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View Full Version : Plane off runway and on fire in Toronto, Canada...


memyselfI
08-02-2005, 02:43 PM
Air France jet.

Not looking good for possible survivors. Thusfar, they are blaming weather.

Donger
08-02-2005, 02:46 PM
Air France. 200 passengers. From the looks of it, it's a long, damn way from the runway. Apparently went off the runway and caught fire.

memyselfI
08-02-2005, 02:50 PM
I don't see how anyone could survive that fireball...:(

tk13
08-02-2005, 02:51 PM
What was it trying to do landing during a severe thunderstorm?

ct
08-02-2005, 02:51 PM
I don't see how anyone could survive that fireball...:(

You don't look around yourself much do ya. People can survive some terrible things...

memyselfI
08-02-2005, 02:54 PM
You don't look around yourself much do ya. People can survive some terrible things...

I hope you are right. I guess we'll see. The shots I saw looked like a plane almost completely engulfed.

Donger
08-02-2005, 02:55 PM
I don't see how anyone could survive that fireball...:(

Depends on when it caught fire, of course. From the looks of how far it skidded and the fact that the airframe looks to be surrounded by trees, I wouldn't surprised if it sheared off a wing. That's bad.

I hope I'm wrong.

Donger
08-02-2005, 02:57 PM
Sudden thunderstorm, possible microburst. Speculating that it was an ILS approach.

ct
08-02-2005, 02:57 PM
where are you guys watching this?

memyselfI
08-02-2005, 02:58 PM
where are you guys watching this?

CNN, MSNBC, Fox News.

Donger
08-02-2005, 03:00 PM
Pilot and co-pilot survived and are being debriefed. Hopefully that's a good sign.

memyselfI
08-02-2005, 03:01 PM
Pilot and co-pilot survived and are being debriefed. Hopefully that's a good sign.

Wow, where did you hear that?

That is a very good sign.

Donger
08-02-2005, 03:02 PM
Wow, where did you hear that?

That is a very good sign.

Fox via Global Television News. Scooping the others, as usual.

:p

wasi
08-02-2005, 03:03 PM
Wow, where did you hear that?

That is a very good sign.

According to sources coveriing the event here, no one has gotten near the plan yet.. its still on fire. It looks bad.

DTLB58
08-02-2005, 03:03 PM
Just saw another eplosion from the plane

Donger
08-02-2005, 03:04 PM
Jeezus, 291 passengers on board. Airbus A340, I think. Big sucker.

WebGem
08-02-2005, 03:05 PM
The pilot was whackin it.

memyselfI
08-02-2005, 03:05 PM
According to sources coveriing the event here, no one has gotten near the plan yet.. its still on fire. It looks bad.

Thank you. I am watching now.

wasi
08-02-2005, 03:06 PM
Sudden thunderstorm, possible microburst. Speculating that it was an ILS approach.

whats a microburst and and ILS approach?

memyselfI
08-02-2005, 03:06 PM
Just saw another eplosion from the plane

That is not good. I've heard there have been three.

DTLB58
08-02-2005, 03:08 PM
A number of people have escaped! :)

Rain Man
08-02-2005, 03:08 PM
Horrible way to go. You can only hope that they died quickly in that type of situation. I shudder to even think about it.

Donger
08-02-2005, 03:08 PM
whats a microburst and and ILS approach?

A microburst is a very powerful downward flow of air (towards the ground) sometimes found near thunderstorms.

ILS = Instrument Landing System.

Rain Man
08-02-2005, 03:08 PM
A number of people have escaped! :)

Really? Excellent!

htismaqe
08-02-2005, 03:09 PM
whats a microburst and and ILS approach?

A microburst is a column of cold air within a thunderstorm. It's so cold that it "sinks" at speeds of up to 150mph. It's basically a straight-line wind gust, straight down.

Knock a plane right out of the sky.

tk13
08-02-2005, 03:09 PM
Oddly enough, they said on CNN that today was the 20 year anniversary of when a plane tried to land in Dallas during a severe thunderstorm and had a very similar accident.

memyselfI
08-02-2005, 03:09 PM
Awful if this could have been avoided by simply waiting out the thunderstorm.

Donger
08-02-2005, 03:10 PM
Two busloads of passengers taken from the scene. Sounds promising.

memyselfI
08-02-2005, 03:10 PM
Oddly enough, they said on CNN that today was the 20 year anniversary of when a plane tried to land in Dallas during a severe thunderstorm and had a very similar accident.

