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Donger
03-16-2005, 12:20 PM
Does anyone happen to know if there is a medical name for the little floating things inside one's eyes? If so, please share.

Thanks.

Braincase
03-16-2005, 12:23 PM
IIRC, they are the remnants of tiny blood vessels that were formed in the womb while your eyes were becoming your eyes. Nothing you can do about it.

Donger
03-16-2005, 12:25 PM
IIRC, they are the remnants of tiny blood vessels that were formed in the womb while your eyes were becoming your eyes. Nothing you can do about it.

That's not what I asked, but thanks anyway.

Pants
03-16-2005, 12:26 PM
Does anybody ever see the little transparent things floating around in mid-air sometimes, but as soon as you try to focus on them - they disappear?

KCFalcon59
03-16-2005, 12:27 PM
eye boogers? sandmen?

Bob Dole
03-16-2005, 12:27 PM
They're oxygen bubbles in your eyeball fluid.

Edit: Or little strands of eyeball crap.

The technical name is "floaters," apparently.

Fire Me Boy!
03-16-2005, 12:28 PM
If we're talking about the same thing, they're called phosphenes.

Braincase
03-16-2005, 12:28 PM
Does anybody ever see the little transparent things floating around in mid-air sometimes, but as soon as you try to focus on them - they disappear?

That's what I was referring to.

Donger
03-16-2005, 12:29 PM
Does anybody ever see the little transparent things floating around in mid-air sometimes, but as soon as you try to focus on them - they disappear?

No. Something's terribly wrong with you.

Bob Dole
03-16-2005, 12:31 PM
If we're talking about the same thing, they're called phosphenes.

Phosphenes are the white spots you see when you close your eyes or sit in the dark.

Donger
03-16-2005, 12:32 PM
If we're talking about the same thing, they're called phosphenes.

No. Phosphenes are sudden and brief spots of light. Floaters are more like specks floating around.

bkkcoh
03-16-2005, 12:32 PM
<a href=" http://www.eyefloaters.com/" target="_blank">Link</a>

http://www.eyefloaters.com/new_Graphic/float.gif


Vitreous floaters ( eye floaters, vitreous opacities) are tiny, cloudy, clumps of cells that appear in the otherwise clear fluid (vitreous) that fills the back three-fourths of the eye. People see floaters as small specks, cobwebs, or clouds moving in their field of vision. The specks appear to be in the air out in front of the eye because they cast a shadow on the retina. They range from being a nuisance that can be ignored, to interfering with essential daily activities such as reading or driving. Floaters that are not close to other ocular structures are ideal for laser disruption because they have no blood supply and can not bleed.
FASCINATING FLOATER FACTS
Almost always the patient will be told that nothing can be done to help their vitreous floaters.
But in reality, laser disruption of the floaters in experienced hands is a simple, in-office procedure. (see Our Procedure page)
The vitreous floaters can be treated in a 20 minute laser procedure in which there is no discomfort and no limitation of activities.
The floaters to a very great extent are obliterated by the laser, not just broken into many smaller floaters (see Science Background page).
People unfamiliar with this operation assume it to be risky, but the world medical literature does not report significant complications for this procedure (see World Literature page).
In my hands, I believe the success rate to be high, approximately 92% (see Floater Types--Success page). My rate of significant complications has been zero.
The only alternative to laser treatment of floaters is the vitrectomy procedure. With it the rate of significant complications approaches 50 percent (see Vitrectomy page).
The treatment requires an unusual eye laser and other specialized equipment.
Dr. Karickhoff had the procedure done on his eye.
Of the 21,000 eye surgeons in the United States, only two do the procedure regularly. Both are located on the east coast. (See Frequent Questions).
Although this procedure is almost unknown to both patients and eye doctors, for years almost all insurance companies including Medicare pay on the procedure and it is listed in their code books.
The contact Laser Lens designed by Dr. Karickhoff is the most frequently used device for floater evaluations and pre-laser drawings in the United States.
Dr. Karickhoff has designed the only contact lens for laser treatment of floaters not in the central visual axis.
Dr. Karickhoff has designed a Floater Finder. With this simple test, the patient can tell the doctor the direction to look for the floater and how far it is from the retina.

alanm
03-16-2005, 12:34 PM
Does anyone happen to know if there is a medical name for the little floating things inside one's eyes? If so, please share.

