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shaneo69
04-26-2005, 09:48 AM
http://www.kcchiefs.com/news/2005/04/26/dawes_daft_about_the_draft/

DAWES: DAFT ABOUT THE DRAFT
Apr 26, 2005, 8:30:35 AM by Media Watch by Rufus Dawes


The annual NFL draft played out before a national television audience and running no less than 17 hours on television over two days is one of the most anticipated events of the sports year. It is among ESPN’s most watched programming, according to the network, and accompanying traffic to this web site last weekend attracted 1.6 million page views. Even the opening weekend of the NFL season doesn’t come close to attracting the attention the draft does.

From weeks of lead-ins on ESPN to the thousands of mock drafts and analysis, to queries on potential strategies and players appearing in newspapers and on web sites around the country, coverage is seemingly endless. We can read for weeks of those players who media believe are “rising/falling” or “overrated/underrated.”

But it is the two days of coverage of the draft on ESPN that ranks as one of the highlights of the television sports year. The TV anchors are decidedly more animated following picks than they are following a touchdown pass or a goal-line stand. A major reason that this event has become such anticipated television is that the NFL has made itself much more video-accessible since ESPN came on the scene.

War room shots are de riguer, commentary from respected coaches – NFL and college – players including our own Trent Green, self-appointed experts before and following each pick, are available for anyone to see. Web sites offer video of player workouts at the annual NFL Combine accompanied by in-depth analysis that attempts to put into context what a GM or coach may – or should I say be – thinking about said player.

In striking shots, we can see the smiles on faces of team personnel following a selection, see anxious parents hugging a son as he dons a team cap and heads to the dais where the NFL commissioner congratulates him and poses alongside for photographs. See the embarrassment and disappointment on California quarterback Aaron Rodgers’ face as he fidgets and waits for his name to be called. These are images reflective of the Academy Awards, the Emmys, the Golden Globes or the twenty or more other award programs that now appear annually on television.

Quick assessments are the order of the day as each pick draws raves or moans from the commentators, pundits, or crowds of fans gathered in parties to watch something that has become a spectacle. Close to home, the local press see the selection of Derrick Johnson in the first round in a glowing light, and view the first day in general as a rousing success with the addition of cornerback Patrick Surtain, obtained in a trade with the Miami Dolphins.

“Good job, Peterson and Hunt,” writes the usually caustic Jason Whitlock, of the Kansas City Star, although he can’t resist tossing a barb at poor Greg Robinson, former Chiefs defensive coordinator and Johnson’s coach at Texas. Colleague Adam Teicher, noting that the team was “mindful of the criticism of recent top picks,” an accusation that is left unverified by anyone from the Chiefs camp, sees the Johnson selection in the context of the entire acquisition process. “That’s a significant overhaul – but the Chiefs needed it,” he writes as the draft heats up. Columnist Joe Posnanski of the Star says of day one: “you could not ask for more.” Randy Covitz, a former Chiefs beat writer for the Star now apparently working the national scene for the newspaper, wraps up the two days this way: “The Chiefs adequately addressed needs on Sunday.” He gave the draft an “A-.”

Working at a decided disadvantage since they traded their second round pick to the Miami Dolphins for Surtain and don’t have a third round pick , the Chiefs’ garner little excitement for their draft from outside the Kansas City metro area.

To wit, CBS SportsLine.com’s Pete Prisco, while admitting that Johnson “fills that need” at defense, also writes that “the problem with him is that he is a run-around defender, a guy who doesn’t take on blocks.” Prisco incorrectly calls compensatory third round selection Dustin Colquitt “a second round pick” and questions why Kansas City would ever waste it on a punter. Obviously, he is unaware of both where the player was taken as well as the team’s 32nd rated punting numbers from the previous year.

But John Czarnecki and Brian Delucia of Foxsports.com believe Johnson to be a “solid pick” saving their superlatives for the deal that brings the team Surtain. Mel Kiper, dean of ESPN.com’s analysis, likes Johnson but says the team “took two questionable offensive players in the seventh round.” What seventh rounders aren’t questionable, we might ask? Who among seventh round players has any realistic chance of making a team that took them? He offers no evidence.

The Sporting News’ Dan Pompeii turns out be a generous grader giving the Chiefs an “A”; Rick Gosselin of the Dallas Morning News, always a tough tester, opts to pass out a “D.” A passing “C,” in the always subjective media grading scale, is generally the best the Chiefs personnel gurus can hope for when all the report cards come out. Philly and Baltimore, as is usually the case, get rave reviews and the crummy teams get their piece of the action, too. Draft Day is always their day.

