounds to me like you've figured out the problem. Any brew that could ferment up to two weeks is not going to show much action at all. If it did the alcohol content would be astronomical. If it were me, I wouldn't touch it for quite a while. It sounds to me like you did everything right and I've never heard of a bad batch of yeast.

My last brew didn't bubble at all, it just moved the vodka in the air lock to the exhaust side. I was worried about it but it turned out fine.

Rukdafaidas
01-18-2005, 07:58 AM
What kind of dry yeast did you use and how much? The best advice I could give a starting homebrewer is to use liquid yeasts and make starters. Keep bumping the starters up until they're about a half gallon for a 5 gallon batch.
When you get several batches under your belt and you get to the point where you are wanting to buy more and more stuff (guaranteed to happen), make one of your first purchases a stainless aeration stone and oxygen setup. When pitching your yeast, pure oxygen really speeds up the process.
Nasium, we probably have some all grain equipment we might want to sell. Like I mentioned in a previous thread, we have built a brewery and will have our old equipment available pretty soon.

Dartgod
01-18-2005, 08:04 AM
What kind of dry yeast did you use and how much? The best advice I could give a starting homebrewer is to use liquid yeasts and make starters. Keep bumping the starters up until they're about a half gallon for a 5 gallon batch.
When you get several batches under your belt and you get to the point where you are wanting to buy more and more stuff (guaranteed to happen), make one of your first purchases a stainless aeration stone and oxygen setup. When pitching your yeast, pure oxygen really speeds up the process.
Nasium, we probably have some all grain equipment we might want to sell. Like I mentioned in a previous thread, we have built a brewery and will have our old equipment available pretty soon.
I didn't use the dry yeast that came with the kit. I bought a vial of White Labs Hefeweizen yeast and used it. I wish I had made a starter with it, but was told that wasn't necessary.

What did you mean by this?
Keep bumping the starters up until they're about a half gallon for a 5 gallon batch.

Radar Chief
01-18-2005, 08:06 AM
Still nothing this morning. I'm starting to get very discouraged. I guess I'll throw in another package of yeast if it's not happeneing when I get home tonight?


Iíve had this exact problem and hereís what I did to jump-start the fermentation.
Go to your local brew store after work, if youíre in KC thereís one called Bacchus Barleycorn (http://www.bacchus-barleycorn.com/) thatís well equipped, and get some Yeast Nutrients.
Create a new pitch by first boiling about 2 cups of water. After the water reaches a full boil, remove it from the heat, cover it with tin foil and poke your thermometer through the foil (the foil is just to keep spores, dust and wild yeast from getting into your pitch).
Once the temperature is below 110 Deg. F , closer to 90 would be OK also, add yeast nutrients, dry yeast and recover with tin foil allowing the dry yeast to reconstitute.
Now allow the pitch to cool to around 70 Deg. F or about room temperature and within an hour or two you should start seeing yeast activity in the pitch.
Now youíre ready to re-pitch with an active pitch and once added to your fermenter, you should start seeing activity within a couple of hours.
Since Iíve had problems getting yeast to start, I do this for every batch and havenít had the problem since.
These guys (http://www.morebeer.com/?ct=1) have a cool solution to the same problem; itís called a ďsmack packĒ. The yeast is contained inside a capsule and surrounded by yeast nutrients, so all you have to do is take the pack and smack it with the heal of your hand to break the capsule. Within 24 hours the pack will swell up until it looks like itís gonna burst, then itís ready to pitch and you know youíre pitching an active yeast.

Dartgod
01-18-2005, 08:12 AM
OK, so the dry yeast that came with the kit is a Nottingham Ale Yeast. How is that going to work with a wheat beer? I bought the hefeweizen liquid yeast because I was told that would be better for the type of beer I was brewing. Is the liquid yeast wasted now? Or will they work together once fermentation starts?

Radar Chief
01-18-2005, 08:14 AM
Something you could use instead of yeast nutrients is to siphon off some sweet wort out of your fermenter and create a new pitch using it.
I personally like adding the yeast to a pitch like this, either with sweet wort of yeast nutrients, so I can see yeast activity and know itís working before pouring it into the wort.

Radar Chief
01-18-2005, 08:19 AM
OK, so the dry yeast that came with the kit is a Nottingham Ale Yeast. How is that going to work with a wheat beer? I bought the hefeweizen liquid yeast because I was told that would be better for the type of beer I was brewing. Is the liquid yeast wasted now? Or will they work together once fermentation starts?

Not wasted just dormant. You could add some yeast nutrients without creating a new pitch, Iíve had that work before also.

You get very little flavor from the yeast, itís probably better to use the White Labs stuff, itís better quality yeast anyway, but the ale yeast that came with your kit will work also with little noticeable difference.
Dry yeast is created from a strain of yeast that works after being dried and possibly heated and cooled several times while in the warehouse waiting for sale. The White Labs liquid yeast is created from a strain that works best for that type of beer and the creators donít have to worry about how hardy it is.

Rukdafaidas
01-18-2005, 08:25 AM
I didn't use the dry yeast that came with the kit. I bought a vial of White Labs Hefeweizen yeast and used it. I wish I had made a starter with it, but was told that wasn't necessary.

What did you mean by this?
Forget about the starter part, let's make this simple and get your beer going.
Is there a certain kind of wheat beer that you're shooting for? Are you wanting a beer that tastes like an American Wheat (Boulevard) or are you wanting a Hefeweizen?
If you're wanting a beer similar to Boulevard's Wheat, dump in the Nottingham it's be great. If you're wanting a Hefeweizen, the yeast is very important. Hefeweizen yeasts impart a clove and banana flavor that comes directly from Hefeweizen yeasts.

Dartgod
01-18-2005, 08:27 AM
Forget about the starter part, let's make this simple and get your beer going.
Is there a certain kind of wheat beer that you're shooting for? Are you wanting a beer that tastes like an American Wheat (Boulevard) or are you wanting a Hefeweizen?
If you're wanting a beer similar to Boulevard's Wheat, dump in the Nottingham it's be great. If you're wanting a Hefeweizen, the yeast is very important. Hefeweizen yeasts impart a clove and banana flavor that comes directly from Hefeweizen yeasts.
At this point, I just want beer.

Keep in mind that anything you suggest, I can't do until around 6:00 p.m. when I get home from work.

cdcox
01-18-2005, 08:31 AM
If it is a true German Hefeweizen yeast it will impart significant flavor to the beer. One of the characteristics of Hefeweizen is an aroma of cloves and/or bananas and this character comes predominantely from the yeast strain used. If you want this authentic character to the beer, you should try to get the current yeast going. If you do add a different yeast, the most agrressive strain will probably dominate (which in this case would probably be the dry yeast since the liquid yeast is slow going). It won't ruin the beer by any means, but you will miss out on the authentic character of a true German Hefeweizen.

cdcox
01-18-2005, 08:32 AM
Forget about the starter part, let's make this simple and get your beer going.
Is there a certain kind of wheat beer that you're shooting for? Are you wanting a beer that tastes like an American Wheat (Boulevard) or are you wanting a Hefeweizen?
If you're wanting a beer similar to Boulevard's Wheat, dump in the Nottingham it's be great. If you're wanting a Hefeweizen, the yeast is very important. Hefeweizen yeasts impart a clove and banana flavor that comes directly from Hefeweizen yeasts.

Uh, what he said.

Rukdafaidas
01-18-2005, 08:34 AM
At this point, I just want beer.

Keep in mind that anything you suggest, I can't do until around 6:00 p.m. when I get home from work.
I'm guessing that it'll be going by the time you get home. If not, pitch the Nottingham, preferrably two packs. If you like Boulevard Wheat, the Nottingham will actually get you closer than the Hefeweizen yeast anyway.
If it is going when you get home, I would caution you not to let it get too high in temperature or it'll taste like banana laffy taffy. I've found the higher end of Hefeweizen yeast produces more banana flavor and the lower temperature range produces more of a clove flavor, which is much more subtle than the banana.

Radar Chief
01-18-2005, 08:40 AM
I'm guessing that it'll be going by the time you get home. If not, pitch the Nottingham, preferrably two packs. If you like Boulevard Wheat, the Nottingham will actually get you closer than the Hefeweizen yeast anyway.
If it is going when you get home, I would caution you not to let it get too high in temperature or it'll taste like banana laffy taffy. I've found the higher end of Hefeweizen yeast produces more banana flavor and the lower temperature range produces more of a clove flavor, which is much more subtle than the banana.

Ok, just for ďwhat ifísĒ, what would you do if the Hefeweizen is preferred but the yeast wonít start? Aerate using an oxygen stone? Add some yeast nutrients? Or something else that hasnít been mentioned?
Iíve had this problem before so Iím curious what more experienced brewers think.

Rukdafaidas
01-18-2005, 08:48 AM
Ok, just for ďwhat ifísĒ, what would you do if the Hefeweizen is preferred but the yeast wonít start? Aerate using an oxygen stone? Add some yeast nutrients? Or something else that hasnít been mentioned?
Iíve had this problem before so Iím curious what more experienced brewers think.
Not everyone would agree with me, but I'd get another vial of White Labs and pitch it.
If you guys want to see a batch damn near explode within hours of pitching, start planning your schedules and use the yeast cakes from your previous batch. Then place it in an area with a lot of towels around. ROFL

Radar Chief
01-18-2005, 08:55 AM
Not everyone would agree with me, but I'd get another vial of White Labs and pitch it.


Thatís a possibility, Iím pretty sure the Bacchose Barleycorn store has WL yeast on hand, although Iíd probably create a live pitch with some nutrients or sweet wort. I just like seeing yeast activity before I pitch it.

Not everyone would agree with me, but I'd get another vial of White Labs and pitch it.
If you guys want to see a batch damn near explode within hours of pitching, start planning your schedules and use the yeast cakes from your previous batch. Then place it in an area with a lot of towels around. ROFL

Iíve thought of doing that before but donít brew often enough to keep yeast cultures going.

Rukdafaidas
01-18-2005, 08:57 AM
Thatís a possibility, Iím pretty sure the Bacchose Barleycorn store has WL yeast on hand, although Iíd probably create a live pitch with some nutrients or sweet wort. I just like seeing yeast activity before I pitch it.



Iíve thought of doing that before but donít brew often enough to keep yeast cultures going.
We always had such active ferments that an airlock definitely wouldn't do the trick. We always had to use blow off tubes and sometimes it would still get messy.

Dartgod
01-18-2005, 03:49 PM
I just called home and the airlock is bubbling! Fermentation has started!!

Rukdafaidas
01-18-2005, 03:57 PM
I just called home and the airlock is bubbling! Fermentation has started!!
Cool, I figured it would. :thumb:

Dartgod
01-18-2005, 03:58 PM
Cool, I figured it would. :thumb:
At least you did. Took 48 hours, but at I learned something; make a starter next time. :thumb:

Radar Chief
01-18-2005, 04:07 PM
I just called home and the airlock is bubbling! Fermentation has started!!

Now comes the hard part: waiting.

Dartgod
01-18-2005, 04:13 PM
Now comes the hard part: waiting.
Waiting? What the hell you think I've been doing the last 48 hours?

LOL, I know what you mean. Of course I could pass the time planning my next brew. Got any favorite extract recipes you'd like to share?

