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View Full Version : Boat Owners, Past and Present: Any Advice?


Kyle401
05-02-2005, 03:00 PM
My wife and I have been thinking about buying a recreational power boat. She is the primary advocate for the boat as I would have to give up my dirt bike to go this direction. But it does seem that boating/skiing would be more of an activity we could share as apposed to motocross, and in the interest of unity, I am open to discussing it.

We started out by pricing some local power boats FSBO. We found a 1986 20' Stingray with a stern-drive inboard 5.7 V8 that has been completely redone except the engine. It is finished in a nice red on white with matching new upholstry and carpeting (all new) and all of the wood has been refinished. NADA has it listed at about $4,200 for average retail, while this one is listed at $5,500 (trailer included).

I have several questions:

How much are registration fees for boats?

How much fuel can I expect to use per day at the lake (4-6 boating hours)? (I'm assuming a lot since it has ~40 gallon tank).

Are boats maintenance nightmares? Do they require a lot of special tools?

Would I be required to have insurance on the boat (no loan)? Should I?

Lastly, do you regret buying your boat, or has it been a good experience?

Bob Dole
05-02-2005, 03:05 PM
Advice?

Rent.

Miles
05-02-2005, 03:06 PM
Find a friend who has a boat.

JimNasium
05-02-2005, 03:07 PM
A boat is nothing more than a hole in the water where you pour money. I agree with the good Senator, rent.

Skip Towne
05-02-2005, 03:10 PM
Just say no to boats.

ChiefsCountry
05-02-2005, 03:12 PM
Thanks a**holes. :harumph:

Kyle401
05-02-2005, 03:19 PM
I was expecting some negative feedback, but I figured that there would be at least a few people who had boats and enjoyed the experience.

Do you guys currently own boats or have you in the past?

Kyle401
05-02-2005, 03:20 PM
Thanks a**holes. :harumph:

WTF? :shrug:

ChiefsCountry
05-02-2005, 03:21 PM
WTF? :shrug:

Read my private message.

Bob Dole
05-02-2005, 03:24 PM
I was expecting some negative feedback, but I figured that there would be at least a few people who had boats and enjoyed the experience.

Do you guys currently own boats or have you in the past?

Past owner.

Kyle401
05-02-2005, 03:27 PM
Read my private message.

Now I get it. ROFL

Iowanian
05-02-2005, 03:30 PM
I have a boat and a dirtbike.

They're both money pits, money pits that I don't get to use nearly often enough these days.

Fuel and maint, and liability insurance are your biggest post-purchase expenses.

When I bought my boat, folks told me that the 2 happiest days of boat ownership are the day you buy it, and the day you sell it.

Mr. Kotter
05-02-2005, 03:30 PM
I was expecting some negative feedback, but I figured that there would be at least a few people who had boats and enjoyed the experience.

Do you guys currently own boats or have you in the past?


We have a Jet boat...for skiing, tubing, and knee boarding. It can serve as a fishin' boat in a pinch, but we bought it with our brother and sister in-law....to share costs and maintenance. I'm glad we did it that way.


How much are registration fees for boats? In Minnesota, every two years it's about $70.

How much fuel can I expect to use per day at the lake (4-6 boating hours)? (I'm assuming a lot since it has ~40 gallon tank). We use about 1 gallon per hour.

Are boats maintenance nightmares? Do they require a lot of special tools? Pay someone else to do; unless you are a mechanic, leave it to the professionals. We have a 140 HP, car engine on the thing though....Scheduled maintenance is worthwhile and not THAT spendy. I'd recommend this over the two-stroke, outboard options---which, apparently, are higher maintenance.

Would I be required to have insurance on the boat (no loan)? Should I? Other than liability (pretty cheap) I don't think it's required--at least not in MN or SD. As long as you have a responsible adult on board, I'd say...nah. If it's cheap, it couldn't hurt though I guess.

Lastly, do you regret buying your boat, or has it been a good experience? Generally, a good experience--especially if you entertain friends, or have younger kids. We also share a lake cabin with the in-laws, so it's nice to mess around on the lake. Sharing it though, has been PERFECT for us.

Simplex3
05-02-2005, 03:40 PM
Unless you live near a lake or go every other weekend the maintenance per hour of use will kill you.

