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View Full Version : uh-oh 200k PRO-Syrian demonstrators in Beruit...


memyselfI
03-08-2005, 08:12 AM
looks like DUHbya's plans to try to back Syria into a corner might not go off so easy afterall. :hmmm: Nothing like firing up the masses against the US and Israel to prove how much US brand democracy is wanted in the ME. :rolleyes:


http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=514&e=2&u=/ap/20050308/ap_on_re_mi_ea/lebanon_syria_32

BEIRUT, Lebanon - Nearly 200,000 pro-Syrian protesters waved flags, chanted and whistled in a central Beirut square Tuesday, answering a nationwide call by the militant Shiite Muslim Hezbollah group for a demonstration to counter weeks of massive rallies demanding Syrian forces leave Lebanon.



Syria Plans Two-Stage Lebanese Pullback
(AP Video)

Loudspeakers blared songs of resistance and organizers handed out Lebanese flags and directed the men and women to separate sections of the square. Demonstrators held up pictures of Syrian President Bashar Assad and signs saying, "Syria & Lebanon brothers forever."


Black-clad Hezbollah guards handled security, lining the perimeter of the square and taking position on rooftops. Trained dogs sniffed for bombs.


Large cranes hoisted two giant red-and-white flags bearing Lebanon's cedar tree. On one, the words, "Thank you Syria," were written in English; on the other, "No to foreign interference."


The demonstration was in front of U.N. offices. Hezbollah opposes the U.N. resolution drafted by the United States and France last year calling for Syria's withdrawal from Lebanon.


The square was just a few blocks from another downtown square where opposition protesters have been demonstrating for days, demanding that Syria withdraw the 14,000 troops it maintains in Lebanon. Nations, including the United States, also demand that Syria withdraw its intelligence agents.


A day after the Syrian and Lebanese leaders announced that Syrian forces would redeploy to eastern Lebanon before the nations discuss a full withdrawal, most of the troops were still in position, with Associated Press reporters in the mountains overlooking Beirut seeing only scattered movement of military trucks heading toward the Bekaa Valley.


A truck carrying 11 soldiers and supplies headed east at midmorning but most of the military traffic was moving in the other direction — empty trucks and buses traveling west apparently to collect soldiers and equipment. Scores of cars also headed toward western Lebanon and the capital, Beirut, bearing passengers waving Lebanese flags on their way to a Beirut protest.


Hezbollah, a Shiite Muslim group, has been mobilizing its followers from across the country for the protest, also meant to denounce the U.N. resolution that also called for dismantling militias — a point Hezbollah sees as aimed at its well-armed military wing.


Hezbollah is widely admired both within Lebanon and across the Arab world for driving Israeli forces out of the country's south. It also has the organizational capability and party discipline to mobilize massive street protests, drawing its strength from the Shiite Muslim community, Lebanon's largest religious sect with 1.2 million people.


In the outlying heavily Shiite regions of the Bekaa and the south, loudspeakers urged followers to travel to Beirut for the protest. A newspaper reported that convoys of Syrians were being brought across the border in buses to participate, but that could not be confirmed.


Opposition leaders, who have been courting Hezbollah's support in their effort to oust Syrian troops, accused Lebanese intelligence agents of exercising pressure on municipalities, public schools and institutions to drive up the number of demonstrators.


Hezbollah officials denied the charges, saying it is part of a campaign to make the demonstration seem "imposed and involuntary."


Hezbollah, founded by Iran (news - web sites) and backed in part by Syria, has emerged as a key player during the latest political instability, capable of tilting the balance either in favor of the pro-Syrian government or the anti-Syrian opposition.


On Monday, in the biggest demonstration yet of anti-Syrian furor, more than 70,000 Lebanese shouting "Freedom! Sovereignty! Independence!" thronged central Beirut. The demonstrators waved Lebanon's cedar-tree flag and thundered, "Syria out!"


The demonstrators marched to the site of the Feb. 14 bombing that killed former Prime Minister Rafik Hariri and touched off the angry but peaceful street protests that drove Lebanon's pro-Syrian government to resign a week ago. Many Lebanese accuse the Syrian government and their government of responsibility for Hariri's death; both deny any involvement.


Faced with incessant international pressure and raging Lebanese opposition, Assad on Saturday announced his troops would withdraw after nearly three decades in Lebanon. On Monday, he met with President Emile Lahoud in Damascus and jointly announced a plan.





