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Jenson71
04-29-2005, 04:01 PM
Do you drink/buy bottled water?

BIG_DADDY
04-29-2005, 04:02 PM
yes

Saulbadguy
04-29-2005, 04:02 PM
I buy it only when i'm going to football games/baseball games, cause they only let you bring in sealed bottles. Otherwise, I drink filtered tap.

RaiderH8r
04-29-2005, 04:05 PM
I drank the water in here in DC once and chipped a tooth. That shit is fortified with minerals and such. That stuff is chunky...

PastorMikH
04-29-2005, 04:05 PM
Say, where is the "Go down to the creek and fill your canteen" option?




I seldom do bottled water. The water here tastes fine and has decent grades. Now, in other parts of the country, I prefer bottled water - I just hate to spend more on a case of water than a case of soda would cost.

jspchief
04-29-2005, 04:06 PM
If I'm not at home I drink only bottled water. And not that disgusting "spring water" crap. It has to be filtered water. Basically I just drink Aquafina...best flavor.

Buster's Dad
04-29-2005, 04:07 PM
We have a r/o system installed in the kitched

Simplex3
04-29-2005, 04:11 PM
We buy distilled water. I'm not buying into the govt's ability to correctly dump chemicals in my kid's drinking water. No point in feeding them floride that we know has no positive benefit for their teeth but the govt. keeps dumping in there anyway.

Skip Towne
04-29-2005, 04:12 PM
Pay for water? Water is free, it falls out of the sky.

Bwana
04-29-2005, 04:12 PM
Only if I'm out hunting.

Donger
04-29-2005, 04:17 PM
When I travel, since hotel water invariably tastes like death.

seclark
04-29-2005, 04:18 PM
yes
sec

alpha_omega
04-29-2005, 04:19 PM
You better believe it...KC public water is gross!

Culligan!

BIG_DADDY
04-29-2005, 04:23 PM
With all the shit they put in our water out here you better believe it. I ahve to be hung over with no water in the house to go ahead and drink tap water. Hell even the dog drinks bottled water.

Bob Dole
04-29-2005, 04:37 PM
Bob Dole just recently started drinking Propel, but hasn't historically been one of those bottled water people.

RedNFeisty
04-29-2005, 04:37 PM
If I am out and about then I will buy bottled water (Aquafina), other then that I keep tap water in the frig.

dirk digler
04-29-2005, 04:38 PM
I drink bottled alot but I do like tap water here where I live.
One of my best friends in high school lived on a farm and they had sulfur water. Now that shit was horrible and it stinks.

Pants
04-29-2005, 04:41 PM
It depends. I have no problem drinking tap water unless it tastes like chlorine. Can't stand that shit. Back home we have a filter for tap water.

philfree
04-29-2005, 04:46 PM
I got a Brita water filter pitcher and I keep in the down stairs fridge with the beer at a temp just above freezing. MMmmmm that's good water!

PhilFree:arrow:

Demonpenz
04-29-2005, 05:24 PM
**** those bottle water old navy wearing cell phone assholes

BIG_DADDY
04-29-2005, 05:27 PM
Bob Dole just recently started drinking Propel, but hasn't historically been one of those bottled water people.

What is propel?

Saulbadguy
04-29-2005, 05:28 PM
What is propel?
Gatorade "fitness" water. Basically water with aspartame and sodium in it, and flavoring.

Count Alex's Losses
04-29-2005, 05:29 PM
Brita water filter beyooooooootch!

keg in kc
04-29-2005, 05:30 PM
Maybe buy a bottle once a month or less. I bought a bottle at the movies today, actually.

I won't drink tapwater, though. I have a 2 gallon Brita container in the fridge. Take a thermos of water to work with me.

Simplex3
04-29-2005, 05:32 PM
**** those bottle water old navy wearing cell phone assholes
Just curious, were you recently raped by a gang of "old navy wearing cell phone assholes"?

Baby Lee
04-29-2005, 05:32 PM
The only payment towards treatment or handling of my water is the Culligan filter in my Fridge, and that's just because the dispense won't work without one. Otherwise water's water, unless you're in Warrensburg [which I very very rarely am].

ENDelt260
04-29-2005, 05:32 PM
Just curious, were you recently raped by a gang of "old navy wearing cell phone assholes"?
Is it really still rape if you pay them beforehand and insist they ignore your resistance?