Radar Chief
01-18-2005, 04:34 PM
Waiting? What the hell you think I've been doing the last 48 hours?

LOL, I know what you mean. Of course I could pass the time planning my next brew. Got any favorite extract recipes you'd like to share?

http://www.morebeer.com/product.html?product_id=18430

This is by far my favorite recipe kit.
Itís an IPA with bold flavor and body, just the way I like it.

ENDelt260
01-18-2005, 04:36 PM
I think I'll just stop by the liquor store on the way home and pick up a twelve pack. Seems faster.

journeyscarab
01-18-2005, 04:38 PM
I think I'll just stop by the liquor store on the way home and pick up a twelve pack. Seems faster.

I second that!

stevieray
01-18-2005, 04:45 PM
This thread made me thirsty.

Radar Chief
01-19-2005, 07:22 AM
I think I'll just stop by the liquor store on the way home and pick up a twelve pack. Seems faster.

It is, if you brew for convenience your wasting time.
If you brew for cost savings, your saving a little but considering the time involved, along with start up equipment cost, your not saving that much.
If you brew for any other reason than the pleasure of drinking, or letting your friends sample, your own quality hand crafted brews youíll be disappointed.
But who am I talking to here, grab some PBR and call it good. ;)

Dartgod
01-19-2005, 07:50 AM
If you brew for any other reason than the pleasure of drinking, or letting your friends sample, your own quality hand crafted brews youíll be disappointed.
Exactly what I hope to get out of it.

BTW, when I left the house, the airlock was bubbling furiously! :thumb:

I counted the bubbles last night and was getting around 180 a minute. This morning they were coming too quickly to even count.

Radar Chief
01-19-2005, 08:45 AM
Exactly what I hope to get out of it.

BTW, when I left the house, the airlock was bubbling furiously! :thumb:

I counted the bubbles last night and was getting around 180 a minute. This morning they were coming too quickly to even count.

Good, getting a nice layer of foam on top? See yeast particles swirling furiously turning sugars into alcohol? This is my favorite part, next to drinking it. :thumb:

Radar Chief
01-19-2005, 08:47 AM
Damn, all this talk about brewing is giveín me the fever. Gonna haveíta by another kit like the one I posted yesterday and brew up a batch. :BLVD:

Dartgod
01-19-2005, 08:50 AM
Good, getting a nice layer of foam on top? See yeast particles swirling furiously turning sugars into alcohol? This is my favorite part, next to drinking it. :thumb:
I have it in a plastic bucket, so I can't see the swirling (I'll have to get a 6.5 gallon carboy for my primary), but I can tell there is a foam layer on top. Probably at least 2-3" thick.

Radar Chief
01-19-2005, 08:54 AM
I have it in a plastic bucket, so I can't see the swirling (I'll have to get a 6.5 gallon carboy for my primary), but I can tell there is a foam layer on top. Probably at least 2-3" thick.

:thumb: Good, that's what ya want.

Dartgod
01-19-2005, 08:04 PM
Exactly what I hope to get out of it.

BTW, when I left the house, the airlock was bubbling furiously! :thumb:

I counted the bubbles last night and was getting around 180 a minute. This morning they were coming too quickly to even count.
The bubbles have slowed quite a bit now. I counted 36 in a minute. Is this normal?

Taco John
01-19-2005, 08:08 PM
I know there are some other home brewers on here; Bwana and TJ for starters.

I'm brewing my first batch ever today. It's a German wheat. Looking forward to tasting this bad boy in about a month! :thumb: :toast: :BLVD:



MMMMMMM.... German Wheat....

YUM!

Dartgod
01-19-2005, 08:10 PM
MMMMMMM.... German Wheat....

YUM!
You want me to send you some? I've got some "special" packaging for you.

http://www.museums.org.za/bio/images/spiders/pisaur3.jpg

Taco John
01-19-2005, 08:11 PM
The bubbles have slowed quite a bit now. I counted 36 in a minute. Is this normal?



Yes... Perfectly normal... It'll bubble and bubble and bubble... and get slower and slower as the sugars get eaten and digested into alcohol... Or yeast urine, however you like to look at it :p

Taco John
01-19-2005, 08:12 PM
You want me to send you some? I've got some "special" packaging for you.



Is it you or is it Bwana that owes me... No wait... You're the one who sent me the spider! ROFL

That fugger was scary!

Taco John
01-19-2005, 08:13 PM
You had to love that when you found out that a spider snuck in there...

Dartgod
01-19-2005, 08:13 PM
Is it you or is it Bwana that owes me... No wait... You're the one who sent me the spider! ROFL

That fugger was scary!
Yeah, check my post again. I added something for you...

Dartgod
01-19-2005, 08:14 PM
You had to love that when you found out that a spider snuck in there...
Yep, sweet justice. :thumb:

JimNasium
01-19-2005, 09:21 PM
I leave for a day and we have fermentation! Congrats DG on your first beer and welcome to a very rewarding hobby!

Dartgod
01-19-2005, 09:32 PM
I leave for a day and we have fermentation! Congrats DG on your first beer and welcome to a very rewarding hobby!
Thanks. Should the bubbles have slowed down that much in one day?

Oh, and it has a faint banana aroma coming out of the airlock. :thumb:

JimNasium
01-19-2005, 09:44 PM
Thanks. Should the bubbles have slowed down that much in one day?

Oh, and it has a faint banana aroma coming out of the airlock. :thumb:Yes, but it depends on the strain of yeast. Usually wheat yeasts have a very violent initial fermentation and then the airlock will go dead. That doesn't mean that your yeast isn't still working though. In general I always leave my beers in primary for two weeks and then in secondary for at least two weeks. That being said I know you want some beer to drink so you will probably want to transfer after one week. I have the luxury of having LOTS of beer ready to drink and so I can be more patient. If you become really obsessed like me you'll end up with 15 gallons in seconday and 5 in primary like I do right now.
:shake:

JimNasium
01-21-2005, 07:55 AM
DG - Are you going to transfer to secondary this weekend? I have the unpleasant task of bottling 15 gallons this saturday. Bottling is the closest thing to work in this hobby. I'll be happy when I have my kegging system up and running.

Dartgod
01-21-2005, 08:13 AM
DG - Are you going to transfer to secondary this weekend? I have the unpleasant task of bottling 15 gallons this saturday. Bottling is the closest thing to work in this hobby. I'll be happy when I have my kegging system up and running.
Most likely. This morning I counted 9 bubbles in a two minute period. I'll probably measure the gravity tomorrow to get a beter idea.

Have you considered going to a keg system?

JimNasium
01-21-2005, 08:16 AM
Most likely. This morning I counted 9 bubbles in a two minute period. I'll probably measure the gravity tomorrow to get a beter idea.

Have you considered going to a keg system?
I've got the taps, the kegs, the CO2 tank but I just haven't taken the time to put everything together. Maybe this spring after my schedule slows a little.

Radar Chief
01-21-2005, 08:46 AM
DG - Are you going to transfer to secondary this weekend? I have the unpleasant task of bottling 15 gallons this saturday. Bottling is the closest thing to work in this hobby. I'll be happy when I have my kegging system up and running.

I heard that. Iíll probably start brewing more when I can collect the gear for a keg system.
Sanitizing bottles just plain sucks, even with a bottle washer.

Dartgod
01-21-2005, 09:18 PM
I'm down to a bubble every 15-30 seconds. Think it's close to being ready for the secondary? I was thinking about doing it tomorrow, but would most likely be Sunday.

BTW I designed a label for it too. What do ya think?

http://www.ramdarts.org/images/beer_label_small.jpg

JimNasium
01-21-2005, 09:28 PM
I'm down to a bubble every 15-30 seconds. Think it's close to being ready for the secondary? I was thinking about doing it tomorrow, but would most likely be Sunday.

BTW I designed a label for it too. What do ya think?

http://www.ramdarts.org/images/beer_label_small.jpg
Very cool label. I don't label mine because I drink them too fast. :banghead: I think you'll be fine transferring tomorrow or Sunday. Just to reiterate my point from earlier though, in general, it is better (IMO) to leave it in primary for another week and then in secondary for as long as you can stand. The beer will have better clarity and the yeast will have the opportunity to completely finish their work. Also, allowing the beer to bulk age helps the flavor profile. That being said, I had my first beer in the bottle one week to the day I brewed it. :rolleyes: I also have waaaay tooooo much beer that is ready to drink as it is. Transfer, bottle and drink. It sounds like you might be hooked. :thumb:

Joe Seahawk
01-21-2005, 09:28 PM
That's a great label Dartgod.. you're not really using 12 ounce bottles though are you?

Man that would take forever to clean all those suckers. I used to brew 15 gallon batches and even the 22 ouncers took forever to sanitize..

Now I brew at a place that has a commercial bottle sanitizer and controlled temp fermenting rooms. Gallaghers (http://www.whereubrew.com/beer_brewing.htm)

I kind of miss doing it at home though.. My wife does not however.. :)

JimNasium
01-21-2005, 09:31 PM
That's a great label Dartgod.. you're not really using 12 ounce bottles though are you?

Man that would take forever to clean all those suckers. I used to brew 15 gallon batches and even the 22 ouncers took forever to sanitize..

Now I brew at a place that has a commercial bottle sanitizer and controlled temp fermenting rooms. Gallaghers (http://www.whereubrew.com/beer_brewing.htm)

I kind of miss doing it at home though.. My wife does not however.. :)
I'm bottling 15 gallons tomorrow night....mostly in 12 ounce bottles. It's gonna really suck. I might have to drink alot to get me through it.

Dartgod
01-21-2005, 09:41 PM
That's a great label Dartgod.. you're not really using 12 ounce bottles though are you?

Man that would take forever to clean all those suckers. I used to brew 15 gallon batches and even the 22 ouncers took forever to sanitize..

Now I brew at a place that has a commercial bottle sanitizer and controlled temp fermenting rooms. Gallaghers (http://www.whereubrew.com/beer_brewing.htm)

I kind of miss doing it at home though.. My wife does not however.. :)
I bought 2 cases of bottles, so not much to clean this time. I've got a great big keg tub that I'll use to sanitize them in.

That's pretty cool idea for a business. They get a lot of people brweing there?

Dartgod
01-21-2005, 09:45 PM
Very cool label. I don't label mine because I drink them too fast. :banghead: I think you'll be fine transferring tomorrow or Sunday. Just to reiterate my point from earlier though, in general, it is better (IMO) to leave it in primary for another week and then in secondary for as long as you can stand. The beer will have better clarity and the yeast will have the opportunity to completely finish their work. Also, allowing the beer to bulk age helps the flavor profile. That being said, I had my first beer in the bottle one week to the day I brewed it. :rolleyes: I also have waaaay tooooo much beer that is ready to drink as it is. Transfer, bottle and drink. It sounds like you might be hooked. :thumb:
I probably won't label all of them. I was just jacking around in Photoshop. Gotta do something to pass the time while i wait for it to finish.

I'll probably move it Sunday and then leave it in the secondary for a couple of more weeks and then bottle. I'll try to let it finish in the bottle for 3 weeks, but I'm sure I'll have to sample some after a week in the bottle. :D

JimNasium
01-21-2005, 09:48 PM
I probably won't label all of them. I was just jacking around in Photoshop. Gotta do something to pass the time while i wait for it to finish.