But the plan set no deadline for the complete withdrawal of Syrian troops and intelligence agents from Lebanon, and Washington rejected the pullback as insufficient. The plan also was unlikely to satisfy the Lebanese opposition and the rest of the international community.

Washington wants a full withdrawal of Syrian soldiers and intelligence agents before Lebanese parliamentary elections expected in April and May. The White House called the Lebanese-Syrian plan "a half measure."

Syria has had troops here since 1976, when they were sent as peacekeepers during Lebanon's 1975-90 civil war. When the war ended, the troops remained and Syria has dominated Lebanon's politics ever since.

On Tuesday morning in the mountains east of Beirut, there was little movement of Syrian troops heading eastward toward the Bekaa Valley or Syria. In Hammana, high up in the foggy and rainy mountains, five soldiers huddled around a bonfire.

Under the plan announced Monday, all Syrian troops in Lebanon would fall back to eastern regions near Syria by March 31. Military officers will decide by April 30 the duration and size of Syrian forces to remain in that region. After that period, the two governments would decide on a date for pullout.

The United States, France, Russia, Germany and the U.N. Security Council have firmly demanded that Syria withdraw all the troops and stop interfering in the affairs of its smaller neighbor.

Donger
03-08-2005, 08:47 AM
On one, the words, "Thank you Syria," were written in English; on the other, "No to foreign interference."

That's moderately ironic.

BTW Denise, "Bush backing Syria into the corner?" How so?

IIRC, the Syrians were stupid enough to hit Hariri, which began this whole deal. Now Hezbollah, a terrorist organization, is attempting to bolster the opposition.

How does any of this have anything to do with Bush?

Radar Chief
03-08-2005, 08:51 AM
Hezbollah, a Shiite Muslim group, has been mobilizing its followers from across the country for the protest, also meant to denounce the U.N. resolution that also called for dismantling militias — a point Hezbollah sees as aimed at its well-armed military wing.


Hezbollah is widely admired both within Lebanon and across the Arab world for driving Israeli forces out of the country's south. It also has the organizational capability and party discipline to mobilize massive street protests, drawing its strength from the Shiite Muslim community, Lebanon's largest religious sect with 1.2 million people.


In the outlying heavily Shiite regions of the Bekaa and the south, loudspeakers urged followers to travel to Beirut for the protest. A newspaper reported that convoys of Syrians were being brought across the border in buses to participate, but that could not be confirmed.


Opposition leaders, who have been courting Hezbollah's support in their effort to oust Syrian troops, accused Lebanese intelligence agents of exercising pressure on municipalities, public schools and institutions to drive up the number of demonstrators.


Hezbollah officials denied the charges, saying it is part of a campaign to make the demonstration seem "imposed and involuntary."


:hmmm:

memyselfI
03-08-2005, 08:52 AM
That's moderately ironic.

BTW Denise, "Bush backing Syria into the corner?" How so?

IIRC, the Syrians were stupid enough to hit Hariri, which began this whole deal. Now Hezbollah, a terrorist organization, is attempting to bolster the opposition.

How does any of this have anything to do with Bush?

He's the one drawing the line in the sand saying that he expects Syrian troops to be out by the time the election in Lebanon. That no peoples should have to vote when occupied by a foreign nation and that the election needs to be monitored by international observers (I think he meant more than the one that was in Iraq) to be considered 'free and fair.'

Ironic, indeed.

Radar Chief
03-08-2005, 08:53 AM
How does any of this have anything to do with Bush?

It doesn’t, but Denise has a one-track mind that shouldn’t be derailed with trivialities like that.

Donger
03-08-2005, 08:57 AM
He's the one drawing the line in the sand saying that he expects Syrian troops to be out by the time the election in Lebanon. That no peoples should have to vote when occupied by a foreign nation and that the election needs to be monitored by international observers (I think he meant more than the one that was in Iraq) to be considered 'free and fair.'

Ironic, indeed.

Only you would compare Syrian troops to American troops...

Show me where American troops stopped or forced ANY Iraqis to vote. Just one example. That shouldn't be too hard.

Cochise
03-08-2005, 08:58 AM
Why am I not surprised that when a murderous state sponsor of terrorism needed a cheerleader, Duhnise was the first one to come to the rescue.

Radar Chief
03-08-2005, 09:00 AM
He's the one drawing the line in the sand saying that he expects Syrian troops to be out by the time the election in Lebanon. That no peoples should have to vote when occupied by a foreign nation and that the election needs to be monitored by international observers (I think he meant more than the one that was in Iraq) to be considered 'free and fair.'

