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View Full Version : Vets and those still in service: When did you join the Army/Navy/Air Force and why?


Count Zarth
04-14-2005, 10:28 PM
Fall in for inspection! Poll forthcoming.

Please vote and post your reasons.

Frazod
04-14-2005, 10:33 PM
I joined when I was 18. Patriotism and wanting to travel were certainly considerations, but took a back seat to being broke and needing a job.

BTW, you're really going to piss off the jarheads. Oh well - technically, they're all in the Navy anyway. :evil:

RedDread
04-14-2005, 10:54 PM
signed up when I was 19, when the drill sergeants asked why I joined I didn't tell em college money

but it was for college money....

Phobia
04-14-2005, 10:55 PM
If this question is relevent to your own life decisions, just do it.

About half my bootcamp platoon was made up on 18 & 19 year old guys. But there were plenty of middle 20 and a few 28 year old people as well. At your age, you won't be the old man.

Frazod
04-14-2005, 10:57 PM
If this question is relevent to your own life decisions, just do it.

About half my bootcamp platoon was made up on 18 & 19 year old guys. But there were plenty of middle 20 and a few 28 year old people as well. At your age, you won't be the old man.

We had one guy in my bootcamp company who was 32 (obviously we called him "gramps"). Most everybody else was just out of high school.

Barret
04-14-2005, 11:50 PM
Joined the Navy when I was 18, 2.5 weeks out from finishing high school. Thought I could get some technical skills and get college paid for.

I also thought "hey, they cant hit me with a bullet or missle if they cant see me" so I joined into the Submarine service. I mean last time I checked the only people that could sink a sub were the Russians and maybe the Chinese. Also went Fast attack since I didnt want to be under water for 3 months on boomer patrols.

DenverChief
04-15-2005, 12:05 AM
Patriotism and wanting to travel were certainly considerations, but took a back seat to being broke and needing a job.



Ditto

trndobrd
04-15-2005, 01:58 AM
Joined the National Guard at 21 because I needed some $. Went to active duty at 24 because I thought it would be fun and a challenge, it was both. Went back in the Guard at 27 because I wanted different challenges, but knew I would miss the friends and paycheck. Went back on Active Duty at 31 and 34 because I was told to.

"Bob" Dobbs
04-15-2005, 02:02 AM
At 24, I was already super bored with my chosen field, so I enlisted in the Army. Best part was, since I was the oldest in my basic training company, I was an immediate squad leader and didn't have to do as many pushups.
:thumb:
the ironic part is, I'm now 43 and back in that original career field.

Over-Head
04-15-2005, 02:23 AM
At your age, you won't be the old man.

Goat boy's more likely to wind up as the pivot man in a circle jerk ROFL

Saggysack
04-15-2005, 02:35 AM
19

Family tradition and because I wanted to. It wasn't about money, and if it was, man was I fooled. Military don't pay worth a damn.

Duck Dog
04-15-2005, 02:38 AM
20 years old. For patriotism, travel, the experience. And because JCCC was turning into a 3 year school.

Ultra Peanut
04-15-2005, 02:43 AM
I joined for the pie.

Ultra Peanut
04-15-2005, 03:13 AM
Can you imagine gochiefs coming back here and playing the "I'm a war vet, you ungrateful little bastards!" card? Wow.

As for why I became I vet, it's mostly because I wanted to help animals.

Duck Dog
04-15-2005, 05:04 AM
Can you imagine gochiefs coming back here and playing the "I'm a war vet, you ungrateful little bastards!" card? Wow.

As for why I became I vet, it's mostly because I wanted to help animals.

He'll have to survive the ass whoopings that are bound to come from his peers first.

Warrior5
04-15-2005, 05:35 AM
Patriotism, a sense of duty, and an internal obligation to serve my country. Wanted to give something back for all that had been given to me and my family.

Pants
04-15-2005, 05:37 AM
If I ever was going to join military, I'd be in a tank crew.

HemiEd
04-15-2005, 06:16 AM
I joined the Navy at 18 for a few reasons. I was too irresponsible to take care of myself. I had no, absolutely no self control. I would stay out every night, all night. I was not interested in school anymore. The funniest one, my Dad still brings up to me is that I was tired of rules. So the Navy sent me to six months of AE school, six days a week, ten hours a day after the 13 week after boot camp. ROFL

Warrior5
04-15-2005, 06:22 AM
If I ever was going to join military, I'd be in a tank crew.

yep.