I'll probably move it Sunday and then leave it in the secondary for a couple of more weeks and then bottle. I'll try to let it finish in the bottle for 3 weeks, but I'm sure I'll have to sample some after a week in the bottle. :D
Hell, I usually pop one 3 days out from bottling just to make sure they are carbonating. I would bottle condition in a warmer room just to speed up the process. A buddy of mine bottle conditions in his basement which maintains at about 62 degrees. His beers sometimes take 6 weeks to fully carbonate. You don't want to torture yourself for that long. :D

JimNasium
01-21-2005, 09:49 PM
Oh, and I almost forgot. Once you transfer you have room in your primary fermentor for your next batch! :thumb:

Dartgod
01-21-2005, 09:53 PM
Oh, and I almost forgot. Once you transfer you have room in your primary fermentor for your next batch! :thumb:
Yeah, I've been thinking about that. :D
I'd like to do a pale ale. Maybe a Sierra Nevada clone.

JimNasium
01-21-2005, 09:57 PM
Yeah, I've been thinking about that. :D
I'd like to do a pale ale. Maybe a Sierra Nevada clone.
Pales are easy and they are ready to drink really quickly. If you are going with a Sierra Nevada clone I'd highly recommend the Wyeast 1056 strain. Good stuff.

Dartgod
01-21-2005, 09:59 PM
Pales are easy and they are ready to drink really quickly. If you are going with a Sierra Nevada clone I'd highly recommend the Wyeast 1056 strain. Good stuff.
Yeah, I've been reading up on it and I guess it's common knowledge thats the same strain Sierra Nevada uses.

Skip Towne
01-21-2005, 10:31 PM
The only time I drank home brew it had white shit floating around in it. It sucked and I didn't want any more of it.

Dartgod
01-21-2005, 11:02 PM
The only time I drank home brew it had white shit floating around in it. It sucked and I didn't want any more of it.
Have you ever seen American Pie? Remember the bedroom scene and the beer that Stifler...ummmm, enhanced?

Rukdafaidas
01-21-2005, 11:28 PM
Kegging is definitely worth it. Especially if you happen to know someone that works for Pepsi, we got all our gear free.
Jim, if you have all the equipment, I'd HIGHLY recommend doing your 15 gallons in kegs. Do you have a place to cool the kegs? If not, get a cheap deep freeze and buy a temp. controller and you're set.

Rukdafaidas
01-21-2005, 11:29 PM
Yeah, I've been reading up on it and I guess it's common knowledge thats the same strain Sierra Nevada uses.
BTW, it's pretty easy to harvest the yeast from a bottle of Sierra Nevada.

Here's a good article (http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter6-7.html) on how to harvest yeast from some commercial beers. The beer has to be bottle conditioned and most aren't, but Sierra Nevada is.

Joe Seahawk
01-22-2005, 12:07 AM
I bought 2 cases of bottles, so not much to clean this time. I've got a great big keg tub that I'll use to sanitize them in.

That's pretty cool idea for a business. They get a lot of people brweing there?

Yeah, It's actually a lot of fun He's got 8 kettles but if you make an appointment it goes very well.. The wort chiller is very handy, No more staying up til 3AM waiting for wort to cool to the proper temp the chiller cools it to the desired temp that you choose instantly..: thumb:

I've actually made several identical batches there, something I was never able to do at home.. But like I said.. I kind of miss making it in my house..

Joe Seahawk
01-22-2005, 12:11 AM
I completely believe this theory..

Filtered Brew vs. Unfiltered?
After many nights of rigorous testing with the scientists at GALLAGHERS INSTITUTE OF BEEROLOGY, Ales Division, we have confirmed our suspicions.

Yeast is good for you.

Home brewers have long claimed that unfiltered beer is healthier for you. Filtering makes beer clear but removes all the yeast and all the wonderful flavors that they provide. Yeast provides B vitamins which have been claimed to reduce the affects of hangovers.

To test that theory, the scientists subjected themselves to repeated nights of studying the affect of filtered vs. unfiltered.

We concluded filtered beer nights produced a wish for quick death, unfiltered nights brought the memory of a great meal!

Decide what's right for you.

Seriously though, unfiltered beer does furnish many more vitamins.

If any of you have other studies or information to confirm this theory, please contact the Beer Scientists at Gallagher's.

Fairplay
01-22-2005, 03:28 AM
A friend of mine use to make home brew quite a bit. He would invite some of us who worked with him to come over and taste his new batch. Generally speaking most of them had a slight vinger taste to them. But you got a good buzz after only a couple beers. Good times.

Dartgod
01-22-2005, 09:54 AM
Today I'm only seeing bubbles in the airlock every 30-60 seconds and the gravity is now 1.019 (1.018 @ 71*). OG was 1.054. I was planning to rack it to the secondary tomorrow. Should I wait?

Bwana
01-22-2005, 10:01 AM
Today I'm only seeing bubbles in the airlock every 30-60 seconds and the gravity is now 1.019 (1.018 @ 71*). OG was 1.054. I was planning to rack it to the secondary tomorrow. Should I wait?

IMHO........yes.

cdcox
01-22-2005, 10:09 AM
My first bacth of home brew was all grain and have never brewed from extracts. I guess I am cursed with the desire to make everything as perfect and complicated as possible. It was so much work (12-14 hr brew sessions) that I wanted to go to 15 gal batches, kegs, dedicated refrigerators, etc so I wouldn't have to brew as often (or at least get more out of the effort). At that point I backed away from the hobby, cause I really couldn't justify the $ for setting up my brewery the way I wanted it.

Dartgod
01-22-2005, 10:10 AM
IMHO........yes.
Some of the people on a couple of brewery BBs I read are suggesting I give a couple of more days. It didn't really start fermenting until Tuesday, so I'll probably do it then instead. I tasted the sample I pulled out and it needs some finishing, but not too bad at this point....for a flat beer. :thumb:

Bwana
01-22-2005, 10:12 AM
Good job Bob, I hope you end up with a great beverage when you're done. The reason I said yes is the fact that you can't hurt it by waiting and could gain from waiting a few days.

Dartgod
02-13-2005, 05:19 PM
Right now I'm enjoying the first beer I've ever brewed and I must say it's not too bad. I bottled last weekend and I wanted to try one to see how well it is carbonating. I tossed one in the fridge this morning. I just popped it open and am enjoying it now. It's carbonated pretty well at this point, but didn't get much of a head in the glass, so it will probably benefit from a couple of more weeks carbonating. I like the taste. It is a very drinkable brew, IMO.

ENDelt260
02-13-2005, 05:22 PM
Shoot, now all you need is an airline, Bob.

Dartgod
02-13-2005, 05:24 PM
Shoot, now all you need is an airline, Bob.
Or a football team or a nuclear weapon.

stevieray
02-13-2005, 05:28 PM
Right now I'm enjoying the first beer I've ever brewed and I must say it's not too bad. I bottled last weekend and I wanted to try one to see how well it is carbonating. I tossed one in the fridge this morning. I just popped it open and am enjoying it now. It's carbonated pretty well at this point, but didn't get much of a head in the glass, so it will probably benefit from a couple of more weeks carbonating. I like the taste. It is a very drinkable brew, IMO.


Congrats!....I want to try one...

Bwana
02-13-2005, 05:51 PM
Right now I'm enjoying the first beer I've ever brewed and I must say it's not too bad. I bottled last weekend and I wanted to try one to see how well it is carbonating. I tossed one in the fridge this morning. I just popped it open and am enjoying it now. It's carbonated pretty well at this point, but didn't get much of a head in the glass, so it will probably benefit from a couple of more weeks carbonating. I like the taste. It is a very drinkable brew, IMO.

Good for you bud! :thumb: What's next??

Dartgod
02-13-2005, 05:55 PM
Good for you bud! :thumb: What's next??
Pale Ale, I think. I know I should let this sit in the bottle for another week or two, but I'm really craving another one right now.

Dartgod
04-02-2006, 02:43 PM
Bumping this because I'm in the middle of brewing my fourth batch, the second one this year. It's a Sierra Nevada Pale Ale clone, second time I've brewed this. It turned out so well last year I figured I'd do it again.

I'll be adding the liquid malt extract here in a few minutes.

JimNasium
04-02-2006, 02:53 PM
Bumping this because I'm in the middle of brewing my fourth batch, the second one this year. It's a Sierra Nevada Pale Ale clone, second time I've brewed this. It turned out so well last year I figured I'd do it again.

I'll be adding the liquid malt extract here in a few minutes.
That's awesome. I've got a house under contract and won't close until April 25th so it looks like it will be at least the first week of May until I get to brew again. :(

Dartgod
04-02-2006, 05:00 PM
Well it's in the fermentor now and the cleanup is finished. I'll be enjoying this tasty new homebrew by Memorial Day. :thumb:

crispystl420
11-27-2011, 06:29 PM
So I brewed my first batch and after two weeks fermenting the shit tastes like apple cider. I used a quarter cup more honey than the recipe called for. Could this be the problem? Should I let it ferment another week?

Lzen
11-27-2011, 06:35 PM
Tastes like apple cider? What style is it supposed to be?

crispystl420
11-27-2011, 06:38 PM
Tastes like apple cider? What style is it supposed to be?

Blonde Ale that I added honey to. Keep in mind I haven't bottled it yet I just tasted it after it fermented. Is this normal?

Lzen
11-27-2011, 06:40 PM
Blonde Ale that I added honey to. Keep in mind I haven't bottled it yet I just tasted it after it fermented. Is this normal?

I see. I never taste after fermenting but before bottling so I can't say if its normal. But I would guess that it probably is normal. You realize that when you add the sugar in the bottles, the remaining yeast feeds on that and ferments for the couple weeks or so that they're in the bottles before serving?

Lzen
11-27-2011, 06:45 PM
I will give one example. My last brew was an amber ale. I let it ferment in the bucket for 3 weeks. I tried one after a week and a half in the bottles. I thought I made a mistake or something because it didn't have much carbonation and didn't taste particularly good. But after about 3 weeks in the bottles, I tried one again just the other day and it tasted pretty good. Point is that some beers take a little longer to finish than others.

crispystl420
11-27-2011, 07:11 PM
I was planning on letting it ferment another week before bottling now I'm wondering if I should just bottle it??

shirtsleeve
11-28-2011, 06:21 AM
I was planning on letting it ferment another week before bottling now I'm wondering if I should just bottle it??

Sounds like either you fermented at the wrong temp, used a funky yeast or weren't sterile enough. Get the brew off the yeast and into a carboy in very cool (fridge) temps. Keep the airlock full of sterile water and let it set for two weeks. All of the funk will drop from the beer and it will clarify nicely. It just might save it. The way to check the fermentation for completion is to check your specific gravity. You should be very close to 1.000 after fermetation considering the type of beer you are trying to brew.

PhillyChiefFan
11-28-2011, 07:44 AM
I brewed an English Pale last week and bottled last night, first batch ever.

I have a feeling I wasn't sterile enough though, and am kind of worried about how it's going to turn out.

Also, I didn't have a wort chiller and the guy who was helping me forgot to tell me that we needed to cool down the wort immediately, so it sat outside and took almost 2 hours to cool down to 55 degrees.

