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View Full Version : **FFToday Homer Mock** 3rd Round Selection


Kyle401
04-07-2005, 08:58 AM
Poll coming. LB was the consensus (http://www.chiefsplanet.com/BB/showthread.php?t=113618) position to target.

Kyle401
04-07-2005, 09:08 AM
Baseline LB Combine results:

Derrick Johnson – Texas
40 – 4.65
Bench – Did not participate
Vertical – 37.5”
Broad-jump – 10’0”
20 yd shuttle – 3.87
3 cone – 7.21
Wonderlic – 21

Jordan Beck – Cal-Poly 6’2” 231 lbs.
Combine:
40 – 4.66
Bench – 25
Vertical – 41”
Broad-jump – 10’8”
20 yd shuttle – 4.12
3 cone – 7.11
Wonderlic – 27
Beck plays hard, shows very good range and is a hit-and-wrap type of tackler who can generate enough pop on contact. He is a smart athlete who makes decent reads and is quick to react to blocking schemes and formations. He has the sudden burst to slip blocks on the move and is very active working down the line.
He made good strides in 2004 as a blitzer, as his rover time allowed him to be uncovered more often, giving him a free lane to make the play behind the line of scrimmage. He needs to do a better job of using his hands, as he lacks ideal size and strength to face up and disengage when taking blockers head on. His marginal change-of-direction skills are evident in pass coverage, as he gathers himself in transition, forcing him to take bad angles and miss tackles trying to recover.
Beck is better playing in the short zone, where he shows better awareness making plays in front of him. He is not an effective tackler in space, as he does not open his hips properly or show enough flexibility. He also struggles to use his hands effectively to prevent blockers from attacking his knees. Still, you notice that he has been highly productive making the clutch plays.
He will sometimes take on blockers with the wrong shoulder, which can result in getting stonewalled. He needs to improve his overall strength, as Beck can not be considered a knock-back tackler, especially since he tends to make too many low tackles working near the pile. Before 2003, he was not really an effective blitzer, but he developed better timing and anticipation skills to combine with his speed to create the lane needed to get to the quarterback in the pocket.
The thing you have to like about Beck is his quickness, high motor and burst on the blitz. However, he needs to show better anticipation skills in pass coverage and must improve his power base, as he lacks strength to stack and control. The level of competition he faced was marginal, but he has produced good numbers. For a team looking for a Cover-2 linebacker or one to play on the weak side, they could find a nice late round project in this player. He might be like Rodney Daingerfield (gets no respect) in some scouts' eyes, but based on his speed and production to date, he is capable of contributing at the next level.
Marcus Lawrence – S. Carolina 6’3” 245 lbs
Combine:
40 – 4.72
Bench – 19
Vertical – 34”
Broad-jump – 10’1”
20 yd shuttle – 4.35
3 cone – 7.18
Wonderlic – 21

Outstanding JUCO player at Butler Community College who came in right away as a junior and started for the Gamecocks.

Lawrence is a prototypical inside linebacker. He is a big, strong player with good strength. Lawrence excels in the stopping the running game, he is good at the point of attack, but could do a better job of using his hands to shed blockers. He doesn't have great quickness, but he fills the holes well and is a good, powerful wrap up tackler. He has decent sideline to sideline speed and can track down backs when in pursuit. There are times though, when Lawrence takes some poor angles to the ball and overruns the play. He isn't great in coverage as he lacks quick change of direction skills, but he does a nice job in space in reading draws and staying at home on misdirection plays. He is a big hitter in the open field and does a nice job of breaking down and setting himself before the tackle. He is effective on the blitz, has pretty good speed coming up the field and can get to the quarterback.

Marcus is the type of player you want in the middle of a defense. He's physical and intimidating and a great run stopper. He has the instincts for the position and if he improves himself in terms of reading and reacting, he'll be an outstanding linebacker. He's a 1st day pick.

Link to interview with Lawrence (http://www.nfldraftcountdown.com/interviews/05/marcuslawrence.html)

Adam Seward – UNLV 6’2” 250 lbs
Combine:
40 – 4.60
Bench – 33
Vertical – 36.5”
Broad-jump – 10’0”
20 yd shuttle – 4.11
3 cone – 7.17
Wonderlic – 33