Mr. Kotter
05-02-2005, 03:41 PM
Unless you live near a lake or go every other weekend the maintenance per hour of use will kill you.

That's one of the reasons we like the Jet Boat....car engine: runs like, maintained like a car....it's been really cool.

Kyle401
05-02-2005, 03:42 PM
We have a Jet boat...for skiing, tubing, and knee boarding. It can serve as a fishin' boat in a pinch, but we bought it with our brother and sister in-law....to share costs and maintenance. I'm glad we did it that way.


How much are registration fees for boats? In Minnesota, every two years it's about $70.

How much fuel can I expect to use per day at the lake (4-6 boating hours)? (I'm assuming a lot since it has ~40 gallon tank). We use about 1 gallon per hour.

Are boats maintenance nightmares? Do they require a lot of special tools? Pay someone else to do; unless you are a mechanic, leave it to the professionals. We have a 140 HP, car engine on the thing though....Scheduled maintenance is worthwhile and not THAT spendy. I'd recommend this over the two-stroke, outboard options---which, apparently, are higher maintenance.

Would I be required to have insurance on the boat (no loan)? Should I? Other than liability (pretty cheap) I don't think it's required--at least not in MN or SD. As long as you have a responsible adult on board, I'd say...nah. If it's cheap, it couldn't hurt though I guess.

Lastly, do you regret buying your boat, or has it been a good experience? Generally, a good experience--especially if you entertain friends, or have younger kids. We also share a lake cabin with the in-laws, so it's nice to mess around on the lake. Sharing it though, has been PERFECT for us.

Thanks for the feedback. I hadn't thought of purchasing a boat jointly with friends/relatives, although I don't think I know anyone who I would really want to get into that situation with. You must have a great relationship with your brother.

AmishChiefsFan
05-02-2005, 03:42 PM
When I bought my boat, folks told me that the 2 happiest days of boat ownership are the day you buy it, and the day you sell it.

I've heard that phrase as well, plus that a boat is a hole in the water you throw money into. Do you have a place to keep a boat?

Mr. Kotter
05-02-2005, 03:46 PM
Thanks for the feedback. I hadn't thought of purchasing a boat jointly with friends/relatives, although I don't think I know anyone who I would really want to get into that situation with. You must have a great relationship with your brother.

We are both pretty laid back; so that helps...but there are occasional conflicts and snafus. We just try to compromise, and plan ahead.

Kyle401
05-02-2005, 03:46 PM
I've heard that phrase as well, plus that a boat is a hole in the water you throw money into. Do you have a place to keep a boat?

I've heard both before also. That's one of the reasons that I wanted to get some feedback from owners.

I would be able to store the boat in my garage, although I would have to park my truck outside all of the time. It's pretty much only inside at night now, so it's not a big deal.

CoMoChief
05-02-2005, 03:47 PM
Usually old boats like that tend to have motor problems. It's nice that its an inboard though. Many tools needed for motor work are just the basic wrenches and socket sets. Most problems with motors that are old like that is the idle on it and the carborators get dirt and stuff in them.

ChiefsCountry
05-02-2005, 03:51 PM
Actually, engine/motor work isn't bad. Those engines hold up better than cars. The problem we run into the most is that people do the work themselves then screw it up, like winterizing.

Kyle401
05-02-2005, 03:53 PM
Usually old boats like that tend to have motor problems. It's nice that its an inboard though. Many tools needed for motor work are just the basic wrenches and socket sets. Most problems with motors that are old like that is the idle on it and the carborators get dirt and stuff in them.
I haven't checked out this particular boat that closely or even started it up, but it has the marine version of the Chevy 350. The owner claims that it has always fired right up for him every season. He says that he has only put 25-35 hours on it in the last 7 years.

I have quite a bit of experience with carbureted 350's so I'm not too worried about that. What I don't have a clue about maintenance wise are trim systems, steering systems, and propellers/drive systems.

JimNasium
05-02-2005, 03:55 PM
Thanks a**holes. :harumph:
Sorry man, my whole view of boating has forever been jaded by 4 years in the United States Coast Guard.

mlyonsd
05-02-2005, 03:55 PM
I've heard both before also. That's one of the reasons that I wanted to get some feedback from owners.

I would be able to store the boat in my garage, although I would have to park my truck outside all of the time. It's pretty much only inside at night now, so it's not a big deal.

