PDA

View Full Version : A RIDDLE THAT'LL KILL YOUR BRAIN!


KChiefsQT
07-14-2005, 07:21 PM
A RIDDLE THAT'LL KILL YOUR BRAIN!

Okay, I just saw this and it's been about five minutes I still haven't got it? Give it a whirl and see what u come up with.

This is going to make you so MAD! There are three words in the English language that end in "gry". ONE is angry and the other is hungry. EveryONE knows what the third ONE means and what it stands for. EveryONE uses them everyday, and if you listened very carefully, I've given you the third word. What is it? _______gry? Repost this and the answer will pop up on the screen automatically.

Count Alex's Losses
07-14-2005, 07:30 PM
The author is writing here about the third word in the second sentence of the riddle, exactly as quoted, NOT some mythical third commonly used English word ending in "-gry".

Jenson71
07-14-2005, 07:30 PM
Going? Hmmm...

DJay23
07-14-2005, 07:35 PM
I don't like it when people **** with my head.

Simplex3
07-14-2005, 07:35 PM
The hardest part about this riddle is that the author is wrong about only 3 words in English ending with "gry":

aggry

\Ag"gry\, Aggri \Ag"gri\, a. Applied to a kind of variegated glass beads of ancient manufacture; as, aggry beads are found in Ashantee and Fantee in Africa.


unangry

adj : not angry [syn: unangry(p)] [ant: angry]
-----------------------------------

The other part that makes it hard is that you've butchered the riddle. Here is the actual riddle:

Angry and hungry are two words in the English language that end in 'gry.' There are three words in the English language. What is the third word? Everyone knows what it means and everyone uses it every day. Look closely and I have already given you the third word. What is it?

Jenson71
07-14-2005, 07:36 PM
I don't like it when people **** with my head.

Then what are you listening to Dave Matthews for?

Coach
07-14-2005, 07:37 PM
orgy?

ChiefsFanatic
07-14-2005, 07:38 PM
I heard that dreamt was the only word in the english language that ends with amt or eamt.

KChiefsQT
07-14-2005, 07:38 PM
[QUOTE=Simplex3]; asunangry

adj : not angry [syn: unangry(p)] [ant: angry]
-----------------------------------

The other part that makes it hard is that you've butchered the riddle. Here is the actualy riddle:[/QUOT

Thats the way I got it.... :harumph:

Jenson71
07-14-2005, 07:39 PM
orgy?

Dyslexiagry?

Simplex3
07-14-2005, 07:40 PM
I heard that dreamt was the only word in the english language that ends with amt or eamt.
It and derivitives thereof unless you go way out there:

amt

\Amt\, n.; pl. Amter, {E}. Amts. [Dan. & Norw., fr. G.] An administrative territorial division in Denmark and Norway.

Each of the provinces [of Denmark] is divided into several amts, answering . . . to the English hundreds. --Encyc. Brit.

Simplex3
07-14-2005, 07:40 PM
[QUOTE=Simplex3]; asunangry

adj : not angry [syn: unangry(p)] [ant: angry]
-----------------------------------

The other part that makes it hard is that you've butchered the riddle. Here is the actualy riddle:[/QUOT

Thats the way I got it.... :harumph:
Did you quote them the same way that you quoted me? :)

ChiefsFanatic
07-14-2005, 07:41 PM
Link (http://www.fun-with-words.com/word_gry_angry_hungry.html)


There are only three words in the English language, all adjectives, which end in "-gry." Two are "angry" and "hungry"; the third word describes the state of the world today. What is it?

This is the (presumed) original version of the puzzle from 1975. The possible answers (if obsolete words, names, and hyphenated compounds of "angry" and "hungry" are allowed) are plentiful. Most of the 124 listed below were in the 1933 edition of the Oxford English Dictionary, and all have appeared in some major dictionary of English:

affect-hungry fire-angry MacLoingry Seagry
aggry Gagry mad-angry self-angry
Agry girl-hungry mad-hungry selfe-angry
ahungry gonagry magry sensation-hungry
air-hungry gry malgry sex-angry
anhungry haegry man-hungry sex-hungry
Badagry half-angry managry Shchigry
Ballingry hangry mannagry shiggry
begry heart-angry Margry Shtchigry
bewgry heart-hungry maugry sight-hungry
boroughmongry higry pigry mawgry skugry
bowgry hogry meagry Sygry
braggry hogrymogry meat-hungry Tangry
Bugry hongry menagry Tchangry
Chockpugry hound-hungry messagry Tchigry
Cogry houngry music-hungry tear-angry
cony-gry huggrymuggry nangry th'angry
conyngry hund-hungry overangry tike-hungry
cottagry Hungry Bungry Pelegry Tingry
Croftangry hwngry Pingry toggry
diamond-hungry iggry Podagry ulgry
dog-hungry Jagry Pongry unangry
dogge-hungry job-hungry pottingry vergry
Dshagry kaingry power-hungry Vigry
Dzagry land-hungry profit-hungry vngry
eard-hungry Langry puggry war-hungry
Echanuggry leather-hungry pugry Wigry
Egry ledderhungry red-angry wind-hungry
euer-angry life-hungry rungry yeard-hungry
ever-angry Lisnagry scavengry yird-hungry
fenegry losengry Schtschigry Ymagry