Yes, I heard that earlier. They were going to report on a guy who was going back to the scene of the accident. Then I never saw the report (channel surfing) but this accident happen shortly thereafter.

htismaqe
08-02-2005, 03:10 PM
Awful if this could have been avoided by simply waiting out the thunderstorm.

Who knows about extenuating circumstances. Maybe they had tried to wait it out and were running low on fuel?

memyselfI
08-02-2005, 03:11 PM
Witness reported seeing smoke and steam from the back of the airplane before landing.

Donger
08-02-2005, 03:11 PM
Air France 358 inbound from Paris.

memyselfI
08-02-2005, 03:12 PM
Who knows about extenuating circumstances. Maybe they had tried to wait it out and were running low on fuel?

They said planes were landing before this one.

htismaqe
08-02-2005, 03:13 PM
Witness reported seeing smoke and steam from the back of the airplane before landing.

So they might not have been able to wait out the storm.

That sucks.

ChiTown
08-02-2005, 03:14 PM
So they might not have been able to wait out the storm.

That sucks.

I haven't heard any of these broadcasters talking about smoke or steam prior to landing.

memyselfI
08-02-2005, 03:15 PM
I haven't heard any of these broadcasters talking about smoke or steam prior to landing.

CNN and Fox both have talked about it within the last 5 minutes.

Could have been struck by lightning? :hmmm:

Pants
08-02-2005, 03:16 PM
Yeah, I don't think it was the weather. If it had been that bad they would have been either redirected or told to circle the airport for a while. It is my understanding there is always enough fuel to keep a plane in the air for a minimum of 40 minutes extra of what the air time is calculated to be. Besides, like someone said, other planes were landing.

tk13
08-02-2005, 03:17 PM
They have a witness live on CNN and he said nothing about smoke. Said he saw the plane land, looked fine, then it sounded like the engine made a funny noise, that it "backed up", and I believe he said the plane then split in half and went sliding off the runway into that valley near the airport.

ChiTown
08-02-2005, 03:18 PM
CNN and Fox both have talked about it within the last 5 minutes.

Could have been struck by lightning? :hmmm:

I stopped watching about 10 minutes ago. Lightning is certainly a possibility.....

Donger
08-02-2005, 03:19 PM
Could have been struck by lightning? :hmmm:

It's highly unlikely that a lightning strike damaged the aircraft.

Donger
08-02-2005, 03:20 PM
They have a witness live on CNN and he said nothing about smoke. Said he saw the plane land, looked fine, then it sounded like the engine made a funny noise, that it "backed up", I believe he said the plane split in half and went sliding off the runway into that valley near the airport.

Hmmm. Possible failure of thrust reverser(s).

htismaqe
08-02-2005, 03:20 PM
CNN and Fox both have talked about it within the last 5 minutes.

Could have been struck by lightning? :hmmm:

Possibly. I'm not sure what the damage indicators are for a lightning strike. Not sure if it would ignite a plane or not.

I know what hail damage looks like on a plane though.

Pants
08-02-2005, 03:23 PM
Hmmm. Possible failure of thrust reverser(s).

I wonder what he meant by "backed up"?

memyselfI
08-02-2005, 03:23 PM
It's highly unlikely that a lightning strike damaged the aircraft.

I have a healthy respect for lightning...it would not surprise me if it damaged the aircraft and played a part of the crash.

htismaqe
08-02-2005, 03:25 PM
I have a healthy respect for lightning...it would not surprise me if it damaged the aircraft and played a part of the crash.

A plane is mostly metal. Depending on how it's constructed, combined with the fact that it's not grounded, may mean lightning would do nothing more than burnout the on-board electrical equipment.

Donger
08-02-2005, 03:26 PM
I have a healthy respect for lightning...it would not surprise me if it damaged the aircraft and played a part of the crash.

Having a healthy respect for lightning is a good idea. However, aircraft aren't grounded, of course, when they are airborne. And, since the skin of the aircraft is mostly metal, the energy is dissipated very well. If anything, I'd be more worried about wind and hail when flying through or near a CB.

Donger
08-02-2005, 03:26 PM
lightning would do nothing more than burnout the on-board electrical equipment.

Even that's rare, in the extreme.

Donger
08-02-2005, 03:28 PM
I wonder what he meant by "backed up"?

I have no idea. Considering how far the aircraft is from the runway, I'd be surprised if it came to a stop, backed-up and then hurtled off the runway.