UNLV: The most prolific tackler in school history with 312 takedowns in just three years ... Needs just 23 tackles this fall to become the all-time leader in the Mountain West Conference, passing Wyoming's Tyler Gottschalk (334 from 2000-03) ... Ranks third in MWC history with 156 solo stops and second in assisted takedowns with 156 ... Along with teammate Jamaal Brimmer, can join QB/P Randall Cunningham as the only three-time first team all-league honorees in school history ... A unanimous selection as 2004 preseason First Team All-MWC (Athlon, CFN, Lindy's, Phil Steele's, The Sporting News) ... Ranked the No. 9 ILB in the nation by Phil Steele's, the No. 5 NFL prospect in the MWC by Lindy's and the No. 21 player in the MWC regardless of position by College Football News ... A local talent who was named to the Butkus Award Watch List in 2003 and 2004 ... Father, Tom, was co-captain of the 1978 NCAA Div. II champion Eastern Illinois squad and served as assistant coach at UNLV from 1986-89 under Wayne Nunnely ... Younger brother, Mark, was a 2004 signee with Nevada, Reno ...

Comments from Gil Brandt of nfl.com on Seward’s Pro day:

Seward (6-2Ό, 248) probably worked himself into a second-round pick. He just did positional workouts, choosing to stand on his combine numbers, which was unbelieveably fast times (4.56 in the 40-yard dash).

Quarterbacks:
Kyle Orton – Purdue 6’3” 226 lbs


A four-year starter who is an intelligent and instinctive signal caller … He is a quiet, respected leader, but might need to get more vocal in order to command presence in the huddle at the next level … Has decent upper-body strength, but despite adding 10 pounds to his frame before last season, he still lacks thickness and muscle definition in his lower body frame … Good athlete with a medium-to-long stride and adequate foot speed … Operates mostly out of the shotgun, and while he shows a smooth, long release, he lacks quickness when dropping back from center in a conventional offense … Shows very good accuracy in the short-to-intermediate passing game, but he has a bit of a long windup and the ball fails to come off his hands quickly when having to throw long … Better throwing from the pocket, as his passes seem to lack velocity and accuracy when he is forced to throw on the move … Has no trouble reading defenses, but will tend to force the ball into coverage instead of taking what's there … Stays on his primary receiver too long … Has displayed the arm strength to fire tight spirals in the intermediate area … If anyone ever questions his toughness, they only have to go back and watch the 2003 Capitol One Bowl … Has a snappy three-quarter-arm delivery and can pass with good velocity when not forced to throw off-balance … Tries to use his arm strength to get out of trouble, but fails to compensate for his feet not being set to throw … Has a very good understanding of the game, competes with tremendous effort and never complains … Effective on timing routes and crossing patterns, putting enough zip on the ball to allow the receivers to catch the pigskin in stride … Does a good job of picking up the blitz, but it might be too good; he will get impatient waiting for his targets to get open and will run at the first sign of pressure … When he fails to get off his first read quickly, he will make poor decisions and force the ball into traffic … Not a threat to run and does not need to be accounted for in this area … Struggles getting back from center to his set point; it was evident during practices at the 2005 East-West Game, where he had a series of fumbles and poor center exchanges throughout the scrimmages … His hip injury stalled what was first thought to be a Heisman Trophy season during the first half of the 2004 season and further medical evaluation of that injury might be needed … Not a blue-chip prospect, but gets the most out of his blue-collar ability to provide good depth on a pro roster.

