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RINGLEADER
01-28-2005, 10:10 AM
Courtesy Ted Kennedy. I think I'll let his comment speak for itself lest I be accused of smearing the Democratic leader's true intentions. Maybe one of the libs on the board can explain how this morale-boosting statement is going to help the cause in Iraq.

Soupnazi
01-28-2005, 10:14 AM
I just let Ted Kennedy's comments roll right off my back kinda like, well, like a car rolls off a bridge in Chappequidick.

memyselfI
01-28-2005, 10:16 AM
Courtesy Ted Kennedy. I think I'll let his comment speak for itself lest I be accused of smearing the Democratic leader's true intentions. Maybe one of the libs on the board can explain how this morale-boosting statement is going to help the cause in Iraq.

Ouch!!!

Ted is reminding us sometimes the truth hurts.

mlyonsd
01-28-2005, 10:18 AM
I just let Ted Kennedy's comments roll right off my back kinda like, well, like a car rolls off a bridge in Chappequidick.

ROFL

Loki
01-28-2005, 11:05 AM
errr... ahhh... *hic*

Loki
01-28-2005, 11:07 AM
still waiting to hear 'presidential hopeful' ted kennedy's SOLUTION to the problem...

errr... ahhh... *hic*

RINGLEADER
01-28-2005, 03:23 PM
Ouch!!!

Ted is reminding us sometimes the truth hurts.


ROFL

Frankly, I find it a lot easier to be on the side of the argument that supports the mission in Iraq, doesn't call it another Vietnam and doesn't applaud keeping military recruiters from doing their job. I don't see how the left benefits by being anti-war or anti-soldier, but they sure are determined to try and find the way...

RINGLEADER
01-28-2005, 03:42 PM
still waiting to hear 'presidential hopeful' ted kennedy's SOLUTION to the problem...

errr... ahhh... *hic*


He has a plan...

Er, oh wait...nevermind...that was Kerry.

You would think if the secret plan to insure success in Iraq that he trumpeted at every stop (while simultaneously claiming he couldn't reveal what it was until he took office) was so rock-solid he would have shared it with the American people by now.

memyselfI
01-28-2005, 03:44 PM
ROFL

Frankly, I find it a lot easier to be on the side of the argument that supports the mission in Iraq, doesn't call it another Vietnam and doesn't applaud keeping military recruiters from doing their job. I don't see how the left benefits by being anti-war or anti-soldier, but they sure are determined to try and find the way...

There is no 'benefit' other than ensuring this does not go on as long as Vietnam did...

people justifiably have less tolerance and stomach for such a waste of time, energy, and lives.

Loki
01-28-2005, 03:58 PM
He has a plan...

Er, oh wait...nevermind...that was Kerry.

You would think if the secret plan to insure success in Iraq that he trumpeted at every stop (while simultaneously claiming he couldn't reveal what it was until he took office) was so rock-solid he would have shared it with the American people by now.

those plans will be coming out in the book deal now in the work$.

the bitter b@stard has to make those non-believers pay somehow
for not voting him in...
:p

SBK
01-28-2005, 04:33 PM
Was it me or was Teddy all red BEFORE he started screaming?

memyselfI
01-28-2005, 04:59 PM
those plans will be coming out in the book deal now in the work$.

the bitter b@stard has to make those non-believers pay somehow
for not voting him in...
:p

Perhaps he and poor 'outed' Mary Cheney can go on a book tour together... ROFL

Calcountry
01-28-2005, 05:15 PM
Ouch!!!

Ted is reminding us sometimes the truth hurts.Ted is a mutha fuggin traitor.

BIG_DADDY
01-28-2005, 07:47 PM
Ted Kennedy should have been locked up a long time ago. I am sure his statement is right on if your a Sunni.

BIG_DADDY
01-28-2005, 07:48 PM
errr... ahhh... *hic*

http://terpsboy.com/blogpics/tedchap.jpg

NICE!!!

BigOlChiefsfan
01-29-2005, 07:27 AM
http://iowahawk.typepad.com/iowahawk/2005/01/it_is_finally_t.html

stumppy
01-29-2005, 07:33 AM
http://iowahawk.typepad.com/iowahawk/2005/01/it_is_finally_t.html

Nice....real nice.:thumb:

CHIEF4EVER
01-29-2005, 08:17 AM
The LWNJ have a lot of nerve if you think about it. They supported a lying, murdering, draft dodging, dope smoking adulterer as president; they support giving our liberty to the UN; they support killing helpless babies (abortion); and they support everyone but the soldier defending their worthless azzez. pretty lame.........

Amnorix
01-29-2005, 12:30 PM
Kennedy's plan, for anyone interested (nobody on the right), involves:

1. going forward with elections;

2. withdrawing the US military presence from Iraq by the end of 2006; and

3. doing whatever we can in the meantime to foster a self-help, stable Iraqi government.

The theory is that, much like Vietnam, we can't affect a military solution to the problem, in that America's presence is viewed by many in Iraq as (1) permanent, (2) designed to subjugate the Iraqi nation, (3) designed to give us a military base in a strategic location.

Note that, like Vietnam, the concern is that we will become permanently entrenched in a "winless" war, and that leaving the US there indefinitely will not result in much more than more American troops' blood being spilled.

Whether Kennedy is right or not, only time will tell.

RINGLEADER
01-29-2005, 05:44 PM
Kennedy's plan, for anyone interested (nobody on the right), involves:

1. going forward with elections;

2. withdrawing the US military presence from Iraq by the end of 2006; and

3. doing whatever we can in the meantime to foster a self-help, stable Iraqi government.

The theory is that, much like Vietnam, we can't affect a military solution to the problem, in that America's presence is viewed by many in Iraq as (1) permanent, (2) designed to subjugate the Iraqi nation, (3) designed to give us a military base in a strategic location.

Note that, like Vietnam, the concern is that we will become permanently entrenched in a "winless" war, and that leaving the US there indefinitely will not result in much more than more American troops' blood being spilled.

Whether Kennedy is right or not, only time will tell.


Yeah, and in the meantime he and the rest of the Dems will be hoping for failure...look at Ike Skelton's speech this morning (or better yet, listen to it) and you'll get a very clear sample of what side the Dems are standing on.

stevieray
01-29-2005, 05:55 PM
I wonder what Dems will do when their Vietnam card doesn't hold weight anymore.

Calcountry
01-29-2005, 06:14 PM
Kennedy's plan, for anyone interested (nobody on the right), involves:

1. going forward with elections;

2. withdrawing the US military presence from Iraq by the end of 2006; and

3. doing whatever we can in the meantime to foster a self-help, stable Iraqi government.

