PDA

View Full Version : Book Recommendations


Amnorix
08-25-2005, 11:21 AM
I do not recall seeing a general "recommended books" type of thread, and perhaps this should be moved to geeksplanet or something, but I thought it might be reasonable to have recommendations/reviews, etc. in one place for those of us who are book addicts.

See next post for my first recommendation.

ptlyon
08-25-2005, 11:25 AM
Playboy or Hustler always worked for me.

Amnorix
08-25-2005, 11:27 AM
I am currently reading "The Hidden Hand: Britain, America and Cold War Secret Intelligence", and highly recommend it with one strong caveat -- it is NOT what I would call easy or leisurely reading. If you don't have a reasonably high threshold for relatively "dry" reading, then you won't make it past the first 100 pages or so, after which it gets easier (or else I'm getting used to the style).

The book reviews allied intelligence during WWII in order to build the groundwork for post-war intelligence, with a particular focus on England and its intelligence services and relationships with the US. It's hardly as if the US is ignored, but it is given in the context of a UK point of view, in respects.

My main reasons for liking this book:

1. I have learned many fascinating things that simply are not dealt with in anything else I have read. Some came as quite a shock. The biggest of these is that by the end of WWII, 1 out of every 8 members of the German military forces (or maybe it was limited ot the Wehrmacht) was a NON-German. Usually these were Ukrainians.

2. The writer is very intelligent, very well versed in the subject matter, able to give clear insight into myopic topics, and presents all sides of various issues very fairly. He points to strengths and weaknesses for what they are, and isn't afraid to heap praise or criticism, with supporting evidence.

3. He puts EVERYTHING into the context of the developing Cold War (I'm up to the Korean War now). Never are random bits of information simply given without presenting why it matters in the larger context of what the US/UK are struggling with.

In short, if you are a serious history student, in particular relating to 20th century history, I highly recommend it. It gives an excellent backdrop to a number of matters that I've not seen elsewhere.

luv
08-25-2005, 11:29 AM
Anything by Grisham. Even the ones that have been made into movies are A LOT better than the movie for the most part. He's got one called A Painted House. Nothing too exciting or suspenseful, but he is an awesome storyteller. I am currently reading The Chamber, and The Summons is on my bookshelf waiting to be next.

Mr. Laz
08-25-2005, 11:30 AM
DRAGON AND THE GRIFFIN ;)

http://www.pickabook.co.uk/covers/may2004/02FB5D10.JPG







.

Donger
08-25-2005, 11:31 AM
I am currently reading "The Hidden Hand: Britain, America and Cold War Secret Intelligence", and highly recommend it with one strong caveat -- it is NOT what I would call easy or leisurely reading. If you don't have a reasonably high threshold for relatively "dry" reading, then you won't make it past the first 100 pages or so, after which it gets easier (or else I'm getting used to the style).

The book reviews allied intelligence during WWII in order to build the groundwork for post-war intelligence, with a particular focus on England and its intelligence services and relationships with the US. It's hardly as if the US is ignored, but it is given in the context of a UK point of view, in respects.

My main reasons for liking this book:

1. I have learned many fascinating things that simply are not dealt with in anything else I have read. Some came as quite a shock. The biggest of these is that by the end of WWII, 1 out of every 8 members of the German military forces (or maybe it was limited ot the Wehrmacht) was a NON-German. Usually these were Ukrainians.

2. The writer is very intelligent, very well versed in the subject matter, able to give clear insight into myopic topics, and presents all sides of various issues very fairly. He points to strengths and weaknesses for what they are, and isn't afraid to heap praise or criticism, with supporting evidence.

3. He puts EVERYTHING into the context of the developing Cold War (I'm up to the Korean War now). Never are random bits of information simply given without presenting why it matters in the larger context of what the US/UK are struggling with.

In short, if you are a serious history student, in particular relating to 20th century history, I highly recommend it. It gives an excellent backdrop to a number of matters that I've not seen elsewhere.

Noooooooo!

Amnorix
08-25-2005, 11:38 AM
Noooooooo!


Interesting. I debated between sending you a PM, cuz I figured this was right up your alley, and starting a general thread. I opted for the latter, obviously.

What causes your reaction? You read the book and hated it?

Amnorix
08-25-2005, 11:39 AM
DRAGON AND THE GRIFFIN ;)




Laz -- I find your new avatar, uhh...., disturbing... :D :Lin: :spock:

Amnorix
08-25-2005, 11:40 AM
General note -- anyone interested in murder/mystery type books would do very well with Caleb Carr's "The Alienist". Just a wee bit on the gruesome side, but a very good read.

Donger
08-25-2005, 11:43 AM
Interesting. I debated between sending you a PM, cuz I figured this was right up your alley, and starting a general thread. I opted for the latter, obviously.