Will that have a terrible effect on it?

1moreTRich
11-28-2011, 09:15 AM
So I brewed my first batch and after two weeks fermenting the shit tastes like apple cider. I used a quarter cup more honey than the recipe called for. Could this be the problem? Should I let it ferment another week?

Green apple off flavor can be a couple of things. Usually it is because the beer is young and hasn't had time to finish fermenting and the yeast hasn't converted all the acetaldehyde. The other, less common ones are the yeast you use is giving off the off flavor, usually because of too high fermentation temps or their was too much sugar (sucrose) used.

Guessing on your description I would guess that it is just too young a this point. Let it keep working, don't take it off the yeast yet, let them finish doing their job. Make sure you are keeping your temperatures in the 65-68 degree range as well.

1moreTRich
11-28-2011, 09:24 AM
I brewed an English Pale last week and bottled last night, first batch ever.

I have a feeling I wasn't sterile enough though, and am kind of worried about how it's going to turn out.

Also, I didn't have a wort chiller and the guy who was helping me forgot to tell me that we needed to cool down the wort immediately, so it sat outside and took almost 2 hours to cool down to 55 degrees.

Will that have a terrible effect on it?

Sanitize not sterilize is the level of cleanliness you are looking for. Did you use some kind of sanitizer such as Star-San, One-Step, or Iodophor?

Usually it is recommended to cool the wort off as quick as possible. This allows what is call the "Cold Break" the protein are thermally shocked and will drop out of suspension. This prevents chill hase. Also the faster you get the wort cooled down, the less time there is for bacteria and oxidation before the yeast can get to work.

With that said 2 hours is not that long of a time. There is a bit of a debate going on about whether rapidly chilling the wort is as necessary as everyone has made it out to be.

As long as you used some sort of sanitizer, I don't think your beer will be too affected. Remember beer is pretty robust, it's harder than you think to ruin it.

crispystl420
11-29-2011, 08:17 PM
Green apple off flavor can be a couple of things. Usually it is because the beer is young and hasn't had time to finish fermenting and the yeast hasn't converted all the acetaldehyde. The other, less common ones are the yeast you use is giving off the off flavor, usually because of too high fermentation temps or their was too much sugar (sucrose) used.

Guessing on your description I would guess that it is just too young a this point. Let it keep working, don't take it off the yeast yet, let them finish doing their job. Make sure you are keeping your temperatures in the 65-68 degree range as well.

Well I left town While it was fermenting and set my heat to 65 but there was a bit of a warm spell here. It could have gotten to around 70-75 is that too high?

otherstar
11-29-2011, 08:47 PM
Well I left town While it was fermenting and set my heat to 65 but there was a bit of a warm spell here. It could have gotten to around 70-75 is that too high?

I ferment ale in Texas at the temp in the summer, but then again I leave it in the bucket for about 4 days, then transfer to a glass carboy for another 3-4 days then I keg it. If I force carbonate it, I can usually drink it about 36 hours after kegging, but it is still a little cloudy at that point. After a week or so in the keg, it's nice and clear. The only times I've ever had off flavors is when I haven't been as careful sanitizing as I should have.

crispystl420
11-29-2011, 09:06 PM
I don't think sanitation is the problem I was very careful in that step.

ReynardMuldrake
11-29-2011, 09:20 PM
I don't think sanitation is the problem I was very careful in that step.

Keep in mind the higher sugar content means more alcohol and more aging before it tastes the way it should. Two weeks after primary is still very very young. When I make wine I age it six months minimum before I even taste it.

Give some time, it will continue to mellow until you can't believe it's the same beer.

1moreTRich
11-29-2011, 09:50 PM
Well I left town While it was fermenting and set my heat to 65 but there was a bit of a warm spell here. It could have gotten to around 70-75 is that too high?

Depending on the yeast, that is probably on the upper end of the spectrum but still probably okay. You also have to realize that when the yeast is fermenting it can be 5-10 degree warmer than the ambient room temperature. I still think it is just on the young side.

KC Dan
11-29-2011, 09:59 PM
my son has been brewing for a little over a year and most of his beers have been very good. Guess what he wants for Christmas?

A 5 gallon keg and kegging accessories!

I have never been prouder of my boy!!!:thumb:ROFL

crispystl420
11-30-2011, 07:17 PM
Depending on the yeast, that is probably on the upper end of the spectrum but still probably okay. You also have to realize that when the yeast is fermenting it can be 5-10 degree warmer than the ambient room temperature. I still think it is just on the young side.

Yeah it doesn't taste skunked or anything just kind of like apple juice I think it's just young.

Dayze
12-01-2011, 09:06 AM
we're moving from an apartment to a house here in a few weeks; I'm looking forward to researchign this stuff again, and hopefully getting a starter set-up sometime in spring.

Dartgod
12-01-2011, 09:21 AM
It's been a couple of years since I brewed and need to get back into it. The local home brew shop is gone now and I'm looking to pickup an extract kit. Anyone have a preference for ordering online? I've looked at quite a few sites but don't have any experience with them.

This one looks promising as far as prices and selection.

http://www.austinhomebrew.com/

Dartgod
12-01-2011, 09:23 AM
my son has been brewing for a little over a year and most of his beers have been very good. Guess what he wants for Christmas?

A 5 gallon keg and kegging accessories!

I have never been prouder of my boy!!!:thumb:ROFL
That's awesome Dan!

1moreTRich
12-01-2011, 12:04 PM
It's been a couple of years since I brewed and need to get back into it. The local home brew shop is gone now and I'm looking to pickup an extract kit. Anyone have a preference for ordering online? I've looked at quite a few sites but don't have any experience with them.

This one looks promising as far as prices and selection.

http://www.austinhomebrew.com/

Austin Homebrew is a great site, very good customer service. Prices can be on the high side sometimes.

Some other good ones I have and do used:
http://www.midwestsupplies.com/homebrewing-ingredients.html
http://www.brewmasterswarehouse.com/ Use code BBBYO for 10% if you use the Brewbuilder.
http://www.northernbrewer.com/ Just updated their site and have been some bugs lately, but I think it has been corrected.

1moreTRich
12-01-2011, 12:07 PM
my son has been brewing for a little over a year and most of his beers have been very good. Guess what he wants for Christmas?

A 5 gallon keg and kegging accessories!

I have never been prouder of my boy!!!:thumb:ROFL

Just an FYI, there are two type of kegs, pin lock and ball lock. Make sure you get the right fittings for the one you choose.

http://stores.kegconnection.com/StoreFront.bok is a place I have used to purchase equipment and the were very helpful in getting me setup. Does he have a fridge or freezer that he is going to use yet?

Shag
12-01-2011, 12:11 PM
Austin Homebrew is a great site, very good customer service. Prices can be on the high side sometimes.

Some other good ones I have and do used:
http://www.midwestsupplies.com/homebrewing-ingredients.html
http://www.brewmasterswarehouse.com/ Use code BBBYO for 10% if you use the Brewbuilder.
http://www.northernbrewer.com/ Just updated there site and have been some bugs lately, but I think it has been corrected.

Northern Brewer and Midwest Supplies are both in my area. Doesn't suck to be a homebrewer in the Twin Cities...

PhillyChiefFan
12-01-2011, 01:27 PM
Sanitize not sterilize is the level of cleanliness you are looking for. Did you use some kind of sanitizer such as Star-San, One-Step, or Iodophor?

Usually it is recommended to cool the wort off as quick as possible. This allows what is call the "Cold Break" the protein are thermally shocked and will drop out of suspension. This prevents chill hase. Also the faster you get the wort cooled down, the less time there is for bacteria and oxidation before the yeast can get to work.

With that said 2 hours is not that long of a time. There is a bit of a debate going on about whether rapidly chilling the wort is as necessary as everyone has made it out to be.

As long as you used some sort of sanitizer, I don't think your beer will be too affected. Remember beer is pretty robust, it's harder than you think to ruin it.


Good to know. Thanks!

I used Star-Sans, it came with the kit I bought. I'm in the market for a wort-chiller and a few other things. I am sure I'm ALREADY addicted to it.

1moreTRich
12-01-2011, 02:17 PM
Good to know. Thanks!

I used Star-Sans, it came with the kit I bought. I'm in the market for a wort-chiller and a few other things. I am sure I'm ALREADY addicted to it.

Star San is what I use and I absolutely love it.

As far a wort chillers go 25inch will be fine for 5 gallon batches, but 50 is always better, haha. I would also recommend getting one with some kind of garden hose fittings for the ends of the copper or putting them on yourself. With mine right now, the hoses are just attached with clamps and I have issues with it leaking because of the temperarture changes during the cool down. Just a suggestion.

KC Dan
12-01-2011, 02:53 PM
Just an FYI, there are two type of kegs, pin lock and ball lock. Make sure you get the right fittings for the one you choose.

http://stores.kegconnection.com/StoreFront.bok is a place I have used to purchase equipment and the were very helpful in getting me setup. Does he have a fridge or freezer that he is going to use yet?Yep, going with a ball-lock type for sure. He is using my garage fridge for now. :thumb:

He will work on getting his own kegerator later. We get all his supplies here at a local brew business (Bader Brew Supplies). It is just down the road from my house here in Vancouver, Wa.

1moreTRich
12-01-2011, 03:54 PM
Yep, going with a ball-lock type for sure. He is using my garage fridge for now. :thumb:

He will work on getting his own kegerator later. We get all his supplies here at a local brew business (Bader Brew Supplies). It is just down the road from my house here in Vancouver, Wa.

Very nice. That first batch you get to keg instead of bottle is freaking awesome. Happy brewing to your son.

Sorce
01-10-2015, 12:06 PM
I bought a dual tap kegerator a few weeks ago. Probably heading to the homebrew store later this afternoon. Just cleaned the carboys, this will be my first attempt at beer, I've made wine before. Probably going to use a kit, are there types of beer that are harder to screw up or is it pretty much the same?

Thinking I may go with a stout for my first beer.

phisherman
01-10-2015, 01:32 PM
Just make sure to sanitize everything thoroughly.

Sorce
01-22-2015, 09:53 AM
Went with an oatmeal stout. Started last Saturday, this picture was taken on Sunday. The bubbling has died down considerably. I think it will be ready to keg this weekend. Not sure how long it will take to force carbonate to where I want it.

http://i.imgur.com/QCidY6k.jpg?1

DMAC
01-22-2015, 11:20 AM
Don't be in a hurry.

Bearcat
01-22-2015, 11:36 AM
Started this last weekend...

http://www.boomchugalug.com/product/i-eat-danger-in-kentucky-for-breakfast-stout/

...I've used ~8oz of chocolate in the past with good results and this called for 24oz. I used 4-6oz of bourbon in the past and was going to maybe double that, and this one calls for a whole ~25oz/750ml bottle. :eek:

An expensive batch with the bourbon, but I'm excited to try it little by little over the next several months.

Sorce
01-22-2015, 11:42 AM
Started this last weekend...

http://www.boomchugalug.com/product/i-eat-danger-in-kentucky-for-breakfast-stout/

...I've used ~8oz of chocolate in the past with good results and this called for 24oz. I used 4-6oz of bourbon in the past and was going to maybe double that, and this one calls for a whole ~25oz/750ml bottle. :eek:

An expensive batch with the bourbon, but I'm excited to try it little by little over the next several months.