Is this coverage accurate, as we can question in Prisco’s easy to spot errors? Moreover, is it excessive? There are untold numbers of pro football fans in this country, but that hardly makes something so lacking in visual elements as a “draft” good viewing. Pictures should always trump words on TV but, as TV critic Robert Bianco noted in the non-stop television coverage of Pope John Paul II’s burial, today’s broadcasters “believe no momentous occasion is complete unless they talk over it” and with so much down time this drives the TV commentators to even more excessive talk as the names slowly come off the board. (USA Today, April 11, 2005) Even as the hours roll on, ESPN’s draft “expert,” Mel Kiper, shows no signs of fatigue. Like the struggling teams, this is his day too, and he’s going to make sure he takes advantage of it.

The lure of “backroom” wheeling and dealing appears irresistible to many sports fans who consider themselves experts and believe they know as much as personnel directors who have spent a year preparing for this moment; and some teams have received such bad publicity in previous drafts that each year fans eagerly anticipate the draft as a time to gloat even before a player has taken the field. Memories are short after draft days. Missing, for instance, are the untold number of experts who stood on tables in sports bars back in 1999 applauding the drafting of supposedly one of the greatest classes of quarterbacks in draft history that included Tim Couch, Akili Smith, Cade McNown, Daunte Culpepper, and Donovan McNabb. (Couch, Smith and McNown made no lasting impressions as we know now.)

In truth, the draft has become a quintessential story of today’s sports world: in the disproportionate reaction to what was a once a simple matter of player procurement handled in earnest by a team’s personnel office.

Is the draft important? Yes, and more important than free agency.

As a TV event? No.

Perhaps it is Michael Wilbon of the Washington Post who most astutely summarizes this about the draft.

“It’s the fuss over the draft I despise,” Wilbon writes. “Mock drafts are worse than allergies as a sign of spring. I particularly hate those. And I hate that the people watching this junk on TV all weekend act as if they can judge the merits of line play and therefore have some idea of which big, fat guard should be selected by whom when they haven’t the slightest clue.”

Hate may be too strong a word, but he’s right when he writes that “there’s no sense in taking anybody at face value when it comes to the NFL draft,” particularly if they envision themselves as experts. (April 22, 2005) “Drafts are to be judged in two to three years,” Wilbon concludes, “not Monday morning.”

Amen.

Brock
04-26-2005, 09:55 AM
Well, this is true. Every year at draft time, it's an opportunity to laugh at some jackasses who get paid to know alot about the NFL but don't.

siberian khatru
04-26-2005, 11:00 AM
Mel Kiper, dean of ESPN.com’s analysis, likes Johnson but says the team “took two questionable offensive players in the seventh round.” What seventh rounders aren’t questionable, we might ask? Who among seventh round players has any realistic chance of making a team that took them? He offers no evidence.

Rufus is still an ass, but this is a good point. :)

Did anybody post Goose's draft grades? I'd like to know why he gave us a D.

ROYC75
04-26-2005, 11:13 AM
Sorry, but Rufus nailed this one dead on.

KChiefs1
04-26-2005, 11:38 AM
Gosselin: Cowboys earn an 'A'

By RICK GOSSELIN / The Dallas Morning News

NFC EAST

Dallas: Jimmy Johnson left the Cowboys after the 1993 season. With Jerry Jones running the draft room, the Cowboys have not carded an A for a draft since then. Until now.

Jones and Bill Parcells engineered the best draft of the post-Johnson era, receiving one of three A's on the NFL grade card. And that A could become an A-plus a year down the road if defensive end Chris Canty recovers from an eye injury that could force him to spend the 2005 season on the sideline. Because of the injury, Canty was a Top 40 talent that slid to Dallas in the fourth round.

The Cowboys had the best first day on this draft. Landing the speed of Demarcus Ware and the size of Marcus Spears was the dream scenario of Jerry Jones and Bill Parcells. The Dallas defensive front got bigger and faster overnight. Good players often come to those who don't trade down. Justin Beriault and Rob Petitti in the sixth round was a good way for the Cowboys to close the draft out. The second day is what makes a good draft great. For a change the Cowboys made some superb second-day draft picks in Canty, Beriault and Petitti.

N.Y. Giants: Given the fact the Giants did not have a first-round selection, this was a solid draft. Justin Tuck was an undervalued pass rusher in the third, and Brandon Jacobs gives the Giants that big back to complement Tiki Barber.