Boats are bigger then you think. That's why you see them sitting outside a lot.

Here's what will happen if you get one....you'll spend several weekends this summer using it, a few less next year, even fewer the next. Pretty soon you'll get tired of keeping it clean and gassing it up.

Unless you're an avid fisherman. And by avid I mean you go out several times a month. But I figure you'd already have one by now if that was the case.

ChiefsCountry
05-02-2005, 03:56 PM
I haven't checked out this particular boat that closely or even started it up, but it has the marine version of the Chevy 350. The owner claims that it has always fired right up for him every season. He says that he has only put 25-35 hours on it in the last 7 years.

I have quite a bit of experience with carbureted 350's so I'm not too worried about that. What I don't have a clue about maintenance wise are trim systems, steering systems, and propellers/drive systems.

If it is Mercruiser then you won't hardly have any problems at all.

Bob Dole
05-02-2005, 03:57 PM
In all seriousness, if you're like most folks you will make a point of going as often as you can the first summer.

The second summer, you'll find that you just don't feel like hassling with it nearly as much and you'll go about half as many times.

By summer 3 you'll be asking yourself why you hassle with it at all and put the thing up for sale.

It's a whole lot easier to just drive to the lake, rent a boat, and let someone else hassle with all the other details.

Iowanian
05-02-2005, 03:59 PM
I've heard that phrase as well, plus that a boat is a hole in the water you throw money into. Do you have a place to keep a boat?

I keep my boat on its trailer, under a tarp next to my house.....and will be in a garage in another month when I move.

I'd like to say I kept it hitched to my boat because I used it so much.

I'll say this.
I like my old boat most days......It was affordable, in decent condition, and the 50 horse Merc starts right up..............but then there are days........

like last fall I went to a lake about 30 miles away with 2 friends.....first time my boat hasn't started for me, but we fished on with the trolling motor. Fished 3hrs with no bites, and Iowanian hits a decent bass.......go to drop the anchor, and the rope is dry rotted and it drops to the bottom. 10 minutes later, I break a 2 day old rod, 30 minutes later break my favorite baitcaster reel............but get into bass and tear them up for the next 2 hrs............a storm clouds suddenly appear....start back towards the ramp, get into underwater weed bed and smoke the trolling motor............Row the boat 1/4 mile back, wade to drag it onto boat.

Still in a good mood, more proof that a bad day fishing is better than a good day working.


This is my 3rd-summer-with-boat............and I already know what they're saying is true. Circumstances keep it from being as used, moreso than desire.

Soupnazi
05-02-2005, 04:00 PM
How much are registration fees for boats?

How much fuel can I expect to use per day at the lake (4-6 boating hours)? (I'm assuming a lot since it has ~40 gallon tank).

Are boats maintenance nightmares? Do they require a lot of special tools?

Would I be required to have insurance on the boat (no loan)? Should I?

Lastly, do you regret buying your boat, or has it been a good experience?

I've owned one for 4 years now. My wife and I absolutely love it. It's great to just be out on the water and gives me something to really look forward to in the summer. In MO, registration is ~ $25 for a 3 yr period, and I think the trailer registration is about the same. Insurance runs me $20/month, and yes you want it b/c it covers you for damage courtesy bad drivers when towing and idiots on the water. I usually spend about $25 for gas in a day, quite a bit less if we're not running around a lot or doing watersports.

Maintenance depends on what you've got. I've got an I/O, and I've done a carb rebuild, cables, bellows and a gimble bearing on mine. They cost me $800, but it was the first time they needed to be done on a 12 yr old boat. Regular engine maintenance is cheap. Oil and gear lube once a year, new cap and wires every 4 yrs or so, plugs every 2 years, and the sea water impeller every 3 yrs. I'm technically inclined and a maintenance freak though.
Outboards tend to be more expensive to maintain and less user-friendly that the automotive engines.

I'd recommend the route your going if you get into boating. Buy something used, and expect to have to put a little money into it. It's far better than buying something new, stuck with depreciation and a payment every month for years, and not enjoying it.

We're actually looking at going a little larger this year. :)

Kyle401
05-02-2005, 04:08 PM
Boats are bigger then you think. That's why you see them sitting outside a lot.

