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View Full Version : Pick your three greatest all-time Arizona/St. Louis/Chicago Cardinals.


Rain Man
06-17-2005, 06:10 PM
Bet you never saw this coming.

Believe it or not, they've actually had some good players.

Rain Man
06-17-2005, 06:32 PM
I must say, Ollie Matson impresses me. Here is his bio from the Hall of Fame.

http://www.profootballhof.com/hof/member.jsp?player_id=143

When Ollie Matson first signed to play with the Chicago Cardinals in 1952, he was hailed as the fleet-footed ball carrier that would hopefully lead the Cardinals out of pro football’s basement.

Seven years later, when traded by the Cardinals to the Los Angeles Rams for an unprecedented nine players, he was tabbed as the star that could give the Rams a long awaited championship. Through no fault of his own, Ollie did neither. Yet little of the luster was lost from one of the most brilliant pro football careers ever.

Obviously, the greatness Matson achieved on National Football League gridirons must be considered an individual accomplishment. He never enjoyed the winning team momentum to carry him along and only two of the 14 teams on which he played finished over the .500 mark. Enemy defenses almost always concentrated on him alone. Yet his career record is exceptional.

Altogether, he gained 12,844 yards on rushing, receptions, and returns. He rushed for 5,173 yards and caught 222 passes for another 3,285 yards. He scored 40 touchdowns running, 23 on receptions, 9 on kick returns, and one on a fumble recovery.

Matson, an All-America college star at the University of San Francisco, was the Cardinals first-round draft choice in 1952. He delayed his pro signing so that he could compete as a member of the American track team in the 1952 Olympics. He won a bronze medal in the 400-meter race and a gold medal from the 1,600-meter relay. When he finally joined the Cardinals he experienced a sensational rookie season.

Then military service interrupted his career for a year but, once back in a football uniform, he was an All-NFL performer, year in and year out. During his 14 pro seasons Ollie earned first- or second-team All-NFL honors six times and was selected to play in six Pro Bowls.

Skip Towne
06-17-2005, 06:42 PM
I must say, Ollie Matson impresses me. Here is his bio from the Hall of Fame.

http://www.profootballhof.com/hof/member.jsp?player_id=143

When Ollie Matson first signed to play with the Chicago Cardinals in 1952, he was hailed as the fleet-footed ball carrier that would hopefully lead the Cardinals out of pro football’s basement.

Seven years later, when traded by the Cardinals to the Los Angeles Rams for an unprecedented nine players, he was tabbed as the star that could give the Rams a long awaited championship. Through no fault of his own, Ollie did neither. Yet little of the luster was lost from one of the most brilliant pro football careers ever.

Obviously, the greatness Matson achieved on National Football League gridirons must be considered an individual accomplishment. He never enjoyed the winning team momentum to carry him along and only two of the 14 teams on which he played finished over the .500 mark. Enemy defenses almost always concentrated on him alone. Yet his career record is exceptional.

Altogether, he gained 12,844 yards on rushing, receptions, and returns. He rushed for 5,173 yards and caught 222 passes for another 3,285 yards. He scored 40 touchdowns running, 23 on receptions, 9 on kick returns, and one on a fumble recovery.

Matson, an All-America college star at the University of San Francisco, was the Cardinals first-round draft choice in 1952. He delayed his pro signing so that he could compete as a member of the American track team in the 1952 Olympics. He won a bronze medal in the 400-meter race and a gold medal from the 1,600-meter relay. When he finally joined the Cardinals he experienced a sensational rookie season.

Then military service interrupted his career for a year but, once back in a football uniform, he was an All-NFL performer, year in and year out. During his 14 pro seasons Ollie earned first- or second-team All-NFL honors six times and was selected to play in six Pro Bowls.
I barely remember him but I don't remember him being fast. I thought he was a fullback. I must have caught the end of his career.

Rain Man
06-17-2005, 06:53 PM
I barely remember him but I don't remember him being fast. I thought he was a fullback. I must have caught the end of his career.


For some reason, I thought he was playing back in the 20's. (Insert 'Skip is old' joke here.) I was surprised to see that he was actually playing into the mid-1960s. My knowledge of football history in the eras before I saw the games myself is sometimes lower than I'd like.

Skip Towne
06-17-2005, 06:58 PM
For some reason, I thought he was playing back in the 20's. (Insert 'Skip is old' joke here.) I was surprised to see that he was actually playing into the mid-1960s. My knowledge of football history in the eras before I saw the games myself is sometimes lower than I'd like.
Do you remember Joe Don Looney?