The theory is that, much like Vietnam, we can't affect a military solution to the problem, in that America's presence is viewed by many in Iraq as (1) permanent, (2) designed to subjugate the Iraqi nation, (3) designed to give us a military base in a strategic location.

Note that, like Vietnam, the concern is that we will become permanently entrenched in a "winless" war, and that leaving the US there indefinitely will not result in much more than more American troops' blood being spilled.

Whether Kennedy is right or not, only time will tell.Has Germany provided for us a strategic, quasi permanent base from which to project power for the past half century?

Was it wrong to throw out a tyrant then?

To the victor goes the spoils, surely you a Patriots fan ought to understand the fruit of victory is to be enjoyed by the victor.

I have no problem with exploiting that country for its oil and strategic location. In the process a middle class will be created in Iraq, a few McD's and Burger Kings selling Pita bread and demitassi.

Amnorix
01-30-2005, 08:26 PM
Has Germany provided for us a strategic, quasi permanent base from which to project power for the past half century?

Was it wrong to throw out a tyrant then?

To the victor goes the spoils, surely you a Patriots fan ought to understand the fruit of victory is to be enjoyed by the victor.

I have no problem with exploiting that country for its oil and strategic location. In the process a middle class will be created in Iraq, a few McD's and Burger Kings selling Pita bread and demitassi.

As to Germany, yes. However, (as I've posted before in detail), the situations in Germany and Japan at the end of WWII aren't very comparable. The main difference is that the PEOPLE of those countries were absolutely exhausted by war, utterly demoralized and willing to accept that they had been conquered. That's not the case with a vast swath of Iraqis. There are numerous other differences as well.

I agree that IF we can establish a friendly government there capable of maintaining itself, it is more than reasonable to hope that we'd be allowed to keep a military base there for our own uses. I fear that is unlikely, bu tonly time will tell.

What you (and the rest of the right) need to realize is that there are many factors both internal and external that make our ability to achieve our short term goals (stable, independent, non-terrorist controlled Iraqi nation) and long term goals (government friendly to the US and willing to host a US military base) very questionable.

I *hope* these things are achievable, but I find it unlikely that they will in fact be achieved.

KCWolfman
01-30-2005, 08:36 PM
Ouch!!!

Ted is reminding us sometimes the truth hurts.
Yeah, that's probably what he said to Mary Jo Kopechne before he drove her off into the river.

Amnorix
01-30-2005, 09:41 PM
Yeah, that's probably what he said to Mary Jo Kopechne before he drove her off into the river.

As usual with the ad hominem attacks. Forget whether or not he has any valid points in favor of insulting the messenger. Never gets old as a tactic.

KCWolfman
01-30-2005, 09:55 PM
As usual with the ad hominem attacks. Forget whether or not he has any valid points in favor of insulting the messenger. Never gets old as a tactic.
Sorry, I have trouble forgiving murderers. I ain't Boston.

6 Iron
01-30-2005, 10:10 PM
As to Germany, yes. However, (as I've posted before in detail), the situations in Germany and Japan at the end of WWII aren't very comparable. The main difference is that the PEOPLE of those countries were absolutely exhausted by war, utterly demoralized and willing to accept that they had been conquered. That's not the case with a vast swath of Iraqis. There are numerous other differences as well.



I *hope* these things are achievable, but I find it unlikely that they will in fact be achieved.

This is not up to your usual standards of argument. A "vast swath"? I am sure that you have a more detailed argument here, but this is not convincing.

Cochise
01-30-2005, 10:15 PM
Sorry, I have trouble forgiving murderers. I ain't Boston.

Uh... well, if the ad hominem consisted of making fun of the guy's weight or something, I could see it being frivolous. But come on, the guy is a freaking murderer, as much a someone who puts a gun to someone's temple and shoots them.

In 2000 when the media was having a coniption over the Bush DUI story, for example, I sure as hell did not hear anyone talking about listening to what he had to say, or address the ideas and not the man, it was "is this the type of person you want making policy?".

I feel the same way about Janklow and anyone else who doesn't even deserve to be walking the streets a free man. The hell with Kennedy and his blathering. If the morons at the DNC want me to consider their message then they might not want to present it through someone whom I wouldn't piss on if he were on fire.

The Pedestrian
01-30-2005, 11:15 PM
Ouch!!!

Ted is reminding us sometimes the truth hurts.

BTW, have you accepted the fact that the vast majority of soldiers in Iraq say that they enjoy what they're doing and understand full-well why they're there, yet?

Michael Michigan
01-30-2005, 11:58 PM
As usual with the ad hominem attacks. Forget whether or not he has any valid points in favor of insulting the messenger. Never gets old as a tactic.

Kennedy has a histoty of cowardice. When the going gets tough, teddy goes swimming:

http://www.nationalledger.com/scribe/archives/2005/01/ted_kennedy_wan.shtml

Here's a memo to Ted Kennedy: Iraq is not inside a car that has just driven off a bridge in Chappaquiddick. While many still debate to this day that Ted Kennedy has a history of bailing out when facing these kinds of life and death decisions there is no chance that America will choose the path of leaving the scene as Kennedy did in 1969. America will not bail and leave the Iraqi people stranded and with little or no hope for survival.

Thankfully, America is now run by the adults instead of the likes of Ted Kennedy. Iraq is not Mary Jo Kopechne.

This country will not slink away while the chance for freedom and democracy in Iraq struggles for oxygen and sinks to the bottom. Ted Kennedy is welcome to choose to run away, but asking American patriots to join in his cowardice is a dead issue.

Cochise
01-31-2005, 07:19 AM
Kennedy has a histoty of cowardice. When the going gets tough, teddy goes swimming:

http://www.nationalledger.com/scribe/archives/2005/01/ted_kennedy_wan.shtml

Here's a memo to Ted Kennedy: Iraq is not inside a car that has just driven off a bridge in Chappaquiddick. While many still debate to this day that Ted Kennedy has a history of bailing out when facing these kinds of life and death decisions there is no chance that America will choose the path of leaving the scene as Kennedy did in 1969. America will not bail and leave the Iraqi people stranded and with little or no hope for survival.

Thankfully, America is now run by the adults instead of the likes of Ted Kennedy. Iraq is not Mary Jo Kopechne.

This country will not slink away while the chance for freedom and democracy in Iraq struggles for oxygen and sinks to the bottom. Ted Kennedy is welcome to choose to run away, but asking American patriots to join in his cowardice is a dead issue.


:clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

Amnorix
01-31-2005, 07:36 AM
Sorry, I have trouble forgiving murderers. I ain't Boston.