Ironic, indeed.

So it’s Bushy “drawing a line in the sand”? Not the UN, or the Lebanese?
And it is truly “ironic” that the same demands you’d make of Iraq don’t apply to Syria.
Maybe “ironic” isn’t the word I’m looking for, “typical” probably fits better.

memyselfI
03-08-2005, 09:01 AM
Only you would compare Syrian troops to American troops...

Show me where American troops stopped or forced ANY Iraqis to vote. Just one example. That shouldn't be too hard.

Ah, I'm comparing situations. Are both countries staging elections while occupied by a foreign country?

memyselfI
03-08-2005, 09:02 AM
So it’s Bushy “drawing a line in the sand”? Not the UN, or the Lebanese?
And it is truly “ironic” that the same demands you’d make of Iraq don’t apply to Syria.
Maybe “ironic” isn’t the word I’m looking for, “typical” probably fits better.

Did you just watch his speech? Were you aware he just gave one that directly spoke to this issue?

Actually, I have no problem with Syria leaving Lebanon. I just think it's hysterical it's DUHbya making the claim he has the power to direct it considering he's occupying a country as well, two actually.

Donger
03-08-2005, 09:02 AM
Ah, I'm comparing situations. Are both countries staging elections while occupied by a foreign country?

Obviously. But, as I said, only you would compare and apparently equate Syrian troops to American.

So, where's your example?

HC_Chief
03-08-2005, 09:03 AM
You're a moron.

MOhillbilly
03-08-2005, 09:03 AM
Ah, I'm comparing situations. Are both countries staging elections while occupied by a foreign country?
i pray to my god you get Ebola in your cvunt.

memyselfI
03-08-2005, 09:04 AM
Obviously. But, as I said, only you would compare and apparently equate Syrian troops to American.

So, where's your example?

Are they both on foreign soil after they achieved their stated objectives?

Radar Chief
03-08-2005, 09:04 AM
Did you just watch his speech? Were you aware he just gave one that directly spoke to this issue?

Actually, I have no problem with Syria leaving Lebanon. I just think it's hysterical it's DUHbya making the claim he has the power to direct it considering he's occupying a country as well, two actually.


Did you miss the LEBANESE people starting this whole thing?

Donger
03-08-2005, 09:07 AM
Are they both on foreign soil after they achieved their stated objectives?

So, you do equate American soldiers and Syrian soldiers?

Do you also believe that the intention of the Syrians in Lebanon is to engender freedom within Lebanon?

memyselfI
03-08-2005, 09:08 AM
Did you miss the LEBANESE people starting this whole thing?

Actually, it was the curious assassination of their former PM and then this curious 'spontaneous uprising' which simultaneously (and curiously) happened when US and Syrian relations were getting strained...

so yes, the Lebanese people who have participated have shown themselves to be opportunists and for the most part were successful in portraying this as a 'people power uprising'. At least the media here were more than happy to portray it as such.

Radar Chief
03-08-2005, 09:11 AM
Actually, it was the curious assassination of their former PM and then this curious 'spontaneous uprising' which simultaneously (and curiously) happened when US and Syrian relations were getting strained...

so yes, the Lebanese people who have participated have shown themselves to be opportunists and for the most part were successful in portraying this as a 'people power uprising'. At least the media here were more than happy to portray it as such.

ROFL Damn that Karl Rove. :bong:

Donger
03-08-2005, 09:11 AM
Actually, it was the curious assassination of their former PM and then this curious 'spontaneous uprising' which simultaneously (and curiously) happened when US and Syrian relations were getting strained...

so yes, the Lebanese people who have participated have shown themselves to be opportunists and for the most part were successful in portraying this as a 'people power uprising'. At least the media here were more than happy to portray it as such.

I knew it.

memyselfI
03-08-2005, 09:17 AM
I knew it.

Interesting article:

.S.-Syria Relations Not Quite as Cold
Officials Cite Assad's Anti-Terror Aid

By Glenn Kessler
Washington Post Staff Writer
Thursday, June 20, 2002; Page A15

Syria's relations with the United States have improved because of its assistance in the war on terrorism, but U.S. officials and Middle East experts said yesterday that Syria's continued support of Hezbollah, Hamas and other militant anti-Israel organizations makes a complete thaw impossible.

