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BIG_DADDY
04-04-2005, 10:54 AM
I haven't used a compound bow since being a kid but I was thinking about picking up a compound bow and doing some hunting this year especially if we move into a house we are trying to rent right now in the mountains. The guy already has the hay bails set up for practice. Any advise would be greatly apprecaited especially on picking out a bow.

Iowanian
04-04-2005, 10:59 AM
I'm a bow hunter........I love it.

My advice is to go to a repuatable bow shop or two and hold some bows by different manufacturers. Shoot a few of them to see which one fits you best.

There are many good bows on the market. with the new cams, its easy to get a bow with a speed of 300fps+, while shooting 50-60lbs. I'd recommend a bow with 75-85% letoff. A bow that is shorter, is easier to maneuver in a tree, but less forgiving if you flinch or shake.

I shoot a Mathews FX, and they make serveral other better models, but they aren't cheap. One of my brothers shoots a Mathews SQ, and the Other a PSE baby G.

If you're looking for something affordable...Hoyt, Browning, Golden Eagle and Fred Bear are repuatable brands.

Tell them you're a beginner, get one with a riser that fits your body type, pull a weight you can easily do after sitting for a long period of time, and with the proper draw length.

I don't know all of the technical mumbo jumbo like some guys, but I know a good bow when I shoot it.

e_train69
04-04-2005, 11:00 AM
BD

Almost all the bows that are made today are excellent. It depends on what you are willing to pay.

The best advice would be to find a "good" local pro shop where you can shoot and try out many different kinds and get the one that feels the best to you. A good pro shop is also a very valuable asset because they can set everything up for you and also perform maintenance.

My personal preference is "Mathews" bows, but they can get a little pricey.

|Zach|
04-04-2005, 11:01 AM
I saw a bunch of them at Bass Pro the other day. Damn that place is big.

Iowanian
04-04-2005, 11:03 AM
These Links should help you too

http://www.huntersfriend.com/bowselection.htm
http://www.yorksport.com/bow.htm
http://www.mcsports.com/info/index.jsp?categoryId=222842

If every hunter, and situation agreed with 1, there wouldn't be so many options. You wouldn't hunt Elk and Moose with the same setup for Turkeys and Whitetails.

I'm telling you now..........Bow hunting can be addictive.

Mike Grose
04-04-2005, 11:06 AM
I haven't used a compound bow since being a kid but I was thinking about picking up a compound bow and doing some hunting this year especially if we move into a house we are trying to rent right now in the mountains. The guy already has the hay bails set up for practice. Any advise would be greatly apprecaited especially on picking out a bow.


Be really careful using hay bales for target backstops. If they are small bales. arrows from modern compounds will zip right through is shot side-on. They also seem to magically find the soft spots between bales as well.

If you are talking about large round bales, just make sure you shoot them on the round sides and you'll be fine. If you shoot them on the flat sides, all your arrows will be somewhere inside the baleafter 1 round of target practice.

Even my wood arrows from my self-bow disappear into the bales if I don't shoot at the correct angle.

I can't imagine what would happen if I fired a carbon arrow from a 70# radical-cam compund into one of them.

BIG_DADDY
04-04-2005, 11:09 AM
These Links should help you too

http://www.huntersfriend.com/bowselection.htm
http://www.yorksport.com/bow.htm
http://www.mcsports.com/info/index.jsp?categoryId=222842

If every hunter, and situation agreed with 1, there wouldn't be so many options. You wouldn't hunt Elk and Moose with the same setup for Turkeys and Whitetails.

I'm telling you now..........Bow hunting can be addictive.

Thanks guys, they used to actually teach us how to shoot with animal targets in high school. Of course that was before all the safty nuts took over. I was the best one in the class I took and have always remembered how much I liked shooting. I have noticed a bunch of Mathews and Hoyt bows on Ebay but I didn't know if it was more complicated than that. Sounds like I need to go check some out first.

jspchief
04-04-2005, 11:10 AM
If it's been awhile, you'll be amazed at the advancement of the bows.