Jenson71
04-29-2005, 05:36 PM
I never, never buy bottled water. It's more expensive than gasoline. Tap water in Waterloo is perfect. In Europe, I drank tap water over expensive bottled water.

Simplex3
04-29-2005, 05:37 PM
I never, never buy bottled water. It's more expensive than gasoline. Tap water in Waterloo is perfect. In Europe, I drank tap water over expensive bottled water.
Gee, you're my hero. It takes a real man to drink fecal matter and chemicals instead of ponying up some cash and getting actualy H2O.

:clap:

Simplex3
04-29-2005, 05:37 PM
Is it really still rape if you pay them beforehand and insist they ignore your resistance?
In California, yes.

chiefs4me
04-29-2005, 05:40 PM
Always......I even cook with it. We have one of those filter thing's on the tap in the kitchen and the kids use it, but not me.

Baby Lee
04-29-2005, 05:42 PM
Gee, you're my hero. It takes a real man to drink fecal matter and chemicals instead of ponying up some cash and getting actualy H2O.

:clap:
I must have missed when Jenson died. Sorry to hear it.

Donger
04-29-2005, 05:42 PM
At home, we drink filtered water through the refrigerator. Tastes great and is already cold. But, my wife still insists on buying bottled water from Costco by the case.

I may divorce her over it.

ENDelt260
04-29-2005, 05:43 PM
A little fecal matter here and there ain't so bad. Gotta keep that immune system in practice for when something major comes along.

Donger
04-29-2005, 05:43 PM
A little fecal matter here and there ain't so bad. Gotta keep that immune system in practice for when something major comes along.

Quit channeling Carlin.

ENDelt260
04-29-2005, 05:44 PM
I may divorce her over it.

Yeah? You said she's hot, right? I think I could deal w/ cases of bottled water. Put in a good word for me?

ENDelt260
04-29-2005, 05:44 PM
Quit channeling Carlin.
"Cause we swam in raw sewage!"

Simplex3
04-29-2005, 05:44 PM
I must have missed when Jenson died. Sorry to hear it.
He actually died at birth but his parents just can't let go and he doesn't have a husband to pull the tube. :shrug:

Donger
04-29-2005, 05:45 PM
Yeah? You said she's hot, right? I think I could deal w/ cases of bottled water. Put in a good word for me?

Everyone says she's hot. But, it's not just the water; she's quite a little cost center.

ENDelt260
04-29-2005, 05:46 PM
Everyone says she's hot. But, it's not just the water; she's quite a little cost center.
Does she spend more than she brings in?

Donger
04-29-2005, 05:47 PM
Does she spend more than she brings in?

Bring in? You're kidding, right?

ENDelt260
04-29-2005, 05:52 PM
Bring in? You're kidding, right?
Uh-oh... I'm rethinking this quickly.

Simplex3
04-29-2005, 05:53 PM
Uh-oh... I'm rethinking this quickly.
I'm not joking when I say this:

Hookers are cheaper. You will get more sex. They will dress up slutty for you.

Donger
04-29-2005, 05:56 PM
Uh-oh... I'm rethinking this quickly.

Well, she does take care of the kids. Any person that can do that with my kids without going completely insane deserves to net around $60K a year.

Boyceofsummer
04-29-2005, 06:12 PM
http://www.fda.gov/fdac/features/2002/402_h2o.html


U.S. Food and Drug Administration
FDA Consumer magazine
July-August 2002
Table of Contents



Bottled Water: Better Than the Tap?

By Anne Christiansen Bullers

It's a rare day that Kelly Harrison, a mother of five from Tulsa, Okla., doesn't find herself chauffeuring kids to some kind of sports practice or school activity. As she checks to see that each child is seat-belted into the family's minivan, Harrison also makes sure they've got the essentials: the right sports equipment, the right clothes, and what she considers to be the right drink--bottled water.

When she was growing up, Harrison, 34, might have grabbed a soft drink or juice on her way out the door. But for her kids, Harrison insists on what she thinks is a healthier choice--water. She says her children's young bodies need water as they play in the Oklahoma sun. Bottled water also contains no caffeine, no calories and no sugar. Plus, bottled water comes in convenient bottles, easy to tote from home to wherever the busy family goes. [See what Americans are drinking in 2002.]