Nice, be interested to hear how it turns out.

1moreTRich
01-22-2015, 05:02 PM
Went with an oatmeal stout. Started last Saturday, this picture was taken on Sunday. The bubbling has died down considerably. I think it will be ready to keg this weekend. Not sure how long it will take to force carbonate to where I want it.

I would give it a little more time than a week to ferment. The initial fermentation might be done, but you want to give the yeast a little more time to clean up after themselves and to let the beer develop, especially with a stout. I would wait until at least next weekend to keg it (for me personally I would wait at least 2 1/2-3 weeks).

As for carbonating, it can take as little or as much time as you want depending on the method you choose. You can do the shake method where you basically hook it up to your gas, purge the air that was left and then just start shaking it. This forces the gas into the beer. It's hard to get exactly right and can be tough to get the head down, but it will get the job done quickly. Second method, you can set your gas up really high for a couple days (35psi+) to get it to where you want it and then turn in down to serving psi. Again, this method is hard to get it perfect, but you won't have as tough a time with the head. Third, just set it to the desired psi (probably somewhere between 8-12psi depending on your preference) and let it sit, in around a week it will be where you want it to be.

Now same with fermentation, the longer you let it hang in the keg, the better it probably will be. If you do the quick carb method, you might have a little co2 bite that is less than desirable (kind of a metallic flavor).

Anyway, hope that helps.

Sorce
01-22-2015, 05:52 PM
I would give it a little more time than a week to ferment. The initial fermentation might be done, but you want to give the yeast a little more time to clean up after themselves and to let the beer develop, especially with a stout. I would wait until at least next weekend to keg it (for me personally I would wait at least 2 1/2-3 weeks).

As for carbonating, it can take as little or as much time as you want depending on the method you choose. You can do the shake method where you basically hook it up to your gas, purge the air that was left and then just start shaking it. This forces the gas into the beer. It's hard to get exactly right and can be tough to get the head down, but it will get the job done quickly. Second method, you can set your gas up really high for a couple days (35psi+) to get it to where you want it and then turn in down to serving psi. Again, this method is hard to get it perfect, but you won't have as tough a time with the head. Third, just set it to the desired psi (probably somewhere between 8-12psi depending on your preference) and let it sit, in around a week it will be where you want it to be.

Now same with fermentation, the longer you let it hang in the keg, the better it probably will be. If you do the quick carb method, you might have a little co2 bite that is less than desirable (kind of a metallic flavor).

Anyway, hope that helps.

The kit said 6 days but letting the yeast settle makes sense, I've made wine before and that's the longest part after fermentation ends.

Sorce
01-22-2015, 06:13 PM
After the advice here and a little reading, I think I'll let it sit for 2 more weeks making 3 weeks in the primary. Then keg and let it set for another week. I don't think I want to do the shake method because that would just mix any yeast back in most likely making it take longer to settle in the keg.

Marcellus
01-22-2015, 06:38 PM
Started this last weekend...

http://www.boomchugalug.com/product/i-eat-danger-in-kentucky-for-breakfast-stout/

...I've used ~8oz of chocolate in the past with good results and this called for 24oz. I used 4-6oz of bourbon in the past and was going to maybe double that, and this one calls for a whole ~25oz/750ml bottle. :eek:

An expensive batch with the bourbon, but I'm excited to try it little by little over the next several months.

Nice.

Earlier this year I made a strong Porter starting at 7%.

Added 1/5th of JD American Honey and some oak blocks from JD barrels to the secondary.

Then added cocoa and some dry hops (just a tad to counter the sweetness of the American honey).

I have some bottled and some kegged. I call it Big Drunk Chocolate Bitch. There is actual story behind the name but who cares.

That being said I used 4oz of cocoa nibs and should have used a little more.

I have that and a Saison on tap right now.

Bottle conditioning I have a Saison with Brett that should be getting close.

I also have 10gal of bohemian style pilsner in fermentation.

And I am brewing a big IPA this weekend that I change up a bit here and there each time I brew it.

1moreTRich
01-23-2015, 09:12 AM
Nice.

Earlier this year I made a strong Porter starting at 7%.

Added 1/5th of JD American Honey and some oak blocks from JD barrels to the secondary.

Then added cocoa and some dry hops (just a tad to counter the sweetness of the American honey).

I have some bottled and some kegged. I call it Big Drunk Chocolate Bitch. There is actual story behind the name but who cares.

That being said I used 4oz of cocoa nibs and should have used a little more.

I have that and a Saison on tap right now.

Bottle conditioning I have a Saison with Brett that should be getting close.

I also have 10gal of bohemian style pilsner in fermentation.

And I am brewing a big IPA this weekend that I change up a bit here and there each time I brew it.

I haven't had the balls to do anything with Brett yet, but I absolutely love sour beers and saisons. If you don't mind, let me know your method and how it works out for you.

phisherman
01-23-2015, 09:53 AM
My buddy and I Bretted a flawed 90 Minute IPA clone early last year and it's about ready to rack into the keg. It smells very funky, in a good way. Stoked to try it. I think we ended up using Lambicus or Bruxellensis, can't remember. We also have a couple 5 gallon carboys of Oud Bruin that have been going for almost 6 months each. They're WAY funky.

Bearcat
01-23-2015, 10:00 AM
Nice.

Earlier this year I made a strong Porter starting at 7%.

Added 1/5th of JD American Honey and some oak blocks from JD barrels to the secondary.

Then added cocoa and some dry hops (just a tad to counter the sweetness of the American honey).

I have some bottled and some kegged. I call it Big Drunk Chocolate Bitch. There is actual story behind the name but who cares.

That being said I used 4oz of cocoa nibs and should have used a little more.

I have that and a Saison on tap right now.

Bottle conditioning I have a Saison with Brett that should be getting close.

I also have 10gal of bohemian style pilsner in fermentation.

And I am brewing a big IPA this weekend that I change up a bit here and there each time I brew it.

Did you get much oak out of the blocks? I have some oak blocks soaking in the bourbon at the moment. I've used chips in the past and didn't notice it at all, but might not have let it sit long enough.

I've thought about buying a barrel (http://oakbarrelsltd.com/)... you can also buy 55 gallon used bourbon barrels, so if we could get 11 people to contribute a stout.... :hmmm:

unlurking
12-30-2016, 08:38 PM
My very first brew day! Small 2 gallon batch of an Irish Red.

Just a first test of gear thrown together from Home Depot. Going cheap! Need to add a few more milk crates, bolt 'em all together, and add some wheels.

Had fun and enjoyed a couple cigars, pizza, and beer for a few hours. Seems like an awesome hobby!

http://oi66.tinypic.com/2i9p82r.jpg

KCUnited
12-31-2016, 09:59 AM
I moved from a glass carboy to a Speidel plastic fermenter for my IPAs and couldn't be happier. It's well made. It has a wide, screw off lid making hopping in primary much easier as well as cleaning. It's got a spigot on the bottom making gravity readings and transferring to the keg much easier. It's pretty much solved any oxidation problems I was running into with transferring IPA.

I use the 20L with 4 gallons of beer and the trub typically settles right below the spigot. The 20L is also small enough to fit into my temp controled dorm fridge. Really the only drawback is that its opaque and you can't see into like glass.

https://www.morebeer.com/products/speidel-plastic-fermenter-20l-53-gal.html?gclid=Cj0KEQiAy53DBRCo4en29Zvcla0BEiQAVIDcc7DuB6ZtPNey39aOCCgXmaV1pE200Q1jvUivDhPAfywaArtF8 P8HAQ

Marcellus
04-17-2017, 06:41 PM
I just brewed a beer using Idaho 7 hops (Also called 007) after having Great Divide Hop Disciples using this hop.

I can say enough about this hop if you like IPA's. Perfect blend of piney and fruity. Incredible hop.

http://i541.photobucket.com/albums/gg361/troyacupp/DB33973D-0F51-4F2B-9F8D-D61DCD3357EA_zpsshjsffdz.jpg (http://s541.photobucket.com/user/troyacupp/media/DB33973D-0F51-4F2B-9F8D-D61DCD3357EA_zpsshjsffdz.jpg.html)

Here is my recipe if you are interested. I can convert it to minimash or extract if anyone needs me to.

12 lbs Pale Malt (2 Row) Bel (3.0 SRM) Grain 1 85.7 %
1 lbs Caramel/Crystal Malt - 20L (20.0 SRM) Grain 2 7.1 %
8.0 oz Acid Malt (3.0 SRM) Grain 3 3.6 %
8.0 oz Oats, Flaked (1.0 SRM) Grain 4 3.6 %

Mash Steps
Mash In Add 21.50 qt of water at 161.5 F 152.0 F 60 min

◯ Batch sparge with 2 steps (1.07gal, 4.77gal) of 168.0 F water
◯ Add water to achieve boil volume of 8.53 gal
◯ Estimated pre-boil gravity is 1.046 SG

Boil Ingredients
0.75 oz Nugget [13.00 %] - Boil 60.0 min Hop 5 28.5 IBUs
1.00 oz Idaho 7 [12.40 %] - Boil 20.0 min Hop 6 21.9 IBUs
1.00 Items Whirlfloc Tablet (Boil 15.0 mins) Fining 7 -

Steeped Hop
1.00 oz Idaho 7 [12.40 %] - Steep/Whirlpool 20.0 min

Primary Fermentation at 67.0 F

Dry Hop after 7 days primary
2.00 oz Idaho 7 [12.40 %] - Dry Hop 7.0 Days

Nickhead
04-17-2017, 06:48 PM
I just brewed a beer using Idaho 7 hops (Also called 007) after having Great Divide Hop Disciples using this hop.

I can say enough about this hop if you like IPA's. Perfect blend of piney and fruity. Incredible hop.

http://i541.photobucket.com/albums/gg361/troyacupp/DB33973D-0F51-4F2B-9F8D-D61DCD3357EA_zpsshjsffdz.jpg (http://s541.photobucket.com/user/troyacupp/media/DB33973D-0F51-4F2B-9F8D-D61DCD3357EA_zpsshjsffdz.jpg.html)

good bump. i just bottled a simple coopers draught last night. my first brew was the stock 'lager'. with the simple brew kit, the beer looks flat, but the carb drops appear to 'add' the carbonated texture. that's the only thing off putting about it. it ferments for six or seven days, then bottled for three to four weeks. :D

Marcellus
04-17-2017, 07:04 PM
good bump. i just bottled a simple coopers draught last night. my first brew was the stock 'lager'. with the simple brew kit, the beer looks flat, but the carb drops appear to 'add' the carbonated texture. that's the only thing off putting about it. it ferments for six or seven days, then bottled for three to four weeks. :D

I would let any beer you are making ferment for 10 days to 14 days unless you have testing equipment to make sure its "done" fermenting.

If not you may end up with a bit of a sweet beer.

You did a lager first? What temp did you ferment it at? Once you bottled it did you hold it warm for a week then put it in the fridge for 3 or 4 weeks?