Philadelphia: Drafting at the bottom of rounds and with a quantity of picks, the Eagles did a superb job filling holes on the roster. Ryan Moats, the Bishop Lynch-ex, is a clone of Brian Westbrook, and Mike Patterson and Trent Cole allow the Eagles to dial up the pass rush.

Washington: When Joe Gibbs was winning Super Bowls in his first go-round with the Redskins, he had stout quarterback and cornerback play. Auburn teammates Jason Campbell and Carlos Rogers give Gibbs a chance for that in 2005.

NFC NORTH

Chicago: The Bears had great success with CB Charles Tillman out of the Louisiana directional schools, so they went back this draft and got Chris Harris. Cedric Benson gives Chicago a ball-control element when the winter weather arrives in November.

Detroit: The Lions have now drafted a wide receiver in the top 10 in each of the last three drafts. If Joey Harrington can't find someone open this season, he'll never find the open receiver. If he can't, maybe Dan Orlovsky can.

Green Bay: Aaron Rodgers could be the steal of the draft at the 24th pick of the first round. He's the much-needed insurance policy against Brett Favre's retirement. The Packers are going to need Nick Collins and Michael Hawkins against the Lions.

Minnesota: The Vikings were the only team to come away with two of the 14 blue-chippers on the draft board. Marcus Johnson, Dustin Fox, Ciatrick Fason and C.J. Mosley all slid about a round lower than where they should have gone. Williamson might make them forget Randy Moss.

NFC SOUTH

Atlanta: The Falcons also did well filling holes on the depth chart from a draft slot at the bottom of the round. White gives Michael Vick a go-to guy, and DeAndra Cobb is an elite kickoff returner. Jordan Beck and Jonathan Babineaux bolster the front seven.

Carolina: The Panthers had the best fifth round of the draft, coming away with an All-Big 12 left tackle (Geoff Hangartner) and the Mountain West Conference's all-time leading tackler (Adam Seward). Thomas Davis will bring an attitude on defense.

New Orleans: QB Aaron Brooks and RB Deuce McAllister both applaud the Saints trading up to get the burly Jammal Brown in the first. Better blocking translates to better production. Josh Bullocks and Alfred Fincher were quality additions on defense.

Tampa Bay: Carnell Williams and Alex Smith give coach Jon Gruden a couple of big-time weapons until he finds a new quarterback. The Bucs were hoping it would be Alex Smith in a draft-day trade. Barrett Ruud could hasten the salary-cap departure of Derrick Brooks.

NFC WEST

Arizona: Antrel Rolle and Eric Green give the Cardinals a couple of big, physical corners. J.J. Arrington could be a steal in the second round, coming off a 2,000-yard rushing season at Cal. Dennis Green has always done well with speed backs.

San Francisco: A quarterback-driven franchise like the 49ers needs the triggerman. Embattled owner John York has to hope his football people drafted the right one, Alex Smith, over Aaron Rodgers. David Baas, Adam Snyder and Derrick Johnson are quality upgrades.

St. Louis: Alex Barron addressed the Rams' most pressing need – a bodyguard on the right side for QB Marc Bulger. It taxed every bit of Mike Martz's willpower, though, to let WR Mark Clayton slide by. The Rams got bigger and tougher in the secondary.

Seattle: The Seahawks reached a little for Chris Spencer in the first and a lot for Lofa Tatupu in the second. But president Tim Ruskell's first draft made a midcourse correction in landing David Greene, LeRoy Hill and Ray Willis on consecutive picks.

AFC EAST

Buffalo: The Bills didn't have a first-rounder. But GM Tom Donahoe puts together a quality draft regardless of where he picks or how many selections he has. This year was no exception. Kevin Everett gives the Bills hands in the passing game.

Miami: Nice draftroom debut by Nick Saban. All six of these players should be starting by opening day 2006. After flirting with Braylon Edwards, the Dolphins made the smart pick and took the running back (Ronnie Brown) in the first.

New England: The Super Bowl champs were drafting for depth. They also added toughness. Logan Mankins, Ellis Hobbs and Nick Kaczur all chew nails. Hobbs is a key addition in that he'll help the Patriots get back into the top 10 in special teams.

N.Y. Jets: Another team without a first-round draft pick. That makes it tough to get a good grade for your draft. The special teams get a boost from the addition of the best kicker (Mike Nugent) and best kick returner (Justin Miller) in the draft.