"I really think this is best for a lot of different reasons," says Harrison, who often tucks a bottle for herself into the basket in her minivan that contains other on-the-go mom necessities, such as a paperback book and her cell phone.

Once, most Americans got their water only from the tap. Now, like Harrison, they're often buying their water in a bottle. At work, after a workout, or just about any time, Americans are drinking bottled water in record numbers--a whopping 5 billion gallons in 2001, according to the International Bottled Water Association (IBWA), an industry trade group. That's about the same amount of water that falls from the American Falls at Niagara Falls in two hours.

Explosive growth in the industry for more than a decade has placed bottled water in nearly every supermarket, convenience store and vending machine from coast to coast, where dozens of brands compete for consumers' dollars. In four years, industry experts anticipate that bottled water will be second only to soda pop as America's beverage of choice.

Water, of course, is essential to human health. Drinking enough water to replace whatever is lost through bodily functions is important. But surveys indicate that most of us might not be drinking enough. Is bottled water part of the answer? To decide, consumers need to arm themselves with knowledge about what they're buying before they grab the next bottle of Dasani, Evian or Perrier off the shelf. "It really pays to do your homework," says Stew Thornley, a water quality health educator with the Minnesota Department of Health.

Different Varieties
Bottled water may seem like a relatively new idea--one born during the heightened awareness of fitness and potential water pollution during the last two or three decades. However, water has been bottled and sold far from its source for thousands of years. In Europe, water from mineral springs was often thought to have curative and sometimes religious powers. Pioneers trekking west across the United States during the 19th century also typically considered drinkable (potable) water a staple to be purchased in anticipation of the long trip across the arid West.

Today, of course, there are dozens of brands of bottled water and many different kinds, including flavored or fizzy, to choose from.

Federal Regulations
The Food and Drug Administration regulates bottled water products that are in interstate commerce under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act).

Under the FD&C Act, manufacturers are responsible for producing safe, wholesome and truthfully labeled food products, including bottled water products. It is a violation of the law to introduce into interstate commerce adulterated or misbranded products that violate the various provisions of the FD&C Act.

The FDA also has established regulations specifically for bottled water, including standard of identity regulations, which define different types of bottled water, and standard of quality regulations, which set maximum levels of contaminants (chemical, physical, microbial and radiological) allowed in bottled water.

From a regulatory standpoint, the FDA describes bottled water as water that is intended for human consumption and that is sealed in bottles or other containers with no added ingredients, except that it may contain a safe and suitable antimicrobial agent. Fluoride may also be added within the limits set by the FDA.

High Standards
Is the extra expense of bottled water worth it? One thing consumers can depend on is that the FDA sets regulations specifically for bottled water to ensure that the bottled water they buy is safe, according to Henry Kim, Ph.D., a supervisory chemist at the FDA's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Office of Plant and Dairy Foods and Beverages. Kim, whose office oversees the agency's regulatory program for bottled water, says that major changes have been made since 1974, when the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) first gave regulatory oversight of public drinking water (tap water) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Each time the EPA establishes a standard for a chemical or microbial contaminant, the FDA either adopts it for bottled water or makes a finding that the standard is not necessary for bottled water in order to protect the public health.

"Generally, over the years, the FDA has adopted EPA standards for tap water as standards for bottled water," Kim says. As a result, standards for contaminants in tap water and bottled water are very similar.

However, in some instances, standards for bottled water are different than for tap water. Kim cites lead as an example. Because lead can leach from pipes as water travels from water utilities to home faucets, the EPA set an action level of 15 parts per billion (ppb) in tap water. This means that when lead levels are above 15 ppb in tap water that reaches home faucets, water utilities must treat the water to reduce the lead levels to below 15 ppb. In bottled water, where lead pipes are not used, the lead limit is set at 5 ppb. Based on FDA survey information, bottlers can readily produce bottled water products with lead levels below 5 ppb. This action was consistent with the FDA's goal of reducing consumers' exposure to lead in drinking water to the extent practicable.

Production of bottled water also must follow the current good manufacturing practices (CGMP) regulations set up and enforced by the FDA. Water must be sampled, analyzed and found to be safe and sanitary. These regulations also require proper plant and equipment design, bottling procedures and recordkeeping.