Not to split hairs, but it's manslaughter at best. :p

memyselfI
01-31-2005, 07:39 AM
BTW, have you accepted the fact that the vast majority of soldiers in Iraq say that they enjoy what they're doing and understand full-well why they're there, yet?

gotta link?

Chief Henry
01-31-2005, 08:04 AM
Gotta an opinion about Ted "the drunken sailor" Kennedy leaving the scene of a crime that Killed and innocent women? He's truly a person to be
worthy of a leadership position in the DNC.

Michael Michigan
01-31-2005, 08:41 AM
gotta link?

Got google?

http://www.militarycity.com/polls/2004_mainbar.php

By Robert Hodierne
Times staff writer

Despite a year of ferocious combat, mounting casualties and frequent deployments, support for the war in Iraq remains overwhelming among the active-duty military, according to the 2004 Military Times Poll.

Sixty-three percent of respondents approve of the way President Bush is handling the war, and 60 percent remain convinced it is a war worth fighting. And support for the war is even greater among those who have served longest in the combat zone: Two-thirds of combat vets say the war is worth fighting.

But the men and women in uniform are under no illusions about how long they will be fighting in Iraq; nearly half said they expect to be there more than five years.

In addition, despite the pressures of a wartime military, 87 percent said they’re satisfied with their jobs and, given the choice today, only 25 percent said they would leave the service.

Compared to last year, support for the war and job satisfaction remain essentially unchanged.

Most surprisingly, a year ago 77 percent said they thought the military was stretched too thin to be effective. This year that number shrank to 66 percent.

The findings are part of the annual Military Times Poll, which this year included 1,423 active-duty subscribers to Air Force Times, Army Times, Navy Times and Marine Corps Times.

The subscribers were randomly surveyed by mail in late November and early December.

Subscribers to the four papers tend to be older, higher in rank and more career-oriented than the military as a whole. The poll has a margin of error of 2.6 percent.

Among the poll’s other findings:

• 75 percent oppose drafting men into the military.

• 60 percent blame Congress for the shortage of body armor in the combat zone.

• Only 12 percent think civilian Pentagon policymakers should be held accountable for abuse at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq.

The support among the military for the Iraq war comes at a time when polls of the civilian population show a steady erosion of such support. In a Washington Post-ABC News poll released last week, for example, 56 percent of Americans said the Iraq war is not worth fighting and 58 percent said they disapproved of the way Bush is handling the war.

But you won’t find many doubters in the military ranks.

Air Force 2nd Lt. Brianne Walker, 24, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark., said, “Weapons of mass destruction or not, [Bush] was doing what he had to do to protect the people. We were the only ones willing to step up and do it.”

Army Sgt. Johanna Matlock at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, said if the United States hadn’t gone to war in Iraq, “they would have come here. We’re fighting terrorists.”

Support for the war is strongest among those who have served the longest in the war zone. Two-thirds of those who have spent more than a year in the war zone say the United States should have gone to war, compared to 60 percent overall in the military sample.

The troops also are fully behind their commander in chief, giving him a 71 percent approval rating on overall handling of his job — compared with only 48 percent among civilians, according to the Washington Post-ABC News poll.

Peter Feaver, a political science professor at Duke University and an expert on civil-military relations, says the poll shows that an “anticipated military ‘revolt’ was not coming to pass.”

“While the military might make criticisms … they remain committed to the enterprise and optimistic that they’ll see it through to victory.”

Feaver sees no “Iraq syndrome akin to the Vietnam syndrome,” marked by alienation from both the war and its leadership.

He says the military today believes “defeat (in Iraq) would be awful and victory is possible and that leads to the staying power you’re seeing. … It’s reflecting a war-time survey of a military that still thinks it can win. … When the military thinks it can’t win, that’s bad news.”

Survey respondents also were clear about the idea of a military draft: They don’t like it.

In addition to the 75 percent who said men should not be drafted, 83 percent rejected the idea of compulsory service for women, and 73 percent said returning to the draft would lower the quality of the force.

Nearly as many, 65 percent, said a draft would make it harder to maintain discipline.

Mostly satisfied

In terms of job satisfaction, the military is comparable to the civilian world. In our poll, 37 percent of service members said they were completely satisfied and another 50 percent said they were somewhat satisfied. Among civilians, those numbers reverse, with 50 percent saying they are completely satisfied and 39 percent somewhat satisfied.

The aspect of military life that drew the most complaints: housing, with a quarter of respondents saying their military housing was poor or very poor.

But there’s no escaping other areas of concern. When asked who should be held accountable for shortages of body armor among deployed troops, respondents gave Congress the biggest share of the blame, 60 percent. But 49 percent said senior military officials also should be held accountable. Only 35 percent laid blame on the Bush administration.

Similarly, most respondents don’t believe responsibility for the abuse of Iraqi prisoners at Abu Ghraib should run uphill.

Respondents were asked to check boxes alongside as many different groups as they thought should be punished for the abuse. Some 74 percent thought the soldiers who committed the abuse should be punished and 67 percent said the officer in direct command of the prison should be punished.

But only 21 percent said high-level military commanders should be held accountable, and even fewer — 12 percent — thought civilian policymakers should share in the blame. The president, meanwhile, was almost blame-free: Only 3 percent named Bush.

Staff writers Joe Chennelly, Bruce Rolfsen, Mark Faram, Gordon Lubold and freelancer Jodi Upton contributed to this report.

Loki
01-31-2005, 09:10 AM
As usual with the ad hominem attacks. Forget whether or not he has any valid points in favor of insulting the messenger. Never gets old as a tactic.

oh amnorix... :shake:

teddy should be locked up in jail with his buddy skakel...

dude, i like you and respect most of what you have to say, but
i'm gunna have to call BS when it comes to anyone defending the
kennedys. defending those CRIMINALS is despicable. why they keep
getting voted into office is beyond my comprehension.

massivetwosh!tts is one f*cked-up state...

:shake: :shake: :shake:

StcChief
01-31-2005, 09:15 AM
Ted should be in prison as somebody's bitch.

When's the dirty bomb goin' off in Boston?

Wait until the superbowl victory parade.

SBK
01-31-2005, 09:16 AM
oh amnorix... :shake:

teddy should be locked up in jail with his buddy skakel...

dude, i like you and respect most of what you have to say, but
i'm gunna have to call BS when it comes to anyone defending the
kennedys. defending those CRIMINALS is despicable. why they keep
getting voted into office is beyond my comprehension.

massivetwosh!tts is one f*cked-up state...

:shake: :shake: :shake:

I like to refer to it as Taxachuttes.