ChiefsFanatic
07-14-2005, 07:44 PM
Link (http://www.worldwidewords.org/articles/gry.htm)


Riddle Me No Riddles

Once upon a time, riddles were respectable. Their antiquity and function can be guessed at from the word’s origin in Old English raedan, “a story or interpretation”, which is cognate with words meaning “counsel, opinion, conjecture” and is also the origin of our modern word read. Such poems (for in its original form the riddle was a verse form) were a regular part of entertainment and instruction, an elevated form of guessing game.

Alas, the riddle is now a debased form, more a play on words than something that demands thought and skill in its solving. Recent events in North America, however, confirm that the riddle—even in this debased form—is far from dead. Nobody seems to be absolutely sure how it started, but quite suddenly everybody concerned with words, from librarians to newspaper columnists to dictionary makers to Usenet newsgroups such as alt.usage.english and rec.puzzles were deluged with enquiries along the lines of “There are three words in English ending in -gry. I only know hungry and angry. Please tell me what the third one is. I’m going mad trying to find the answer”. The reason why so many people were tearing their hair out is that there is no third common word in English ending in -gry, though there are several rare or obsolete ones. So why were so many people desperate to find something that didn’t exist?

It seems that the question had been taken from some old book of puzzles, had been given publicity, perhaps on a radio programme (Richard Lederer says it was on the Bob Grant radio talk show on WMCA in New York City in 1975), had taken the fancy of large numbers of people, and had been passed by word of mouth across North America, becoming corrupted on the way, until later hearers only received the bastardised version I’ve already quoted. I’ve seen various versions of the supposed original form of the riddle. It may have have been something like:

There are two words that end with “gry”.
Angry is one and hungry is another.
What is the third word.
Everyone uses it every day and
Everyone knows what it means.
If you have been listening,
I have already told you what the word is.

One of the first mistakes in transmission appears to have been the inclusion of a question mark at the end of the third line. This turned a simple bit of verbal trickery, whose answer is “what”, into a fruitless exercise in lexicographic detective work. Another version is:

Think of words ending in “gry”.
Angry and hungry are two of them.
There are only three words in the English language.
What is the third word?
The word is something that everyone uses every day.
If you have listened carefully,
I have already told you what it is.

and in this case the answer must surely be “language” (the third word in “the English language”).

Yet a third version claiming to be the original was published in the US magazine Parade in March 1997, in a letter from Charles Wiedemann of New Jersey, who was responding to an article on the mystery by Marilyn Vos Savant. His version is:

There are at least three words
In the English language that end in g or y.
One of them is “hungry”, and another one is “angry”.
There is a third word, a short one,
Which you probably say every day.
If you are listening carefully to everything I say,
You just heard me say it three times.
What is it?

which relies on verbal trickery to confuse the quickly-said “g or y” with “gry”. The answer is actually “say”.

In one form or another the basic riddle seems to have been known for many years (one person is quoted in the alt.usage.english FAQ as saying “I heard this riddle 20 years ago from a fiddle player. He got it from his wife who taught pre-school”). Several librarians in the US report that it is a common question, to which long ago they determined stock answers, confirming that it is far from new. It seems it has also crossed the Atlantic, as it is quoted as a question asked of the Oxford Word and Language Service (OWLS) in Questions of English.

Everybody is very pleased that this most recent peak of interest in the riddle is now over and we can get back to some real work. Here, for the record and in case anybody is still interested, are a few other words in -gry that do exist in English, though only specialist dictionary-makers and students of the history of the language have even heard of most of them. I have left out compounds such as land-hungry.

aggry: Coloured and variegated glass beads of ancient manufacture, found buried in the ground in Africa. A word of unknown origin. Seemingly always used attributively, as in aggry beads.

braggry: A variant form of braggery. Obsolete.

conyngry: An obsolete dialectal variant of conyger, itself an obsolete term meaning “rabbit warren”.

gry: The smallest unit in Locke’s proposed decimal system of linear measurement, being the tenth of a line, the hundredth of an inch, and the thousandth of a (“philosophical”) foot. Also the grunt of a pig, an insignificant trifle, or a verb meaning to roar. Obsolete.

iggry: Egyptian colloquial Arabic pronunciation of ijri: “Hurry up!”, brought back after the First World War by members of British and Australian forces who had fought in Egypt.

meagry: Having a meagre appearance. Obsolete.

nangry: A variant form of angry. Obsolete.

podagry: Dodder, or the condition of a plant infested with it.

puggry: A variant form of puggree, a light turban or head-covering worn by inhabitants of the Indian subcontinent.