I agree with what others have said, a good local shop will be able to help you and get you a bow that fits.

Once you know what you want, you might try Cabelas. They usually have some reasonably priced bow packages (http://http://cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/index/index-display.jhtml?id=cat600266&navAction=jump&navCount=1&parentId=cat21424&parentType=category&cmCat=)that come with rest, quiver, etc.

If you're just starting out though, I'd suggest the local shops. Those guys will be able to answer all your questions.

FWIW, you don't have to spend a mint. I still use a big 'ol Browning that's about 8 years old. It kills deer just as good. Like my dad always said....it's not the arrow, it's the indian.

Earthling
04-04-2005, 11:10 AM
One word of advise BD...A friend of mine, and myself, packed up his camper with tent, food, etc. and stopped on the way out of town to get the hunting liscence for bow hunting. I was told I had to have a "Hunters Safety Card" and they would not issue a liscence to me. (I missed it by 7 months of not having to have one) You may not need one in CA or you may already have it. I don't own a bow but I have used his "Bear" and it felt perfect. It was an 80lb. and after it kicked down it was comfortable to hold a draw on it. Different outfits that sell them will match your body to a bow...Depending on your body type, arm length and the like. Good luck.

BIG_DADDY
04-04-2005, 11:11 AM
Be really careful using hay bales for target backstops. If they are small bales. arrows from modern compounds will zip right through is shot side-on. They also seem to magically find the soft spots between bales as well.

If you are talking about large round bales, just make sure you shoot them on the round sides and you'll be fine. If you shoot them on the flat sides, all your arrows will be somewhere inside the baleafter 1 round of target practice.

Even my wood arrows from my self-bow disappear into the bales if I don't shoot at the correct angle.

I can't imagine what would happen if I fired a carbon arrow from a 70# radical-cam compund into one of them.

There are just woods behind them.

BIG_DADDY
04-04-2005, 11:13 AM
One word of advise BD...A friend of mine, and myself, packed up his camper with tent, food, etc. and stopped on the way out of town to get the hunting liscence for bow hunting. I was told I had to have a "Hunters Safety Card" and they would not issue a liscence to me. (I missed it by 7 months of not having to have one) You may not need one in CA or you may already have it. I don't own a bow but I have used his "Bear" and it felt perfect. It was an 80lb. and after it kicked down it was comfortable to hold a draw on it. Different outfits that sell them will match your body to a bow...Depending on your body type, arm length and the like. Good luck.

Safety card? Good god the safety manieacs have struck again. ROFL

Calcountry
04-04-2005, 11:13 AM
Be really careful using hay bales for target backstops. If they are small bales. arrows from modern compounds will zip right through is shot side-on. They also seem to magically find the soft spots between bales as well.

If you are talking about large round bales, just make sure you shoot them on the round sides and you'll be fine. If you shoot them on the flat sides, all your arrows will be somewhere inside the baleafter 1 round of target practice.

Even my wood arrows from my self-bow disappear into the bales if I don't shoot at the correct angle.

I can't imagine what would happen if I fired a carbon arrow from a 70# radical-cam compund into one of them.I don't believe i have ever seen those in California.

Iowanian
04-04-2005, 11:16 AM
jsp is right.........You don't have to buy a top end bow to get it done. I plan on replacing the bow string every couple of years, and eventually cams or riser if it shows damage, but I'll probably be shooting my bow for at least another decade.

A good Bow shop will be your best friend. they'll help set you up, remember your name, give you tips on equipment, give you shooting pointers(you need to practice...good shots, not alot of arrows) alot. They'll celebrate your first success with you like its their own.

I'd also recemmend after enough target time, shooting some 3D targets, as well as an indoor 3D video target before hitting the treestand.

Bow hunting takes some pretty good initial investmetns (half dozen arrows is $60, broadheads $25)..tree stands, camo, cover scent etc...........Of course you'll always need to learn about animal sign, stand placement, shooting from above..........