AFC NORTH

Baltimore: The Ravens had the best second round of the draft, coming away with the Big 12 sack leader (Dan Cody) and a three-year starter at left tackle (Adam Terry). Good players seem to find the Ravens in every round of every draft.

Cincinnati: Marvin Lewis wants to build a defense with personality and heart. So David Pollack was the key addition because he breathes fire. Lewis is hoping he can be to the Bengals what Tedy Bruschi was to the Patriots.

Cleveland: When new GM Phil Savage left Baltimore, he brought draft-day know-how to Cleveland. He selected eight low-risk, big-school producers. Charlie Frye will be the quarterback of the future, and Braylon Edwards will help him get there.

Pittsburgh: Getting Heath Miller, Bryant McFadden and Chris Kemoeatu late in rounds all qualify as steals, and Trai Essex addressed the only hole on a 15-1 team – offensive right tackle. Miller will give Ben Roethlisberger a security blanket in the passing game.

AFC SOUTH

Houston: The Texans reached for Travis Johnson in the first, but that was offset by the fact Vernand Morency slid to them in the third. Jerome Mathis could feast as the speed receiver opposite Andre Johnson. He also returns kicks.

Indianapolis: The Colts spent most of the weekend reaching to address needs. Indy needed playmakers in the secondary and might have found them in Marlon Jackson, Kelvin Hayden and Matt Giordano. Jonathan Welsh and Tyjuan Hagler inject more speed into an already fast pass rush.

Jacksonville: Matt Jones was the most interesting pick in the draft, but Chad Owens could have the quickest impact on the Jaguars. He scored eight career touchdowns on kick returns. Alvin Pearman was the best pass-catching back in this draft.

Tennessee: The Titans are pressed against the salary cap and need as many young players as they can find. All 11 picks might make the team. The Titans had the best fourth round in the draft, coming away with OT David Stewart and WR Roydell Williams.

AFC WEST

Denver: The Broncos drafted Darrent Williams a round too high and both Karl Paymah and Maurice Clarett at least two rounds too high. The Broncos are better on the field than they are at the draft table. Chris Myers was a good get in the sixth, though.

Kansas City: The Chiefs started out with a bang in selecting the sliding Derrick Johnson, the best pure linebacker in the draft. But taking a punter with their next pick took the steam out of this draft. Khari Long was a great value pick in the sixth, though.

Oakland: The Raiders had the best third round of the draft, landing their quarterback of the future (Andrew Walter) and a run-stuffing linebacker to stalk AFC West foes LaDainian Tomlinson and Priest Holmes. A lack of picks slowed down the second day.

San Diego: The Chargers addressed a soft defensive front by drafting the size of Shawne Merriman (270-pound linebacker) and Luis Castillo (300-pound tackle). Getting four-year starters Wesley Britt and Wes Sims made for a productive second day.

Skip Towne
04-26-2005, 11:46 AM
Why isn't the NFL Combine televised? I'll bet there would be a lot of interest. We read about it all the time.

htismaqe
04-26-2005, 11:47 AM
Why would you post this for me? I could care less what the idiot says.

Mr. Laz
04-26-2005, 11:50 AM
Why isn't the NFL Combine televised? I'll bet there would be a lot of interest. We read about it all the time.

it's shown on the NFL network

Mr. Laz
04-26-2005, 11:53 AM
DAWES: DAFT ABOUT THE DRAFT
Apr 26, 2005, 8:30:35 AM by Media Watch by Rufus Dawes
Bash the Media ... blah,blah,blah ... Bash the media ... blah,blah,blah


funny ... AS A member of the MEDIA, when Dawes writes his opinions it's somehow different than when other media members express theirs.

siberian khatru
04-26-2005, 11:59 AM
Thank you, KChiefs1. :thumb:

Deberg_1990
04-26-2005, 12:02 PM
Why isn't the NFL Combine televised? I'll bet there would be a lot of interest. We read about it all the time.

The NFL Network showed "Stopwatch to Stopwatch" coverage of it this year. It was pretty interesting.

ct
04-26-2005, 12:23 PM
Gosselin: Cowboys earn an 'A'

By RICK GOSSELIN / The Dallas Morning News


AFC WEST

Denver: The Broncos drafted Darrent Williams a round too high and both Karl Paymah and Maurice Clarett at least two rounds too high. The Broncos are better on the field than they are at the draft table. Chris Myers was a good get in the sixth, though.

