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MOhillbilly
08-04-2005, 01:51 PM
http://www.hexedsince1975.com/VintageDogs.html

BIG_DADDY
08-04-2005, 01:55 PM
Cool pics. God bless the bullies.

vailpass
08-04-2005, 01:57 PM
I thought bulldogs looked like this:

MOhillbilly
08-04-2005, 01:59 PM
I thought bulldogs looked like this:

:cuss:

BIG_DADDY
08-04-2005, 02:04 PM
STUBBY, PitBull Terrier, WWI. The most decorated war dog in U.S. history.

chagrin
08-04-2005, 02:53 PM
BD, that's very interesting; what did the dog do for the medals?

vailpass
08-04-2005, 03:02 PM
:cuss:

MO I'm not giving you sh*t. When I think of a bulldog I think of a dog like the one I posted, or like the one in your avatar. Am I wrong?

MOhillbilly
08-04-2005, 03:07 PM
MO I'm not giving you sh*t. When I think of a bulldog I think of a dog like the one I posted, or like the one in your avatar. Am I wrong?

No. but theres lots of bulldog 'types'.
the apbt got hung w/ that name after the split w/ the UKC and bloodlines mag.(UKC didnt want anything to do w/ the combat anymore even though they had sanctioned fight for years-see UKC rules)

old timers and dogmen call the apbt 'bulldogs' cause they see the english bulldog as a bastard show version and a joke and the APBT as the true lineage of "bulldogs of old'

BIG_DADDY
08-04-2005, 03:12 PM
BD, that's very interesting; what did the dog do for the medals?



Sergeant Stubby, Over There!


America's first war dog, Stubby, served 18 months 'over there' and participated in seventeen battles on the Western Front. He saved his regiment from surprise mustard gas attacks, located and comforted the wounded, and even once caught a German spy by the seat of his pants. Back home his exploits were front page news of every major newspaper.

Stubby was a bull terrier - broadly speaking, very broadly! No one ever discovered where he hailed from originaly. One day he just appeared, when a bunch of soldiers were training at Yale Field in New Haven, Ct; he trotted in and out among the ranks as they drilled, stopping to make a friend here and a friend there, until pretty soon he was on chummy terms with the whole bunch.

One soldier though, in particular, developed a fonest for the dog, a Corporal Robert Conroy, who when it became time for the outfit to ship out, hid Stubby on board the troop ship.

So stowaway Stubby sailed for France, after that Cpl. Conroy became his accepted master, even though he was still on chummy terms with every one else in the outfit; and in the same spirit of camarderie that had marked his initial overtures at Yale.

It was at Chemin des Dames that Stubby saw his first action, and it was there that the boys discovered he was a war dog par excellence. The boom of artillery fire didn't faze him in least, and he soon learned to follow the men's example of ducking when the big ones started falling close. Naturally he didn't know why he was ducking, but it became a great game to see who could hit the dugout first. After a few days, Stubby won every time. He could hear the whine of shells long before the men. It got so they'd watch him!

Then one night Stubby made doggy history. It was an unusally quiet night in the trenches. Some of the boys were catching cat naps in muddy dugouts, and Stubby was stretched out beside Conroy. Suddenly his big blunt head snapped up and his ears pricked alert. The movement woke Conroy, who looked at the dog sleepily just in time to see him sniff the air tentatively, utter a low growl, then spring to his feet, and go bounding from the dugout, around a corner out of sight.

Afew seconds later there was a sharp cry of pain and then the sound of a great scuffle outside. Conroy jumped from his bed, grabbed his rifle and went tearing out towards the direction of the noise.

A ludicrous sight met his eyes. Single-pawed, in a vigorous offensive from the rear, Stubby had captured a German spy, who'd been prowling through the trenches. The man was whirling desperately in an effort to shake off the snarling bundle of canine tooth and muscle that had attached itself to his differential. But Stubby was there to stay.

It took only afew moments to capture the Hun and disarm him, but it required considerably more time to convince Stubby that his mission had been successfully carried out and that he should now release the beautiful hold he had on that nice, soft German bottom.