I like "Pederson's Bowhunting" magazine also.
www.bowhuntingmag.com

Earthling
04-04-2005, 11:16 AM
Safety card? Good god the safety manieacs have struck again. ROFL

Yep. A twenty hour class and 40 bucks or something. All they needed to say was not to walk around with the bow loaded.

Iowanian
04-04-2005, 11:17 AM
You don't have to spend alot of cash though.............Our Good friend Sec hunts with a bow he made out of 2 yardsticks and his old catheter hose, and makes his own arrows.


The Hunter's safety course thing has been in effect for years. I took it when I was 12 I think. Its a good class if you haven't hunted much, but kills a saturday. Its basics of Weapon safety, shooting instruction and game laws and ethics.

ptlyon
04-04-2005, 11:32 AM
I can only agree with what everyone has said on this thread BD. Go to a good, reputable shop and hopefully they will have a different variety for you to try.

Iowa likes his Matthews, but when I tried one I thought I felt a little extra twang in it. I bought a Hoyt Ultratec and I love it. It was spendy, $1100 when it was all said and done. Bow, arrows, rest, broadheads, release, quiver, etc. But the way I look at it, I just might own that bow for a lifetime, so it was worth the investment.

The key is to try different ones and enjoy the feel of it. Then you will shoot with greater confidence.

BIG_DADDY
04-04-2005, 11:37 AM
I can only agree with what everyone has said on this thread BD. Go to a good, reputable shop and hopefully they will have a different variety for you to try.

Iowa likes his Matthews, but when I tried one I thought I felt a little extra twang in it. I bought a Hoyt Ultratec and I love it. It was spendy, $1100 when it was all said and done. Bow, arrows, rest, broadheads, release, quiver, etc. But the way I look at it, I just might own that bow for a lifetime, so it was worth the investment.

The key is to try different ones and enjoy the feel of it. Then you will shoot with greater confidence.

They sure are cheaper on Ebay, some of them are even new. They have a few Hoyt Ultratec's there now. I need to see if I can try it at a dealer and then maybe buy it online. I hate paying sales tax as well you know how I am about taxes.

ptlyon
04-04-2005, 11:49 AM
They sure are cheaper on Ebay, some of them are even new. They have a few Hoyt Ultratec's there now. I need to see if I can try it at a dealer and then maybe buy it online. I hate paying sales tax as well you know how I am about taxes.

The only thing about buying them online is 1) You don't get a chance to try it until you buy it, and 2) The possibility of it being damaged or something weird with it. I am not saying that you would like an Ultratec, or maybe even a Matthews, it is just how it feels in your hand and how you shoot it.

I think you are a bigger guy like me, and I went with the Ultratec because of it's larger size. It just felt better on the release to me.

But it is all personal opinion.

As far as you buying one and trying it at a shop, that probably won't be a problem. They would charge you a minimal lane fee. The advantage of buying one at a bow shop is that you get to try different sights, counter balancers, etc. They will interchange different accessories and then you can find the one you like.

Try going to a bow shop first. Try different ones. Find one you like and then see if you can find it cheaper online.

The only thing is, it will probably be a wash in the end with the lane and service fees that a bow shop will probably charge you to find an entire setup that you like.

That would be the advantage on knowing how it all works, but I just have never learned it. You could do it yourself. But that takes time and a lot of questions to knowledgeable people in the sport.

Iowanian
04-04-2005, 12:30 PM
If you're going via Ebay...which I think is OK....I still recemmend that you go to some bow shops and shoot some bows, so you know exactly which models you like..............Then look for your model on ebay.

Make sure the Draw length is adjustable to your reach.

jcroft
04-04-2005, 12:32 PM
Girls only want boyfriends with skills. Nunchuck skills, bow hunting skills, computer hacking skills....

Earthling
04-04-2005, 12:36 PM
Girls only want boyfriends with skills. Nunchuck skills, bow hunting skills, computer hacking skills....
I dunno...I had a skill saw and still couldn't get dates.

BIG_DADDY
04-04-2005, 12:39 PM
If you're going via Ebay...which I think is OK....I still recemmend that you go to some bow shops and shoot some bows, so you know exactly which models you like..............Then look for your model on ebay.