The FDA also oversees inspections of the bottling plants. Kim says, "Because the FDA's experience over the years has shown that bottled water poses no significant public health risk, we consider bottled water not to be a high risk food." Nevertheless, the FDA inspects bottled water plants under its general food safety program and also contracts with the states to perform some bottled water plant inspections. In addition, some states require bottled water firms to be licensed annually.

Members of the IBWA also agree to adhere to the association's Model Code, a set of standards that is more stringent than federal regulations in some areas. Bottling plants that adopt the IBWA Model Code agree to one unannounced annual inspection by an independent firm.

The FDA also classifies some bottled water according to its origin.

Artesian well water. Water from a well that taps an aquifer--layers of porous rock, sand and earth that contain water--which is under pressure from surrounding upper layers of rock or clay. When tapped, the pressure in the aquifer, commonly called artesian pressure, pushes the water above the level of the aquifer, sometimes to the surface. Other means may be used to help bring the water to the surface.
According to the EPA, water from artesian aquifers often is more pure because the confining layers of rock and clay impede the movement of contamination. However, despite the claims of some bottlers, there is no guarantee that artesian waters are any cleaner than ground water from an unconfined aquifer, the EPA says.
Mineral water. Water from an underground source that contains at least 250 parts per million total dissolved solids. Minerals and trace elements must come from the source of the underground water. They cannot be added later.
Spring water. Derived from an underground formation from which water flows naturally to the earth's surface. Spring water must be collected only at the spring or through a borehole tapping the underground formation feeding the spring. If some external force is used to collect the water through a borehole, the water must have the same composition and quality as the water that naturally flows to the surface.
Well water. Water from a hole bored or drilled into the ground, which taps into an aquifer.
Bottled water may be used as an ingredient in beverages, such as diluted juices or flavored bottled waters. However, beverages labeled as containing "sparkling water," "seltzer water," "soda water," "tonic water," or "club soda" are not included as bottled water under the FDA's regulations, because these beverages have historically been considered soft drinks.

Some bottled water also comes from municipal sources--in other words--the tap. Municipal water is usually treated before it is bottled.

Examples of water treatments include:

Distillation. In this process, water is turned into a vapor. Since minerals are too heavy to vaporize, they are left behind, and the vapors are condensed into water again.
Reverse osmosis. Water is forced through membranes to remove minerals in the water.
Absolute 1 micron filtration. Water flows through filters that remove particles larger than one micron in size, such as Cryptosporidium, a parasitic protozoan.
Ozonation. Bottlers of all types of waters typically use ozone gas, an antimicrobial agent, to disinfect the water instead of chlorine, since chlorine can leave residual taste and odor to the water.
Bottled water that has been treated by distillation, reverse osmosis, or other suitable process and that meets the definition of "purified water" in the U.S. Pharmacopeia can be labeled as "purified water."

Bottled vs. Tap
Whether bottled water is better than tap water, and justifies its expense, remains under debate. Stephen Kay, vice president of the IBWA, says member bottlers are selling the quality, consistency and safety that bottled water promises, and providing a service for those whose municipal systems do not provide good quality drinking water.

"Bottled water is produced and regulated exclusively for human consumption," Kay says. "Some people in their municipal markets have the luxury of good water. Others do not."

Thornley, of the Minnesota Department of Health, agrees that consumers can depend on bottled water's safety and quality. But he says consumers should feel the same way about the quality of their tap water. Tap water may sometimes look or taste differently, he says, but that doesn't mean it's unsafe. In fact, the most dangerous contaminants are those that consumers cannot see, smell or taste, he says. But consumers don't need to worry about their presence, he adds. Municipal water systems serving 25 people or more are subject to the federal Safe Drinking Water Act. As such, the water constantly and thoroughly tested for harmful substances, he says. If there is a problem, consumers will be warned through the media or other outlets.

"In lieu of being told otherwise, consumers should feel confident of the safety of their water," Thornley says.

Dr. Robert Ophaug, a professor of oral health at the University of Minnesota School of Dentistry, notes that tap water has another advantage many people don't think about: It typically contains fluoride. Many communities have elected to add fluoride to drinking water to promote strong teeth and prevent tooth decay in residents, though some groups continue to oppose this practice and believe it's detrimental to health.