Syria's cooperation in the fight against al Qaeda was highlighted by the revelation this week that a key figure in the Sept. 11 plot, Mohammed Haydar Zammar, had been arrested in Morocco and sent to Syria for interrogation, with American knowledge. While U.S. officials have not been able to question Zammar, Americans have submitted questions to the Syrians.

"They have been very helpful," a State Department official said. "But we still have very serious concerns and that's why they are still on the list of state sponsors of terrorism."

A recent State Department report said that Syria has not been implicated directly in an act of terrorism since 1986 but that it has continued to provide haven and logistical support to terrorist organizations operating in the Bekaa Valley in Lebanon, which is under Syrian control.

Besides Syria's support for what the United States considers terrorist organizations -- and which the Syrians call resistance fighters -- the official cited Syria's aid to Iraq in evading international sanctions, such as the illegal importation of oil, as another source of friction.


Nevertheless, officials said Syria has been unstinting in helping in the battle against al Qaeda, in large part because Syrian officials view fundamentalist Islamic movements as destabilizing. After Sept. 11, Syrian President Bashar Assad pledged his support in a letter to President Bush, and that has been followed up by concrete actions.

Vincent Cannistraro, a former counterterrorism chief for the CIA, said Syria has "been completely cooperative" in investigating al Qaeda and persons associating with al Qaeda. In some cases, he said, Syrian officials have avoided arresting suspects so they can continue to monitor their conversations and movements and report back to the United States.

Richard W. Erdman, the chief State Department specialist for Syria, recently told the American Israel Public Affairs Committee that Syria's actions against al Qaeda have "helped save American lives."

Assad, in an interview published yesterday in the San Jose Mercury News, said Syria within the past three months provided information on an al Qaeda operation that, if successful, would have killed "many American soldiers." He declined to provide details.

Cannistraro said Syria makes a distinction between what it considers legitimate support for the Palestinians and terrorism in general, and that its efforts to combat al Qaeda were considered a possible route to getting off the U.S. list of terrorist-sponsor states. "They have been trying to get off of it for a long time," he said. "They are very bitter about it."

"There will come a time when the administration realizes that this label is not correct," Assad told the Mercury News.

Citing Syria's cooperation, the Bush administration recently opposed a bill backed by key members of Congress, including House Majority Leader Richard K. Armey (R-Tex.), that would punish Syria for its support of terrorist groups. The Syrian Accountability Act would impose economic and political sanctions until the president certifies it has ended support of terrorist groups, withdrawn from Lebanon and complied with United Nations resolutions against Iraq.

Supporters of the legislation complain that Syria is subject to fewer sanctions than any of the seven nations listed as state sponsors of terrorism.

Assad has signaled in other ways that he is eager to improve relations with the United States.

Last month, a senior delegation of Syrian officials, headed by Deputy Foreign Minister Walid al-Moualem, met with Assistant Secretary of State William J. Burns, Sen. Arlen Specter (R-Pa.) and other Americans at Rice University in Houston. While U.S. officials play down the importance of the meeting, some participants said the tenor of discussions suggested Syria was serious about improving relations.

Shibley Telhami, a Middle East expert at the University of Maryland who attended the meeting, said the Syrian delegation was empowered by Assad to discuss a range of issues, including "a tough exchange on the question of terrorism" and ways to promote cultural and political exchanges.

"This was probably the most interesting Syrian-U.S. exchange that I've seen," Telhami said.

"There seems to be a real readiness to build on the cooperation in practical ways on the issue of terrorism," said Edward P. Djerejian, director of the James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy at Rice.

But U.S. officials remain skeptical. Diplomatic sources said that in recent weeks Hezbollah has built up forces, including missiles capable of reaching northern Israeli population centers, along Lebanon's southern border with Israel, prompting a round of U.S. warnings to Syria, Iran and Lebanon.

"Talking to Syria is not a problem," the State Department official said. "Getting them to do what we want is a problem."

Donger
03-08-2005, 09:25 AM
"Talking to Syria is not a problem," the State Department official said. "Getting them to do what we want is a problem."

Are you insinuating that we somehow convinced the Syrians to assassinate Hariri?

RINGLEADER
03-08-2005, 09:41 AM
And the hard-left libs carry the banner for Hezbollah yet again...

Can't wait to see Dick Durbin and Ted Kennedy carry on about this. I really don't believe they realize just how stupid it makes them look when they question the changes that are taking place in the Middle East that would never have occured without our invasion of Iraq.