RangerSniper124
04-15-2005, 06:47 AM
I joined the Army at 18 for several reasons. Family tradition was the first my father served 2 tours in Vietnam, Both Grandfather's during WWII. One in Bastogne during the Battle of the Bulge the other climbed the cliffs at Normandy during the invasion.
I also received a hefty signing bonus and college fund.

trndobrd
04-15-2005, 07:07 AM
He'll have to survive the ass whoopings that are bound to come from his peers first.


There are no "ass whoopings" in basic training anymore.



Lot's of slips and falls in the showers and stairwells though.

wilas101
04-15-2005, 07:08 AM
I left for Basic on May 25, 1988. 3 days after graduation.

My reasoning? I had no motives such as pay or college money or anything like that. I had simply known, for as long as I could remember, that I would join the Army.

(this is where my single visioned approach to life failed me at this time)

I turned down the nuke program from the Navy and a civil engineering specialty from the Air Force in order to secure my airborne school and RIP slots.

18 weeks and one fractured ankle later I realized I was not as hard core as I might have led myself to believe so I declined holding over at airborne school and was sent to the 101st in Ft. Campbell. I ets'd with no applicable skills for the traditional job force and one hell of an attitude. I was, however, a good shot and I knew how to daisy chain claymores but that did little to impress prospective employers.


The moral of my story? While being a grunt makes you cooler than everyone else.... there's more money in talking to the navy/air force. :)


As a side note of interest I gave serious consideration to joining the French Foreign Legion after my ets date but luckily my dislike for those self rightous a$$holes in that country convinced me not to. The Legionaires on the other hand were pretty cool.

jettio
04-15-2005, 07:14 AM
19

Family tradition and because I wanted to. It wasn't about money, and if it was, man was I fooled. Military don't pay worth a damn.

ROFL

I remember when I first saw the pay charts, I assumed that military pay must be tax-free and that that was factored in the low numbers on the pay chart.

JohninGpt
04-15-2005, 07:25 AM
I joined the Navy reserve at 18 and went active at 20. Now I have about 17 years of active time and am looking forward to hanging it up in three more years. Problem is, I don't know what I want to be when I grow up, anyone out there hiring?
I'm in route home from a six month deal in Iraq right now, and I'm fairly militaried out, and really thirsty for a cold beer.

Phobia
04-15-2005, 07:34 AM
I'd hire a seabee in a second. The only problem is I pay military wages.

JohninGpt
04-15-2005, 07:39 AM
I'd hire a seabee in a second. The only problem is I pay military wages.
Cool! That's E7 over 18 with BAH, BAS, and my military retirement! Actually the military pays pretty good if you stick around long enough.

Phobia
04-15-2005, 07:40 AM
Yeah, but you're gonna hate starting at E-1 with my company. ;)

SCTrojan
04-15-2005, 07:42 AM
They paid for college, couldn't have afforded USC otherwise.

JohninGpt
04-15-2005, 07:43 AM
Yeah, but you're gonna hate starting at E-1 with my company. ;)
Yeah the pay would suck, but I had a damn good time as a non-po.

Bowser
04-15-2005, 07:51 AM
I joined the Air Force at 18, entered when I was 19. I think I did it as much for my dad as I did it for myself (he was a WW II vet, flew on B-17's), but it ended up being a great move. The other services hated us! I was an E-1 over in Okinawa and had my own room with a fridge, and marine sgts. were living four to a room over there! They called us "civillians in uniform", and it's pretty much true.

If you're considering it, give the AF some thought. I had a blast.

redbrian
04-15-2005, 07:52 AM
Joined when I was 17, spent the summer in inactive reserves, turned 18 in Aug, went to boot camp the first of Sep.

Spent 5.5 glorious years in the Air Force, ok the first 3 sucked but the last 2 were pretty damn good, if it was not for all the dipshits I would have made it a carrier.