What causes your reaction? You read the book and hated it?

Basically just my ongoing love/hate of history tomes.

No, I've not read it, but I will pick up a copy since I've been traveling a lot recently. Sounds right up my alley, and it sure beats watching TV in the hotel room!

Thanks for the heads-up.

Count Zarth
08-25-2005, 11:44 AM
Anything by James Rollins.

Saulbadguy
08-25-2005, 11:45 AM
'Rix...if you like World War II stories and the like, try the book "Without Vodka"

http://www.withoutvodka.com/

Its a recollection of the life of a young polish boy who grows up in WWII-era Poland and Russia.

WisChief
08-25-2005, 11:47 AM
I'm always reading something - mostly for entertainment, but this one is about food/nutrition and he's not trying to sell anything. Very practical and useful.

"SuperFoods Rx"
Steven Pratt, M.D

"SuperFoods Rx is based on a simple but profound premise: some foods are dramatically better than others for our health and longevity.
Sure, everyone knows that an apple is a better snack than potato chips, but do you know that a daily handful of walnuts or a bowl of blueberries can actually improve your well-being and longevity?

Steven Pratt, M.D., witnessed the positive results that occurred when his patients with age-related macular degeneration changed their diets to include certain powerhouse foods -- those he has identified as SuperFoods. Backed by proven research on fourteen of the most nutrient-dense foods, this book puts these tools in your hands, and on your plate, to give you more energy, greater protection against disease, and a healthy lifestyle now and for the future.

Whether you're 63 or 23, now is the right time to start eating the SuperFoods way. By making these foods part of your regular eating habits, you can actually change the course of your biochemistry and stop the incremental changes in your body that lead to diseases such as type II diabetes, hypertension, certain cancers, obesity, and Alzheimer's.

What are the fourteen SuperFoods? Many may already be part of your daily meals, while some may make occasional appearances. But all are supermarket-friendly nutrition powerhouses:

Beans • Blueberries • Broccoli • Oats •
Oranges • Pumpkin • Salmon • Soy • Spinach •
Tea -- green or black • Tomatoes • Turkey • Walnuts • Yogurt

"SuperFoods Rx not only outlines the amazing health benefits of these fourteen foods, it also includes delicious recipes, kitchen tips, andshopping suggestions that will make the SuperFoods lifestyle simple and irresistible.

Don't like tomatoes? Not to worry; almost all of the SuperFoods have sidekicks -- or substitutions -- that you can enjoy instead. Have some lycopene-rich red watermelon or pink grapefruit instead of tomatoes. Can't bear the thought of spinach? Choose from a list of other dark leafy greens, romaine lettuce, or orange bell peppers.

In "SuperFoods Rx, Dr. Pratt leads you from the twentieth-century world of macronutrients -- proteins, fats, and carbohydrates -- into the twenty-first-century world of micronutrients -- phytonutrients, carotenoids, and antioxidants. You'll find:

Individual chapters dedicated to each of the fourteen SuperFoods, with the health benefits for each outlined and supported by Dr. Pratt's research, along with ideas for simple ways to get more of these foods into your everyday meals.

Fifty original recipes featuring SuperFoods, especially developed by Chef Michel Stroot of the world-renowned Golden Door Spa.

A shopping list of brand-name foods to ensure you're buying the most nutrient-dense SuperFoods available.

Guidelines for formulating your daily nutrient goals and supplement recommendations.

With Dr. Pratt to guide you through the new nutritional frontier, you will be able to choose and enjoy the foods that are most beneficial to your health, well-being, and longevity.

NewChief
08-25-2005, 11:48 AM
This gives me another idea, to raise money for CP, might be to start one of those amazon bookstore things where we can recommend books, people buy them through the bookstore, and the Planet gets a percentage of the sells.

I haven't been reading much lately. I read the first two books in the Baroque Cycle by Neal Stephenson recently, and love them. I'm waiting for the third one to get checked back into the library.

Here's the review for Quicksilver from amazon:

In Quicksilver, the first volume of the "Baroque Cycle," Neal Stephenson launches his most ambitious work to date. The novel, divided into three books, opens in 1713 with the ageless Enoch Root seeking Daniel Waterhouse on the campus of what passes for MIT in eighteenth-century Massachusetts. Daniel, Enoch's message conveys, is key to resolving an explosive scientific battle of preeminence between Isaac Newton and Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz over the development of calculus. As Daniel returns to London aboard the Minerva, readers are catapulted back half a century to recall his years at Cambridge with young Isaac. Daniel is a perfect historical witness. Privy to Robert Hooke's early drawings of microscope images and with associates among the English nobility, religious radicals, and the Royal Society, he also befriends Samuel Pepys, risks a cup of coffee, and enjoys a lecture on Belgian waffles and cleavage-—all before the year 1700.
In the second book, Stephenson introduces Jack Shaftoe and Eliza. "Half-Cocked" Jack (also know as the "King of the Vagabonds") recovers the English Eliza from a Turkish harem. Fleeing the siege of Vienna, the two journey across Europe driven by Eliza's lust for fame, fortune, and nobility. Gradually, their circle intertwines with that of Daniel in the third book of the novel.