It’s a pretty meagre (or meagry) selection ...

KChiefsQT
07-14-2005, 07:44 PM
Did you quote them the same way that you quoted me? :)


ROFL waiiiiiiit :deevee:

DJay23
07-14-2005, 07:48 PM
Then what are you listening to Dave Matthews for?
um, i'm not sure what the hell that's supposed to mean.

Electric
07-14-2005, 07:50 PM
I guess you gotta have one to kill it!

Simplex3
07-14-2005, 07:51 PM
um, i'm not sure what the hell that's supposed to mean.
Chocolate dancing babies, dumbass. :shake:

Buck
08-15-2010, 01:55 AM
So what is the answer?

Pitt Gorilla
08-15-2010, 02:34 AM
The match.

T-post Tom
08-15-2010, 02:35 AM
Chocolate dancing babies, dumbass. :shake:

yah!

Now put your hands together for Mr. Randy Watson!

orange
08-15-2010, 02:42 AM
Once upon a time, riddles were respectable.

I accept that. Alas, Charles Wiedemann's riddle wasn't:


Yet a third version claiming to be the original was published in the US magazine Parade in March 1997, in a letter from Charles Wiedemann of New Jersey, who was responding to an article on the mystery by Marilyn Vos Savant. His version is:

There are at least three words
In the English language that end in g or y.
One of them is “hungry”, and another one is “angry”.
There is a third word, a short one,
Which you probably say every day.
If you are listening carefully to everything I say,
You just heard me say it three times.
What is it?

which relies on verbal trickery to confuse the quickly-said “g or y” with “gry”. The answer is actually “say”.


The answer is wrong. Can anyone tell us why?

Crush
08-15-2010, 07:23 AM
http://img15.imageshack.us/img15/9831/scanners.gif

FAX
08-15-2010, 07:40 AM
I'm pretty sure this is a trick question. The "third" word could be a lot of things and hidden in the question.

However, the closest actual word I could think of is an alternate spelling of vinegary ... or "vinegry" which is in common use (in the spoken language, anyhow). I go with that.

FAX

Hog Farmer
08-15-2010, 07:45 AM
There'S only one word in the English language that ends in "bation". Can you guess what it is ?

JD10367
08-15-2010, 08:08 AM
http://assets.head-fi.org/3/32/32accad8_Bump2.jpg

Pasta Giant Meatball
08-15-2010, 08:16 AM
There'S only one word in the English language that ends in "bation". Can you guess what it is ?

Drafterbation

jrowe
08-15-2010, 08:46 AM
"language" is the answer. There are only three words in "the english language." What's the third.

Sully
08-15-2010, 09:02 AM
You don't bury the survivors?

boogblaster
08-15-2010, 10:23 AM
suckgry

Ugly Duck
08-15-2010, 10:27 AM
"language" is the answer. There are only three words in "the english language." What's the third.

Aw c'mon now.... that's it?

crazycoffey
08-15-2010, 10:38 AM
A RIDDLE THAT'LL KILL YOUR BRAIN!

Okay, I just saw this and it's been about five minutes I still haven't got it? Give it a whirl and see what u come up with.

This is going to make you so MAD! There are three words in the English language that end in "gry". ONE is angry and the other is hungry. EveryONE knows what the third ONE means and what it stands for. EveryONE uses them everyday, and if you listened very carefully, I've given you the third word. What is it? _______gry? Repost this and the answer will pop up on the screen automatically.


Onegry?
meagry?
aggry?

http://www.fun-with-words.com/word_gry_angry_hungry.html

orange
08-15-2010, 12:48 PM
The question is "What is it?" Everything else there is misdirection.

"It" is it.

Now, does anyone want to try to answer #22?

orange
08-15-2010, 01:01 PM
http://www.fun-with-words.com/word_gry_angry_hungry.html

fashion and cushion

Lzen
08-16-2010, 11:24 AM
Aw c'mon now.... that's it?

If you read Simplex3's post with the riddle un-butchered, you would very easily see that 'language' is, in fact, the answer.