A 20' boat will fit in my garage (26') even if there were 4-5' (I think more like 2-3') of extra trailer length. It may be snug but it will fit.

Here's what will happen if you get one....you'll spend several weekends this summer using it, a few less next year, even fewer the next. Pretty soon you'll get tired of keeping it clean and gassing it up.

I could see this scenario happening also. I figure that if that happens, I sell the boat and go back to motocross. Hopefully then the wife will be satified that I tried to find a more inclusive hobby.

Unless you're an avid fisherman. And by avid I mean you go out several times a month. But I figure you'd already have one by now if that was the case.

I used to be an "avid" fisherman when I was in high school and had access to my dad's fishing boat. I often went 2-3 times a week of course I had more time then. Since I moved away and haven't had a boat, I have been going 4-5 times per season but it sucks trying to fish lakes from the shore. I don't think that this boat would be that great for fishing, but I would probably use it for that purpose occasionally.

alpha_omega
05-02-2005, 04:09 PM
Buy a sailboat!

Dave Lane
05-02-2005, 04:19 PM
Don't

Dave

Ice Man
05-02-2005, 04:20 PM
We have a 1988 21' cuddy cabin powered by a 350 cu. in. w/4 barrel carb. Aside from normal maint. and wear & tear, we haven't had any major problems. Normal automotive tools will do you fine. If you don't get the manuals when you buy the boat, go out and buy the tech manuals for the motor and the outdrive (if you intend to do the maint). Buy liability insurance (in case your boat causes damage to another boat, marina dock, etc.) Replacement insurance is your call. Join Boat/US and signup for towing and trailering insurance.

BUT BEFORE YOU BUY, take the boat out on the water. (If the present owner won't let you..RUN AWAY). Pull the boat and trailer with your rig. Launch/recovery (easy to do or a divorce in the making)? Run the boat, idle, slow, and wide open. How does it respond to tight cornering? Bring it into a marina slip; how does it handle at idle speed while trying to maneuver in tight spaces? Water ski behind it. How fast/easy is it to get the skier up on plane? After you recover the boat, pull the drain plug. How much water did you take on?

And lastly, as the years go by you will probably use the boat less and less. So what? It's paid for and there is nothing quite like being on the water.

redbrian
05-02-2005, 04:30 PM
Had a bass boat when I lived in Springfield, made it down to the lake most weeks to fish.

Moved to St. Louis and never used it again, finally sold it.

Donít miss it one bit, was a pain in the ass with storage and up keep.

We still go boating when we want; only now we use the wifeís auntís boats.

She has a deck boat with I/O great for waterskiing and cursing the lake, in addition she has two jet skis and a bass buggy.

The only thing we have to do in return, is a little work around her cabin and buy the gas, canít beat it.

One hint about gas bring your own, gas at the lake tends to be 10% to 20% higher.

Kyle401
05-02-2005, 04:30 PM
We have a 1988 21' cuddy cabin powered by a 350 cu. in. w/4 barrel carb. Aside from normal maint. and wear & tear, we haven't had any major problems. Normal automotive tools will do you fine. If you don't get the manuals when you buy the boat, go out and buy the tech manuals for the motor and the outdrive (if you intend to do the maint). Buy liability insurance (in case your boat causes damage to another boat, marina dock, etc.) Replacement insurance is your call. Join Boat/US and signup for towing and trailering insurance.

BUT BEFORE YOU BUY, take the boat out on the water. (If the present owner won't let you..RUN AWAY). Pull the boat and trailer with your rig. Launch/recovery (easy to do or a divorce in the making)? Run the boat, idle, slow, and wide open. How does it respond to tight cornering? Bring it into a marina slip; how does it handle at idle speed while trying to maneuver in tight spaces? Water ski behind it. How fast/easy is it to get the skier up on plane? After you recover the boat, pull the drain plug. How much water did you take on?

And lastly, as the years go by you will probably use the boat less and less. So what? It's paid for and there is nothing quite like being on the water.

Thanks, I was planning on asking the owner to let me take it to the lake for a test spin if we decided to buy it. There's some things in there that I wouldn't have thought to look for.