Radar Chief
04-15-2005, 07:53 AM
Joined the Army at age 21. Why? Because by that time I’d worked enough factory and construction jobs to see that it sucked and I’d be screwed if something bad happened like injuring my back. So, I first went to school, but by this time I’d pissed my parents off so bad by being a general looser that I was on my own to pay for it. I did ok, worked part time while putting myself through school, kept a pretty good grade average going but was practically starving to death. I got down to less than 150 lbs, which probably doesn’t sound that bad but made me look like a concentration camp victim. That summer a friend from high school was back for leave before heading to Berlin, he was a Gun Bunny (11B) BTW. He convinced me I could get a good education from the Army and have money for collage to boot.
I don’t regret a bit of it, my Army education and experience is a big part of why I got the job I now have working in the R&D Engineering department for an electronics manufacture. My only regret is that I didn’t have commanders more like Warrior 5. If I had, I’d probably still be in and looking towards retirement. But since every commander I had seemed to think the troops under his/her command were there to further his/her career, I decided to become a PFC (Proud Fugg’n Civilian).

PunkinDrublic
04-15-2005, 07:53 AM
I was just out of high school and I really wanted to get out of KC and see other things. Joining the military was a lot more exciting than a semester at JCCC. A lot of my friends at the time were just total ****ing burnouts. I joined the Navy went through boot camp and got stationed in San Diego for 4 years. Being 19 away from home and in So Cal was awesome and some of the best times of my life.

Phobia
04-15-2005, 07:55 AM
Yeah the pay would suck, but I had a damn good time as a non-po.

Yeah - I don't think I can compete with $59056.56 plus COLA, 30 days vacation, and all those pretty uniforms.

That's not too bad. FWIW, I'd be at 15 years right now had I opted to stay in. Only problem is I'd probably be stuck at E6 or E7. Marine promotions are slow. I have a buddy who just retired E6. He was an E5 the same time as me 10 years ago.

wilas101
04-15-2005, 07:58 AM
I joined the Air Force at 18, entered when I was 19. I think I did it as much for my dad as I did it for myself (he was a WW II vet, flew on B-17's), but it ended up being a great move. The other services hated us! I was an E-1 over in Okinawa and had my own room with a fridge, and marine sgts. were living four to a room over there! They called us "civillians in uniform", and it's pretty much true.

If you're considering it, give the AF some thought. I had a blast.

My real eye opener with the Air Force was in Saudi. They let us go into town and a buddy and I ran into a couple guys in the Air Force. We talked with them a bit and they asked if we wanted to go get some breakfast with them so we went along.

Nice breakfast, all you wanted to eat but the thing that absolutely threw us was when we asked where we had to take our trays and dishes.

The reply: "What do you mean, where do you take them? You leave them here on the table."


I realize that doesn't sound like much but after years of putting up my own tray, finding a service that puts your tray up for you. Thats huge. lol

Radar Chief
04-15-2005, 07:59 AM
Yeah - I don't think I can compete with $59056.56 plus COLA, 30 days vacation, and all those pretty uniforms.

That's not too bad. FWIW, I'd be at 15 years right now had I opted to stay in. Only problem is I'd probably be stuck at E6 or E7. Marine promotions are slow. I have a buddy who just retired E6. He was an E5 the same time as me 10 years ago.

I’d be about the same, joined in ’88.

JohninGpt
04-15-2005, 08:08 AM
Yeah - I don't think I can compete with $59056.56 plus COLA, 30 days vacation, and all those pretty uniforms.

That's not too bad. FWIW, I'd be at 15 years right now had I opted to stay in. Only problem is I'd probably be stuck at E6 or E7. Marine promotions are slow. I have a buddy who just retired E6. He was an E5 the same time as me 10 years ago.
I spent most of the past six months in the wonderful world of the USMC. We were attached to 1MARDIV and dealt mainly with 2/11 and 2/5. When we travelled a little farther west we worked with 1/23, But those guys are all home now, 2MARDIV has the con. I did earn my Fleet Marine Force (FMF) pin with 2MARDIV.

trndobrd
04-15-2005, 08:13 AM
My real eye opener with the Air Force was in Saudi. They let us go into town and a buddy and I ran into a couple guys in the Air Force. We talked with them a bit and they asked if we wanted to go get some breakfast with them so we went along.

Nice breakfast, all you wanted to eat but the thing that absolutely threw us was when we asked where we had to take our trays and dishes.

The reply: "What do you mean, where do you take them? You leave them here on the table."


I realize that doesn't sound like much but after years of putting up my own tray, finding a service that puts your tray up for you. Thats huge. lol


I had the same Air Force culture shock in Saudi. I was trying to get billeting at Prince Sultan Air Base for some of my soldiers and they said they had enough E-1 to E-4 rooms, and enough E-7 rooms. But my officers and E-5 and E-6s were out of luck, and would not be able to stay. I suggested that my Lieutenant could stay with his Platoon Sergeant and the E-5/6s could stay in E-4 billets.