Loki
01-31-2005, 09:21 AM
Got google?
http://www.militarycity.com/polls/2004_mainbar.php
...


nice article MM

:thumb:

Mr. Kotter
01-31-2005, 09:27 AM
Got google?

http://www.militarycity.com/polls/2004_mainbar.php

By Robert Hodierne
Times staff writer

Despite a year of ferocious combat, mounting casualties and frequent deployments, support for the war in Iraq remains overwhelming among the active-duty military, according to the 2004 Military Times Poll.

Sixty-three percent of respondents approve of the way President Bush is handling the war, and 60 percent remain convinced it is a war worth fighting. And support for the war is even greater among those who have served longest in the combat zone: Two-thirds of combat vets say the war is worth fighting.

But the men and women in uniform are under no illusions about how long they will be fighting in Iraq; nearly half said they expect to be there more than five years.

In addition, despite the pressures of a wartime military, 87 percent said they’re satisfied with their jobs and, given the choice today, only 25 percent said they would leave the service.

Compared to last year, support for the war and job satisfaction remain essentially unchanged.

Most surprisingly, a year ago 77 percent said they thought the military was stretched too thin to be effective. This year that number shrank to 66 percent.

The findings are part of the annual Military Times Poll, which this year included 1,423 active-duty subscribers to Air Force Times, Army Times, Navy Times and Marine Corps Times.

The subscribers were randomly surveyed by mail in late November and early December.

Subscribers to the four papers tend to be older, higher in rank and more career-oriented than the military as a whole. The poll has a margin of error of 2.6 percent.

Among the poll’s other findings:

• 75 percent oppose drafting men into the military.

• 60 percent blame Congress for the shortage of body armor in the combat zone.

• Only 12 percent think civilian Pentagon policymakers should be held accountable for abuse at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq.

The support among the military for the Iraq war comes at a time when polls of the civilian population show a steady erosion of such support. In a Washington Post-ABC News poll released last week, for example, 56 percent of Americans said the Iraq war is not worth fighting and 58 percent said they disapproved of the way Bush is handling the war.

But you won’t find many doubters in the military ranks.

Air Force 2nd Lt. Brianne Walker, 24, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark., said, “Weapons of mass destruction or not, [Bush] was doing what he had to do to protect the people. We were the only ones willing to step up and do it.”

Army Sgt. Johanna Matlock at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, said if the United States hadn’t gone to war in Iraq, “they would have come here. We’re fighting terrorists.”

Support for the war is strongest among those who have served the longest in the war zone. Two-thirds of those who have spent more than a year in the war zone say the United States should have gone to war, compared to 60 percent overall in the military sample.

The troops also are fully behind their commander in chief, giving him a 71 percent approval rating on overall handling of his job — compared with only 48 percent among civilians, according to the Washington Post-ABC News poll.

Peter Feaver, a political science professor at Duke University and an expert on civil-military relations, says the poll shows that an “anticipated military ‘revolt’ was not coming to pass.”

“While the military might make criticisms … they remain committed to the enterprise and optimistic that they’ll see it through to victory.”

Feaver sees no “Iraq syndrome akin to the Vietnam syndrome,” marked by alienation from both the war and its leadership.

He says the military today believes “defeat (in Iraq) would be awful and victory is possible and that leads to the staying power you’re seeing. … It’s reflecting a war-time survey of a military that still thinks it can win. … When the military thinks it can’t win, that’s bad news.”

Survey respondents also were clear about the idea of a military draft: They don’t like it.

In addition to the 75 percent who said men should not be drafted, 83 percent rejected the idea of compulsory service for women, and 73 percent said returning to the draft would lower the quality of the force.

Nearly as many, 65 percent, said a draft would make it harder to maintain discipline.

Mostly satisfied

In terms of job satisfaction, the military is comparable to the civilian world. In our poll, 37 percent of service members said they were completely satisfied and another 50 percent said they were somewhat satisfied. Among civilians, those numbers reverse, with 50 percent saying they are completely satisfied and 39 percent somewhat satisfied.

The aspect of military life that drew the most complaints: housing, with a quarter of respondents saying their military housing was poor or very poor.

But there’s no escaping other areas of concern. When asked who should be held accountable for shortages of body armor among deployed troops, respondents gave Congress the biggest share of the blame, 60 percent. But 49 percent said senior military officials also should be held accountable. Only 35 percent laid blame on the Bush administration.

Similarly, most respondents don’t believe responsibility for the abuse of Iraqi prisoners at Abu Ghraib should run uphill.

Respondents were asked to check boxes alongside as many different groups as they thought should be punished for the abuse. Some 74 percent thought the soldiers who committed the abuse should be punished and 67 percent said the officer in direct command of the prison should be punished.

But only 21 percent said high-level military commanders should be held accountable, and even fewer — 12 percent — thought civilian policymakers should share in the blame. The president, meanwhile, was almost blame-free: Only 3 percent named Bush.

Staff writers Joe Chennelly, Bruce Rolfsen, Mark Faram, Gordon Lubold and freelancer Jodi Upton contributed to this report.

THAT seems to have left Duhnise....speechless. ROFL

:clap:

Loki
01-31-2005, 09:29 AM
Ted should be in prison as somebody's bitch.

When's the dirty bomb goin' off in Boston?

Wait until the superbowl victory parade.

errr... ummm... *hic*
i'd like fouah ourdahs of
durtee boumbs ovah heah...
errr... ahhh... *hic*
i'm ready to pahhtee...

Loki
01-31-2005, 09:36 AM
Ted should be in prison as somebody's bitch.

When's the dirty bomb goin' off in Boston?

Wait until the superbowl victory parade.

errr... ummm...
which one of you left the durtee boumb in my toilet??!!

Amnorix
01-31-2005, 11:01 AM
I like to refer to it as Taxachuttes.

As I've already proven in other posts, the average tax burden of the average Massachusetts citizen is less than that of the average person in the United States, as a percentage of income.

Get your facts straight please.

go bowe
01-31-2005, 11:02 AM
Courtesy Ted Kennedy. I think I'll let his comment speak for itself lest I be accused of smearing the Democratic leader's true intentions. Maybe one of the libs on the board can explain how this morale-boosting statement is going to help the cause in Iraq.oh shit!

reading the thread header, i actually thought you had lost your mind and posted some crazy article like denise does...

but, coming from out of date teddy, it isn't all that surprising...

Mr. Kotter
01-31-2005, 11:07 AM
As I've already proven in other posts, the average tax burden of the average Massachusetts citizen is less than that of the average person in the United States, as a percentage of income.

Get your facts straight please.

Who cares? If it annoys you....that's all some of us need...

