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View Full Version : Taxes solve everthing


Calcountry
02-15-2005, 01:43 PM
When you read this article, keep in mind, that 80% of these people voted for Kerry.

http://sfexaminer.com/articles/2005/02/15/news/20050215_ne01_toll.txt


:shake:

StcChief
02-15-2005, 02:02 PM
They get what they deserve living there.

whoman69
02-15-2005, 02:15 PM
Several cities use tolls to lower traffic and pay for their streets budget including Chicago, where it is impossible to get to the inner city without paying a toll. What difference does it make if the tolls are in the most congested areas or on the roads leading to them.

Calcountry
02-15-2005, 04:50 PM
Several cities use tolls to lower traffic and pay for their streets budget including Chicago, where it is impossible to get to the inner city without paying a toll. What difference does it make if the tolls are in the most congested areas or on the roads leading to them.I don't want to go there.

PastorMikH
02-15-2005, 04:55 PM
I would think that a toll would creat a lot of problems for businesses in the area. Granted traffic is moving slow, but less cars means less customers. Also, industry would have to pay tolls to get supplies needed and manufactured goods delivered, which in volume, could hurt their business.

KCWolfman
02-16-2005, 12:01 AM
Several cities use tolls to lower traffic and pay for their streets budget including Chicago, where it is impossible to get to the inner city without paying a toll. What difference does it make if the tolls are in the most congested areas or on the roads leading to them.
So you are suggesting a toll not to improve the roads (as most tolls are initiated) but rather to limit business and travelers from going downtown?

And this makes sense to you?

Stinger
02-16-2005, 12:13 AM
Well they might go this route as well

States Mull Taxing Drivers By Mile
CORVALLIS, Ore., Feb. 14, 2005


College student Jayson Just commutes an odometer-spinning 2,000 miles a month. As CBS News Correspondent Sandra Hughes reports, his monthly gas bill once topped his car payment.

"I was paying about $500 a month," says Just.

So Just bought a fuel efficient hybrid and said goodbye to his gas-guzzling BMW.

And what kind of mileage does he get?

"The EPA estimate is 60 in the city, 51 on the highway," says Just.

And that saves him almost $300 a month in gas. It's great for Just but bad for the roads he's driving on, because he also pays a lot less in gasoline taxes which fund highway projects and road repairs. As more and more hybrids hit the road, cash-strapped states are warning of rough roads ahead.

Officials in car-clogged California are so worried they may be considering a replacement for the gas tax altogether, replacing it with something called "tax by the mile."

Seeing tax dollars dwindling, neighboring Oregon has already started road testing the idea.

"Drivers will get charged for how many miles they use the roads, and it's as simple as that," says engineer David Kim.

Kim and his team at Oregon State University equipped a test car with a global positioning device to keep track of its mileage. Eventually, every car would need one.

"So, if you drive 10 miles you will pay a certain fee which will be, let's say, one tenth of what someone pays if they drive 100 miles," says Kim.

The new tax would be charged each time you fill up. A computer inside the gas pump would communicate with your car's odometer to calculate how much you owe.

The system could also track how often you drive during rush hour and charge higher fees to discourage peak use. That's an idea that could break the bottleneck on California's freeways.

"We're getting a lot of interest from other states," says Jim Whitty of the Oregon Department of Transportation. "They're watching what we're doing.

"Transportation officials across the country are concerned about what's going to happen with the gas tax revenues."

Privacy advocates say it's more like big brother riding on your bumper, not to mention a disincentive to buy fuel-efficient cars.

"It's not fair for people like me who have to commute, and we don't have any choice but take the freeways," says Just. "We shouldn't have to be taxed."

But tax-by-mile advocates say it may be the only way to ensure that fuel efficiency doesn't prevent smooth sailing down the road.

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/02/14/eveningnews/main674120.shtml

DenverChief
02-16-2005, 12:26 AM
Well they might go this route as well



http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/02/14/eveningnews/main674120.shtml
:banghead:

yunghungwell
02-16-2005, 10:48 AM
Kim and his team at Oregon State University equipped a test car with a global positioning device to keep track of its mileage. Eventually, every car would need one.

Privacy advocates say it's more like big brother riding on your bumper, not to mention a disincentive to buy fuel-efficient cars


I'd say focking big brother! Next you will have to have a "666" tattoo and an identifying electronic chip implanted in you neck to be able to buy groceries.

RINGLEADER
02-16-2005, 11:13 AM
Several cities use tolls to lower traffic and pay for their streets budget including Chicago, where it is impossible to get to the inner city without paying a toll. What difference does it make if the tolls are in the most congested areas or on the roads leading to them.

The thing that sucks about the Chicago toll-roads is that they were only supposed to be pay-as-you-go until the costs of building the roads was recouped. I think that happened something like 20 years ago and the toll booths stay open...

KCTitus
02-16-2005, 11:36 AM
In Richmond, VA, we have a series of tolls on the roads...There is one that is the downtown expressway. The toll was erected by the local transit authority to pay for the bonds that were issued years ago to build the road. Since the opening of that road, the toll price has been increased 3 times and the transit authority has more debt now than it did when it initially built the roads.

There is no end in sight for these tolls and it's clearly the easiest way to get downtown, instead, most commuters like myself are forced to use the interstate which actually combines 2 interstate highways (I-64 and I-95) for most of the trip to downtown Richmond.

Traffic and bottlenecks are horrible and the 'expressway' is barely used. IMO, it would be wiser to increase traffic on the expressway and the only way to do that is lower the toll price for each car, but it could increase overall revenue...instead they're talking further increases.

stupid!

Lzen
02-16-2005, 12:29 PM
The thing that sucks about the Chicago toll-roads is that they were only supposed to be pay-as-you-go until the costs of building the roads was recouped. I think that happened something like 20 years ago and the toll booths stay open...

That's pretty much the same thing that happened here in Kansas.