"But we CAN'T put E-6es in E-4 rooms" she said, as if I was asking her to bend the rules of physics.

"Why not?"

"Because they are in a higher paygrade," was the response.

"They're not going to care. We're infantry. We are used just sleeping all in one tent if we have one, or just everyone on the ground sharing a couple ponchos"

The Chief Technical Master Sergeant or whatever the hell she was gave me an astonished look like I had just stripped naked, set basket of fruit on my head and started singing Les Marsailles.

"Well," she stammered "we just can't do that."

I then explained that I was wrong about my numbers. I really had 4 additional E-4s, no E-5s or E-6s, two E-7s and no Officers. Everyone had a good night sleep.

redbrian
04-15-2005, 08:17 AM
My real eye opener with the Air Force was in Saudi. They let us go into town and a buddy and I ran into a couple guys in the Air Force. We talked with them a bit and they asked if we wanted to go get some breakfast with them so we went along.

Nice breakfast, all you wanted to eat but the thing that absolutely threw us was when we asked where we had to take our trays and dishes.

The reply: "What do you mean, where do you take them? You leave them here on the table."


I realize that doesn't sound like much but after years of putting up my own tray, finding a service that puts your tray up for you. Thats huge. lol

The Air Force with out a doubt is the White Collar unit of the military, don’t get me wrong there are a few crap jobs in the Air Force but for the most part it’s a 9 to 5 type atmosphere.

The chow halls are top notch, while stationed down in Biloxi for text school I actually got real tired of eating shrimp, crab and other sea foods every night.

Rain Man
04-15-2005, 08:20 AM
My real eye opener with the Air Force was in Saudi. They let us go into town and a buddy and I ran into a couple guys in the Air Force. We talked with them a bit and they asked if we wanted to go get some breakfast with them so we went along.

Nice breakfast, all you wanted to eat but the thing that absolutely threw us was when we asked where we had to take our trays and dishes.

The reply: "What do you mean, where do you take them? You leave them here on the table."


I realize that doesn't sound like much but after years of putting up my own tray, finding a service that puts your tray up for you. Thats huge. lol


I can listen to war stories all day.

:p

Phobia
04-15-2005, 08:21 AM
Anytime we were within spitting distance of an AF Base, we'd always go eat their chow. It was like going out to a decent restaurant.

Radar Chief
04-15-2005, 08:21 AM
I can listen to war stories all day.

:p

Well, there was that time when I was in the Poontang Delta…. ;)

JohninGpt
04-15-2005, 08:21 AM
The Air Force with out a doubt is the White Collar unit of the military, don’t get me wrong there are a few crap jobs in the Air Force but for the most part it’s a 9 to 5 type atmosphere.

The chow halls are top notch, while stationed down in Biloxi for text school I actually got real tired of eating shrimp, crab and other sea foods every night.
I'm homeported at CBC Gulfport and live on the beach in Biloxi about 5 miles west of Keesler. I don't know how long ago you were there, but the place has a huge new BX and commissary and all of the chow halls have been replaced over the last few years. Nice base.

Otter
04-15-2005, 08:22 AM
Move into a dorm, join the military, get into a mountain climbing school...do somthing that challenges you and gets you out of that comfortable little rut you've fallen into.

You're becoming way too content being a loser.

Phobia
04-15-2005, 08:23 AM
I can listen to war stories all day.

:p

Did you hear the one about the strip club just outside the gates of every Marine base I was stationed at? It's true. Some dudes would go there on payday, spend their entire check and do nothing else for 2 weeks. It was pretty pathetic.

Bowser
04-15-2005, 08:26 AM
The thing that sucked about basic in the Air Force was the damned classes. They went on forever, and it was near impossible to stay awake for the whole day. The PT was a joke, the obstacle course was a joke, and we only got to fire a modified M-16 that shot .22 rounds once, which was also a joke. And the whole deal was only six weeks long, although I think they upped it to eight weeks now.

To summarize, Air Force basic training is a joke. Learn to stand at attention, march in formation, shine your boots, and keep your dorm room clean and you'll make it.

redbrian
04-15-2005, 08:27 AM
I'm homeported at CBC Gulfport and live on the beach in Biloxi about 5 miles west of Keesler. I don't know how long ago you were there, but the place has a huge new BX and commissary and all of the chow halls have been replaced over the last few years. Nice base.