Pants
08-02-2005, 03:28 PM
You think one of the engines went into reverse while the other didn't? That would turn the plane around incredibly fast and might even rip it apart... I just realized this is a 4 engine plane, so I don't know the likeliness of somethng like this happening.

htismaqe
08-02-2005, 03:28 PM
Having a healthy respect for lightning is a good idea. However, aircraft aren't grounded, of course, when they are airborne. And, since the skin of the aircraft is mostly metal, the energy is dissipated very well. If anything, I'd be more worried about wind and hail when flying through or near a CB.

Hail is the worst.

memyselfI
08-02-2005, 03:29 PM
Having a healthy respect for lightning is a good idea. However, aircraft aren't grounded, of course, when they are airborne. And, since the skin of the aircraft is mostly metal, the energy is dissipated very well. If anything, I'd be more worried about wind and hail when flying through or near a CB.

I'll have to remember this the next time I'm having a panic attack about flying in a thunderstorm...

I HATE IT.

htismaqe
08-02-2005, 03:30 PM
I'll have to remember this the next time I'm having a panic attack about flying in a thunderstorm...

I HATE IT.

I hate flying period.

Donger
08-02-2005, 03:31 PM
You think one of the engines went into reverse while the other didn't? That would turn the plane around incredibly fast and might even rip it apart...

I'm just speculating. But, the reversers are a tad important when it comes to stopping on a wet runway.

Pants
08-02-2005, 03:31 PM
Hail is the worst.

How so? I was under the impression that extreme bursts of wind (mb's being on the extreme) were the most dangerous...

memyselfI
08-02-2005, 03:31 PM
I hate flying period.

Me too...

in all honesty.

ChiTown
08-02-2005, 03:32 PM
Hail is the worst.

Humor me....why is hail the worst.

Pants
08-02-2005, 03:32 PM
I'm just speculating. But, the reversers are a tad important when it comes to stopping on a wet runway.

Oh for sure, I just don't see how the plane could be ripped apart...

tk13
08-02-2005, 03:32 PM
News anchor Miles O'Brien on CNN (who is a pilot) said he was talking to some of his pilot friends and one of them brought up a situation in Warsaw about 12 years ago where a plane tried to land on a wet runway and hydroplaned... and when that happened the plane's computer systems read that as the plane hadn't landed yet because the wheels were spinning off the ground, so they wouldn't allow the braking system to work properly, and the pilot was helpless to stop the plane. Didn't say that's what happened, but it's another possibility.

Pants
08-02-2005, 03:34 PM
News anchor Miles O'Brien on CNN (who is a pilot) said he was talking to some of his pilot friends and one of them brought up a situation in Warsaw about 12 years ago where a plane tried to land on a wet runway and hydroplaned... and when that happened the plane's computer systems read that as the plane hadn't landed yet because the wheels were spinning off the ground, so they wouldn't allow the braking system to work properly, and the pilot was helpless to stop the plane. Didn't say that's what happened, but it's another possibility.

I don't know, they usually try change things around to prevent incidents like that happening in the future... My guess is - there is some sort of a system that prevents such things nowadays...

Planes land on wet surfaces daily, IDK.

ChiTown
08-02-2005, 03:34 PM
News anchor Miles O'Brien on CNN (who is a pilot) said he was talking to some of his pilot friends and one of them brought up a situation in Warsaw about 12 years ago where a plane tried to land on a wet runway and hydroplaned... and when that happened the plane's computer systems read that as the plane hadn't landed yet because the wheels were spinning off the ground, so they wouldn't allow the braking system to work properly, and the pilot was helpless to stop the plane. Didn't say that's what happened, but it's another possibility.

That actually makes a helluvalot of sense. However, surely they have some kind of override system. No?

KChiefsQT
08-02-2005, 03:34 PM
According to a witness.... the plane looks like it was landing fine, skidded off runway...broke into half and caught fire. This is horrible... scares the shit out of me considering I just flew through a damn hurricane. My thoughts and prayers go out to the passengers on board and their families as well. So sad..... :(

Donger
08-02-2005, 03:36 PM
Possibly NO fatalities.

memyselfI
08-02-2005, 03:36 PM
Possibly NO fatalities.

Wouldn't that be a miracle!

Rain Man
08-02-2005, 03:36 PM
I have no idea. Considering how far the aircraft is from the runway, I'd be surprised if it came to a stop, backed-up and then hurtled off the runway.

How far is it from the runway? Are we talking feet or miles?

Pants
08-02-2005, 03:37 PM
How far is it from the runway? Are we talking feet or miles?