By the end of the war, Stubby was known not only to every regiment, division, and army, but to the whole AEF. Honors by the bale were heaped on his muscled shoulders. At Mandres en Bassigny he was introduced to President Woodrow Wilson, who "shook hands" with him. Medal and emblemed jackets were bestowed upon him for each deed of valor, plus a wound stripe for his grenade splinter. Not to be left out, the Marines even made him an honorary sergeant.

After the Armistice was signed, Stubby returned home with Conroy and his popularity seemed to grow even more. He became a nationally acclaimed hero, and eventually was received by presidents Harding and Coolidge. Even General John "Black Jack" Pershing, who commanded the American Expeditionary Forces during the war, presented Stubby with a gold medal made by the Humane Society and declared him to be a "hero of the highest caliber."

Stubby toured the country by invitation and probably led more parades than any other dog in American history; he was also promoted to honorary sergeant by the Legion, becoming the highest ranking dog to ever serve in the Army.

He was even made an honorary member of the American Red Cross, the American Legion and the YMCA, which issued him a lifetime membership card good for "three bones a day and a place to sleep."


Afterwards, Stubby became Georgetown University's mascot. In 1921, Stubby's owner, Robert Conroy was headed to Georgetown for law school and took the dog along. According to a 1983 account in Georgetown Magazine, Stubby "served several terms as mascot to the football team." Between the halves, Stubby would nudge a football around the field, much to the delight of the crowd.

Old age finally caught up with the small warrior on April 4th, 1926, as he took ill and died in Conroy's arms.

It's said, that Stubby and afew of his friends were instrumental in inspiring the creation of the United States 'K-9 Corps' just in time for World War ll.

BIG_DADDY
08-04-2005, 03:36 PM
Here is an old Colby dog named Bobtail that was rumoured to have won 20 fights.

chagrin
08-04-2005, 03:40 PM
Dude, that's very cool!

vailpass
08-04-2005, 04:13 PM
No. but theres lots of bulldog 'types'.
the apbt got hung w/ that name after the split w/ the UKC and bloodlines mag.(UKC didnt want anything to do w/ the combat anymore even though they had sanctioned fight for years-see UKC rules)

old timers and dogmen call the apbt 'bulldogs' cause they see the english bulldog as a bastard show version and a joke and the APBT as the true lineage of "bulldogs of old'


Thanks for the G2. I see now that I totally insulted you with the english bully pic. Sorry, was completely unintntional :shrug:

Rain Man
08-04-2005, 04:23 PM
Great. I've accomplished less in life than Stubby.

MOhillbilly
08-04-2005, 04:31 PM
Here is an old Colby dog named Bobtail that was rumoured to have won 20 fights.

couple things. consider that the cajun rules and modified cajun rules were presented by gaboon trahan to save dogs and shorten the match and still test gameness.
IMO the fact that he won 20 under UKC rules is amazing.
If you look at the old colby dogs and the colby dogs of today bred tight they look like throwbacks to the old gashouse gang dogs and the tige and cockney charlies Pilot.

If you look at the old pics of the Centepede dog red/red(not OFRN) they look like the hollingsworth-mayday dogs of today - bred tight.

there are exception-take an Eli(black) dog and breed him supertight and youll get a throw back(red/red) but breed him to a black Eli bitch and you could get anything.

the point is GAMEBRED dogs look like & ACT like the dogs of yesteryear while the scatterbred curs that you get in the paper act like.......well curs

Chest Rockwell
08-04-2005, 04:31 PM
Great. I've accomplished less in life than Stubby.

Don't feel bad, who hasn't? Except for possibly Rich Scanlon and Matt Jones, of course.

Seriously though, that was one of the coolest things I've ever read.

Thanks BD.

MOhillbilly
08-04-2005, 04:32 PM
Great. I've accomplished less in life than Stubby.

It said i had to spread it around before i could give it to you again Rain Man.

BIG_DADDY
08-04-2005, 05:12 PM
Don't feel bad, who hasn't? Except for possibly Rich Scanlon and Matt Jones, of course.

Seriously though, that was one of the coolest things I've ever read.

Thanks BD.

It's kind of cool to know there was a time when our media and politicians were not trying to feminize the entire country and there was a bully in the white house instead of being marked for genocide.