Nickhead
04-17-2017, 07:09 PM
the kit calls for fermenting around 21 C for a week, then in the bottle @18-20 C for 3 weeks.

basically i took a pot of simmering water, added the malt extract, then the brew enhancer. took that pot, put in fermenting container. added cold water to bring to 28 C @ 23 liter mark. added provided yeast packet, and let sit for a week. :D

http://store.coopers.com.au/lager-1-7kg.html

Nickhead
04-17-2017, 07:13 PM
given the fact it is autumn like temp wise, i needed a way to keep the temp consistent. i ferment the beer in my pantry. it's in the middle of the house. on top of that, i wrapped the fermenting container with an old windshield aluminum visor. worked great.

Marcellus
04-17-2017, 07:14 PM
the kit calls for fermenting around 21 C for a week, then in the bottle @18-20 C for 3 weeks.

basically i took a pot of simmering water, added the malt extract, then the brew enhancer. took that pot, put in fermenting container. added cold water to bring to 28 C @ 23 liter mark. added provided yeast packet, and let sit for a week. :D

http://store.coopers.com.au/lager-1-7kg.html

Damn you are a full on metric convert.

My guess is you used ale yeast not Lager yeast. Just lookded at the recipe though and they call it a lager. Thats warm for a lager.

As long as the beer is good it doesn't matter! :thumb:

Nickhead
04-17-2017, 07:19 PM
Damn you are a full on metric convert.

My guess is you used ale yeast not Lager yeast. Just lookded at the recipe though and they call it a lager. Thats warm for a lager.

As long as the beer is good it doesn't matter! :thumb:

i have probably mixed up my two brews as it was merely a cost cutting venture from retail beers.

two brews so far, and one was lager, the other draught ROFL

for each can of malt, it came with its own yeast packet.

my first brew i am drinking now, and it tastes good. i just imagined in my mind when pouring it would head up like in the pics. maybe it does i am just too new to it to know any 'tricks' other than the suggested recipe and fermentation.

as far as warm for lager, i was really surprised at how 'cool' the temps are when doing home brew. just me being a newb is all. :D

ETA: i wanted to but didn't when bottling, but wonder. after capping the beer with carbonation drops, does it help/hurt to give the bottle a shake? i didn't take notice as to how quickly they dissolve?

Marcellus
04-18-2017, 06:11 AM
i have probably mixed up my two brews as it was merely a cost cutting venture from retail beers.

two brews so far, and one was lager, the other draught ROFL

for each can of malt, it came with its own yeast packet.

my first brew i am drinking now, and it tastes good. i just imagined in my mind when pouring it would head up like in the pics. maybe it does i am just too new to it to know any 'tricks' other than the suggested recipe and fermentation.

as far as warm for lager, i was really surprised at how 'cool' the temps are when doing home brew. just me being a newb is all. :D

ETA: i wanted to but didn't when bottling, but wonder. after capping the beer with carbonation drops, does it help/hurt to give the bottle a shake? i didn't take notice as to how quickly they dissolve?

Those carbonation drops suck and that's probably the issue. Look for some actual priming sugar you add to the beer before bottling, it should be easy to find.

KCUnited
04-18-2017, 06:29 AM
NEIPA I brewed with London Ale III, hopped with El Dorado, Citra, and Mosaic. It's actually a WeldWerks Juicy Bits clone that I hope to get to try the real deal one day. The keg just kicked last weekend. It was easily my best brew yet. Getting my chloride:sulfate ratio in the 2.5/1 range made a big difference in the style.

http://i1290.photobucket.com/albums/b539/KCUnited1/0316d84e-8c51-4c31-b162-ee42d992072c_zpsj8gz4o0l.jpg

Marcellus
04-18-2017, 06:35 PM
NEIPA I brewed with London Ale III, hopped with El Dorado, Citra, and Mosaic. It's actually a WeldWerks Juicy Bits clone that I hope to get to try the real deal one day. The keg just kicked last weekend. It was easily my best brew yet. Getting my chloride:sulfate ratio in the 2.5/1 range made a big difference in the style.

http://i1290.photobucket.com/albums/b539/KCUnited1/0316d84e-8c51-4c31-b162-ee42d992072c_zpsj8gz4o0l.jpg

You nailed the haziness aspect of NEIPA.

I like all those hops, sounds interesting.

KCUnited
04-18-2017, 07:39 PM
You nailed the haziness aspect of NEIPA.

I like all those hops, sounds interesting.

I've used 1318 5x now and have yet to have a beer fallout. It's a beast.

Here's the recipe and some of my notes.

MALT/GRAIN BILL
10 lb (4.5 kg) pale-ale malt [4.1 SRM]
1 lb (454 g) flaked wheat [1.6 SRM]
1 lb (454 g) flaked oats [1.0 SRM]
12 oz (340 g) Dextrin malt [2.0 SRM]

HOPS SCHEDULE
0.15 oz (4.2 g) Mosaic [13.1% AA] at FWH
0.15 oz (4.2 g) Citra [12.5% AA] at FWH
0.15 oz (4.2 g) El Dorado [14.8% AA] at FWH

0.2 oz (5.7 g) Mosaic [13.1% AA] at 40 steep
0.2 oz (5.7 g) Citra [12.5% AA] at 40 steep
0.2 oz (5.7 g) El Dorado [14.8% AA] at 40 steep

0.45 oz (12.8 g) Mosaic [13.1% AA] at 30 steep
0.45 oz (12.8 g) Citra [12.5% AA] at 30 steep
0.45 oz (12.8 g) El Dorado [14.8% AA] steep

0.6 oz (17 g) Mosaic [13.1% AA] at 20 steep
0.6 oz (17 g) Citra [12.5% AA] at 20 steep
0.6 oz (17 g) El Dorado [14.8% AA] at 20 steep

0.65 oz (18.4 g) Mosaic [13.1% AA] dry hop for 8 days, starting at 5Ė5.5į Plato (1.020Ė1.022)
0.65 oz (18.4 g) Citra [12.5% AA] dry hop for 8 days, starting at 5Ė5.5į Plato (1.020Ė1.022)
0.65 oz (18.4 g) El Dorado [14.8% AA] dry hop for 8 days, starting at 5Ė5.5į Plato (1.020Ė1.022)

1 oz (28 g) Mosaic [13.1% AA] dry hop for 4 days
1 oz (28 g) Citra [12.5% AA] dry hop for 4 days
1 oz (28 g) El Dorado [14.8% AA] dry hop for 4 days

Yeast: Wyeast 1318, w/starter, intermittent shaking

Mash Temp: 149F

Water:
Ca 148, Mg 12, Na 8, Cl 178, SO4 78

Hop Schedule:
FWH - Same
40 minute - Flame out
30 minute - 175F
20 minute - 165F

I don't have a whirlpool system, so I just let the temp drop naturally, with my immersion chiller inserted to stir the hops and drop to fermentation temp after the 20 minute addition.

OG: 1.066

Fermentation Temp: 67F, temp controlled

I was at 1.022 after 36 hours and added my 8 day dry hops

I was at 1.012 on day 6 and added my 4 day dry hops

Due to ambient room temp, I was only able to raise fermentation temp to 69F in an attempted diacetyl rest. Fortunately, I'm not picking up any diacetyl.

Kegged on day 10, no dry hops in keg.

FG: 1.012

Marcellus
04-19-2017, 08:10 AM
Interesting, so the only real bittering hops are the FWH and not much at that. Whats the projected IBU around 50?

I know that IBU isn't a perfect indicator of bitterness I am just curious. I may give this a shot for fun.

KCUnited
04-19-2017, 08:37 AM
Interesting, so the only real bittering hops are the FWH and not much at that. Whats the projected IBU around 50?

I know that IBU isn't a perfect indicator of bitterness I am just curious. I may give this a shot for fun.

I was honestly leery about the FWH addition as I usually just do 5 minute or flameout additions for this "style", but it was just right, for me anyway. I use BeerSmith to build my recipes. It lists the IBU's at 84, but I don't rely on their whirlpool/steep IBU calculations, especially when adding them at different post boil-temps. It certainly doesn't come across that bitter.

KCUnited
05-06-2017, 11:52 AM
My lastest hazy IPA. This one is Fawcett Pearl Malt, hopped with Citra and Mosaic with Wyeast 1318.

http://i1290.photobucket.com/albums/b539/KCUnited1/e6cea7e6-2384-4ee4-9dce-8edd140fd4c8_zpsrpkfoq0s.jpg

KCrockaholic
05-06-2017, 12:10 PM
Perfect timing for this thread to get bumped. I ordered a homebrew kit from Northern Brewing a couple days ago. I've never brewed before, but I'm looking into making some citra IPA types.

So since I'll be a brewing noob, what do I need to know or be careful of? Is it just trial and error?

My family is coming into town at the end of June. I'd rather my first batch not be completely terrible when they try it.

KCUnited
05-06-2017, 12:21 PM
If you're extract brewing, Northern Brewer sells a 5 gallon Zombie Dirt kit which is a Zombie Dust clone; a 100% citra pale ale.

EDIT: Holy balls. I just looked it up and that kit is $60! Had no idea extract kits were that spendy.

Anyway, just pick up John Palmer's How To Brew. You can probably find the online version by googling it. Watch some Youtube videos and google specific questions which should lead you to a homebrewing forum full of info. Maybe pick up a magazine like Brew Your Own that has recipes listed in both all grain and extract versions.

Indian Chief
05-06-2017, 12:26 PM
Good timing. I brewed last night. A bourbon vanilla porter for the winter. I knew I would have to let it bottle condition for several months so I had to plan ahead.

I'm still trying to decide which bourbon to soak the oak cubes in for secondary. Considering Bulleit, Elijah Craig 12, Maker's, and Woodford. Any suggestions would be welcome.

KCrockaholic
05-06-2017, 12:30 PM
If you're extract brewing, Northern Brewer sells a 5 gallon Zombie Dirt kit which is a Zombie Dust clone; a 100% citra pale ale.

EDIT: Holy balls. I just looked it up and that kit is $60! Had no idea extract kits were that spendy.

Anyway, just pick up John Palmer's How To Brew. You can probably find the online version by googling it. Watch some Youtube videos and google specific questions which should lead you to a homebrewing forum full of info. Maybe pick up a magazine like Brew Your Own that has recipes listed in both all grain and extract versions.

I'm going to do my first batch with extract, then eventually try out all grain brewing. I've got a couple home brew books on order at the library that I'll check out for a couple weeks. Btw your beers look terrific in color.

KCrockaholic
05-06-2017, 12:31 PM
Good timing. I brewed last night. A bourbon vanilla porter for the winter. I knew I would have to let it bottle condition for several months so I had to plan ahead.

I'm still trying to decide which bourbon to soak the oak cubes in for secondary. Considering Bulleit, Elijah Craig 12, Maker's, and Woodford. Any suggestions would be welcome.

I really like Buffalo Trace, but aim for a quality whiskey that's rich in flavor imo.

KCUnited
05-06-2017, 12:40 PM
I'm going to do my first batch with extract, then eventually try out all grain brewing. I've got a couple home brew books on order at the library that I'll check out for a couple weeks. Btw your beers look terrific in color.

Thanks. That was only my 12th batch. I started with an extract brew and moved to all grain. I'm still a n00b but my best advice would be to not over complicate things early on and just learn about your equipment and focus on keeping everything clean and sanitized and have some fun.

lewdog
05-06-2017, 01:50 PM
Good timing. I brewed last night. A bourbon vanilla porter for the winter. I knew I would have to let it bottle condition for several months so I had to plan ahead.