Kansas City: The Chiefs started out with a bang in selecting the sliding Derrick Johnson, the best pure linebacker in the draft. But taking a punter with their next pick took the steam out of this draft. Khari Long was a great value pick in the sixth, though.

Oakland: The Raiders had the best third round of the draft, landing their quarterback of the future (Andrew Walter) and a run-stuffing linebacker to stalk AFC West foes LaDainian Tomlinson and Priest Holmes. A lack of picks slowed down the second day.

San Diego: The Chargers addressed a soft defensive front by drafting the size of Shawne Merriman (270-pound linebacker) and Luis Castillo (300-pound tackle). Getting four-year starters Wesley Britt and Wes Sims made for a productive second day.

Khari Long is the only late pick he mentions, and positively? This guy has pipe-dream project written all over him, IMHO!

And RE: Rufus, he's exactly right. Too many 'experts' with way too much to say. However...it is this explosion of interest and discussion that has carried the NFL to the heights it enjoys now. A double-edged sword no doubt.

siberian khatru
04-26-2005, 12:25 PM
Khari Long is the only late pick he mentions, and positively? This guy has pipe-dream project written all over him, IMHO!

Yeah, I'm OK with the Colquitt pick, and at the time Long was the only pick I didn't really understand or like. Oh, well. :shrug:

ChiefsCountry
04-26-2005, 12:43 PM
Gosselin must be pleasing the Baylor alums that work at the Morning News, bc that was the only pick most of us here didnt like.

htismaqe
04-26-2005, 01:00 PM
Bash the Media ... blah,blah,blah ... Bash the media ... blah,blah,blah


funny ... AS A member of the MEDIA, when Dawes writes his opinions it's somehow different than when other media members express theirs.

Bash the Chiefs ... blah,blah,blah ... Bash the Chiefs ... blah,blah,blah


funny ... by reposting his articles here for the SOLE PURPOSE of bashing them, you're doing the SAME THING Rufus does...

Mr. Laz
04-26-2005, 01:09 PM
Bash the Chiefs ... blah,blah,blah ... Bash the Chiefs ... blah,blah,blah

funny ... by reposting his articles here for the SOLE PURPOSE of bashing them, you're doing the SAME THING Rufus does...
sorry ... but i DIDN'T repost his article here



and i don't know that i ever have, asshole.

WilliamTheIrish
04-26-2005, 01:15 PM
Bash the Chiefs ... blah,blah,blah ... Bash the Chiefs ... blah,blah,blah


funny ... by reposting his articles here for the SOLE PURPOSE of bashing them, you're doing the SAME THING Rufus does.



sorry ... but i DIDN'T repost his article here



and i don't know that i ever have, asshole.


Do I have to get my belt?

Huh? Do I?

Mr. Laz
04-26-2005, 01:17 PM
Do I have to get my belt?

Huh? Do I?
Are we there yet?

nmt1
04-26-2005, 01:20 PM
I'd like to know why he gave us a D.

I can tell you exactly why he gave us a D and it's the same reason so many around here lose their minds every year during and after the draft. We didn't pick who he thought we should.

siberian khatru
04-26-2005, 01:26 PM
I can tell you exactly why he gave us a D and it's the same reason so many around here lose their minds every year during and after the draft. We didn't pick who he thought we should.

Right, I understand that. I was interested in knowing who he thought we should pick. I respect Goose's opinion, unlike Prisco's. Maybe Goose could convince me to switch to full "DAMMIT CARL!" mode. :p

jspchief
04-26-2005, 01:31 PM
Funny that he calls the draft as a TV event unimportant.
How many people on the Planet alone watched at least a portion of the draft? How many people posted mock drafts, or commented on mocks, or participated in mocks? How many of us are here now pouring over draft grades?


Seems to me that it appeals to a lot of football fans. We create mocks that are pure speculation, based on mostly opinion, then we watch teams speculate and opine on players in the draft, then we read and create grades that are pure speculation based on opinion.

Yes, It's mostly a load of crap. But judging by the industry it's created, it's a product that the NFL fan is buying. We're in the middle of the off-season, getting our NFL fix.

I'm always amazed that these media guys can be critical of our fanaticism. If we weren't as fanatical as we are, there would be a lot less need for the Rufus' of the world. The fan's never-ending thirst for sports related information and conversation is the sole reason that there are TV and Radio stations dedicated to sports, and countless journalists whose job is to cover only sports.