My particular favorite from the last week was Assad saying in an interview: "I'm not Saddam Hussein, I want to cooperate."

RINGLEADER
03-08-2005, 09:43 AM
Actually, it was the curious assassination of their former PM and then this curious 'spontaneous uprising' which simultaneously (and curiously) happened when US and Syrian relations were getting strained...

so yes, the Lebanese people who have participated have shown themselves to be opportunists and for the most part were successful in portraying this as a 'people power uprising'. At least the media here were more than happy to portray it as such.

...and Bush planned 9/11...and the Republicans hacked the voting machines...and Bush invaded Afghanistan for oil...etc., etc., etc.

alanm
03-08-2005, 11:15 AM
...and Bush planned 9/11...and the Republicans hacked the voting machines...and Bush invaded Afghanistan for oil...etc., etc., etc.
I'd like to see the windfall from that oil pretty damn quick. :cuss:

BIG_DADDY
03-08-2005, 11:15 AM
Phuck Syria!!!

mlyonsd
03-08-2005, 11:26 AM
The United States, France, Russia, Germany and the U.N. Security Council have firmly demanded that Syria withdraw all the troops and stop interfering in the affairs of its smaller neighbor.

Looks like we're not the only ones with a dog in the race this time. It ought to be interesting to see how this plays out.

vailpass
03-08-2005, 11:45 AM
i pray to my god you get Ebola in your cvunt.

ROFL Thanks for the belly laugh. ROFL

jettio
03-08-2005, 11:49 AM
I got a glimpse of that and it sounded like I heard Samari more than I heard Syria.

I am no expert at reading arabic, but I could swear that one of the banners said:

"May peace be upon the holy one who brings the wrath of Allah upon the false King with the brylcreem mullet."

They must already get the NFL Network in Beirut.

memyselfI
03-08-2005, 11:55 AM
Looks like we're not the only ones with a dog in the race this time. It ought to be interesting to see how this plays out.

They will demand until the cows come home. Just like many of the same folks have demanded Israel adhere to numerous UN resolutions...

doesn't mean they will support a damn thing other than words or more resolutions or perhaps sanctions but that is it.

KCWolfman
03-08-2005, 02:22 PM
Actually, it was the curious assassination of their former PM and then this curious 'spontaneous uprising' which simultaneously (and curiously) happened when US and Syrian relations were getting strained...

so yes, the Lebanese people who have participated have shown themselves to be opportunists and for the most part were successful in portraying this as a 'people power uprising'. At least the media here were more than happy to portray it as such.
I love it.

The people who are native of Lebanon are conspiracists who desire only upheaval. Damn them for wanting their own nation indeed.

Duck Dog
03-08-2005, 03:21 PM
Actually, it was the curious assassination of their former PM and then this curious 'spontaneous uprising' which simultaneously (and curiously) happened when US and Syrian relations were getting strained...

so yes, the Lebanese people who have participated have shown themselves to be opportunists and for the most part were successful in portraying this as a 'people power uprising'. At least the media here were more than happy to portray it as such.


Do you alway's take the side of terrorists?

It must be miserable living in America and hating it at the same time.

Duck Dog
03-08-2005, 03:22 PM
I love it.

The people who are native of Lebanon are conspiracists who desire only upheaval. Damn them for wanting their own nation indeed.


And yet she backs the terrorists/insurgents.

Go figure.

Cochise
03-08-2005, 03:41 PM
I love it.

The people who are native of Lebanon are conspiracists who desire only upheaval. Damn them for wanting their own nation indeed.

I trust she'll be condemning the Palestinians too then, for desiring their own nation and causing upheaval, right? Right?

memyselfI
03-08-2005, 03:43 PM
I love it.

The people who are native of Lebanon are conspiracists who desire only upheaval. Damn them for wanting their own nation indeed.

No, I'm sure there are people there who want the Syrians out of Lebanon. They are just not the entire country as was portrayed since the assassination of the former PM.

Latest estimates were of 500k people in support of Syria in downtown Beirut.

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/usatoday/20050308/ts_usatoday/manylebaneseseesyriaasafriendnotoccupier

Many Lebanese see Syria as a friend, not occupier

Tue Mar 8,11:49 AM ET Top Stories - USATODAY.com


News analysis by Barbara Slavin, USA TODAY

The anti-Syrian demonstrations taking place almost daily in Beirut's Martyrs Square since last month might leave the impression that all of Lebanon is rising up against Syrian occupation.