Heh, not miles...

KChiefsQT
08-02-2005, 03:37 PM
That actually makes a helluvalot of sense. However, surely they have some kind of override system. No?

If they don't they better now.

Donger
08-02-2005, 03:37 PM
How far is it from the runway? Are we talking feet or miles?

I looks like hundreds of yards, maybe a quarter mile.

tk13
08-02-2005, 03:37 PM
I don't know, they usually try change things around to prevent incidents like that happening in the future... My guess is - there is some sort of a system that prevents such things nowadays...

Planes land on wet surfaces daily, IDK.
Yeah, but cars drive on wet surfaces daily. Doesn't mean there isn't one that doesn't hydroplane every once in a while.

ChiTown
08-02-2005, 03:37 PM
How far is it from the runway? Are we talking feet or miles?

It's at a ravine near the end of the runway

htismaqe
08-02-2005, 03:38 PM
Humor me....why is hail the worst.

As a passenger, it's ****ing loud. Inch-diameter hail sounds like the end of the world.

As a pilot, there's been cases where windshields have cracked and the nose of the plane has actually been so badly damage that the fuselage has been compromised.

Rain Man
08-02-2005, 03:38 PM
According to a witness.... the plane looks like it was landing fine, skidded off runway...broke into half and caught fire. This is horrible... scares the shit out of me considering I just flew through a damn hurricane. My thoughts and prayers go out to the passengers on board and their families as well. So sad..... :(

That sounds a lot more feasible than "backing up."

The only way I could see the plane "backing up" would be if one of the engines suddenly went full throttle while the thrust reverser was engaged, and even then it would just go in a big circle, more or less.

Pants
08-02-2005, 03:39 PM
They are saying, now, there was adequate time to escape before the fire broke out, and there's a good chance there were no fatalities.

Duck Dog
08-02-2005, 03:39 PM
If a French plane crashes in Canada, where do you bury the survivors?

KChiefsQT
08-02-2005, 03:39 PM
Possibly NO fatalities.

Where'd u hear this?

Well... the pilot's in the hospital and I pray he survives. I would like to know what the hell happened here before I get on another plane. Is it just me, or do they just seem to "fly" through the emergency procedures now a days. I remember when I used to fly it was a detailed presentation of exits and so fourth. Last week when I was on a plane, it took no longer than 30 seconds. hmmm...

Donger
08-02-2005, 03:40 PM
Airbus planes were some of the first to use fly-by-wire control systems. The flight computer 'interprets' the control inputs of the pilots. There have been a few instances of early Airbuses not 'wanting' to land and basically overiding the pilot inputs. Damn software.

I'd be very surprised if this had anything to do with this accident, however. Probably a mechanical malfunction or weather-related.

Rain Man
08-02-2005, 03:40 PM
As a passenger, it's ****ing loud. Inch-diameter hail sounds like the end of the world.

As a pilot, there's been cases where windshields have cracked and the nose of the plane has actually been so badly damage that the fuselage has been compromised.


Hail is bad, but geese is probably worse.

Pants
08-02-2005, 03:41 PM
Where'd u hear this?

Well... the pilot's in the hospital and I pray he survives. I would like to know what the hell happened here before I get on another plane. Is it just me, or do they just seem to "fly" through the emergency procedures now a days. I remember when I used to fly it was a detailed presentation of exits and so fourth. Last week when I was on a plane, it took no longer than 30 seconds. hmmm...

Flying is much safer than driving (cliche, I know). The thing humans have trouble with is having absolutely no control over the sitaution.

tk13
08-02-2005, 03:41 PM
Let me clarify that again... the witness described the engine sound as "backing up". Not the plane itself. I'm not exactly sure what that would sound like, but he meant the engine made a funny noise.

Donger
08-02-2005, 03:42 PM
As a passenger, it's ****ing loud. Inch-diameter hail sounds like the end of the world.

As a pilot, there's been cases where windshields have cracked and the nose of the plane has actually been so badly damage that the fuselage has been compromised.

Not to mention that the shape of the wing is somewhat critical. Having the sh*t smacked out of it and mishaping it is not good for lift.

KChiefsQT
08-02-2005, 03:42 PM
Now a witness says plane was hit by lightning.

Rain Man
08-02-2005, 03:42 PM
If a French plane crashes in Canada, where do you bury the survivors?

It would be rude to bury the survivors.