HemiEd
05-02-2005, 05:26 PM
Well Kyle, unlike many of the responses I have read, I love boating and the freedom that it brings. I am on my seventh one, much like houses, I have been upgrading each time. I know the exact boat you are talking about, I looked at the exact model you are talking about new and really wanted it. Instead in 86 I found a guy laid off at lear that had an 85 Sunbird willing to lose his ass. I raised my daughters water skiing at very early ages. Now we just like to go cruising, set anchor and swim. Get the boat! It is a good middle of the pack boat and sounds like it is in good shape.



I have several questions:

How much are registration fees for boats? My wife mails the check, not much. They are for several years

How much fuel can I expect to use per day at the lake (4-6 boating hours)? (I'm assuming a lot since it has ~40 gallon tank). It is like your car (350 chevy) on steroids. Boats are not efficient, if you are running it wide open you are going to use a lot. If you are just puttering around you will not use much.

Are boats maintenance nightmares? Do they require a lot of special tools? The age this is getting to be it will require some. Stuff is always getting lose from vibration. Hopefully you are handy or mechanically proficient. If not, buy a newer boat. :)

Would I be required to have insurance on the boat (no loan)? Should I?
Do not, I repeat, do not go on a public waterway without insurance. Bad things can happen, you could get ruined financially. Boat insurance is cheap.
Lastly, do you regret buying your boat, or has it been a good experience? The old worn out cliche is somewhat true. The two best days are the day you bought it and the day you sold it.

Now here are some things that you may already know but did not ask.
Tow vehichle, do you have one? I ruined more than one family car pulling one before I could justify a real two rig.
Water Safety, do you have any experience? If not, read the coast guard saftey course. You will be glad you did. Get good at boating before you enjoy adult beverages on the water. I learned the hard way, expensive.
Storage is the most expensive part after the initial purchase for me. Do you have a place to keep it both during the season and off season? Are there local laws that govern this? We can not keep a boat at our house, even on my property so I have to pay winter storage. I also pay dry dock storage in the summer.

Well hope this helps, happy boating! :thumb:

Kyle401
05-02-2005, 05:39 PM
Well Kyle, unlike many of the responses I have read, I love boating and the freedom that it brings. I am on my seventh one, much like houses, I have been upgrading each time. I know the exact boat you are talking about, I looked at the exact model you are talking about new and really wanted it. Instead in 86 I found a guy laid off at lear that had an 85 Sunbird willing to lose his ass. I raised my daughters water skiing at very early ages. Now we just like to go cruising, set anchor and swim. Get the boat! It is a good middle of the pack boat and sounds like it is in good shape.


Now here are some things that you may already know but did not ask.
Tow vehichle, do you have one? I ruined more than one family car pulling one before I could justify a real two rig.
Water Safety, do you have any experience? If not, read the coast guard saftey course. You will be glad you did. Get good at boating before you enjoy adult beverages on the water. I learned the hard way, expensive.
Storage is the most expensive part after the initial purchase for me. Do you have a place to keep it both during the season and off season? Are there local laws that govern this? We can not keep a boat at our house, even on my property so I have to pay winter storage. I also pay dry dock storage in the summer.

Well hope this helps, happy boating! :thumb:

Thanks for your response Ed. I do have a tow vehicle (1/2 ton Chevy). It doesn't have a Hemi, but it has been pretty good so far. It is a 2wd, will this be a problem on boat ramps? I passed a Missouri boater safety course in 7th grade (recieved a boater's safety license), but I don't have much experience on public water and that was a long time ago so a refresher course would be required. I'm pretty sure that the boat would fit in my garage, although that would leave my truck outside. Storage doesn't project to be a big deal at least at this time.

HemiEd
05-02-2005, 05:50 PM
Thanks for your response Ed. I do have a tow vehicle (1/2 ton Chevy). It doesn't have a Hemi, but it has been pretty good so far. It is a 2wd, will this be a problem on boat ramps? I passed a Missouri boater safety course in 7th grade (recieved a boater's safety license), but I don't have much experience on public water and that was a long time ago so a refresher course would be required. I'm pretty sure that the boat would fit in my garage, although that would leave my truck outside. Storage doesn't project to be a big deal at least at this time.

No Hemi!? WTF? ROFL
Your 1/2 ton Chevy should be just fine, better than the 80 Buick Skylark that I started pulling boats with. ROFL If your truck does not have a posi you might find steep wet boat ramps to be a problem. My Dakota has a problem on wet boat ramps so I use the Durango. I use 4 wheel drive on ours a lot but it is a very heavy boat. Just take it easy the first few times out until you get comfortible with everything. Enjoy!