Andrew Walter – Arizona 6’5” 234 lbs

Has excellent size and arm strength for his position … Mature field general that the younger players really looked up to … Athletic, smart and has a good grasp of a pro-style offense … Shows quick setup and follow-through ability, with excellent field vision as he can look defenses off and is able to find his secondary receivers with ease … Classic dropback passer who will sit in the pocket to deliver and can handle pressure well … Throws a nice, tight spiral and has touch on his shorter throws … His arm strength is above average and he is strong enough to make all the throws, but loses accuracy with his deep tosses when throwing on the move … Has the ability to roll and throw also, but this is an area he is not very comfortable in … Might not be that mobile, but somehow has the ability to avoid the rush, doing a very good job of delivering arm throws when stepping into the pocket with defenders in his face … You see some overthrows, as this happens when he is rushed or pressured … Has adequate agility and foot speed to reach the throwing point, but carries the ball very low, which makes him susceptible to fumbling. He leaves it too exposed rolling out of the pocket … When he keeps the ball with a high release, Walter demonstrates a much more compact delivery … Has the ability to throw with touch and timing, doing a nice job of hitting his receivers in stride … Plays with good field awareness and has the lateral slide to escape pressure … Not afraid to run with the ball or throw it away, but is also quick looking off his primary target to spot his secondary receivers … Good student of the game who works hard in practice and spends the extra hours studying film … Tough and durable and until injuring his shoulder in the 2004 season finale vs. Arizona, had never had to miss a game due to injury … Able to throw 50-60 yards downfield with ease, but he has that low release and three-quarter sidearm delivery that affects his accuracy on long throws … When he is under control, he can pick apart a defense with his precision in the short area, especially on underneath routes … While he has an aggressive playing style, he does not often force it into traffic, but will take chances due to confidence in his athletic ability … Technically sound passer who still needs to refine his release and mechanics, but has the arm strength and size that coaches love to develop … Underwent surgery in December after he suffered a third-degree separation of his throwing shoulder when he was slammed to the turf midway through the fourth quarter of the 2004 season finale vs. Arizona. Doctors hope he will be ready to throw in April, but say he will definitely be recovered by the time training camp opens.
Wide Recievers:
Brandon Jones – Oklahoma 6’1” 208 lbs
Positives: Has broad shoulders, long arms, well-built upper body, big bubble, thick thighs and calves and tight waist and hips … Has above-average flexibility, balance and body control … Tough, physical catcher who can move around and catch the ball in a crowd … Aggressive route runner who pushes the field and has developed into a very productive red-zone target … Fluid at the top of the route and has a subtle weave to freeze the cornerback … Adjusts to the ball in the air, using his long arms and body control to compete for jump balls … Best when working over the middle, as he shows very good leg power and the ability to break arm tackles … Uses his body effectively to shield and can leverage for position in tight situations … Has strong and reliable hands, routinely catching with arms extended away from the frame … Does a nice job of adjusting low and back for the bad throws … Strong and competitive runner who can gain additional yardage after the catch … Turns upfield and fights for yardage … Can split defenders and break some tackles … Aggressive blocker who gets after the defender, battles to stay on and will finish with good strength.
Negatives: Smooth runner, but lacks a sudden burst off the snap and needs to gather before getting to top speed … Better in the short area, as he seems to lose sight of the ball on deep routes … Will power through tackles, but lacks good hip wiggle to elude … Looks stiff when changing direction and lacks explosion through his cuts … Does not have the second gear needed to head up field and elude after the catch (most of his yards after the catch comes from generating power, rather than a burst).