Ophaug says bottled water often does not have fluoride added to it. Or, if it has been purified through reverse osmosis or distillation, the fluoride may have been removed. People who drink mostly bottled water, especially those who have children, need to be aware of this, he says. They may need to use supplemental fluoride that is available by prescription from dentists or doctors. The supplements are usually recommended for children ages 7 to 16. Fluoride supplements cost around $15 for a three-month supply.

"At the least, inform the children's dentist or doctor that you are relying on bottled water," Ophaug says.

The IBWA says there are more than 20 brands of bottled water with added fluoride available to consumers today. When fluoride is added to bottled water, the FDA requires that the term "fluoridated," "fluoride added," or "with added fluoride" be used on the label. Consumers interested in how much fluoride bottled water contains can usually find out by contacting individual companies directly.

Surging Sales
Consumers don't appear ready to give up their bottled water any time soon. Younger, health-oriented people are driving the market's growth, according to industry officials. "They've grown up with bottled water, and it doesn't seem like such a stretch to them to buy water," says Kay.

Jeremy Buccellato, 31, of Ramsey, Minn., says he's heard the arguments that tap water is just as good if not better than bottled water. A glass from his own tap, however, provides water that's discolored, chlorinated, and tastes like "pool water." Buccellato says the extra money he spends on bottles of Dasani water is worth it.

"It tastes better and looks better, plus it's easy to take with me," says Buccellato. "What's not to like?"

Harrison agrees that there's nothing like a refreshing cool bottle of water to beat the heat during an Oklahoma summer.

"It's a product that fits our needs and our lifestyle," she says.

Anne Christiansen Bullers is a free-lance writer in Prairie Village, Kan.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

To Filter or Not to Filter?
Consumers can buy purified water. They also have the option of doing it at home.

Numerous companies sell filtration systems. Some attach to the faucet and filter the water as it comes through the tap. Others are containers that filter the water in them. Among the best-known manufacturers are PUR and Brita.

Water purified with these products typically costs less than buying bottled water. According to Brita, its high-end faucet filter system provides water for 18 cents a gallon, a considerable saving from $1 or more typically charged for an 8- to 12-ounce bottle of water.

John B. Ferguson, communications manager/executive editor with the Water Quality Association, says that consumers can feel confident about the water quality provided by brand name home-filtration systems.

Stew Thornley of the Minnesota Department of Health agrees that home filtration systems can improve the taste or appearance of tap water at a minimal cost. However, Thornley points out that consumers need to be careful about maintaining these filters. Typically, specific instructions are included with the purchase of the product. Without proper maintenance, he says, it's possible bacteria or other contaminants can build up in the products.

FDA/Office of Public Affairs
Web page created by tg 2002-JUN-21.

http://www.thenation.com/doc.mhtml?i=20050103&s=goldstein


comment | Posted December 16, 2004

Red Sluts, Blue Sluts
by Richard Goldstein

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The Golden Girls and Sex and the City are available on DVD. Desperate Housewives airs Sundays at 9 pm EST on ABC.
he first pop phenomenon since the election is that salacious howler of a prime-time soap called Desperate Housewives. At this writing, it's the top-rated show on television, and the media are galvanized by its success at a time when red-state reverence is seeping into everything.

Despite its gleeful attitude toward fornication, this show is popular in Bush country. It even grabs men who never watch such sudsy stuff. One reason is its subject: babes behaving badly. These sexy suburban sisters don't have faggot friends--or careers, like most women in sitcoms today. And this trad but funky set-up suits the Monday Night Football crowd just fine (as the risqué locker-room visit by one of the show's stars, Nicollette Sheridan, attests). Yet Housewives also appeals to gay men and feminists: the Sex and the City set. How can the same package attract such a diverse audience? Even more remarkably, how can it succeed in such a chastened cultural climate?


ADVERTISEMENT At first glance, Housewives is a pungent rebellion against the ideal of America the Wholesome. Set in the proverbial suburban byway of Wisteria Lane, the show features more unhappy couples than a Doctor Phil special. With a knowing smirk, it showcases infidelity, treachery and outright schadenfreude. If that sounds like a scathing indictment of Bush time, it also plays as a critique of Godless narcissism. This two-edged tenor is what allows the show to cross over from red to blue. Housewives is liberal on the surface but conservative at the core.