I'm still trying to decide which bourbon to soak the oak cubes in for secondary. Considering Bulleit, Elijah Craig 12, Maker's, and Woodford. Any suggestions would be welcome.

Not a huge Maker's or Buffalo Trace fan.

Depends on what you want to spend or if that's not a concern. Regular Bulleit doesn't compare to EC 12 or Woodford, IMO. Bulleit 10 year on the other hand is great and actually distilled by 4 roses. 4 roses always knows what they are doing.

KCrockaholic
05-14-2017, 04:45 PM
I'm doing my first home brew tomorrow evening. I have a Chinook IPA recipe but I want to be a little more creative with it and make this more of a hoppy citrus IPA.

My current plan is

1oz Chinook at 60m
1oz Chinook at 30m
1oz Cascade at 15m
1oz Chinook at 5m

Dry hop after 5 days days with 1oz Citra.

I'm also wanting to add orange zest at the end of the boil.

Any advice is appreciated. I'm wanting to raise the abv of this up from about 6% to closer to 7%. Any advice on how to do that as well?

KCUnited
05-14-2017, 04:57 PM
A fermentable sugar (turbinado, corn) at 15 left in the boil will bump the OG. Or up your grains/extract to make it bigger.

KCrockaholic
05-14-2017, 05:08 PM
A fermentable sugar (turbinado, corn) at 15 left in the boil will bump the OG. Or up your grains/extract to make it bigger.

Ok, I have an 8 gallon kettle, but it's for a 5 gallon batch. Would .5lb of corn sugar be enough to bump it up 1%?

KCUnited
05-14-2017, 05:12 PM
Ok, I have an 8 gallon kettle, but it's for a 5 gallon batch. Would .5lb of corn sugar be enough to bump it up 1%?

No idea. There may be a calculation out there on the Internets though.

KCrockaholic
05-14-2017, 05:21 PM
Looks like roughly .75lb of cane sugar should do the trick. I have a hydrometer, so I'll see how it turns out.

Zebedee DuBois
05-14-2017, 05:52 PM
To raise abv, you add more sugar. If you are doing an extract batch, add more malt extract. If you are doing all-grain, add more 2-row. Cheers!

KCrockaholic
05-14-2017, 08:15 PM
To raise abv, you add more sugar. If you are doing an extract batch, add more malt extract. If you are doing all-grain, add more 2-row. Cheers!

It is indeed an extract kit. I grabbed some white cane sugar from the store.

Marcellus
05-15-2017, 08:27 AM
I'm doing my first home brew tomorrow evening. I have a Chinook IPA recipe but I want to be a little more creative with it and make this more of a hoppy citrus IPA.

My current plan is

1oz Chinook at 60m
1oz Chinook at 30m
1oz Cascade at 15m
1oz Chinook at 5m

Dry hop after 5 days days with 1oz Citra.

I'm also wanting to add orange zest at the end of the boil.

Any advice is appreciated. I'm wanting to raise the abv of this up from about 6% to closer to 7%. Any advice on how to do that as well?

1lb of sugar will bump ABV without doing damage.

My advice is take the 15min and 45 minute additions and add them at flame out (sometimes called steep or whirlpool). When you stop the boil put the lid on your pot and let it set for about 5 minutes.. Put those 2oz of hops in and then let it set for another 20 minutes, then proceed as usual.

You will get way more hop flavor using 2oz at flame out than you will get adding them at 15 and 5.

I would also recommend 2oz for dry hop in 5gal of beer.

I have been making some fantastic IPA's lately with my only hop additions being 60, 30, and flame out, then a 5 day dry hop in primary after 7 days of fermentation.

Also for anyone who plans to get beyond kit brewing, I highly recommend BeerSmith software.

Well worth the $30.

www.beersmith.com

ChiefGator
05-15-2017, 01:23 PM
I admit I like the taste of hops, but putting hops in at 60 minutes seems like a huge waste. Fifteen minutes before the end of the boil is generally as early as I will add them.

Marcellus
05-15-2017, 01:36 PM
I admit I like the taste of hops, but putting hops in at 60 minutes seems like a huge waste. Fifteen minutes before the end of the boil is generally as early as I will add them.

You need to have some level of bittering hop to offset the sweetness. 60 minute hops are just that, for bittering and add very little flavor.

You don't use any 60 minute hop additions? I know that's been done but that's still a rarity.

Since you don't get any real hop flavor from 60 minute hops just bitternes some breweries actually use a hop oil concentrate at 60 minutes rather than actual hops. First wort hopping is another thing popular now where you add hops before the boil and some people even put hops in their mash.

Best bet is to use a strong bittering hop like Magnum for your 60 minute addition so you use less and its a bit cheaper.

KCUnited
05-15-2017, 01:49 PM
I've pretty much settled into a small amount of FWHs and big steep additions for my hoppy beers, nothing in between. Adjusting my water and adding my first round of dry hops before fermentation is complete have made the biggest impact on improving my hoppy beers.

Marcellus
05-15-2017, 01:56 PM
I've pretty much settled into a small amount of FWHs and big steep additions for my hoppy beers, nothing in between. Adjusting my water and adding my first round of dry hops before fermentation is complete have made the biggest impact on improving my hoppy beers.

Yea FWH while providing flavor and a more smooth bitterness is basically your 60 minute addition.

I have been doing 7 days fermentation then adding hops for 5 days and then cold crash and keg. I can get a beer into the keg and drinkable in as little as 2 weeks. Thats the nice thing about force carbing. You can crank it up to 40psi for a day and have a drinkable beer pretty fast.

Less time if there is no dry hop.

Marcellus
05-15-2017, 01:57 PM
We need to arrange a CP Homebrew beer swap. That could be fun.

KCUnited
05-15-2017, 02:06 PM
Yea FWH while providing flavor and a more smooth bitterness is basically your 60 minute addition.

I have been doing 7 days fermentation then adding hops for 5 days and then cold crash and keg. I can get a beer into the keg and drinkable in as little as 2 weeks. Thats the nice thing about force carbing. You can crank it up to 40psi for a day and have a drinkable beer pretty fast.

Less time if there is no dry hop.

I ferment for 7 days as well and add my first round of dry hops at roughly ~1.024, which is about 36 hours into fermentation with my prefered yeast and leave them til I keg. I like the biotransformation I get from certain hops while the yeast is still active and I can pop the top on my fermentor to add them while its still producing CO2. After I keg, I've found it dependant on the yeast for when it's best. I brew a lot with Wyeast 1318 and I've found that 3 weeks in the keg is it's sweet spot.

KCUnited
05-15-2017, 02:09 PM
We need to arrange a CP Homebrew beer swap. That could be fun.

I'd totally be down for that, but I've yet to successfully bottle an IPA without oxidizing it, so I keg everything. Anyone have experience using a keg gun to bottle?

KCUnited
05-15-2017, 02:17 PM
I've seen other forums do something where everyone agrees upon a style and ingredients until they come up with a recipe. Everyone brews the same recipe then shares their thoughts/experience. I'd be down for something like that to. We could come up with a CP beer.

Zebedee DuBois
05-15-2017, 04:16 PM
I'd totally be down for that, but I've yet to successfully bottle an IPA without oxidizing it, so I keg everything. Anyone have experience using a keg gun to bottle?

Just used a blichman beer-gun for the first time on the last batch. We filled about 90 bottles. Had to fiddle with the keg pressure a little to find the optimum delivery flow - but overall we were very pleased with the performance.

Pawnmower
05-15-2017, 04:36 PM
I've seen other forums do something where everyone agrees upon a style and ingredients until they come up with a recipe. Everyone brews the same recipe then shares their thoughts/experience. I'd be down for something like that to. We could come up with a CP beer.

I'd be game , I have a small setup but I do mainly extract with some grain infusion. I have about 12 gallon capacity per run.

KCUnited
05-15-2017, 08:26 PM
I'd be game , I have a small setup but I do mainly extract with some grain infusion. I have about 12 gallon capacity per run.

Word. I brew 3 to 3.5 gallon batches. I use the BeerSmith software Marcellus linked which can convert to extract, so we should be able to provide an all grain/extract recipe.

If a few more people are interested we/I/someone can create a separate thread. With my small capacity, I struggle to brew bigger beers, but something crushable might be better for a CP beer on Sunday's. We can cross that bridge later though.

Speak up if you're interested.

KCrockaholic
05-15-2017, 11:33 PM
Finished my first brew night at about 11pm. Started around 8pm. My hop schedule was

1oz Chinook at 60
1oz Chinook at 15
1oz Chinook at 5
1oz Cascade at 0

1lb sugar at 2m

Brought the temp down to 83 degrees before entering the fermentation carboy. Added yeast. Sitting now in the closet trying to keep the temp steady with a water + frozen water bottle bucket.

My OG was 1.050 or something close to that. I'm a dumb dumb though. The first wort I used was from the 2.75 Gal batch from the kettle before I added the other water. I sawa 1.130 OG and nearly shit myself. Then quickly realized why. Anyways, I'm looking forward to the coming weeks of seeing how this one turns out.

I could've done a couple things differently but it's my first batch. Trial and error.

I'll be dry hopping with Citra after 5 days. Maybe Saturday. Quick question. Should I dry hop in the primary or secondary?

KCrockaholic
05-15-2017, 11:41 PM
Word. I brew 3 to 3.5 gallon batches. I use the BeerSmith software Marcellus linked which can convert to extract, so we should be able to provide an all grain/extract recipe.

If a few more people are interested we/I/someone can create a separate thread. With my small capacity, I struggle to brew bigger beers, but something crushable might be better for a CP beer on Sunday's. We can cross that bridge later though.

Speak up if you're interested.

I'd do it. I plan on my primary carboy always being full of something.

ChiefGator
05-16-2017, 12:53 PM
You need to have some level of bittering hop to offset the sweetness. 60 minute hops are just that, for bittering and add very little flavor.

You don't use any 60 minute hop additions? I know that's been done but that's still a rarity.

Since you don't get any real hop flavor from 60 minute hops just bitternes some breweries actually use a hop oil concentrate at 60 minutes rather than actual hops. First wort hopping is another thing popular now where you add hops before the boil and some people even put hops in their mash.

Best bet is to use a strong bittering hop like Magnum for your 60 minute addition so you use less and its a bit cheaper.

I don't really like my beer that bitter I guess. I absolutely love the fresh taste of hops though, so I will heavily hop it in the last bit. I think I have done 30 minute boils.

Haven't yet done a dry hop.

I do agree as well.. if you are going to let hops boil for 60 minutes, I would go for the cheapest hops.. don't waste some good German Tettnang or any noble hops really.

Dartgod
05-16-2017, 01:16 PM
I've seen other forums do something where everyone agrees upon a style and ingredients until they come up with a recipe. Everyone brews the same recipe then shares their thoughts/experience. I'd be down for something like that to. We could come up with a CP beer.

I'd be down for something like that. It's been a few years since I brewed, but still have all the equipment and I need a reason to get it out.

KCUnited
05-16-2017, 01:22 PM
Cool, I think that's 4 of us interested.