Make sure the Draw length is adjustable to your reach.

Thanks Iowanian and the rest of you for your input. I don't care what anyone says about you guys your alright in my book. :thumb:

Chiefnj
04-04-2005, 12:44 PM
Can you sit still in a chair the size of an airplane seat (economy) for 5 hours in 20 degree weather suspended 20 feet up in a tree? If so, then pursue bowhunting.

First question, price.

Second question, fingers or release? If you shoot fingers, your compound bow selection is somewhat limited.

Third question, one cam or two?

Fourth question, what amount of let-off do you want?

Go to a local bowshop, not a general sporting goods store that sells bows, but a bow specialty shop that will let you shoot the bow (hopefully).

ptlyon
04-04-2005, 12:50 PM
Third question, one cam or two?


or the cam and a half

UTChief
04-04-2005, 01:32 PM
Safety card? Good god the safety manieacs have struck again. ROFL

I highly recomend this course (you don't realy have a choice) but unles you are a exspert hunter you learn alot from shot placement to tracking to ethics on how far away to shoot depending on your abillity.

As far as bow selection I am one sided I use to shoot for hoyt I wasn't good enough to be a staff shooter but I was sponserd buy them, Basicly just got things for cost.
I havent hunted with a bow since my accident but befor that I have killed 4 deer and two elk with a bow.

Their is now other hunting exsperince greater than bow hunting elk in full rut and having a mature bull screaming at you 30 yards away, wonce you have you willnever go back to a rifle.

Hunting with a bow takes a lot more time and dedication, you just can't show up opening morning and sit on a ridge and hope someone pushes somthing buy you .

Archery takes a lot of practice and you will use diferent muscles that you normaly wouldn't use to sand at full draw for 3 to 4 munits watting for a animal to step past lat little limb so you have that clear window to take a cleen shot.

seclark
04-04-2005, 02:37 PM
You don't have to spend alot of cash though.............Our Good friend Sec hunts with a bow he made out of 2 yardsticks and his old catheter hose, and makes his own arrows.


thought my ears were burning...i love to shoot my bows. whether it's at deer, targets, or the neighbors cat, it's great fun.
sec

yunghungwell
04-04-2005, 02:55 PM
If you're going via Ebay...which I think is OK....I still recemmend that you go to some bow shops and shoot some bows, so you know exactly which models you like..............Then look for your model on ebay.

Make sure the Draw length is adjustable to your reach.


Or have somebody at a bow measure your draw length then make sure that you buy a bow, ebay or other wise that is the correct draw length. Fixed draw length bows are slightly more consistent than adjustable draw length bows. Finally, a fixed draw length bow doesn’t mean permanently fixed draw length. Many times you just need to change the cam, which can be usually be found on ebay also.

KC Kings
04-04-2005, 04:15 PM
Safety card? Good god the safety manieacs have struck again. ROFL

http://www.dfg.ca.gov/huntered/
California does have a hunters safety course if you want to get a hunting license you are required to take it. I hunted several youth hunts before I took the class, and didn't learn much about hunting at all, but if you aren't raised around guns or hunting, you will probably learn something.

It would be funny to see the beer drinking, pot smoking, weightlifting, Big Daddy sitting around with a bunch of 15 year olds learning about shooting safety.

BIG_DADDY
04-04-2005, 04:19 PM
http://www.dfg.ca.gov/huntered/
California does have a hunters safety course if you want to get a hunting license you are required to take it. I hunted several youth hunts before I took the class, and didn't learn much about hunting at all, but if you aren't raised around guns or hunting, you will probably learn something.

It would be funny to see the beer drinking, pot smoking, weightlifting, Big Daddy sitting around with a bunch of 15 year olds learning about shooting safety.

I hunted in Oregon as a kid and shot guns my whole life. This will be a waste of time and money.

Iowanian
04-04-2005, 07:05 PM
There is more to safety that how to shoot your bow and ethics.