The show's creator, Marc Cherry, calls himself a Republican. But that didn't stop him from honing his skills on The Golden Girls, a vastly popular sitcom in 1985 (and a harbinger of the Clinton years, if you ask me). It revolved around a group of sexually active retired women, a radical premise back then and a frisson even now. Thirteen years later, Sex and the City turned this formula into the definitive hip urban comedy of the '90s. The women in both shows never paid for their sins, though they struggled with the complications of their lives. Through it all, they maintained an antic, lusty attitude and a real sense of sisterhood. That's still the stance of liberal sitcoms.

But conservative eras instill a much harsher mood. To meet that demand, Cherry took the libidinous style of Sex and the City and combined it with the breathy excess of Reagan-era dramas like Dallas and Dynasty. Now that spirit is back, with blazing push-up bras. Desperate Housewives has the same lurid venality, the same cartoony ambience and the same over-the-top bitchiness. Its tone is titillating rather than droll. Its characters inspire ridicule rather than empathy. Their transgressions are sinful rather than soulful. And a sense of imminent retribution hovers over Wisteria Lane like the Satan ex machina in a cautionary tale.

Religious conservatives are perfectly willing to be entertained by immorality; they only require that it be punished, at least eventually. As for wives who trespass against their husbands, bring 'em on--as long as they act like sluts rather than sexual adventurers. Such creatures are inevitable in a world where faith has been forgotten along with the knowledge of right and wrong. If that's your take on Housewives, it can be relished as a sendup of the polluted world.

But as all successful producers know, the people of God aren't the only ones who watch TV. So do the Bush-hating multitudes, and they buy stuff--especially those who belong to the feminazi bicoastal elite. They, too, must be entertained. The trick is to enchant viewers on both sides of the cultural divide. Men like Cherry are expert at that task. They have mastered the art of mixing tropes to convey a double meaning. Their most successful products shimmer with moral ambiguity. Certainly that's the case for Desperate Housewives, as it will be for the imitators that are bound to flow from its success.

While the creators of this show understand the golden conservative rule of sinful pleasure--it must beget ruination--on TV this could take many seasons, and meanwhile everyone can focus on the hot means to that hellish end. For different reasons, secular humanists and fundamentalists alike can revel in the foibles of idle, affluent housewives. The right can view the show's sexual politics--women competing for men, men struggling for dominance over their wives--as fidelity to the patriarchal code, while lefties can see the same thing as camp. What's more, a babe is a babe, a hunk is a hunk, and the joys of watching their unseemly meeting cross party lines.

A generation ago, the prime-time mantra was "Who shot J.R.?" Now it's "Why did Mary Alice Young kill herself?" Her girlfriends are dying to know, but we're more interested in whether Gabrielle Solis, the Latina hussy who can't keep her hands off the young gardener, can keep his misgivings and her husband's suspicions in check. Can Bree Van De Kamp save her marriage by finding the ho within? What evil lies in the slatternly heart of Edie Britt? And will Gabrielle's nosy mother-in-law, the victim of a hit-and-run by Bree's self-centered son, ever recover to tell her tale? Stay tuned--and enjoy the show. Just don't take it as a hopeful sign.

Bwana
04-29-2005, 06:20 PM
http://www.fda.gov/fdac/features/2002/402_h2o.html


Thanks for posting an entire F*cking book strokestick. :shake:

Pants
04-29-2005, 06:22 PM
Gee, you're my hero. It takes a real man to drink fecal matter and chemicals instead of ponying up some cash and getting actualy H2O.

:clap:

Do they put "stupid" chemicals in bottled water or is it genetic with you? Jesus.

Donger
04-29-2005, 06:22 PM
WTF do the last 80 billion words of that post have to do with bottled water, Boyce?

Red Sluts, Blue Sluts?

Boyceofsummer
04-29-2005, 06:34 PM
I'm not joking when I say this:

Hookers are cheaper. You will get more sex. They will dress up slutty for you.

I did not divert attention from the original subject. I only adjust to the current topic. My apologies.

Simplex3
04-29-2005, 06:41 PM
Do they put "stupid" chemicals in bottled water or is it genetic with you? Jesus.
First, if you'd read the thread you'd see I drink distilled water. Second, chiil out Francis. There are about 10 of you f**kers on this board that freak out and over-react over stupid shit. Maybe we should divide the football forum into "regular" and "all reach-around all the time" for those of you that can't handle a jab now and again. For that matter, head on over to the Chiefs Coalition site, they like to stroke eachother all day.