Mr. Taxachusettes. :p

go bowe
01-31-2005, 11:08 AM
http://iowahawk.typepad.com/iowahawk/2005/01/it_is_finally_t.htmlgood Gawd, i drive an oldsmobile... :eek: :eek: :eek:

go bowe
01-31-2005, 11:14 AM
The LWNJ have a lot of nerve if you think about it. They supported a lying, murdering, draft dodging, dope smoking adulterer as president; they support giving our liberty to the UN; they support killing helpless babies (abortion); and they support everyone but the soldier defending their worthless azzez. pretty lame.........now, now, now...

bill is long gone, aren't there enough other lunatics in the democratic party to bag on?

besides, my old law school buddy didn't actually murder anybody, did he?

and he just took advantage of draft deferrments like millions of other young men at the time...

and he didn't inhale, remember? (although it sure looked like he was inhaling to me...)

now, to be fair, he did lie (pretty much) under oath and to the american people (depending on the meaning of is, that is)...

and he did engage in sexual activity (remember he did not have sexual relations with that woman) outside of his marriage...

imo, bill has more than enough faults to criticize without adding any (unproven) allegations and insinuations (well, calling him a murderer is probably a little more than an insinuation)...

Amnorix
01-31-2005, 11:16 AM
oh amnorix... :shake:

teddy should be locked up in jail with his buddy skakel...

dude, i like you and respect most of what you have to say, but
i'm gunna have to call BS when it comes to anyone defending the
kennedys. defending those CRIMINALS is despicable. why they keep
getting voted into office is beyond my comprehension.

massivetwosh!tts is one f*cked-up state...

:shake: :shake: :shake:

Ted Kennedy's father made his money with bootleg liquor. He then bought his oldest son's way into the White House, possibly on the back of too many dead voters in Illinois. JFK is one of the most overrated Presidents in history anyway.

And the whole family can't seem to keep their pants zipped, of that there is little doubt.

Nevertheless, I can honestly say that there are DAMN FEW people on Capitol Hill who can hold Ted Kennedy's jock when it comes to be a superb legislator. He is a true "mover and shaker", does what he believes to be in the best interests of the US and his constituents, and is an extremely effective Senator.

Amnorix
01-31-2005, 11:29 AM
Who cares? If it annoys you....that's all some of us need...

Mr. Taxachusettes. :p

Nor can anyone spell the name of the state, apparently... :p

Mr. Kotter
01-31-2005, 11:32 AM
Nor can anyone spell the name of the state, apparently... :p

The extra "e" is to distinguish it from the state... :harumph:

Loki
01-31-2005, 11:35 AM
Ted Kennedy's father made his money with bootleg liquor. He then bought his oldest son's way into the White House, possibly on the back of too many dead voters in Illinois. JFK is one of the most overrated Presidents in history anyway.

And the whole family can't seem to keep their pants zipped, of that there is little doubt.

Nevertheless, I can honestly say that there are DAMN FEW people on Capitol Hill who can hold Ted Kennedy's jock when it comes to be a superb legislator. He is a true "mover and shaker", does what he believes to be in the best interests of the US and his constituents, and is an extremely effective Senator.

errr... ummm...
big jock, tiny dick,
even smallah brain...
*hic*

Radar Chief
01-31-2005, 12:05 PM
“The Chappaquidick has become part of the problem, not part of the solution.” ROFL

Chief Faithful
01-31-2005, 02:29 PM
As to Germany, yes. However, (as I've posted before in detail), the situations in Germany and Japan at the end of WWII aren't very comparable. The main difference is that the PEOPLE of those countries were absolutely exhausted by war, utterly demoralized and willing to accept that they had been conquered. That's not the case with a vast swath of Iraqis. There are numerous other differences as well.

I agree that IF we can establish a friendly government there capable of maintaining itself, it is more than reasonable to hope that we'd be allowed to keep a military base there for our own uses. I fear that is unlikely, bu tonly time will tell.

What you (and the rest of the right) need to realize is that there are many factors both internal and external that make our ability to achieve our short term goals (stable, independent, non-terrorist controlled Iraqi nation) and long term goals (government friendly to the US and willing to host a US military base) very questionable.

I *hope* these things are achievable, but I find it unlikely that they will in fact be achieved.

So you think a jungle war in a different culture with an enemy from another country supplied and backed by the Soviets is comparable to Iraq?

Kennedy knows this is not another Vietnam, but his motivation is not to do what is best for America either.

Amnorix
01-31-2005, 02:34 PM
So you think a jungle war in a different culture with an enemy from another country supplied and backed by the Soviets is comparable to Iraq?

Kennedy knows this is not another Vietnam, but his motivation is not to do what is best for America either.
The cultures of Germany, the Middle East (including Iraq) and Vietnam (and Japan, for that matter) are all quite different. No argument on that score.

IMHO, Iraq is "more like" Vietnam than Germany, although there are certainly significant differences between all three situations. Each situation is, ultimately, unique.

But I am concerned that this will turn out much like Vietnam. I hope not, but that doesn't change the concern.

The Pedestrian
01-31-2005, 03:54 PM
gotta link?

I would give you my links, but I don't give the names, ranks, and addresses of soldiers over the internet.

memyselfI
01-31-2005, 04:00 PM
I would give you my links, but I don't give the names, ranks, and addresses of soldiers over the internet.

You KNOW the 'vast majority' of soldiers in Iraq personally? :hmmm:


ROFL

memyselfI
01-31-2005, 04:03 PM
Got google?

http://www.militarycity.com/polls/2004_mainbar.php


Subscribers to the four papers tend to be older, higher in rank and more career-oriented than the military as a whole.

Nuff said.

The Pedestrian
01-31-2005, 04:08 PM
You KNOW the 'vast majority' of soldiers in Iraq personally? :hmmm:


ROFL

Absolutely not, and I would like to ask you not to twist my words. I know some soldiers in various parts...

Loki
01-31-2005, 04:23 PM
Nuff said.

lemme guess... :hmmm:

you feel this information renders the entire study as void...

|Zach|
01-31-2005, 04:25 PM
Absolutely not, and I would like to ask you not to twist my words. I know some soldiers in various parts...
So how do you back up your assertion... :hmmm:

Donger
01-31-2005, 04:32 PM
Nuff said.

Actually, no it's not.

You neglected to include the following:

"Even so, it is perhaps the most representative independent sample possible because of the inherent challenges in polling servicemen and women, according to polling experts and military sociologists."

Warrior5
01-31-2005, 05:17 PM
Nuff said.

Well crap...I spent 17 months "over there", and I know a whole bunch of Soldiers, Airmen, Sailors, and Marines who have been/are there.

But since I don't know the majority, and since I am a career officer, I guess that renders my opinion void as well.