I can't caution you enough to be careful climbing into or getting out of your tree. If you aren't half Orangutan, I'd recommend you start with a ladder stand.

After I killed my buck last year in the rain, I climbed back up to spot my shot to locate blood for tracking (so dungwell and my brother could drag my deer out) and I slipped and fell 8-10' onto the back of my brainbucket and shoulder.

I don't use them like I should, but as a beginner, you should seriously consider a safety harness.

You'll either Hate Bowhunting or Love it...........Don't give up until you see at least 1 deer at 10'.

Darkwolfe
04-04-2005, 07:18 PM
Make sure the Draw length is adjustable to your reach.

IMHO That comment is the best piece of advice you can get. Even the overall draw weight of the bow falls in second place. A 90lb draw bow is useless if the draw falls wrong and you can't keep your arms steady enough to hit your target.

A multi-pin sight is very useful too. You should be able to sight in pins at 50 & 75 yards for hunting. If you want longer ranges, great, but don't expect to drop a whitetail at 100 yards unless you are damned lucky. 75 yards is stretching it anyway.

You guys would have a chuckle out of my bow. It's an ancient (like 20 years) old Bear Blacktail hunter that's had some tweaking done to it. I'm not sure what the draw is now, but it's well over the original 60-70lb that it was made with. Typically I'm throwing 125 grain broadheads on aluminum shafts. Graphite shafts cost too much in my book.

I got that goofy thing out of a garage sale for $40 nearly 15 years ago and got with a local gunshop that did bow work too. After about another $40 (the guy owed me a favor) and some testing on the range, that thing was set to match me as close as is possible.

Get a professional to help you adjust whatever bow you get to match you alone, you'll get much much better use of the bow that way.

yunghungwell
04-05-2005, 07:30 AM
There is more to safety that how to shoot your bow and ethics.

I can't caution you enough to be careful climbing into or getting out of your tree. If you aren't half Orangutan, I'd recommend you start with a ladder stand.

After I killed my buck last year in the rain, I climbed back up to spot my shot to locate blood for tracking (so dungwell and my brother could drag my deer out) and I slipped and fell 8-10' onto the back of my brainbucket and shoulder.



OH YES, Iowanian is the coolest retard.

http://www.thirdav.com/zinestuff/cr19_cov.jpg

Chiefnj
04-05-2005, 07:44 AM
A multi-pin sight is very useful too. You should be able to sight in pins at 50 & 75 yards for hunting. If you want longer ranges, great, but don't expect to drop a whitetail at 100 yards unless you are damned lucky. 75 yards is stretching it anyway.

.

Are you talking yards or feet? I don't know anyone one the east coast who would have pins set for anything greater than 40 yards. I'm not aware of 3D tournaments shooting that far with stationary targets.

Iowanian
04-05-2005, 09:57 AM
Darke..............If you're shooting 75 yards with a bow.........You're either Cupid or a fool.

Big Daddy...........I shot a deer at 37 yards this fall. That is about the longest I'd ever want to shoot. First of all, in a timber, you're not likely to have a clear shot further than that and secondly, the Kill zone for a whitetail is a little bigger than a softball.

I'd guess that most bow kills are 10-20 yards.....I know some elk and Bighorn hunts require longer shots........but No responsible Beginner(or seasoned hunter who isn't VERY SKILLED at those distances) would shoot over 30-40 yards. I know people who kill deer at 50-60 yards, but they're William Tell.

I recommend setting your Pins at 10, 20 and 25/30 yards. Todays bows are fast enough, that there isn't much drop in trajectory at those distances, but there is a difference from 20-30 yards.

seclark
04-05-2005, 10:02 AM
i've never shot over 30yards in the timber. target shoots are a little different, but i'm not crazy about trashing my arrows.
sec

Darkwolfe
04-05-2005, 07:46 PM
Darke..............If you're shooting 75 yards with a bow.........You're either Cupid or a fool.

.
Texas mule deer. Nearly the size of a cow. Whitetail deer are a lot smaller. Sorry, brain was in muley huntin' mode.