Oh, you might want to read this thread:
http://www.chiefsplanet.com/BB/showthread.php?t=113438&page=1&pp=30

Iowanian
05-02-2005, 06:13 PM
as a boat owner, no fargin way do I let you take my boat on the water to ski without paying?

2 reasons.
1. liability
2. What if you tear it up and then "don't want it" after you knock the bottom end off.

I'd start it with a hose, show you it worked and let you look it over..............but it wouldn't leave my property until I had the money in hand.

Chiefsrocker
05-02-2005, 06:22 PM
My wife and I have a 1969 Evinrude Sportsman. V-6 inboard that seats at least 6 and can pull 2 skiers. We have our problems withit, but it is mostly replacing older parts (Fuel pump, water pump, etc.) Its like anything else mechanical, if you take care of it, it will last, if it is worth a damn to begin with. Winterizing is really key. Keep it under wraps in the garage or shed. Take it out early and clean it up and re-lube it. Just got with mine this week, and it took a good 8 hours to get it "unwinterized". Also had to replace the water pump. Just got old. Anyway, insurance is relatively cheap, and registration isnt bad either. Lake permits can get expensive. Here, it costs more to ski than fish with a boat. It has brought us many fun hours, and I recommend a boat, only if you have the space and time. Dont buy it to take it out every "once in a while". Just have fun with it!

Chiefsrocker
05-02-2005, 06:24 PM
Oh yea, I pull it with my 2003 Ford Explorer with a V-6 and towing package. Need to use the 4wd on some boat ramps, but it does just fine.

2bikemike
05-02-2005, 06:34 PM
I used to have a boat and I miss having it. I did all my own maintenance. There is quite a bit to do owning a boat. If you are serious about it think long and hard about how you will use it. Make sure it has plenty of storage. Inboards are IMHO a much better motor than an outboard.

We used to use are boat quite regurlary. The trick is to plan in advance. Living in So Cal there are not many fresh water lakes to ski in and the Bay really sucks for skiing. The reason we ended up selling our boat is because my wife started working weekends. Her normal days off were Thursday and Friday. So it made it difficult to get away to go skiing. We used to go to Vegas and Lake Mead or Laughlin and Lake Mohave. Damn those were fun times.

ltlchfinD
05-02-2005, 07:05 PM
I love my boat. It is like a mini vacation every time I'm on it. I leave all worries on the shore. Some ice cold beer and good tunes and you're set. My boat is fairly new so I'm not sure on maintenance, but I fill the tank every other weekend. My wife and kids enjoy it as well especially if it will instill some marital harmony. ENJOY!

dtebbe
05-02-2005, 08:17 PM
My advice would be to by a jet boat with a Mercury powerhead, minimum 175hp. Jet boats really rock because they generally weigh less, go faster, and are easier to get in/out of the water. The best part is that they only draft about 18" of water, so you don't have to worry about tearing a lower unit off. I have a 1997 Sea Ray Sea Rayder with the 175hp mercury sportjet. It's 16' long seats five, and is perfect for the wife and son to have a good time on. Best of all, it's given me no problems to speak of, and it's a piece of cake to get in/out of the water. Mine does about 53 mph (GPS indicated) with 3 adults in it. Jet boats are instantly on plane, which makes them awesome for towing skiiers, tubes, and wakeboards (until you are ready for that big wake). IMHO they are the best kept secret on the water. You can get them up to about 22' long now.

Here are the brands to look at:
Sugar Sand (the Mercedes Benz)
Sea Ray (only decent years are 97 and 98, stopped production in 99)
Sea Doo (make sure it has the Mercury motor)

The main thing to stay away from with jet boats are any boats that use PWC (ie. jet ski) motors. This rules out Yamaha, and most Sea Doo models. Those motors are right on the edge tune-wise, and not bullet-proof like the Mercury V6. I like the smaller boat most of the time for playing, but it would be nice to have the extra space a 18'-20' model would afford. I've been watching for a deal on one, and will upgrade when I find one.

Here's a pic of my little Sea Ray:
http://tko.cc/boat/rayder2.jpg

Best $6000 I ever spent, we were on the lake about every weekend last summer.