Pants
08-02-2005, 03:42 PM
Airbus planes were some of the first to use fly-by-wire control systems. The flight computer 'interprets' the control inputs of the pilots. There have been a few instances of early Airbuses not 'wanting' to land and basically overiding the pilot inputs. Damn software.

I'd be very surprised if this had anything to do with this accident, however. Probably a mechanical malfunction or weather-related.

I've always prefered Airbus over Boeing for some reason...

jynni
08-02-2005, 03:43 PM
If a French plane crashes in Canada, where do you bury the survivors?

In the ark that Moses built?

tk13
08-02-2005, 03:43 PM
Now they have somebody on the CBC I believe that claims he saw the plane struck by lightning. Go figure.....

Donger
08-02-2005, 03:43 PM
Let me clarify that again... the witness described the engine sound as "backing up". Not the plane itself. I'm not exactly sure what that would sound like, but he meant the engine made a funny noise.

Sounds like they came in too hot and cranked the reversers longer than usual, trying to stop in time.

Pants
08-02-2005, 03:44 PM
Let me clarify that again... the witness described the engine sound as "backing up". Not the plane itself. I'm not exactly sure what that would sound like, but he meant the engine made a funny noise.

That's the really loud whining noise when the thrust reverseres kick in... I love that sound, heh.

tk13
08-02-2005, 03:44 PM
Check that, this guy on now is a passenger. It's being simulcast on CNN right now.

KChiefsQT
08-02-2005, 03:44 PM
Flying is much safer than driving (cliche, I know). The thing humans have trouble with is having absolutely no control over the sitaution.

Ohhh yeah. I know that... what I was saying is that they should take more time explaining the procedures (and I know it gets old after you hear it for the hundreth time) better.

Passanger who is safe and escaped (2nd one off) says all people around him were running like crazy and he thinks that most people got off...but he can't tell for sure. Says plane was totally full.

Rain Man
08-02-2005, 03:44 PM
I've always prefered Airbus over Boeing for some reason...

What? No Tupolev?

Donger
08-02-2005, 03:45 PM
I've always prefered Airbus over Boeing for some reason...

If it ain't Boeing, I ain't going.

In all honesty, all aircraft have their quirks. 737s had a nasty tendency to have rudder issues a while back.

ChiTown
08-02-2005, 03:45 PM
As a passenger, it's ****ing loud. Inch-diameter hail sounds like the end of the world.

As a pilot, there's been cases where windshields have cracked and the nose of the plane has actually been so badly damage that the fuselage has been compromised.

Yes. I flew into a hail storm going from Vietnam to Beijing. It sounded like a war zone. It was comforting nowing I was on Vietnam Airlines at the time...... :deevee:

KChiefsQT
08-02-2005, 03:46 PM
Now they have somebody on the CBC I believe that claims he saw the plane struck by lightning. Go figure.....
He was on the plane... and said that the lights went off inside the plane as they landed.

Pants
08-02-2005, 03:46 PM
350 people on board? That's no 340. Must be one of those brand new giants.

Donger
08-02-2005, 03:46 PM
Now they have somebody on the CBC I believe that claims he saw the plane struck by lightning. Go figure.....

Hell, the shuttle has been hit by lightning before. It's not that rare, and VERY rarely causes even minimal damage to commercial aircraft.

Donger
08-02-2005, 03:47 PM
350 people on board? That's no 340. Must be one of those brand new giants.

The new bird is still in testing.

Pants
08-02-2005, 03:48 PM
The new bird is still in testing.

Oh really? I thought airlines were already buying them, my bad.

tk13
08-02-2005, 03:49 PM
Hell, the shuttle has been hit by lightning before. It's not that rare, and VERY rarely causes even minimal damage to commercial aircraft.
I'm not sure I'm buying that either. I think that was an assumption made by a reporter when the passengers all say the lights went out on the plane...

Rain Man
08-02-2005, 03:49 PM
When I was in the defense industry, I worked on (more or less) plane crash analysis. My boss at the time was examining in theory a system for passenger planes where, if a crash landing was imminent, the pilot could jettison the wings. Yes, the wings. The theory was that the wings hold most or all of the fuel, so if you can dump them right as you land, you can conceivably get the fuselage past the big fuel explosion.

For some reason, management didn't like the idea from a public relations standpoint - having a wing fall off in midair didn't strike a chord with them - so it wasn't pursued heavily.

KC Kings
08-02-2005, 03:50 PM
Fox news just reported "The plane landed and all emergency exits were opened in time for all passengers to escape unharmed, but as soon as they saw the flames the realized they were in danger and immediately gave up, and waited for somebody to rescue them. "


What do you expect from the passengers of a French Air bus?