Misplaced_Chiefs_Fan
01-31-2005, 06:16 PM
Well crap...I spent 17 months "over there", and I know a whole bunch of Soldiers, Airmen, Sailors, and Marines who have been/are there.

But since I don't know the majority, and since I am a career officer, I guess that renders my opinion void as well.


Well, just the officer part. ROFL


Brave Rifles, Sir.

Warrior5
01-31-2005, 06:27 PM
Well, just the officer part. ROFL


Brave Rifles, Sir.

Yeah, yeah, I know...you work for a living. :thumb:

MOS?

Loki
01-31-2005, 07:19 PM
Well crap...I spent 17 months "over there", and I know a whole bunch of Soldiers, Airmen, Sailors, and Marines who have been/are there.

But since I don't know the majority, and since I am a career officer, I guess that renders my opinion void as well.

yeah... the whole "career soldier" thing must make you BIASED. job
security or something self-serving like that... :rolleyes:

and why poll soldiers about THEIR opinions? your actual
involvement in the war only taints your ability to make properly
informed choices... :p

ted kennedy and mememe have all the RIGHT answers...

KCWolfman
01-31-2005, 07:21 PM
Well crap...I spent 17 months "over there", and I know a whole bunch of Soldiers, Airmen, Sailors, and Marines who have been/are there.

But since I don't know the majority, and since I am a career officer, I guess that renders my opinion void as well.
Thanks

memyselfI
01-31-2005, 08:02 PM
So how do you back up your assertion... :hmmm:

That is what I was wondering. :thumb:

KCWolfman
01-31-2005, 08:05 PM
That is what I was wondering. :thumb:
Have a response to Warrior's point on the same topic?

memyselfI
01-31-2005, 08:05 PM
Actually, no it's not.

You neglected to include the following:

"Even so, it is perhaps the most representative independent sample possible because of the inherent challenges in polling servicemen and women, according to polling experts and military sociologists."


OIC, poll a bunch of higher ranking career military folks who have made their career in the military their choice and attribute their feelings across the board to even be representative of the tens of thousands who are reservists or National Guard and who did NOT sign up for this type of activity and many who have openly and actively complained about their use in another country in a warzone.

Got it.

Amnorix
01-31-2005, 08:14 PM
While I'm glad our forces believe in our cause, and are willing to make whatever sacrifices the political leadership of this country may request/require of them, the simple fact is that letting the military decide these things isn't very different from asking a football team's players to decide what the game plan will be from week to week.

The military should receive specific jobs/tasks/objectives that are given to them by our political leadership. They should NOT decide what those jobs/tasks/objectives actually are. Our military leadership, of course, should be involved in determining what is/isn't achievable, and what force levels are required to obtain certain objectives, etc.

KCWolfman
01-31-2005, 08:16 PM
While I'm glad our forces believe in our cause, and are willing to make whatever sacrifices the political leadership of this country may request/require of them, the simple fact is that letting the military decide these things isn't very different from asking a football team's players to decide what the game plan will be from week to week.

The military should receive specific jobs/tasks/objectives that are given to them by our political leadership. They should NOT decide what those jobs/tasks/objectives actually are. Our military leadership, of course, should be involved in determining what is/isn't achievable, and what force levels are required to obtain certain objectives, etc.
Pretty basic analogy, and one that honestly doesn't work. The military leaders are more akin to assistant coaches than players. And good assistant coaches do lead and set game plans with the equipment and talent they have.

Donger
01-31-2005, 08:26 PM
OIC, poll a bunch of higher ranking career military folks who have made their career in the military their choice and attribute their feelings across the board to even be representative of the tens of thousands who are reservists or National Guard and who did NOT sign up for this type of activity and many who have openly and actively complained about their use in another country in a warzone.

Got it.

You got that from my quote?

Wow, you really are f*cked up.

Loki
01-31-2005, 08:28 PM
You got that from my quote?

Wow, you really are f*cked up.

31 JAN 2005:

donger FINALLY gets it...

:clap:

memyselfI
01-31-2005, 08:28 PM
You got that from my quote?

Wow, you really are f*cked up.


"Even so, it is perhaps the most representative independent sample possible because of the inherent challenges in polling servicemen and women, according to polling experts and military sociologists."

You tell me what this line means when applied to the 'vast majority' as this article was used to support Slayer's assertion.

Misplaced_Chiefs_Fan
01-31-2005, 08:33 PM
Yeah, yeah, I know...you work for a living. :thumb:

MOS?


98C4HT9AP

(Signals Intelligence Analyst - Sergeant First Class - Instructor Qualified - Cryptanalyst - Arabic/Syrian Linguist: For those Army Military Occupation Specialty challenged)

Spent 2 years with the 3rd ACR (86-87) before I reclassified as an Arab linguist and got sent to the 101st. Taught T9 at Goodfellow AFB for a while then finished up at Ft. Meade before the Army made me an offer I could refuse. Would have been an E-8 at 16 years if I had stayed in.

KCWolfman
01-31-2005, 08:35 PM
98C4HT9AP

(Signals Intelligence Analyst - Sergeant First Class - Instructor Qualified - Cryptanalyst - Arabic/Syrian Linguist: For those Army Military Occupation Specialty challenged)

Spent 2 years with the 3rd ACR (86-87) before I reclassified as an Arab linguist and got sent to the 101st. Taught T9 at Goodfellow AFB for a while then finished up at Ft. Meade before the Army made me an offer I could refuse. Would have been an E-8 at 16 years if I had stayed in.
You don't qualify for an opinion, Duhnise says so.

What is ironic is this is the woman who made a bulletin board living off of "I have a friend who..." for more than 3 years as the base for many of her opinions.

Donger
01-31-2005, 08:42 PM
You tell me what this line means when applied to the 'vast majority' as this article was used to support Slayer's assertion.

I've no idea, nor do I care, about Slayer's assertion. My position stands; how you got from 1 to 2 on this issue is beyond asinine.

Misplaced_Chiefs_Fan
01-31-2005, 08:43 PM
What can I say?

I was just some poor dumb enlisted guy who didn't know no better. ;)

memyselfI
01-31-2005, 08:43 PM
You don't qualify for an opinion, Duhnise says so.

What is ironic is this is the woman who made a bulletin board living off of "I have a friend who..." for more than 3 years as the base for many of her opinions.

Where did I say he does not qualify for an opinion?

I said that the opinions of these POLLED officers is debateable as being representative of officers who do not fit the 'high ranking career officer' profile and who may not be fighting in Iraq.

KCWolfman
01-31-2005, 08:44 PM
Where did I say he does not qualify for an opinion?