Tuesday, a counterdemonstration by Hezbollah, a Shiite Muslim group, will show there's another face of Lebanon.


Lebanese Shiites are an estimated 40% of the country's 4.4 million people. They're not so eager for a quick departure of about 15,000 Syrian troops who have been a fixture in Lebanon for 29 years.Syria has been under intense pressure to pull out its troops since the Feb. 14 assassination of former Lebanese prime minister Rafik Hariri in a car bombing. Several prominent Lebanese politicians have blamed Syria. The United States, France and other countries have demanded a full Syrian withdrawal from Lebanon.


But Lebanese Shiites fear a withdrawal would hurt their interests and cause a return to civil strife, says Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations.


Lebanon was embroiled in civil war from 1975 to 1989. The war was fought largely between Muslims, 60% of the population, and Christians, 39%. It involved most of Lebanon's 18 religious and ethnic groups, as well as Palestinians, and left more than 100,000 dead.


Today, Lebanon remains divided, and "important segments will side with the Syrians," Haass says.


A poll of 1,250 Lebanese, taken Feb. 19-24, showed widespread revulsion for Hariri's murder but different views about who was responsible. Non-Shiites were much more inclined to pin the blame on Syria. About 50% of Druze and Maronite Christians blamed Syria or its Lebanese allies. By contrast, 53% of Shiites blamed Israel, and 19% blamed the United States, pollster Zogby International says.


Forty-two percent of Maronites said they thought the Syrians would withdraw from Lebanon; only 7% of Shiites expected that.


Kenneth Katzman, a Middle East expert at the Congressional Research Service in Washington, says the Bush administration has been too quick to interpret the anti-Syria protests as a sign Lebanon is on the road to democracy.


"It's not Eastern Europe circa 1989," after the fall of the Berlin Wall, Katzman says. Democratic movements in Lebanon and Iraq (news - web sites) are being used by ethnic and religious groups for their own interests, he says.


In Iraq, Shiites and Kurds saw a chance to take power long denied them by a Sunni Arab elite. In Lebanon, Maronite Christians, who invited the Syrians in to save them in 1975 from an alliance of Lebanese Muslim and Palestinian groups, have grown tired of Syrian control, Katzman says.


Maronite Christians dominated under the French, who created modern Lebanon after World War I to give minority Christians a sanctuary within Greater Syria, which was overwhelmingly Muslim. In the past two decades, Shiites, historically the most downtrodden of Lebanese, have increased their numbers and their influence.


John Zogby, president of the polling company and a Lebanese-American, says Syria is viewed by Shiites as a protector in part because it is led by Alawites, an obscure sect that is a Shiite offshoot.


"Syria may have outlived its usefulness in Lebanon, but it's not the time for self-congratulation by the Bush administration. This is not over," Zogby says.


Katzman says Hezbollah's leader, Sheik Hassan Nasrallah, could emerge as a major power broker whether Syria withdraws or not. Hezbollah "has a tremendous network of charities and businesses and a television station" as well as a trained militia of 25,000 men.


Hezbollah was created with Iranian and Syrian backing after the Israeli invasion of Lebanon in 1982. The organization routinely turns out 100,000 people for demonstrations, as much or more than the daily anti-Syria demonstrations of the past few weeks, says Rashid Khalidi, director of the Middle East Institute at Columbia University.





Hezbollah had wide support during the 1990s when it fought Israeli occupation of southern Lebanon. Israel withdrew in 2000, but Syria continues to back the group to keep the pressure on Israel until it returns the Golan Heights, captured from Syria in a 1967 war.

A major unanswered question is whether Lebanon's 70,000-man national army could control the country if the Syrians withdrew. A United Nations (news - web sites) Security Council resolution passed last fall calls for Hezbollah to be disarmed, but that will be hard to do.

"Hezbollah was the al-Qaeda of the 1980s," Katzman says, pointing to the truck bomb that killed 241 U.S. Marines in 1983 and dozens of kidnappings of Westerners.

It is unlikely Syria will give up its leverage in Lebanon even if it redeploys its forces on the other side of the border.

The Lebanese capital, Beirut, has functioned as an economic outpost for Syria much as Hong Kong did for China before it opened to the West. There are an estimated 1 million Syrians working at menial jobs in Lebanon, as well as a network of smugglers, drug dealers and legitimate businessmen, Haass says.