VAChief
06-17-2005, 07:01 PM
How about McArthur Lane?

gblowfish
06-17-2005, 07:04 PM
1. Fred Bird.
2. Rod Tidwell
3. Bill Bidwill

Greatest Cardinals? Are you kiddin me???

Skip Towne
06-17-2005, 07:09 PM
How about McArthur Lane?
Pretty decent runner. Played for the Chiefs late in his career.

Miles
06-17-2005, 07:47 PM
Man how could you leave off Plummer? His 1999 season was memorable.

ENDelt260
06-17-2005, 07:48 PM
The Racine days don't count?

crossbow
06-17-2005, 08:02 PM
Pat Tilly was an outstanding receiver. Otis Anderson was a 245 pound tailback with speed. Very talented runner.

papasmurf
06-17-2005, 08:03 PM
Missing Johnny Roland

Ultra Peanut
06-17-2005, 08:36 PM
Kurt Warner
Jeff Blake
Josh Scobey

Skip Towne
06-17-2005, 08:39 PM
Missing Johnny Roland
Uh-huh......MUron

Rain Man
06-17-2005, 09:23 PM
Do you remember Joe Don Looney?


Not at all. I read some article a while back about him that said he was a maverick. I think the article said he moved out to the middle of the desert when he retired, or some such thing.

Skip Towne
06-17-2005, 09:34 PM
Not at all. I read some article a while back about him that said he was a maverick. I think the article said he moved out to the middle of the desert when he retired, or some such thing.
I remember him well. He played at OU in '62 and '63. He turned Bud Wilkinson on his ear. He was 6'1" and weighed 227# and ran a 9.6 hundred. A white boy (well, some Indian blood). He reminded me of Riggins in more ways than one. Riggins was a problem child who was always in trouble. Joe Don made him look like a choir boy. Joe Don "retired" to a small farm in south Texas and subsisted with no running water or electricity on a small acreage. Mostly from his NFL pension and the kindness of his wealthy father. I just read the biography of him. An easy read that took me two days. PM me for the name and author. I checked it out of the Bartlesville, Ok library

Frazod
06-17-2005, 09:37 PM
Albert Pujols. :p

Ultra Peanut
06-17-2005, 09:41 PM
Middle School Boys Declare: 'Poo-holes' Our Favorite MLB Star

A study released today by Major League Baseball to gauge middle school boys’ interest in baseball has found that St. Louis Cardinals rookie outfielder Albert Pujols is the most favorite player among the age group.

“Poo-holes! Poo-holes! Poo-holes!” yelled Billy Thomas, age 12, when asked who his favorite player was. His pronouncement received a chorus of agreeing giggles at his lunch table.

“Some people like Bonds, others say A-Rod is the best,” said Johnny Oldham, age 11, “but I’ve got two words for you: Poo and Holes.” Oldham went on to say that he has suffered for his devotion to his favorite player. His social studies teacher, Mrs. Mandlebrew, has sent him too the office several times after he has declared his love for Pujols.

The study found that many of the boys were unclear as to the correct spelling of Pujols name. When told that the Cardinals star spelled his name “P-u-j-o-l-s” and not “P-o-o H-o-l-e-s” as all the boys had written on their surveys, Garret Wilson, age 12, looked distraught before loudly declaring: “I don’t care. He’ll always be a big, stinky poo hole to me!” He then turned and skipped off down the hall.

Former Baltimore Orioles star Boog Powell was voted the most favorite retired player among the age group. Dick Trickle won for favorite non-team sports athlete. Britney Spears took first in every other category.

Darien25
06-18-2005, 01:48 AM
You can't leave out the versatile Stump Mitchell! I believe he played back in the Anderson, Green, and Lomax era.

tk13
06-18-2005, 02:17 AM
Wendell Bryant

Rain Man
06-18-2005, 01:30 PM
I just read the biography of him. An easy read that took me two days. PM me for the name and author. I checked it out of the Bartlesville, Ok library

I'd be interested, but that reminds me. First, I need to read Otis Taylor's book. Anyone remember the title of it?

Bowser
06-18-2005, 01:59 PM
David Boston

StcChief
06-18-2005, 02:45 PM
perty easy their probowlers

Hart,Smith,Deirdorf