Craig Bragg – UCLA 6’1” 196 lbs
Positives: Has good size, speed, strength and athletic ability for the position … Displays solid work habits … Generates a quick release with good lateral movement … Can get deep and create separation after the catch and is best when working against man coverage, as he uses his hands effectively to prevent the defender from rerouting him … Runs precise short curl options, quick slants and out routes and has the ability to run the deep post and fade route … Makes good adjustments on his routes and to the ball and shows excellent ball concentration with the ability to catch out of his frame and make the over-the-shoulder catch … Both a hands-and-body catcher with the ability to use his size to shield defenders from the ball … Will not hesitate to compete and catch the ball over defenders … Does a good job of sinking his hips, dropping his weight and accelerating out of his breaks without gearing down … Solid effort blocker who can pester and get in the way of a defender … Despite a lack of blazing speed, he does have that second gear to elude after the catch … Slippery and elusive working in space, displaying the vision to break off his route and come back to the ball when the quarterback is pressured.
Negatives: Lacks top-end speed, but compensates with a good burst and quickly builds up his acceleration … Has the short-area burst to avoid the jam, but when a defender gets hands on him, he shows inconsistency getting off the line … While he generally displays good hands, he needs to secure the ball better before heading up field (looks to run before catching the ball, leading to some drops of easy throws) … Must do a better job of settling and finding the soft spot in the zone … Sets up a defender with fakes to get deep, but does not have that outstanding quickness to gain separation on speed alone … Will gather and round on cuts … Must be more aware of the markers and do a better job of keeping his feet in bounds when working the sidelines.
Defensive End:
Bill Swancutt – Oregon State 6’4” 264 lbs
Swancutt is a tireless worker on the field, compensating for a lack of ideal size and average quickness with excellent open field balance and above-average quickness in the short area. He fires out low off the snap and has an array of pass-rush moves to get to the quarterback, but does rely on his spin move too often. He runs with a medium-to-short stride and shows very good change-of-direction agility. Swancutt is quick to read and react to plays as they develop.
He is best coming off the edge, as he lacks the bulk to hold ground when working through traffic. He does a very good job of flattening and running down the line of scrimmage while he chases. Swancutt struggles when he gets too high in his stance, as the larger blockers can lock on and prevent him from redirecting. He can hold some ground at the point of attack, but struggles to defeat double teams. Swancutt does show good hand usage to ward off low blocks and has the lateral agility to be an effective tackler on exterior plays.
Swancutt is an adequate tackler with some impact behind his hits, relying more on positioning to wrap and secure. He is effective making arm tackles and rarely can a runner break wide with Swancutt hovering on the edge. He looks quicker than his timed speed when in pursuit and his motor never shuts off. Swancutt moves quick off the line to gain leverage, getting his hands up quickly on the blocker to separate. His low pad level and arm extension lets Swancutt do a very good job of keeping blockers from attacking his feet.
He is very instinctive, moving well laterally to stretch the play outside and can find the ball working through trash. Swancutt is a decent bull rusher with enough power to push the pocket. Swancutt shows the body control to adjust to the play at full speed. His high motor is evident, as he consistently pursues the ball across the field. While he is an effective right end, his lack of size may be better suited for the open end position, where he can utilize his quickness off the ball to gain a free lane to the quarterback.
Swancutt is a quick reader who has the lateral agility to get transfer and has the balance and foot speed to pursue through trash. He is more fluid than sudden as an athlete and while he may be just a little step lacking in explosion, he doesn't stay blocked and routinely gets schemed by his opponents. Swancutt has a full reperetoire as a pass rusher and never quits in his pursuit.
Toss out the computer numbers that the football gods like, such as size, speed and strength. This kid is a classic overachiever, but definitely a player that needs to be accounted for on the field. He may not be drafted very high, but come back in three years and judge for yourself then.
Defensive Tackle:
Lorenzo Alexander – California 6’1” 301 lbs
Alexander has a short, wide frame that could conceivably carry additional bulk. His commitment to the game is evident in the way he trains, the way he practices and the extra hours he spends in the film room. He can dominate against double teams when he stays low and uses his hands to split-and-stack. He has good lower-body strength, active hands, and the ability to get an edge on a blocker's shoulder to gain gap penetration.
It is rare to see him on the ground, but this will happen when he gets too high in his stance, as he is a bit late protecting his legs at times. He can operate in a three-technique due to his quick first step and good upper-body strength. He shows adequate balance when on the move and can chase and make plays down the line, but is best working in the box, as he does not have the foot speed for long pursuit. Alexander's instincts are evident as he quickly diagnoses and reacts to traps and pulls.
When he gets a good angle, he attacks the ball carrier with violent intent. While he can make plays behind the line of scrimmage, he seems more comfortable in his role of handling combos and stacking at the point of attack. For a player of his size, he shows good quickness along with strength and proper pad level. He plays with good body lean and has the power to stack-and-control. Alexander will fight pressure and stack.
While good for a quick burst, Alexander is sometimes a step away from making the play in pursuit. When he rises and gets high in his stance, he will wash past the ball. When he stays low and brings his hands up, he can jolt the blocker to get him off balance and then dip to shorten the edge. On film, his ability to keep his feet moving while engaged stands out, as he shows balance and strength to collapse the pocket or beat the offensive lineman up field.
He has all the qualities seen in Carolina's Brenston Buckner, but is more refined at this stage of his career. Look for Alexander to go in the middle rounds, as some teams might get stuck on his lack of statistics. But, to truly appreciate his ability, you have to watch films to see the way he combats multiple blockers, which opened the door for big plays by his teammates.

Coogs
04-07-2005, 09:16 AM
I went with Orton. I think the Purdue QB system could be a good system to be in. And I also think some of the teams before us in the early 4th round could select him before our pick at 116. I think some of the rest of the guys on this list will be there at 116.

htismaqe
04-07-2005, 10:12 AM
Orton sucks.

Brock
04-07-2005, 10:18 AM
It sounds like Beck is as athletic as Johnson and smarter to boot.

Chiefnj
04-07-2005, 10:22 AM
I went with Seward. I've heard of him and think it would be better for the Chiefs in the future to move Bell to the SAM.

Kyle401
04-07-2005, 10:38 AM
We are now on the clock. All of the guys in the poll are still available.

Kyle401
04-07-2005, 10:40 AM
Rufus, Phil, any opinions on this one?

Kyle401
04-07-2005, 11:06 AM
:banghead: Now we have a 3-way tie! I have a feeling no matter which way this pick goes 75% of people won't like it.

Edit: we need to make the pick by 1:30 pm central.

htismaqe
04-07-2005, 11:08 AM
I think we take a WR here.

We need help at WSLB, but my problem with the OLB's available here is that they all look pretty much exactly like Keyaron Fox coming out of college last year. We need a DEFINITE upgrade or just stick with Fox, IMO.

Andrew Walter is intriguing. He's a very polished QB, he's just not athletically spectacular.

htismaqe
04-07-2005, 11:09 AM
DO NOT pick Kyle Orton.

PLEASE.

:D

Kyle401
04-07-2005, 11:15 AM
DO NOT pick Kyle Orton.