DT

Kyle401
05-03-2005, 10:06 AM
No Hemi!? WTF? ROFL
Your 1/2 ton Chevy should be just fine, better than the 80 Buick Skylark that I started pulling boats with. ROFL If your truck does not have a posi you might find steep wet boat ramps to be a problem. My Dakota has a problem on wet boat ramps so I use the Durango. I use 4 wheel drive on ours a lot but it is a very heavy boat. Just take it easy the first few times out until you get comfortible with everything. Enjoy!

Oh, you might want to read this thread:
http://www.chiefsplanet.com/BB/showthread.php?t=113438&page=1&pp=30

My truck doesn't have a posi, but I've been looking for an excuse to swap in an Auburn unit. I've had it grossing over 12,500 before and it performed pretty well. I had plenty of power, but I didn't trust the transmission (has a cooler but no temp gauge) and rear end to hold up to that weight if I pushed it so I let it drop to 45 mph and into 2nd for steep climbs. With the boat all loaded, I should be grossing about 8,000-8,500 which would be well within my truck's limits.

Kyle401
05-03-2005, 10:17 AM
as a boat owner, no fargin way do I let you take my boat on the water to ski without paying?

2 reasons.
1. liability
2. What if you tear it up and then "don't want it" after you knock the bottom end off.

I'd start it with a hose, show you it worked and let you look it over..............but it wouldn't leave my property until I had the money in hand.

Understandable. But, I've never purchased a car/truck or bike without a test drive. I can't see myself buying a boat that's almost 20 years old without having it on the water. I would not be opposed to giving the owner a security deposit and signing a statement that I will pay for damages resulting from collisions (knock the bottom end off). I would actually prefer that the owner accompany me to the lake to show me any little tricks that he may have learned about the boat.

Chief Henry
05-03-2005, 10:24 AM
I married into a family that had practically lived on the water. He'll the most time I spent around water was Sundays near Round Lake in NW Iowa fishing for Bull heads!!!!

I soon became a HUGE fan of BOATING with my wife and her family. After her parents "Gave us"
their 20 year old boat in the summer of 2001, the Lower unit went out. It was going to cost about
$2,000-2,500 to fix. So my wife and I purchased
our new 18.5 foot Sea Sprit from a local boat dealer who happens to be a friend and church member.

We use it alot in the summer, but we live right in between two nice lakes with in a 30 minute drive
from where we live. The boat has never given us any problems. We love it. We take my neice and nephew out all the time. We take friends out all the time too. Make sure your wife learns how to run the boat and make sure she knows how to put the boat on and off the trailer. If you have to take her and boat some place and practise this. You can't
beleave how much this will help you out. I've seen
many guys bust their ass putting boats on and off the trailor..........We decided to buy new so we
would avoid any problems with other boat owners.
We trusted the guy we bought from and have had no problems. Be sure and take care of it.

I choose not to allow any driking of alcohol on our boat. I've seen drunk boaters and what happens.
It ain't pretty.

Just my .02 cents worth.

If your gonna buy it, USE IT and learn it.

Skip Towne
05-03-2005, 10:58 AM
I married into a family that had practically lived on the water. He'll the most time I spent around water was Sundays near Round Lake in NW Iowa fishing for Bull heads!!!!

I soon became a HUGE fan of BOATING with my wife and her family. After her parents "Gave us"
their 20 year old boat in the summer of 2001, the Lower unit went out. It was going to cost about
$2,000-2,500 to fix. So my wife and I purchased
our new 18.5 foot Sea Sprit from a local boat dealer who happens to be a friend and church member.

We use it alot in the summer, but we live right in between two nice lakes with in a 30 minute drive
from where we live. The boat has never given us any problems. We love it. We take my neice and nephew out all the time. We take friends out all the time too. Make sure your wife learns how to run the boat and make sure she knows how to put the boat on and off the trailer. If you have to take her and boat some place and practise this. You can't
beleave how much this will help you out. I've seen
many guys bust their ass putting boats on and off the trailor..........We decided to buy new so we
would avoid any problems with other boat owners.
We trusted the guy we bought from and have had no problems. Be sure and take care of it.

I choose not to allow any driking of alcohol on our boat. I've seen drunk boaters and what happens.
It ain't pretty.