Diminished influence in Lebanon could be fatal to the regime of Bashar Assad, the son of the late Syrian leader Hafez Assad.

Bashar, a British-trained ophthalmologist, has been president since 2000 but is not regarded as a strong figure. Holdovers from his father's security services are extremely influential, says Martha Kessler, a Syria expert and former CIA (news - web sites) analyst. The old guard may resist giving up the money and power amassed in Lebanon, she says.

"This is more about the future of the regime in Syria than it is about Lebanon," Haass says. "The stakes here are enormous."

Chief Henry
03-08-2005, 03:55 PM
This post just makes me shake my head in disgust.
Yet again she stoops to new levels.

Garcia Bronco
03-08-2005, 04:54 PM
looks like DUHbya's plans to try to back Syria into a corner might not go off so easy afterall. :hmmm: Nothing like firing up the masses against the US and Israel to prove how much US brand democracy is wanted in the ME. :rolleyes:


.


So now your ultra liberal stance is that democracy is bad? Quit making Anne Coulter's point.

Iowanian
03-08-2005, 04:56 PM
Sounds like a great place for a couple hundred thousand pounds of cluster bombs.

RINGLEADER
03-08-2005, 10:36 PM
No, I'm sure there are people there who want the Syrians out of Lebanon. They are just not the entire country as was portrayed since the assassination of the former PM.

Latest estimates were of 500k people in support of Syria in downtown Beirut."


How many of those 500,000 people were women D-Nise? I haven't been able to find one photo that wasn't 99% men in the anti-democracy marches held today. I would think you would be outraged...

Duck Dog
03-09-2005, 07:08 AM
Sounds like a great place for a couple hundred thousand pounds of cluster bombs.


I was thinking MOAB.

vailpass
03-09-2005, 10:38 AM
How about a nice assortment of aerial surprises?

Iowanian
03-09-2005, 10:48 AM
An entire Buffet of Peacemakers.

Duck Dog
03-09-2005, 10:52 AM
An entire Buffet of Peacemakers.

Thus the perfect caption was born.

beavis
03-09-2005, 01:11 PM
My particular favorite from the last week was Assad saying in an interview: "I'm not Saddam Hussein, I want to cooperate."
It is moderatly amusing watching him piss down his leg trying to placate us for fear of a couple of cluster bombs interupting that evenings torture sessions.

But Iraq accomplished nothing. :rolleyes:

BIG_DADDY
03-09-2005, 05:32 PM
How many of those 500,000 people were women D-Nise? I haven't been able to find one photo that wasn't 99% men in the anti-democracy marches held today. I would think you would be outraged...

Every one of her positions is one of convenience. There is never any consistency.

craneref
03-13-2005, 01:10 PM
Let me see one was a completely spontaneous march for freedom, one where no govenment or institution was involved to insure the number of people was enough. The spontaneous pressure caused the mass resignation of a puppet government that was propped up by a terorist state. The ohter was an institutionalized coordinated presentation of people bussed in from around the country and maybe even out of the country with a specific number in mind, that accomplished nothing but showing that the terrorist state still has clout with the people. The Nazi party never had too much problem turning out LARGE demonstrations to support Hitler and his fanatical murdering ways, but that didn't mean they all agreed or were right. It is amazing how your hatred for anything Right blind the bravery of thos people who risked their lives for a shot at freedom, reminds me of a bunch of farmers I heard of a couple hundred years or so ago, and that turned out pretty well. Basically your freedom to spout your venomous hatred toward anyghing that could be attributed towards your President which you dispise. I was NEVER a supporter of President Clinton, but if this would have happened during his presidency, I would have cheered the lebanese just as I would have cherred the Iraqi's. Open your eyes and see that this is MUCH bigger than your politcal agenda, this is about FREEDOM. You enjoy it every day, why can't others have it too.

mlyonsd
03-14-2005, 12:19 PM
Uh-oh, it looks like over 800,000 protesters turned out today in Beirut demanding for Syria to get out of their country. Maybe there are more that want them out then want them to stay? :hmmm:

http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2005-03-14-lebanon-syria_x.htm

BigOlChiefsfan
04-24-2005, 07:10 AM
http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20050424/ap_on_re_mi_ea/lebanon_syria

BEIRUT, Lebanon - Syrian troops burned documents and dismantled military posts in their final hours in Lebanon Sunday, before deploying toward the border and effectively ending 29 years of military presence in the country

A few score Syrian troops will remain in Lebanon for a farewell ceremony Tuesday that the Lebanese Army plans to hold in a town close to the Syrian border.