I said that the opinions of these POLLED officers is debateable as being representative of officers who do not fit the 'high ranking career officer' profile and who may not be fighting in Iraq.
He is not Polled, an Officer, nor "not fighting in Iraq". Had you read his earlier posts you would see he has been in-country and states that the people he knows in-country support Slayer's opinion.

Donger
01-31-2005, 08:46 PM
I said that the opinions of these POLLED officers is debateable as being representative of officers who do not fit the 'high ranking career officer' profile and who may not be fighting in Iraq.

Are you selectively blind or something?

"Even so, it is perhaps the most representative independent sample possible because of the inherent challenges in polling servicemen and women, according to polling experts and military sociologists."

Misplaced_Chiefs_Fan
01-31-2005, 08:46 PM
He is not Polled, an Officer, nor "not fighting in Iraq". Had you read his earlier posts you would see he has been in-country and states that the people he knows in-country support Slayer's opinion.


Apparently reading comprehension is not one of her strong points. . .

memyselfI
01-31-2005, 08:48 PM
He is not Polled, an Officer, nor "not fighting in Iraq". Had you read his earlier posts you would see he has been in-country and states that the people he knows in-country support Slayer's opinion.

I'm not talking about anyone on this board. I am referring to the ARTICLE posted by MM, the people POLLED, and how it was applied to Slayer's point.

Do NOT confuse the points to satisfy your agenda.

Donger
01-31-2005, 08:50 PM
Do NOT confuse the points to satisfy your agenda.

Now THAT's classic.

memyselfI
01-31-2005, 08:51 PM
Now THAT's classic.


uh, a classic tactic used on this board. :thumb:

KCWolfman
01-31-2005, 08:51 PM
I'm not talking about anyone on this board.
This is in direct conflict with this
I said that the opinions of these POLLED officers is debateable as being representative of officers who do not fit the 'high ranking career officer' profile and who may not be fighting in Iraq.

Again, he met all your criterion for not being a bought officer as a shill yet you disregard his opinion because it doesn't support your own. He has mentioned his standing regarding your opinion at least 2 times on this thread and perhaps 3 disproving your theory, yet you ignore his posts as they don't support your own.

memyselfI
01-31-2005, 08:53 PM
This is in direct conflict with this


Again, he met all your criterion for not being a bought officer as a shill yet you disregard his opinion because it doesn't support your own. He has mentioned his standing regarding your opinion at least 2 times on this thread and perhaps 3 disproving your theory, yet you ignore his posts as they don't support your own.

Was he polled. I must have missed his response indicating he was. :hmmm:

KCWolfman
01-31-2005, 08:55 PM
Was he polled. I must have missed his response indicating he was. :hmmm:
I believe I said he wasn't. When proven to ignore his point, you went on a tangent regarding MM instead of Slayer.

I don't blame you as you are wrong and you don't want to admit it, but it would be best to ignore the posts instead of digging yourself deeper.

Donger
01-31-2005, 08:58 PM
uh, a classic tactic used on this board. :thumb:

What? Pointing out the obvious?

If you say so, I suppose.

Loki
01-31-2005, 09:03 PM
Now THAT's classic.

and ironic...

isn't it usually someone else saying that to her?
:shrug:

memyselfI
01-31-2005, 09:03 PM
I believe I said he wasn't. When proven to ignore his point, you went on a tangent regarding MM instead of Slayer.

I don't blame you as you are wrong and you don't want to admit it, but it would be best to ignore the posts instead of digging yourself deeper.

Ah, he WASN'T polled. Well then I respect his opinion, thank him for offering it, but don't find it particularly useful when applied to MM's article or Slayer's point of the 'vast majority' he referenced but did not support. Both of which I've been discussing...

I do not doubt there are MANY people quite happy and content to be in Iraq. I also do not doubt that the majority of those who are happy campers ARE IN FACT CAREER MILITARY PEOPLE.

My point was their views and opinions may not be reflective of many of the people who signed on for two weeks a month at their nearest Guard facility Anytown, USA and are instead in service for 18 months in another country in a war zone

KCWolfman
01-31-2005, 09:05 PM
My point was their views and opinions may not be reflective of many of the people who signed on for two weeks a month at their nearest Guard facility Anytown, USA and are instead in service for 18 months in another country in a war zone

So now you have scaled back from Non Officer, Non Polled personnel to only those in the reserves (who, btw, knew what they were signing on for before they signed).

Crying about being in a military situation when you join the Army, Navy, Marines, or Air Force is just silly and not to be taken seriously, even by extremists as yourself.

Loki
01-31-2005, 09:05 PM
...
My point was their views and opinions may not be reflective of many of the people who signed on for two weeks a month at their nearest Guard facility Anytown, USA and are instead in service for 18 months in another country in a war zone
...


you base this assumption on?
a. opinion
b. fact
c. opposing point of view simply to be controversial

2bikemike
01-31-2005, 09:08 PM
.

My point was their views and opinions may not be reflective of many of the people who signed on for two weeks a month at their nearest Guard facility Anytown, USA and are instead in service for 18 months in another country in a war zone

Anybody who signed up for the reserves knew what they were signing up for. If they didn't they were incredibly stupid. I have no sympathy for someone who looks to take the benefits of the reserves or the guard and then cry about being sent to do the job they were trained and signed on to do.

Misplaced_Chiefs_Fan
01-31-2005, 09:09 PM
you base this assumption on?
a. opinion
b. fact
c. opposing point of view simply to be controversial


(waves hand in the air, wildly)

Oooh, ooh, Mr. Kotter! Can I answer that one!

It's gotta be "C"!

Donger
01-31-2005, 09:09 PM
My point was their views and opinions may not be reflective of many of the people who signed on for two weeks a month at their nearest Guard facility Anytown, USA and are instead in service for 18 months in another country in a war zone

You've got to be f*cking kidding me...

memyselfI
01-31-2005, 09:10 PM
you base this assumption on?
a. opinion
b. fact
c. opposing point of view simply to be controversial

http://www.bringthemhomenow.org/

memyselfI
01-31-2005, 09:11 PM
you base this assumption on?
a. opinion
b. fact
c. opposing point of view simply to be controversial

http://www.mfso.org/

KCWolfman
01-31-2005, 09:11 PM
http://www.bringthemhomenow.org/
Well that seems to be an unbiased site. Do you also subscribe to ihatemilitary.com?

Donger
01-31-2005, 09:12 PM
http://www.bringthemhomenow.org/

I used to believe that you at least had some foundation in rational thought.

I could point you to some far out right-wing websites as well. Do you consider those to be as valid as that?

Loki
01-31-2005, 09:14 PM
You've got to be f*cking kidding me...

lol... donger... you're losing your bearing dude...
(was wondering when that was going to happen... :) )

memyselfI
01-31-2005, 09:15 PM
Well that seems to be an unbiased site. Do you also subscribe to ihatemilitary.com?

