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CosmicPal
04-17-2005, 07:21 PM
Interesting subject: Should parents allow their kids to drink in their homes under their adult supervision.

I have to agree with the parent who allowed his son to throw a party just as long as everyone knew they weren't driving home and that he was there to supervise it.

On the other hand, it is illegal for teens to drink- and he was after all- supporting underage drinking. I, for one, appreciate what he did since he knew the teenagers would then all go to the beach and drink and all drive home...

I know there are a lot of parents on the planet- how do you feel about this?

Mr. Kotter
04-17-2005, 07:57 PM
Tough one, no doubt. I'd like to see us become more European in our view/use of alcohol.....(libs, mark this day down...heh.)

However, as long as it's against the law, I can't imagine undermining that by serving my own kids alcohol until they are "of age" under any circumstances (outside a sip of wine at a Holiday dinner or something like that.)

Rausch
04-17-2005, 08:13 PM
It isn't illegal to serve minors alcohol if you're their legal gaurdian and it's in the home. It's also legal (in small amounts) in religous ceremonies (communion, etc.)

Now, that's a far cry from letting your kid throw a party, but there is a difference...

Bob Dole
04-17-2005, 08:47 PM
Through two different sets of teenagers, Bob Dole has taken the "allow them to drink sometimes at home" approach.

They were going to do it anyway. Doing it at home allowed Bob Dole some oversight.

jettio
04-17-2005, 09:10 PM
We touched on this a couple of years ago, get the organ donor cards filled out, keep the do-gooder parents out of it, let the kids loose, and get some of those annoying organ needing hospital patients back on the streets.

KCWolfman
04-17-2005, 09:58 PM
I dunno. I understand a kid drinking at their parent's house. I don't understand a parent risking their freedom for a kid that doesn't belong to them without their parent's permission just so you can look cool to your own kids.

Valiant
04-17-2005, 10:10 PM
Im all for it.. Either have a parent supervise

or

kids do it anyway without supervision, and then have sex, do drugs, or commit a felony...

you decide...

KCWolfman
04-17-2005, 11:17 PM
Im all for it.. Either have a parent supervise

or

kids do it anyway without supervision, and then have sex, do drugs, or commit a felony...

you decide...
Do you realize how many people's lives you are talking about here? When you allow someone other than your own children to drink on your property, you have decided to become their parent without their parent's permission. You have also decided that you can tell when every single kid there has reached his limit and you have decided you can stay up all night and watch every single kid until you are positive beyond any doubt that every single one leaving is sober.

Again, if a parent wants to let their kid drink at home, that is probably a smart way to start them, to watch them, to guide them, and to show them their own limitations. However, I don't see how one adult has the right to assume that responsibility for other peoples' children.

Demonpenz
04-17-2005, 11:51 PM
Half the fun is sneaking around to hide the shit.

Simplex3
04-17-2005, 11:58 PM
My dad cured me of drinking and smoking on a float trip when I was 7. The rocking of the boat, the fact that he didn't tell me to not inhale the cigar smoke...

I don't think I even finished one beer. I puked multiple times. I was sick for 12 hours. I didn't drink until I was 23.

As for the party:

Hell no. What about the parents that didn't know? I'd be furious if I found out my kid was spending the night somewhere and the parents let them drink. And it's against the law. "Don't worry son, you can pick and choose the laws you want to follow."

Frazod
04-18-2005, 12:07 AM
When I was a kid, there was a basement not unlike the Foreman's basement on That 70's Show where we hung out sometimes and drank and smoked. The parents knew and didn't care. Unforunately, the kid who lived there was a dick, and I didn't like him. So I didn't go over there all that much.

But we were certainly safer there than when we simply drove around getting hammered because we didn't have anywhere to go.

KCWolfman
04-18-2005, 12:08 AM
When I was a kid, there was a basement not unlike the Foreman's basement on That 70's Show where we hung out sometimes and drank and smoked. The parents knew and didn't care. Unforunately, the kid who lived there was a dick, and I didn't like him. So I didn't go over there all that much.