Chan93lx50
04-26-2005, 01:45 PM
I do though like to end my sentences with though, though

whoman69
04-26-2005, 02:54 PM
I am sure the NFL would totally disagree with Rufus' opinion on this one. They gain money and exposure from the draft being on TV. It would be horribly boring for us to sit there thru 15 minutes between picks without any commentary going on. I am sure that when Whitlock and the other reporters grade a draft they use the same system I do. They can't go out and scout all these players, so they rely on draft experts who put more time into it and get a consensus from them. What would Rufus say about election day coverage?

“Drafts are to be judged in two to three years,” Wilbon concludes, “not Monday morning.”
Then why talk about the draft at all. Should we end all forms of speculation. Did anybody ask Wilbon who he thinks will win the Super Bowl this season? According to this view his answer should be, I won't know until February 5. Who's going to win the AFC West this year? Won't know until somebody clinches. How many games will the Chiefs win this year? Guess we'll know when the season is over.

There is a way to grade a draft once its done. Its called draft value. The Chiefs might think they got a great player in Kawika Mitchell in the 2nd round, but most thought they could have waited until the 4th. Kawika was a bad draft value so the Chiefs get a bad grade. Not even the Patriots thought that when they drafted Tom Brady that he was going to bring them a handful of SB trophies. The draft is all speculation. Anything we talk about on this board is speculation, an opinion. So called draft experts, what is that? Is even a GM a draft expert? Who was that draft expert in Cincinnati that drafted the likes of David Klingler and Akili Smith year after year? I say the Chiefs had a great draft thru the first five rounds. Should I even care what they did in the 6th and 7th round anyway? What percentage of those guys even make the final roster?

htismaqe
04-26-2005, 04:17 PM
sorry ... but i DIDN'T repost his article here



and i don't know that i ever have, asshole.

I didn't say you did, but boy did you ever get defensive.

I guess the hypocrite shoe fits...

Bob Dole
04-26-2005, 04:23 PM
Oh, sweet irony.

“Good job, Peterson and Hunt,” writes the usually caustic Jason Whitlock, of the Kansas City Star, although he can’t resist tossing a barb at poor Greg Robinson, former Chiefs defensive coordinator and Johnson’s coach at Texas.

shaneo69
04-26-2005, 04:29 PM
Funny that he calls the draft as a TV event unimportant.

How many people on the Planet alone watched at least a portion of the draft? How many people posted mock drafts, or commented on mocks, or participated in mocks? How many of us are here now pouring over draft grades?

Seems to me that it appeals to a lot of football fans. We create mocks that are pure speculation, based on mostly opinion, then we watch teams speculate and opine on players in the draft, then we read and create grades that are pure speculation based on opinion.

Yes, It's mostly a load of crap. But judging by the industry it's created, it's a product that the NFL fan is buying. We're in the middle of the off-season, getting our NFL fix.

I'm always amazed that these media guys can be critical of our fanaticism. If we weren't as fanatical as we are, there would be a lot less need for the Rufus' of the world. The fan's never-ending thirst for sports related information and conversation is the sole reason that there are TV and Radio stations dedicated to sports, and countless journalists whose job is to cover only sports.


I was wondering if anyone else would pick up on this. In Rufus' (Carl's) perfect world, the players drafted would be kept confidential so that fans couldn't express their opinions about their team's picks. You wouldn't find out who they drafted until they lined up in Week 1.

Bob Dole
04-26-2005, 04:30 PM
I was wondering if anyone else would pick up on this. In Rufus' (Carl's) perfect world, the players drafted would be kept confidential so that fans couldn't express their opinions about their team's picks. You wouldn't find out who they drafted until they lined up in Week 1.

Or in the case of the Chiefs under Vermeil, week 21.

htismaqe
04-26-2005, 04:34 PM
I was wondering if anyone else would pick up on this. In Rufus' (Carl's) perfect world, the players drafted would be kept confidential so that fans couldn't express their opinions about their team's picks. You wouldn't find out who they drafted until they lined up in Week 1.

The whole thing is just ****ing insulting.

I don't think Carl, Rufus, or the rest can deal with the Internet generation. It's like that slap-in-the-face letter from Bill Polian to Colts fans that free agency is a farce and that's why they don't get involved.

They can't deal with the idea that fans DO know football, now more than ever before. They can't deal with the fact that, in many cases, the fans know more about some of these guys than their scouts do.

The whole Rufus Dawes schtick is one of the lowest class deals in all of professional sports.

htismaqe
04-26-2005, 04:34 PM
Or in the case of the Chiefs under Vermeil, week 21.

ROFL