Just my .02 cents worth.

If your gonna buy it, USE IT and learn it.
You don't allow alcohol on your boat and you still have friends? Amazing!!

Chief Henry
05-03-2005, 11:05 AM
You don't allow alcohol on your boat and you still have friends? Amazing!!


Not much of a problem either. Boating and drinking are not a good combination. You should have seen some drunks two summers ago down at Lake Thunderhead. Some college age guys on the front of a
speed boat hauling ass down the lake and they have a guy trying to stand on the front end of the boat like he was surfing!!!

Hey, I'm not against drinking, When we go to Canada we indulge on the boat heavily. But when it comes to pulling water skiers and tubers
while drinking :shake:......Why risk it?

Hoover
05-03-2005, 11:07 AM
I have a boat question.

I have always wanted a 1940's or 50's boat, ya know the onw that are made of wood that have an inboard engine. Anyone know what they call those?

Hoover
05-03-2005, 11:13 AM
This is what I want.

My wife is not a fan of boating so I think it might be a while till I get my baby.

shakesthecat
05-03-2005, 11:17 AM
This is what I want.

My wife is not a fan of boating so I think it might be a while till I get my baby.


I have a buddy who had an old Chris Craft wooden powerboat.
While they definitely look cool, this guy couldn't wait to get rid of it.
A bottomless time and money pit.

Hoover
05-03-2005, 11:20 AM
I have a buddy who had an old Chris Craft wooden powerboat.
While they definitely look cool, this guy couldn't wait to get rid of it.
A bottomless time and money pit.
What are the problems?

shakesthecat
05-03-2005, 11:28 AM
What are the problems?

His leaked. A LOT.
He said it was a common problem with most wooden boats that are 40+ years old.

Hoover
05-03-2005, 12:34 PM
His leaked. A LOT.
He said it was a common problem with most wooden boats that are 40+ years old.
There are companies that now build new ones with fiderglass hulls and wood tops, maybe I should go that way. Thanks for the info

Skip Towne
05-03-2005, 12:42 PM
I have a boat question.

I have always wanted a 1940's or 50's boat, ya know the onw that are made of wood that have an inboard engine. Anyone know what they call those?
Lead sleds? Wooden boats are very heavy. My dad had one in the 60's and it would barely pull a skier out of the water.

Kerberos
05-03-2005, 01:07 PM
I have owned 2 Jetskis in the past 6 years and both were Seadoo. I have sold my last one (2000 Seadoo RX) a year and a half ago with the arrival of my son ... as many have listed above they are money pits... just like a boat.

BUT ... there are allot more choices with jetskis NOW then there was just a few years ago.

You can get a 3 seater Supercharged 4 stroke Seadoo now that will go 68-70 True MPH out of the box.

You can take the ole lady for a spin, take her skiing or wakeboarding on it and then drop her off to go race some other jets ! :D That is where the fun is at.


IMHO anything you get that has a motor for the water is going to be a money pit .... almost gauranteed. Just know that before you buy it !


Cliff

Kyle401
05-03-2005, 01:27 PM
I have owned 2 Jetskis in the past 6 years and both were Seadoo. I have sold my last one (2000 Seadoo RX) a year and a half ago with the arrival of my son ... as many have listed above they are money pits... just like a boat.

BUT ... there are allot more choices with jetskis NOW then there was just a few years ago.

You can get a 3 seater Supercharged 4 stroke Seadoo now that will go 68-70 True MPH out of the box.

You can take the ole lady for a spin, take her skiing or wakeboarding on it and then drop her off to go race some other jets ! :D That is where the fun is at.


IMHO anything you get that has a motor for the water is going to be a money pit .... almost gauranteed. Just know that before you buy it !


Cliff

I rode an acquaintance's jetski last year when I was visiting a friend in Minneapolis. I only took it to an indicated 64-65 mph (which I figured was about 60 mph in true speed) and it felt like the hull was going to break every time I hit a wake (no I wasn't sitting down). I didn't hold it at speed very long since it was borrowed and I didn't feel too confident on it, but it was fun. The owner claimed that it was good for 70 mph indicated, but I had it wide open, maybe on smoother water. I hadn't ridden a jetski in 7-8 years and the last one I was on was only good for about 40-50 mph IIRC so it was a big difference.