In Damascus, the Syrian capital, a government official said: "Within the next few hours, all the troops will be out of Lebanon."


"What will be left are those who will take part in the official farewell" on Tuesday, the official said, speaking on condition of anonymity.

In the border town of Anjar, home of Syria's chief of military intelligence in Lebanon, Syrian officials appeared to be going about their business as usual Sunday.

But at the Deir el-Ahmar base, Syria's last major garrison in the Bekaa Valley, 15 tanks rolled on to flatbed trucks, ready for the drive home, witnesses told The Associated Press. Soldiers burned papers, knocked down walls and loaded ammunition on to trucks.

Syrian troops had already vacated at least 10 positions in the northern part of the Bekaa Valley on Saturday. Dozens of trucks carrying hundreds of soldiers and at least 150 armored vehicles, towing artillery pieces and rocket launchers, crossed the border into Syria, witnesses said.

"Tomorrow everything will be over," a Lebanese military officer said Saturday, speaking on condition of anonymity, as is typical for military officials here.

On Tuesday, Lebanese troops at a base in Rayak, few miles from the Syrian border, will conduct a ceremony to pay tribute to the Syrian Army's role in Lebanon, a Lebanese military officer said.

Afterward, the token Syrian force will leave, and there will not be a single Syrian soldier left in Lebanon. The Syrians entered Lebanon in 1976, ostensibly as peacekeepers in the year-old civil war. After the war ended in 1990, 40,000 Syrian troops remained in Lebanon, giving Damascus the decisive say in Lebanese politics.

Syria began withdrawing from Lebanon last month following international and Lebanese pressure in the wake of the assassination of former Prime Minister Rafik Hariri on Feb. 14.

In September 2004, when the number of Syrian troops in Lebanon stood at about 14,000, the U.N. Security Council adopted a resolution calling on Syria to withdraw all its troops and intelligence operatives.


Last week, Lebanese and Syrian officials said the remaining 1,000 troops would be gone by April 26.

Secretary-General Kofi Annan said last week he was delaying until Tuesday the release of a report to the Security Council on Syria in Lebanon so he could confirm the full withdrawal.
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Syria withdraws all troops from Lebanon, the CHIEFS get starters with picks 1,2 & 3, the Donx draft a 5'8" CB.

Sure, 'tis a grand weekend for the good guys. We should all go buy a lottery ticket.

mlyonsd
04-24-2005, 07:17 AM
http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20050424/ap_on_re_mi_ea/lebanon_syria

Syria withdraws all troops from Lebanon, the CHIEFS get starters with picks 1,2 & 3, the Donx draft a 5'8" CB.

Sure, 'tis a grand weekend for the good guys. We should all go buy a lottery ticket.

ROFL

KCWolfman
04-24-2005, 10:06 AM
De-nise should be on board any second to congratulate GWB for a job well done.

BCD
04-24-2005, 05:16 PM
Why does this stupid Bitch always seem to defend these radical Arab groups? They're not progressive, and they hate women. Is she ****ing insane, or just retarded?

Radar Chief
04-25-2005, 06:43 AM
Is she ****ing insane, or just retarded?

Yes. :thumb:

Braincase
04-25-2005, 06:53 AM
Where are her posts about PRO-North Korean protestors in South Korea? Certainly those aren't staged by North Koreans that have infiltrated South Korea?

And if we shut the border with Mexico, do you think they'll have any problems coming up with 200,000 protestors? Christ, there's more than that in illegal immigrants in freakin' New Hampshire.

Loki
04-25-2005, 08:26 AM
De-nise should be on board any second to congratulate GWB for a job well done.

yeah.... any time now.

KCWolfman
04-25-2005, 09:03 PM
yeah.... any time now.
I have seen her responses on many other threads, perhaps she just didn't see this one?

memyselfI
04-25-2005, 09:09 PM
I have seen her responses on many other threads, perhaps she just didn't see this one?

Sorry, I've been distracted by increasing violence in Iraq and handholding and coddling of a ruthless leader in Crawford. No kudos from me...

KCWolfman
04-25-2005, 09:10 PM
Sorry, I've been distracted by increasing violence in Iraq and handholding and coddling of a ruthless leader in Crawford. No kudos from me...
Yup, look hard enough and you can always distract from your own erroneous interpretations.