Seriously though, yahoo says "AM 680 also said some passengers could be seen climbing from the plane and that emergency workers said most of 252 people on board were safe."
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20050802/ap_on_re_ca/canada_plane_crash

Donger
08-02-2005, 03:50 PM
having a wing fall off in midair didn't strike a chord with them

ROFL

Donger
08-02-2005, 03:51 PM
Oh really? I thought airlines were already buying them, my bad.

Placing orders, yes. Delivery? No, not yet.

Pants
08-02-2005, 03:51 PM
Just looked up the plance capacities, must've been a 340-600. What a huge freaking plane.

ChiTown
08-02-2005, 03:51 PM
They just said that ALL passengers exited alive. Unreal!

Pants
08-02-2005, 03:52 PM
They just said that ALL passengers exited alive. Unreal!

Good shit.

memyselfI
08-02-2005, 03:53 PM
They just said that ALL passengers exited alive. Unreal!

Thank God! :clap:

vailpass
08-02-2005, 03:53 PM
If it ain't Boeing, I ain't going.

In all honesty, all aircraft have their quirks. 737s had a nasty tendency to have rudder issues a while back.

What's good for Boeing is good for America. Still, it's the avionics that count.
Give me Rockwell Collins over Honeywell any day.

KChiefsQT
08-02-2005, 03:53 PM
They just said that ALL passengers exited alive. Unreal!

Thank god.

htismaqe
08-02-2005, 03:55 PM
If it ain't Boeing, I ain't going.

In all honesty, all aircraft have their quirks. 737s had a nasty tendency to have rudder issues a while back.

And most of these planes little quirks are exacerbated by the airlines tendency to cut corners during maintenance.

I still think back to AA flight 191 out of Chicago where manufacturer specs said specifically to remove the engine and pylon in TWO PIECES and the airline use a forklift to do the whole thing in one piece.

KC Kings
08-02-2005, 03:56 PM
When I was in the defense industry, I worked on (more or less) plane crash analysis. My boss at the time was examining in theory a system for passenger planes where, if a crash landing was imminent, the pilot could jettison the wings. Yes, the wings. The theory was that the wings hold most or all of the fuel, so if you can dump them right as you land, you can conceivably get the fuselage past the big fuel explosion.

For some reason, management didn't like the idea from a public relations standpoint - having a wing fall off in midair didn't strike a chord with them - so it wasn't pursued heavily.

That sounds like a good idea. I wonder how durable quick release wings would be during flight though?

For a school project I invented this anchor device for trains. It takes coal trains up to a mile to stop with the brakes that have now, but if you placed a couple modified anchors along the train that would tear up the existing landscape pretty good, but should stop the train a lot faster.

Damn the management, always holding the man down.

Rain Man
08-02-2005, 06:07 PM
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/8801092/page/2/

The above article narrows the causes down to either lightning strikes, bad weather, pilot error, an engine problem, a power failure, rampaging kittens, or aliens.

Michael Michigan
08-02-2005, 06:35 PM
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/8801092/page/2/

The above article narrows the causes down to either lightning strikes, bad weather, pilot error, an engine problem, a power failure, rampaging kittens, or aliens.

I'll take aliens for $500 Alex.

OldTownChief
08-02-2005, 06:52 PM
That sounds like a good idea. I wonder how durable quick release wings would be during flight though?

For a school project I invented this anchor device for trains. It takes coal trains up to a mile to stop with the brakes that have now, but if you placed a couple modified anchors along the train that would tear up the existing landscape pretty good, but should stop the train a lot faster.

Damn the management, always holding the man down.



ROFL

OldTownChief
08-02-2005, 06:55 PM
Thank God! :clap:

I find it very hard to believe that you actually mean that.

memyselfI
08-02-2005, 08:24 PM
I find it very hard to believe that you actually mean that.

Why?

Because I used the word God?

I believe in God. I don't believe in organized religion.

OldTownChief
08-02-2005, 08:31 PM
Why?

Because I used the word God?

I believe in God. I don't believe in organized religion.

I just feel you would have been much more excited if this could have ended in someone's tragedy. Deny it all you want, you don't fool many.

memyselfI
08-02-2005, 08:37 PM
I just feel you would have been much more excited if this could have ended in someone's tragedy. Deny it all you want, you don't fool many.

Think what you want. The scene was horrific. It's a miracle that anyone survived let alone everyone.