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Jenny Gump
04-19-2005, 08:25 PM
Why do they call the captain of the ship the "Skipper"?






Or am I basing my knowledge of nautical exploits solely on Gilligan's Island?

shaneo69
04-19-2005, 08:26 PM
Anyone in charge gets the "skipper" moniker. They call baseball managers "skipper" as well.

Jenny Gump
04-19-2005, 08:28 PM
Anyone in charge gets the "skipper" moniker. They call baseball managers "skipper" as well.

Okay. But what is the origin of the term?

shaneo69
04-19-2005, 08:30 PM
Okay. But what is the origin of the term?

I'd have to leave here and go to another site to find out. It's just not worth it.

Jenny Gump
04-19-2005, 08:44 PM
I'd have to leave here and go to another site to find out. It's just not worth it.

Exactly why I asked.

Marada
04-19-2005, 08:48 PM
Why do they call the captain of the ship the "Skipper"?


Here ya go!

Origin of the word skipper
English (chiefly Norfolk): 1: occupational name for the master of a ship, Middle English skipper (from Middle Low German, Middle Dutch schipper.

Jenny Gump
04-19-2005, 08:49 PM
Here ya go!

Origin of the word skipper
English (chiefly Norfolk): 1: occupational name for the master of a ship, Middle English skipper (from Middle Low German, Middle Dutch schipper.

Yeah, but where did the Germans and the Dutch get it from?

Mr. Kotter
04-19-2005, 08:50 PM
http://www.word-detective.com/021402.html

...The later Dutch form of the same word, "schip," had a derivative, "schipper," which meant "captain of a ship" and lives on in our English term "skipper." Meanwhile, the German form wandered into first Italian (as "schifo"), then French ("esquif"), and finally settled into English in the 16th century as our modern "skiff."

Jenny Gump
04-19-2005, 08:53 PM
http://www.word-detective.com/021402.html

...The later Dutch form of the same word, "schip," had a derivative, "schipper," which meant "captain of a ship" and lives on in our English term "skipper." Meanwhile, the German form wandered into first Italian (as "schifo"), then French ("esquif"), and finally settled into English in the 16th century as our modern "skiff."

Thanks Skipper.

Mr. Kotter
04-19-2005, 09:09 PM
Thanks Skipper.

You wanna be "first mate?" :p

CoMoChief
04-19-2005, 09:10 PM
I think its an old naval slang term that means leader.

CoMoChief
04-19-2005, 09:11 PM
Forget the link, listen to me. Im the man with all the answers.

Inspector
04-19-2005, 09:12 PM
I've never been called a boat type, but often referred to as the big torpedo.......

Mr. Kotter
04-19-2005, 09:26 PM
Forget the link, listen to me. Im the man with all the answers.

She all ready repped me sucka....hey, you....get off of my cloud.... :p

PBJ PBJ PBJ

Phobia
04-19-2005, 09:28 PM
I don't know a lot about boats, but I heard they got a new one in Rome today.

Brando
04-19-2005, 09:42 PM
I don't know a lot about boats, but I heard they got a new one in Rome today.

Apparently it comes with a Hitler Youth survival knife too!