I'll nominate Springfield Watch Party as a name for the beer.

ChiefGator
05-16-2017, 02:34 PM
Damn.. I would like to be in.. Getting awfully tired of no backyard in the condo I am renting... still not committed to buying in this city, although I did just start looking at 10 acres of backyard and how much that costs outside Jacksonville.

KCUnited
05-16-2017, 04:39 PM
Ok, seems like we've got a few people interested in a CP homebrew collaboration.

Here's what I was thinking and have seen done on other beer forums, and please feel free to chime in with alternative or better ideas:

- Start an official signup thread. Whoever is interested posts their name and a couple styles they like or think would work for all experience levels.

- Once we know who's interested, we can create a poll or come to a consensus on the style.

- From there we can vote/come to a consensus on the ingredients, yeast, and brewing/fermentation process. We should be able to convert the recipe for all/partial grain and extract brewers.

- Ideally, everyone would brew the recipe on their own and post photos, thoughts, tasting notes, recommendations, whatever.

- Profit.

My threads typically have the same probability for success as a child sired by Travis Henry, but I don't mind organizing it unless someone with more homebrewing experience and/or CP clout wants to do it.

What do y'all think?

Marcellus
05-16-2017, 05:38 PM
Ok, seems like we've got a few people interested in a CP homebrew collaboration.

Here's what I was thinking and have seen done on other beer forums, and please feel free to chime in with alternative or better ideas:

- Start an official signup thread. Whoever is interested posts their name and a couple styles they like or think would work for all experience levels.

- Once we know who's interested, we can create a poll or come to a consensus on the style.

- From there we can vote/come to a consensus on the ingredients, yeast, and brewing/fermentation process. We should be able to convert the recipe for all/partial grain and extract brewers.

- Ideally, everyone would brew the recipe on their own and post photos, thoughts, tasting notes, recommendations, whatever.

- Profit.

My threads typically have the same probability for success as a child sired by Travis Henry, but I don't mind organizing it unless someone with more home brewing experience and/or CP clout wants to do it.

What do y'all think?

Im in and could offer some help for the noobs.

Suggestion would be to make a simple beer, maybe a pale ale or a Saison.

This time of year with warmer temps Saison is easy to ferment, a yeast like Wyeast 3274 can make a good Saison at 75-80 degrees in fermentation. I have temp control for fermentation but I know many do not.

KCUnited
05-16-2017, 05:59 PM
Im in and could offer some help for the noobs.

Suggestion would be to make a simple beer, maybe a pale ale or a Saison.

This time of year with warmer temps Saison is easy to ferment, a yeast like Wyeast 3274 can make a good Saison at 75-80 degrees in fermentation. I have temp control for fermentation but I know many do not.

Cool. Hopefully this can be something for everyone. An excuse for experienced brewers to do something different, or motivation to dust off (and sanitize) some equipment and fire a burner for others, or a learning experience for beginners.

I agree with you and was thinking session IPA or pale, but you bring up a good point on the wide fermentation temp range for saisons, plus their simplicity of ingredients and drinkability.

We can leave it here for a day or so for any more feedback and then get an official signup of who's interested and go from there.

Pawnmower
05-16-2017, 07:20 PM
Word. I brew 3 to 3.5 gallon batches. I use the BeerSmith software Marcellus linked which can convert to extract, so we should be able to provide an all grain/extract recipe.

If a few more people are interested we/I/someone can create a separate thread. With my small capacity, I struggle to brew bigger beers, but something crushable might be better for a CP beer on Sunday's. We can cross that bridge later though.

Speak up if you're interested.

Hell yah. Im in gor sure. Ill take some pics too. Ill probably just do a 5 gallon batch in my 7 gallon primary. I would mildly prefer IPA but ill go with the majority!

unlurking
05-16-2017, 07:27 PM
I'd love to try the group recipe. Remote participant from Denver. All grain, 3 gallon batch setup.

I'm totally up for an IPA as well. Was planning on trying the Avery Maharaja recipe this summer.

KCrockaholic
05-16-2017, 07:42 PM
I think it'd be cool if we could all do a batch within the same couple of days. Almost like a fantasy football draft online. Getting everyone to join in and post their updates in the same thread. Then we could all be on the same cycle and decide upon the exact recipe, boil time, fermentation time, ect.

Then all be able to drink the same beer within a day or two of each other after 6 weeks or whatever time frame. Just have an entire thread dedicated to our homebrew updates and help others who seemed to run into problems. Post pics or videos.

My first batch is looking great so far. The airlock is going crazy already. But I have the temp hovering around 68 degrees. I'd really be excited if my first batch goes smoothly.

I felt like the brew night was a success and didn't run into any issues.

Blurry pic but this is after 22 hours.

unlurking
05-16-2017, 08:04 PM
If anyone wants a free option to beersmith, I use brewtoad.

https://www.brewtoad.com/

Someone can publish the recipe, anyone with a free account can then enter a brew log that automatically adjust the recipe for their system.

Indian Chief
05-16-2017, 08:06 PM
Interested in doing a concurrent brew with everyone. I have a 5 gallon setup but would probably do a half batch because of space/bottling restrictions for me.

JASONSAUTO
05-16-2017, 08:30 PM
This is fucking awesome, I'm rooting for you guys too pull this off.
Have fun!

KCrockaholic
05-16-2017, 11:47 PM
Im in and could offer some help for the noobs.

Suggestion would be to make a simple beer, maybe a pale ale or a Saison.

This time of year with warmer temps Saison is easy to ferment, a yeast like Wyeast 3274 can make a good Saison at 75-80 degrees in fermentation. I have temp control for fermentation but I know many do not.

What do you use for temp control? I'd be up for anything but a lager. I'm not about to chill anything to 55 degrees in the summer. Saison makes a great beer though. 76 degrees would be easy to pull off with the summer around the corner.

Zebedee DuBois
05-17-2017, 05:16 AM
Im in and could offer some help for the noobs.

Suggestion would be to make a simple beer, maybe a pale ale or a Saison.

This time of year with warmer temps Saison is easy to ferment, a yeast like Wyeast 3274 can make a good Saison at 75-80 degrees in fermentation. I have temp control for fermentation but I know many do not.

I've got a Wyeast 3274 Saison fermenting right now!

This is the second go at this recipe, the first time I wasn't aware of 3274's tendency to stall. Now I have some heating wraps on a controller. I'm 4 days in, I had it at about 80 for a couple days and now have it at 86

Any advice on temps and time?

Marcellus
05-17-2017, 06:17 AM
I've got a Wyeast 3274 Saison fermenting right now!

This is the second go at this recipe, the first time I wasn't aware of 3274's tendency to stall. Now I have some heating wraps on a controller. I'm 4 days in, I had it at about 80 for a couple days and now have it at 86

Any advice on temps and time?

Sometimes it will stall at 1.03 or so. If you keep it at 80 or above for a few weeks it will finish out. I have never had it stall at 80F only when I started it at 72. I get the best results going around 72 for a week or so then turning it up to 80 for another 2 weeks. I just kegged a saison on Sunday using that temp range and time. I think I have use 3274 5 or 6 times now.

You may want to give the fermenter a little shake to rouse the yeast just a bit. I have never gone above 80 using that yeast, curious to see how the 96 effects it.

What do you use for temp control? I'd be up for anything but a lager. I'm not about to chill anything to 55 degrees in the summer. Saison makes a great beer though. 76 degrees would be easy to pull off with the summer around the corner.


I have a carboy heater that I put on the carboy then I put it in a chest freezer I have with temp control.

My temp controller has a plug for heat and cool so between the carboy heater and the freezer they kick on and off to maintain temp. I have the temp probe taped to the carboy to monitor its temperature not the temp of the freezer. I can keep temp within a few degrees of set point all the time using this method.

In the summer I dont need the heater just the cooling unless I am making a saison or something I want to maintain 80 degrees or so.

unlurking
05-17-2017, 06:52 AM
Heh. How about something that is a little more forgiving? I have a stable 67į environment during the summer.

Marcellus
05-17-2017, 07:20 AM
I guess we could start informal poll to see what style but IPA appears to be a favorite.

KCUnited
05-17-2017, 08:04 AM
I can get started on a signup/style thread. Logistically I was thinking each person that's interested can post the top 2 styles they're interested in brewing, ranked #1 and #2, in the thread. I can update the OP with names and style preferences. If there's no definitive consensus, we can put it to a formal vote with a poll.

From there, we can decide on ABV/gravities. Then grains, hops, yeast, and so forth.

Once we have the recipe, we can create an official thread for the beer and consolidate informative links within the OP.

phisherman
05-17-2017, 08:25 AM
Hazy IPA all the way.

unlurking
05-17-2017, 08:44 AM
1) citrus ipa
2) belgian strong

KCUnited
05-17-2017, 08:46 AM
Fuck it, I just created a poll.

http://www.chiefsplanet.com/BB/showthread.php?t=307783

I kept it simple, so if you want another style that isn't listed, write it in. If IPA or Pale wins, we can have a discussion on west coast, hazy, dank, tropical, etc. afterwards.

Marcellus
05-17-2017, 12:24 PM
On a side note I am in an Iron Brewers contest our local brewing club is doing.

Basically we came up with a list of ingredients, set up bracket and started a tournament.

You have to brew a beer using an ingredient randomly drawn from the list and you go head to head against another brewer making a beer using that same ingredient.

You both bring the beer to the monthly meeting and they do blind tastings and vote.

Anyway I think I lucked out as I ended up with Lemon Grass and have several ideas using that.

One of the ingredients on the list was yellow mustard. Imagine trying to make a beer and using mustard.

Rules state you must use the ingredient and you have to be able to taste it in the beer.

I saw another brew club's ingredient board for this same style contest and one of the ingredients was Cpt Crunch. Holy shit could you imagine.

KCrockaholic
05-21-2017, 04:35 PM
Today is day 6 post brew. Did the citra hop yesterday. My Krausen has begun to fall off and I currently have a thin layer of green on top I'm sure due to the hop pellets expanding and disintegrating into the beer.

My current plan is to bottle on June 2nd. Then begin the next batch of something else on June 3rd. Hopefully June 2nd isn't too early.

Nickhead
05-21-2017, 04:48 PM
moisture in the top of glass bottle, and small white floaters in the beer. i assume the caps didn't fit the bottle properly? (was my fear from the beginning that the bottles i used may not be the standard bottle top size).

Marcellus
05-21-2017, 04:50 PM
Today is day 6 post brew. Did the citra hop yesterday. My Krausen has begun to fall off and I currently have a thin layer of green on top I'm sure due to the hop pellets expanding and disintegrating into the beer.

My current plan is to bottle on June 2nd. Then begin the next batch of something else on June 3rd. Hopefully June 2nd isn't too early.

June 2nd should be way past when you can bottle that beer unless its an imperial. Not sure why you would think it could be too early. Fermentation will be way done by then and thats a long dry hop. You wont hurt anything by going that long though.

If your next brew you are doing a beer using the same kind of yeast you can literally dump the beer onto that yeast cake in the fermenter after you rack off of it to bottle that beer. Save you some time and $ on yeast and will work fine 2 or 3 times.

I often take the yeast cake and trub off the bottom of my fermenter and put it it into sanitized mason jars and save it in the fridge for beers I make later.