But we were certainly safer there than when we simply drove around getting hammered because we didn't have anywhere to go.
Drunk kids don't stay put. If they did, they wouldn't have the highest death rate on the highways today.

CosmicPal
04-18-2005, 12:09 AM
My parents traveled quite a bit- often leaving us with the house.

They often told us that they didn't want us smoking, drinking, and doing drugs, but that they understood they couldn't control what went outside the house. They pleaded with us that if we ever got drunk to not drive home- or better yet- call them and they would pick us up.

I did just that one night in high school. Called my parents at 2AM drunk off my azz. They didn't appreciate the fact I was hammered, but they did make me one hell of a breakfast in the morning and thanked me for calling them.

Well, while one of my parents were out of town- my sister and I threw a bash. One of my buddies was hammered and wanted to drive home- I pleaded with him to stay, but he was like 6-2 and 200 lbs back then. So, against everyone elses pleas at the party, I called his parents and told them it would be best for them to pick him up since I wasn't going to let him drive home. His parents were freakin' elated! They were so proud of me that they just HAD to tell my parents. Dammit.

Anyways, the reason why I'm bringing this up is there is an alternative to teenage drinking and that is doing what my parents did for us- talking to your kids and letting them know that it's okay to call them if you get too phucked up. What are you consequences- a grounding? Big deal. It's often better than being dead.

Frazod
04-18-2005, 12:11 AM
Drunk kids don't stay put. If they did, they wouldn't have the highest death rate on the highways today.

God knows I didn't. I couldn't even tell you how many times I drove home completely obliterated. I suppose I'm lucky (a) to be alive and (b) that I never killed anybody else.

I was certainly safer when I could get hammered and actually spend the night at the place I did my drinking.

jcroft
04-18-2005, 12:14 AM
Interesting subject: Should parents allow their kids to drink in their homes under their adult supervision.

I have to agree with the parent who allowed his son to throw a party just as long as everyone knew they weren't driving home and that he was there to supervise it.

On the other hand, it is illegal for teens to drink- and he was after all- supporting underage drinking. I, for one, appreciate what he did since he knew the teenagers would then all go to the beach and drink and all drive home...

I know there are a lot of parents on the planet- how do you feel about this?

For me, it's an issue of law vs. morals. Morally, I'd feel fine about letting my nearly-adult children drink moderatley under my roof and in my supervision. But, it's aganist the law and you run the risk of getting busted for it. As such, I probably wouldn't do it -- even though it's "okay" within my personal morals.

One thing that I think is NOT morally okay is to let OTHER people's kids drink in my house. That's my biggest propblem with the parents that do this -- usually it's not just their kids, they're hosting a party full of kids whose parents aren't aware they are drinking.

jcroft
04-18-2005, 12:15 AM
It isn't illegal to serve minors alcohol if you're their legal gaurdian and it's in the home.

Are you sure? Is this different from state to state? I just saw a documentary about this and it was talking about some state up north ( i think Michigan, maybe?), and it definitely seemed to be illegal there...

KCWolfman
04-18-2005, 12:41 AM
Are you sure? Is this different from state to state? I just saw a documentary about this and it was talking about some state up north ( i think Michigan, maybe?), and it definitely seemed to be illegal there...
I don't think so.

If so, several homes and churches should be busted for serving wine in ceremonies and meals.

Rausch
04-18-2005, 12:52 AM
I don't think so.

If so, several homes and churches should be busted for serving wine in ceremonies and meals.

Yup.

Anyong Bluth
04-18-2005, 02:43 AM
Vermont is looking at lowering the age of drinking to 18 again, but it stands little chance due to the fact it would lose federal highway aid (10 mil) or so if it did.

Kansas probably doesn't even get that much, I'm over 21 and wouldn't like to but would support a tax to offset the loss is cost as a gesture to the Feds to quit holding state's decisions over the coals by bribing them.

big nasty kcnut
04-18-2005, 04:11 AM
My brother and i had party underaged with our parents supervision. Everybody had a good time and no accidents.