Oh, I see. They are only decent military families if they support the war.

Gotcha.

Loki
01-31-2005, 09:16 PM
http://www.bringthemhomenow.org/

the likelihood of me clicking that link and reading whatever dRiVeL has
shaped YOUR opinion is slim to none... :rolleyes:

Loki
01-31-2005, 09:17 PM
http://www.mfso.org/

:shake:
ohhh goody... another link i can ignore.

i gave you 3 good choices... what are these links?

Donger
01-31-2005, 09:17 PM
lol... donger... you're losing your bearing dude...
(was wondering when that was going to happen... :) )

Nah. Pretty much had her figured out within the first few interactions I had with her. The struggle is the glory, after all.

Someone should write a book about this chick. She's filled with so much hate, and yet she manages to control herself (more or less). That's rather interesting to me, and worthy of study.

KCWolfman
01-31-2005, 09:18 PM
Oh, I see. They are only decent military families if they support the war.

Gotcha.
Didn't say that. However, your hypocrisy is more than just thinly veiled on this thread, now isn't it?

[sic] Do you have proof that people want to serve their duty? I have proof that they don't from an extremist website with an agenda.

If you are going to berate someone for 4 or 5 pages about lack of proof, at least have a legitimate unbiased source of your own to support your position.

Donger
01-31-2005, 09:19 PM
Oh, I see. They are only decent military families if they support the war.

Gotcha.

Gee. Military families that want their family members home, safe and sound, ASAP...

What a concept.

Loki
01-31-2005, 09:20 PM
Nah. Pretty much had her figured out within the first few interactions I had with her. The struggle is the glory, after all.

Someone should write a book about this chick. She's filled with so much hate, and yet she manages to control herself (more or less). That's rather interesting to me, and worthy of study.

dude... i'd hate to see you hang yourself with your tie or shoelaces
one you delved into THAT nonsensical thought-process...

beware... beware...

memyselfI
01-31-2005, 09:20 PM
Didn't say that. However, your hypocrisy is more than just thinly veiled on this thread, now isn't it?

[sic] Do you have proof that people want to serve their duty? I have proof that they don't from an extremist website with an agenda.

If you are going to berate someone for 4 or 5 pages about lack of proof, at least have a legitimate unbiased source of your own to support your position.


Unbiased?

You mean like polling career high ranking officers who likely are not on the frontlines and asking them if they like being in Iraq? :hmmm:

memyselfI
01-31-2005, 09:21 PM
Gee. Military families that want their family members home, safe and sound, ASAP...

What a concept.

Actually, they not only want their loved ones home but they want the government to stop sending others and stop the war. That is a concept.

Donger
01-31-2005, 09:24 PM
dude... i'd hate to see you hang yourself with your tie or shoelaces
one you delved into THAT nonsensical thought-process...

beware... beware...

No worries. I've been around nonsensical people all my life. I came from Europe, after all.

KCWolfman
01-31-2005, 09:24 PM
Unbiased?

You mean like polling career high ranking officers who likely are not on the frontlines and asking them if they like being in Iraq? :hmmm:
Yeah, like those that you were bitchin about before you started using your own source as a sorry excuse.

BTW - There is no "front line". If you are going to have an opinion at least be informed.

Iowanian
01-31-2005, 09:25 PM
Gee. Military families that want their family members home, safe and sound, ASAP...

What a concept.

I know I'd prefer my brother was here instead of somewhere in Bum**** bagdad, safe and sound. That said.......I supported this war with other people's family there, I support it now. Pulling out too early is a disservice to those who have already saccrificed Time away from family, wounds, and death. I'm pretty sure None of them LOVE being there, but they knew what they were doing when they signed the line and took the oath.

But what would I know about what military families might think, thats any better than something Dense read on a blog from some deserter.

Loki
01-31-2005, 09:26 PM
No worries. I've been around nonsensical people all my life. I came from Europe, after all.

come float with us donger... we all
float down here...

heyyyyy dong-ger ... come on and
anyliiiize her...

http://www.cpaws.org/images/br/franklin-turtle.gif
beware donger... beware

Donger
01-31-2005, 09:27 PM
Actually, they not only want their loved ones home but they want the government to stop sending others and stop the war. That is a concept.

Perhaps you've not heard, but elections were held yesterday in Iraq (which I assume is the "war" you're talking about). Will peace come to fruition from those elections? I don't know. But, apparently unlike you, I'm optimisitic.

KCWolfman
01-31-2005, 09:28 PM
Perhaps you've not heard, but elections were held yesterday in Iraq (which I assume is the "war" you're talking about). Will peace come to fruition from those elections? I don't know. But, apparently unlike you, I'm optimisitic.
I believe she is optimistic as well, optimistic on hoping the current administration fails, even at the expense of a nation.

Donger
01-31-2005, 09:28 PM
come float with us donger... we all
float down here...

heyyyyy dong-ger ... come on and
anyliiiize her...

http://www.cpaws.org/images/br/franklin-turtle.gif
beware donger... beware

You've no idea how much I hate Franklin. Just consider yourself lucky you didn't post a picture of Little Bear...

Donger
01-31-2005, 09:30 PM
I know I'd prefer my brother was here instead of somewhere in Bum**** bagdad, safe and sound. That said.......I supported this war with other people's family there, I support it now. Pulling out too early is a disservice to those who have already saccrificed Time away from family, wounds, and death. I'm pretty sure None of them LOVE being there, but they knew what they were doing when they signed the line and took the oath.

But what would I know about what military families might think, thats any better than something Dense read on a blog from some deserter.

Indeed.

Please give your brother my thanks and heartfelt gratitude.

Donger
01-31-2005, 09:31 PM
I believe she is optimistic as well, optimistic on hoping the current administration fails, even at the expense of a nation.

And there's the rub. To be so vehemently partisan must be poison to the soul.

Loki
01-31-2005, 09:32 PM
You've no idea how much I hate Franklin. Just consider yourself lucky you didn't post a picture of Little Bear...

lol... i had considered it. however, i couldn't find a decent enough
picture to torment you with. ;)

Donger
01-31-2005, 09:39 PM
lol... i had considered it. however, i couldn't find a decent enough
picture to torment you with. ;)

Heh. My son actually says, "Daddy! Don't look!!" when Little Bear comes on.

I probably need to restrain that impulse, based on the reaction of a three-year-old.

2bikemike
01-31-2005, 09:44 PM
No worries. I've been around nonsensical people all my life. I came from Europe, after all.

Wow I'm sorry for you!