It was back in the dark ages that I was there, winter and spring of 74/75.

I've heard that it's real nice down there now, back when I was there it was still messed up from Cameil (sp?). In fact the beach was still off limits due to all of the garbage that was washed in from the hurricane

redbrian
04-15-2005, 08:29 AM
The thing that sucked about basic in the Air Force was the damned classes. They went on forever, and it was near impossible to stay awake for the whole day. The PT was a joke, the obstacle course was a joke, and we only got to fire a modified M-16 that shot .22 rounds once, which was also a joke. And the whole deal was only six weeks long, although I think they upped it to eight weeks now.

To summarize, Air Force basic training is a joke. Learn to stand at attention, march in formation, shine your boots, and keep your dorm room clean and you'll make it.

Yep that sums up my experince, actually came out of bootcamp in worse shape than I went in.

trndobrd
04-15-2005, 08:29 AM
The thing that sucked about basic in the Air Force was the damned classes. They went on forever, and it was near impossible to stay awake for the whole day. The PT was a joke, the obstacle course was a joke, and we only got to fire a modified M-16 that shot .22 rounds once, which was also a joke. And the whole deal was only six weeks long, although I think they upped it to eight weeks now.

To summarize, Air Force basic training is a joke. Learn to stand at attention, march in formation, shine your boots, and keep your dorm room clean and you'll make it.


When I was in Basic we would lament our decision not to go into the Air Force believing that in Air Force Basic punnishment would probably be limited to not getting sprinkles on your ice cream

Rain Man
04-15-2005, 08:29 AM
Move into a dorm, join the military, get into a mountain climbing school...do somthing that challenges you and gets you out of that comfortable little rut you've fallen into.

You're becoming way too content being a loser.



I appreciate you challenging me on this. Let me think about it.

redbrian
04-15-2005, 08:33 AM
I can listen to war stories all day.

:p

The difference between a war story and a fairy tale is that a fairy tale begins “once upon a time”, while a war story begins “this is no bull shit”.

Bowser
04-15-2005, 08:34 AM
When I was in Basic we would lament our decision not to go into the Air Force believing that in Air Force Basic punnishment would probably be limited to not getting sprinkles on your ice cream

Please! We got sprinkles! And pizza parties on Sunday!

Duck Dog
04-15-2005, 08:35 AM
Yep, when we flew to Saudi we stopped at Dover AFB. I remember leaving our trays on the table in the mess hall. I also remember the food was damn good. Then again to an 11B, any meal was good.

In Korea, the AF folks got paid extra money to live in the same barracks that I lived in because it was below AF standards.

In Turkey, the AF was there TAX FREE! While the Army personel paid taxes.

Unless they are going in the military to kick ass and take names, I alway's give youngsters the advice to join the AF.

Duck Dog
04-15-2005, 08:36 AM
And one more thing about the AF. Their PT test requirements are half of what the Army's is.

Phobia
04-15-2005, 08:54 AM
New York Post
April 13, 2005

Clashing Military Cultures

By Ralph Peters

Last month, I sat in the of fice of Col. Jon "Dog" Davis, a veteran Marine aviator. While at war, the Corps' pilots had seen a rise in their accident rate. Davis was determined to do something about it.

I wanted to be sympathetic, so I said, "Well, you're flying some very old aircraft."

Davis, a taut, no-nonsense Marine, looked me in the eye and said, "They may be old, but they're good. That's no excuse."

As commander of the Marine Aviation Weapons and Tactics Squadron 1 out in Yuma, Ariz., Davis could have nodded and gone along, blaming the jets and helicopters. But he's a Marine. And Marines don't make excuses. They do their best with what the taxpayers give them. And their best is pretty damn good.

Contrast that with a recent conversation I had with two Air Force generals. I had written columns critical of the platinum-plated F/A-22, the most expensive fighter in history and an aircraft without a mission. So the Air Force decided to lobby me.

Those two generals spun the numbers until the stone-cold truth was buried under a mantra of "air dominance," imaginary combat roles and financial slight-of-hand. Still, I wanted to be fair. I took them seriously and investigated their claims.

Not one thing they said held up under scrutiny.

Morally bankrupt, the Air Force is willing to turn a blind eye to the pressing needs of soldiers and Marines at war in order to get more of its $300-million-apiece junk fighters. With newer, far more costly aircraft than the Marines possess, the Air Force pleads that it just can't defend our country without devouring the nation's defense budget.