:shake:

Pants
04-29-2005, 06:43 PM
First, if you'd read the thread you'd see I drink distilled water. Second, chiil out Francis. There are about 10 of you f**kers on this board that freak out and over-react over stupid shit. Maybe we should divide the football forum into "regular" and "all reach-around all the time" for those of you that can't handle a jab now and again. For that matter, head on over to the Chiefs Coalition site, they like to stroke eachother all day.

:shake:

Ironic much?

Skip Towne
04-29-2005, 06:44 PM
Thanks for posting an entire F*cking book strokestick. :shake:
No shit. Anyone who read all that raise your hand.

Baby Lee
04-29-2005, 06:44 PM
First, if you'd read the thread you'd see I drink distilled water. Second, chiil out Francis. There are about 10 of you f**kers on this board that freak out and over-react over stupid shit. Maybe we should divide the football forum into "regular" and "all reach-around all the time" for those of you that can't handle a jab now and again. For that matter, head on over to the Chiefs Coalition site, they like to stroke eachother all day.

:shake:
My freak out Pwns your freak out!!!

Pants
04-29-2005, 06:45 PM
My freak out Pwns your freak out!!!

ROFL

cdcox
04-29-2005, 06:49 PM
Bottled water is regulated much less than tap water.

Ny wife and daughter we used to drink bottled because of a the chlorinated flavor to our tap water, but we swithced to a Britta filter due to the cost.

Simplex3
04-29-2005, 06:53 PM
Ironic much?
I post a joke. You act like I just said "let's go beat up a Jew!"

I throw s**t against the wall at everyone when it's there to be thrown. I'm very equal opportunity. I'm also not exactly the only smartass on this board. Some people appreciate it, others don't. There are only a couple of you that see fit to constantly comment on it. The rest just read past it and move the f**k on.

SCTrojan
04-29-2005, 06:54 PM
Not normally. Only buy bottled water when I need a portable water source. I drink tap water on ice at home.

There are places, however, where I can't stand the taste of the tap water. Lawton, Oklahoma, comes to mind. Bought water in gallon bottles there.

chiefs4me
04-29-2005, 08:15 PM
No shit. Anyone who read all that raise your hand.



:LOL:......oh wait...you said raise your hand...ROFL

Pants
04-29-2005, 08:19 PM
I post a joke. You act like I just said "let's go beat up a Jew!"

I throw s**t against the wall at everyone when it's there to be thrown. I'm very equal opportunity. I'm also not exactly the only smartass on this board. Some people appreciate it, others don't. There are only a couple of you that see fit to constantly comment on it. The rest just read past it and move the f**k on.

Go re-read your post. Maybe you'll see the irony.

chiefs4me
04-29-2005, 08:21 PM
First, if you'd read the thread you'd see I drink distilled water. Second, chiil out Francis. There are about 10 of you f**kers on this board that freak out and over-react over stupid shit. Maybe we should divide the football forum into "regular" and "all reach-around all the time" for those of you that can't handle a jab now and again. For that matter, head on over to the Chiefs Coalition site, they like to stroke eachother all day.

:shake:



Now you are dissing on the other site on this board...what's got your panties in a wad...:harumph:

Pants
04-29-2005, 08:24 PM
Now you are dissing on the other site on this board...what's got your panties in a wad...:harumph:

I think he freaked out and over-reacted over stupid shit. Maybe we should divide the football forum into "regular" and "all reach-around all the time" for people like him, who can't handle a jab now and again. For that matter, I think he should head on over to the Chiefs Coalition site, they like to stroke each other all day there.

PastorMikH
04-29-2005, 08:27 PM
This is all Carl's fault. Had he passed over Johnson and gotten us a TE with the first pick, then instead of trading the the second pick for Surtain he'd drafted Jason White, everyone would be griping about the terrible draft and there would be all these fights over little things like water.



WAY TO GO CARL!:cuss:

chiefs4me
04-29-2005, 08:45 PM
I think he freaked out and over-reacted over stupid shit. Maybe we should divide the football forum into "regular" and "all reach-around all the time" for people like him, who can't handle a jab now and again. For that matter, I think he should head on over to the Chiefs Coalition site, they like to stroke each other all day there.



OMG....ROFL.........ROFL