Anyong Bluth
04-18-2005, 06:00 AM
people fear the outlash of teen drinking that would result if they lower the age, but sometimes you have to take a step back to take a step forward. The idea you can serve in the army or buy smokes but not drink is obtuse and if you expect them to act like adults then treat them as such. Don't hide behind 21 as a reason for other incidents - make the punishment for drinking & driving or buying for a minor under 18 stiffer and stop trying to stop gap a problem by over restriction

Large fines & losing your license until 21 if busted for drunk driving would make many think twice. Not to mention if parents are around when they do start drinking there is a better chance someone is watching or preventing this practice from starting than @ 21 when no one is around to account for their behavior.

ChiefsFanatic
04-18-2005, 07:21 AM
It isn't illegal to serve minors alcohol if you're their legal gaurdian and it's in the home. It's also legal (in small amounts) in religous ceremonies (communion, etc.)

Now, that's a far cry from letting your kid throw a party, but there is a difference...

It is only illegal for minors to purchase hooch, or to purchase hooch for minors. But having it and letting them drink it, I agree, not illegal.

KCWolfman
04-18-2005, 07:27 AM
It is only illegal for minors to purchase hooch, or to purchase hooch for minors. But having it and letting them drink it, I agree, not illegal.
Providing you are the legal guardian

Mile High Mania
04-18-2005, 07:38 AM
I was surprised when in high school, my parents offered up the use of our house for the "after prom" party.

My parents and little brother stayed 10 minutes away at a hotel and I'm more than certain my dad did a drive by or two.

Anyway, I think there were 6 of us and dates (or other) that stayed at my house. A couple of the girls were taken home by midnight, others were picked up by their parents.

Nothing got out of hand or broken and nobody had the urge to drive. I was shocked when my parents offered up the use of the house and they talked to each of the parents.

Again, some view as crazy ... but, one way or another we were drinking somewhere after prom. The shocker is that this didn't get out of hand with 20 people showing up.

NewChief
04-18-2005, 08:01 AM
Again, if a parent wants to let their kid drink at home, that is probably a smart way to start them, to watch them, to guide them, and to show them their own limitations. However, I don't see how one adult has the right to assume that responsibility for other peoples' children.

Not to mention:

Can you imagine how annoying it is to have a house full of drunk teenagers? Good lord. Shoot me now.

Anyong Bluth
04-18-2005, 08:56 AM
Mile High - I agree completely


Problem is there are many parent that don't know how to draw the line or their kids aren't ready to assume that responsibility. Probably some even on here.

My parents and most my extended family held the same standard. I grew up in a REALLY large Irish Catholic family and any get togethers had booze - we just knew that if we were going out that we could call at any time and our parents or someone would get us, AND if we did drive our asses would be in a sling and we wouldn't see the light of day for ages, car sold, send the kid to do community service... the whole 9 yards.

It was always treated to us as something to enjoy and never some mythical right of "adulthood"

I remember the 1st time I tasted beer. My dad was watching hockey with me and I asked him what he was drinking. He poured a sip in a cup and let me try. Never had some huge curiousity or issues with booze growing up. Guess it took the "mystery" out of it?

Mile High Mania
04-18-2005, 09:42 AM
Each family has to take their own approach. In my case, my group of friends were all "good kids" and fairly responsible. So, my parents took a chance... I don't know how others viewed it, and it really doesn't matter to me.

They could have put is in lockdown - home by midnight and all of that, and I am willing to bet something crazy would have happened.

It's all about trust... if you're a kid and you've earned the trust and you don't abuse it, then there's a little more flexibility.

Will I do the same thing in 14 years when my boy is a senior or 16 years when my daughter is a senior? I dunno... it's a whole new ballgame with the girl, and I have to say I was shocked that the parents of the girls that stayed at our house were cool with it.

I cannot say that I'd be the same. Double standard, I know... but, that's life.

Brock
04-18-2005, 09:56 AM
It's a felony in Kansas.