Meanwhile, Marine aviators fly combat missions in aging jets and ancient helicopters, doing their best for America — and refusing to beg, lie, cheat or blame their gear.

I had gone out to Yuma to speak to Dog Davis' Marines about future war. The truth is they should have been lecturing to me. There is nothing more inspiring than being around United States Marines (yes, a retired Army officer wrote that). The Corps does more with its limited resources than any other branch of government. The Marines are a bargain rivaled only by our under-funded Coast Guard.

Even the military installations are different. A Marine base is well-maintained and perfectly groomed, but utterly without frills. Guest quarters are Motel 6, not the St. Regis. Air Force bases are the country clubs of la vie militaire.

Meanwhile, the Air Force twiddles its thumbs and dreams of war with China. Its leaders would even revive the Soviet Union, if they could. Just to have something to do.

If you go into the Pentagon these days, you'll find only half of the building is at war. The Army and Marine staffs (the latter in the Navy Annex) put in brutal hours and barely see their families. The Navy, at least, is grappling with the changed strategic environment. Meanwhile, the Air Force staff haunts the Pentagon espresso bar and lobbies for more money.

The Air Force hasn't forgotten how to fight. But it only wants to fight the other services.

Recently, the blue-suiters have been floating one of the most disgraceful propositions I've ever encountered in Washington (and that's saying something).

I heard the con directly from one of the Air Force generals who tried to sell me on the worthless F/A-22. The poison goes like this: "The Air Force and Navy can dominate their battle space. Why can't the Army and Marines?"

Let me translate that: At a time when soldiers and Marines are fighting and dying in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere, the Air Force shamefully implies that our ground forces are incompetent, hinting that, if the Air Force ran the world, we'd get better results.

How low can a service go? Not a single Air Force fighter pilot has lost his life in combat in Iraq. But the Air Force is willing to slander those who do our nation's fighting and dying.

As for the vile proposition itself, well, it's easy to "dominate your battle space" if you don't have anyone to battle. Our fighter-jock Air Force doesn't have an enemy (Air Force special-ops and transport crews, as well as ground-liaison personnel, serve magnificently — but the generals regard them as second-class citizens).

While courage is certainly required, Air Force and Navy combat challenges are engineering problems, matters of physics and geometry. Our Army and Marines, by contrast, face brutally human, knife-fight conflicts that require human solutions.

The Air Force is about metal. The Marines and Army deal in flesh and blood — in problems that don't have clear or easy solutions.

Hey, if the Air Force knows of a simple, by-the-numbers way to win the War on Terror, combat insurgents in urban terrain and help battered populations rebuild their countries, the generals in blue ought to share the wisdom. (They've certainly been paid enough for it.)

But the Air Force doesn't have any solutions. Just institutional greed. Their strategy? Trash our troops. Lie about capabilities and costs. Belittle the genuine dangers facing our country, while creating imaginary threats. Keep the F/A-22 buy alive, no matter what it takes.

A little while ago I wrote that our Air Force needed to be saved from itself. Now I'm no longer sure salvation's possible.

If you want to see how to fly and fight, call in the Marines.

Ralph Peters is the author of "Beyond Baghdad: Postmodern War and Peace."

Rain Man
04-15-2005, 08:59 AM
Wow. Interesting article.



If I join the military, I'm definitely going Air Force.

Phobia
04-15-2005, 09:00 AM
Wow. Interesting article.



If I join the military, I'm definitely going Air Force.

That's the way I'd do it if I had it to do again. Heh. The USMC is no picnic, that's for certain.

Duck Dog
04-15-2005, 09:05 AM
New York Post
April 13, 2005

Clashing Military Cultures

By Ralph Peters

Good read. Reminds of the Army saying; "Improvise, Adapt and Overcome."

SCTrojan
04-15-2005, 09:20 AM
In Turkey, the AF was there TAX FREE! While the Army personel paid taxes.



FWIW, when I passed through there in March, '03, the Army people were tax exempt. Of course, they were on Incirlik Air Base where Northern Watch was still going on. Don't know about the rest of the area.

JimNasium
04-15-2005, 09:51 AM
I joined the Coast Guard at age 21 after a local scandal involving a mule, 5,000 cat-eye marbles, a bushel of rutabagas and three 16-year old girls.

Simba
04-15-2005, 11:37 AM
17. Just to prove my dad wrong.