Thanks.
Dust particles. :)

Donger
03-16-2005, 12:35 PM
http://www.allaboutvision.com/conditions/spotsfloats.htm (http://)

"If you suddenly see new floaters, or eye floaters accompanied by flashes of light or peripheral vision loss, it could indicate serious conditions such as diabetic retinopathy"

Great. Now I have to try to look at and identify each floater in each of my eyes.

Fire Me Boy!
03-16-2005, 12:35 PM
Phosphenes are the white spots you see when you close your eyes or sit in the dark.

"Phosphene

Phosphenes are signals from the neurons of the retina to the visual cortex of the brain which are interpreted by the brain as lights and visual patterns, but are not caused by visual light. They can be produced by neurons randomly firing (similar to what causes muscle twitches) and a variety of other causes, including pressure to the eyeball and (less commonly) various diseases of the retina and nerves. Phosphenes are most easily noticed with the eyelids closed, or in a darkened environment."

http://www.answers.com/phosphenes&r=67

By that definition, they are only MORE noticable when your eyes are closed, but not exclusively apparent at that time.

Fire Me Boy!
03-16-2005, 12:39 PM
OR, how about this as a medical term... the floatie things in MY eyes are called "contact lenses."

bkkcoh
03-16-2005, 12:41 PM
OR, how about this as a medical term... the floatie things in MY eyes are called "contact lenses."


If the contacts are in your eyes, instead of on them, you put them in way too deep... :thumb: :cuss: :p

BigMeatballDave
03-16-2005, 12:45 PM
That's what I was referring to.Holy shit! You just solved a 25-year mystery for me!

jspchief
03-16-2005, 12:49 PM
They are a side effect of dirty legs.

Fire Me Boy!
03-16-2005, 01:55 PM
Too much masturbation.

bkkcoh
03-16-2005, 02:34 PM
Too much masturbation.

tmi :banghead: :rolleyes:

KCTitus
03-16-2005, 02:37 PM
I think it means you have to piss really bad.

Fire Me Boy!
03-16-2005, 02:42 PM
tmi :banghead: :rolleyes:
I'm not the one seein' floaters!

bkkcoh
03-16-2005, 02:44 PM
I'm not the one seein' floaters!

It doesn't really make that much difference, it is still tmi.......


What happens in the bedroom or bathroom needs to stay there.... :thumb:

Fire Me Boy!
03-16-2005, 02:54 PM
It doesn't really make that much difference, it is still tmi.......


What happens in the bedroom or bathroom needs to stay there.... :thumb:
Exactly my point when I caught my coworkers making new floaters in his eyes at my desk! :cuss:

bkkcoh
03-16-2005, 02:56 PM
Exactly my point when I caught my coworkers making new floaters in his eyes at my desk! :cuss:
:whackit: :Lin:

penchief
03-16-2005, 03:49 PM
Does anyone happen to know if there is a medical name for the little floating things inside one's eyes? If so, please share.

Thanks.

Nope. I've had 20/20 all my life but also had a boatload of floaters. They can be very annoying on bright days.

Anytime I've asked a doctor about them he or she has referred to them simply as "floaters."

However, I understand that if a person were to all of a sudden get a bunch of floaters that they should have it checked out because it may be a sign of diabetes.

seclark
03-16-2005, 03:54 PM
if they're floatin, you aint getting enough iron.

BigVE
03-16-2005, 03:57 PM
Not an expert here by any means but I have had to deal with floaters for alot of years. Three different eye doctors and one opthomologist have told me the same basic thing: they are no big deal. They all just called them "floaters", no fancy name.