Iowanian
04-05-2005, 07:49 PM
I don't care if its an elephant, I've never heard of a 80-100 yards shot with a bow....Not since I was loosin arrahs at da Engrish lines in 1694.


I can understand the Confusion.......Texans have their women fooled that

*-------------* is 6".

Darkwolfe
04-05-2005, 07:54 PM
Oh, I lost few, no doubt there. I've always had a thing for long range shots anyway. But I don't try the 80+ range. 75 is stretching it no matter what you do. Only time I go for that shot is if I have a perfect side profile to aim for. And that's on a muley, forget it on a little whitetail.

I know you think I'm crazy, but when you grow up in the sticks like I did, sometimes target shooting and pushing your range to its limits is all you have to fight boredom with.

It's cool.

Darkwolfe
04-05-2005, 07:55 PM
I can understand the Confusion.......Texans have their women fooled that

*-------------* is 6".


You be nice now. Them thar's fightin' words! :)

Iowanian
04-05-2005, 07:56 PM
I'm more of a fan of a single shot that is a Moneyshot vs the "pull and Pray" method.

If you're shooting 80 yards with a bow that old, you've been watching too many Middle Ages War movies. I'm thinking about hunting rabbits this year with a Catapult and old Pumpkins.

Iowanian
04-05-2005, 07:59 PM
Jazz.......I hate to be the one to break this to you...............

But *-------------------------* is a Texas Foot long........In Iowa, its just the width.

Darkwolfe
04-05-2005, 08:01 PM
No argument there.

Ever been able to just feel the path your arrow will take? Know just when to let it go?

Dern it.. Now I got the itch to go find a nice long ravine to set up and get my eye back in practice. Freakin' 40 hour week is just killer.

BIG_DADDY
04-05-2005, 09:21 PM
Big Daddy...........I shot a deer at 37 yards this fall. That is about the longest I'd ever want to shoot. First of all, in a timber, you're not likely to have a clear shot further than that and secondly, the Kill zone for a whitetail is a little bigger than a softball.

I'd guess that most bow kills are 10-20 yards.....I know some elk and Bighorn hunts require longer shots........but No responsible Beginner(or seasoned hunter who isn't VERY SKILLED at those distances) would shoot over 30-40 yards. I know people who kill deer at 50-60 yards, but they're William Tell.

I recommend setting your Pins at 10, 20 and 25/30 yards. Todays bows are fast enough, that there isn't much drop in trajectory at those distances, but there is a difference from 20-30 yards.

I still have to pick up my bow first. There are some archery clubs here and that looks like the direction I will end up going. The guy who was renting the house I was going to get here where I could shoot a lot of deer right out my back door and had the targets set up is now crying about my dog. Apparently his wife is freaked out about pitbulls and keeps his balls in a box over their fireplace. He apparently was bit by what he thought was a pitbull once before too when said animal got in a fight with his dog and the tard tried to break them up himself. Gee, wonder why he got bit. :rolleyes:

On top of that we lost a huge deal today that was a 99% done deal and will cost me personally enough to buy a small house in some parts of the country so my focas has changed a little between both events. Oh well, such is life. I will go to some pro shops as you suggested this weekend though and check it out. I'll let you know which bows I liked. I loved it as a kid, I am sure that won't change. I am still a kid now I just look all old and stuff. I may check out the place in Pacifica too just to see what's going on there. I think I need to get my shit together pretty quick though if I am going to make hunting season.

jspchief
04-05-2005, 10:13 PM
Texas mule deer. Nearly the size of a cow. Whitetail deer are a lot smaller. Sorry, brain was in muley huntin' mode.

Sorry, I have to call bullsh*t.

You'd be lobbing the arrow at 75 yards, not to mention how much you'd have to adjust for wind. And what does the fact that it's mule deer have to do with it? Even if they are freakish "cow sized" ones? If anything, you'd want to be closer for a larger animal, an arrow probably wouldn't even pass through a whitetail at 75 yards, let alone your antlered cows.