PLEASE.

:D
I agree on Walters being a better prospect than Orton, but this selection will be made based on the outcome of the polls. In the first poll most people thought we should take a LB so we will choose one of the LB's if no one else pulls into the lead.

Hey if you can get Phil to vote for Jones also, you can get a 4 way tie. :banghead:

ChiefsCountry
04-07-2005, 11:38 AM
I still think Dustin Colquitt the Punter out of Tennessee would be the best pick. Helps right now and in the future. But I went to the future here with Kyle Orton. The last Purdue QB we had turned out to be pretty good.

htismaqe
04-07-2005, 11:43 AM
I agree on Walters being a better prospect than Orton, but this selection will be made based on the outcome of the polls. In the first poll most people thought we should take a LB so we will choose one of the LB's if no one else pulls into the lead.

Hey if you can get Phil to vote for Jones also, you can get a 4 way tie. :banghead:

I'm a ****ing mod. I'll rig the poll before I let us draft Kyle Orton.

:D

Coogs
04-07-2005, 11:51 AM
Orton sucks.

Quite a few here thought that about Brees too. Look at him now. Besides, Orton could have 2 to 3 years to groom under Green before taking over. just about the amount of time Brees needed.

Kyle401
04-07-2005, 12:13 PM
Great another 3-way tie. :banghead: We have about 15 minutes to make our pick. If nothing changes we will be selecting Beck because Spicy McHaggis backed him in the previous thread but hasn't voted in this poll.

Chiefnj
04-07-2005, 12:17 PM
Somebody else vote for Seward. He's bigger and faster than the other LB's and was productive in college. Plus, he'll knock Scanlon off the roster and we won't have to read about Scanlon any more.

Coogs
04-07-2005, 12:21 PM
Does this move Bell to OLB? If it does, then I guess you can switch my vote from Orton to Seward.

philfree
04-07-2005, 12:22 PM
I still think Dustin Colquitt the Punter out of Tennessee would be the best pick.


It'd be nice to have a punter we could count on.


PhilFree :arrow:

Kyle401
04-07-2005, 12:26 PM
Does this move Bell to OLB? If it does, then I guess you can switch my vote from Orton to Seward.

Depends on his performance in training camp. I would work with Seward and Bell on the outside and inside to find the combination both are comfortable with. Of course if Fox steps up this could be a depth selection. Typically 3rd rounders do not start right away for any team, much less the Chiefs.

Kyle401
04-07-2005, 12:27 PM
2 minutes left, Seward or Beck?

Coogs
04-07-2005, 12:30 PM
Depends on his performance in training camp. I would work with Seward and Bell on the outside and inside to find the combination both are comfortable with. Of course if Fox steps up this could be a depth selection. Typically 3rd rounders do not start right away for any team, much less the Chiefs.

Actually, I hope we pick a spot for Bell and let him stay right there.

Coogs
04-07-2005, 12:30 PM
2 minutes left, Seward or Beck?

Seward I guess.

ChiefsCountry
04-07-2005, 12:35 PM
Orton is in the lead.

Kyle401
04-07-2005, 12:35 PM
I make the pick (Seward) and come back to find Orton would have won if Coogs didn't change his vote. Sorry for the lack of time guys, but the rest of the homers over at fftoday were already whining about how long this was taking us.

Coogs
04-07-2005, 12:39 PM
I make the pick (Seward) and come back to find Orton would have won if Coogs didn't change his vote. Sorry for the lack of time guys, but the rest of the homers over at fftoday were already whining about how long this was taking us.

God, I hope I didn't screw up the Chiefs for the nixt 12 years. :p

htismaqe
04-07-2005, 02:44 PM
Quite a few here thought that about Brees too. Look at him now. Besides, Orton could have 2 to 3 years to groom under Green before taking over. just about the amount of time Brees needed.

Bress HAS sucked, except for this last year. And that was largely because he was on a 3-foot leash. His TD/INT ratio was superb, but compare him to other QB's with similar ratios - he had almost 2000 less yards than most of them, including Trent Green...

Chiefnj
04-07-2005, 02:58 PM
Bress HAS sucked, except for this last year. And that was largely because he was on a 3-foot leash. His TD/INT ratio was superb, but compare him to other QB's with similar ratios - he had almost 2000 less yards than most of them, including Trent Green...

You just like to piss on anything Marty. The only other QB's with a similar 4:1 TD to INT ratio (or better) were Manning (who set league records) and McNabb who had about 800 more passing yards, not 2000.

chiefscafan
04-07-2005, 03:00 PM
what about adrian mcpherson give him a year or two to learn under green