The book courses with Stephenson's scholarship but is rarely bogged down in its historical detail. Stephenson is especially impressive in his ability to represent dialogue over the evolving worldview of seventeenth-century scientists and enliven the most abstruse explanation of theory. Though replete with science, the novel is as much about the complex struggles for political ascendancy and the workings of financial markets. Further, the novel's literary ambitions match its physical size. Stephenson narrates through epistolary chapters, fragments of plays and poems, journal entries, maps, drawings, genealogic tables, and copious contemporary epigrams. But, caught in this richness, the prose is occasionally neglected and wants editing. Further, anticipating a cycle, the book does not provide a satisfying conclusion to its 900 pages. These are minor quibbles, though. Stephenson has matched ambition to execution, and his faithful, durable readers will be both entertained and richly rewarded with a practicum in Baroque science, cypher, culture, and politics. --Patrick O'Kelley--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

ptlyon
08-25-2005, 12:09 PM
This gives me another idea, to raise money for CP, might be to start one of those amazon bookstore things where we can recommend books, people buy them through the bookstore, and the Planet gets a percentage of the sells.


Out****ingstanding. We can all have book review parties with Biff and Tad and drink sherry and wine and maybe knit later.

That being said, that's a good idea.

MOhillbilly
08-25-2005, 12:12 PM
http://www.charlesbukowski.20m.com/home.html

Ham on Rye is where id start,you will never look at the world in the same light.

WisChief
08-25-2005, 12:14 PM
Fly Boys - James Bradley

I just finished this one and mostly enjoyed it. This review pretty much sums up how I feel. Good read.

From Publishers Weekly
The author of Flags of Our Fathers achieves considerable but not equal success in this new Pacific War-themed history. Again he approaches the conflict focused on a small group of men: nine American Navy and Marine aviators who were shot down off the Japanese-held island of Chichi Jima in February 1945. All of them were eventually executed by the Japanese; several of the guilty parties were tried and condemned as war criminals. When the book keeps its eye on the aviators-growing up under a variety of conditions before the war, entering service, serving as the U. S. Navy's spearhead aboard the fast carriers, or facing captivity and death-it is as compelling as its predecessor. However, a chapter on prewar aviation is an uncritical panegyric to WWI aerial bombing advocate Billy Mitchell, who was eventually court-martialed for criticizing armed forces brass. More problematic is that Bradley tries to encompass not only the whole history of the Pacific War, but the whole history of the cultures of the two opposing countries that led to the racial attitudes which both sides brought to the war. Those attitudes, Bradley argues, played a large role in the brutal training of the Japanese army, which led to atrocities that in turn sharpened already keen American hostility. Some readers' hackles will rise at the discussion of the guilt of both sides, but, despite some missteps, Bradley attempts to strike an informed balance with the perspective of more than half a century.

StcChief
08-25-2005, 12:16 PM
I vote put it as a 'folder area' like pictures, DC, etc.

Rain Man
08-25-2005, 12:16 PM
I usually read nonfiction, but I read a novel a little while back that I really liked. "You Shall Know Our Velocity", by David Eggers (sp?), is about a screwed-up guy who decides to travel around the world giving away some money that he got in a windfall. It's very well-written and clever.

Count Zarth
08-25-2005, 12:19 PM
I usually read nonfiction, but I read a novel a little while back that I really liked. "You Shall Know Our Velocity", by David Eggers (sp?), is about a screwed-up guy who decides to travel around the world giving away some money that he got in a windfall. It's very well-written and clever.

Where can I buy your novel, Kevin?

ptlyon
08-25-2005, 12:20 PM
Where can I buy your novel, Kevin?

Kiss @$$

Bowser
08-25-2005, 12:21 PM
Is anybody reading Dean Koontz's "Frankenstein" series? I like his work, and was wondering if it is worthy of being picked up.

ptlyon
08-25-2005, 12:24 PM
I like his work, and was wondering if it is worthy of being picked up.

As worthy as picking up a $2 wh0re!!!!!!!!!11111111oneoneoneone

Bowser
08-25-2005, 12:26 PM
As worthy as picking up a $2 wh0re!!!!!!!!!11111111oneoneoneone

Does said whore have false teeth?

Count Zarth
08-25-2005, 12:27 PM
As worthy as picking up a $2 wh0re!!!!!!!!!11111111oneoneoneone

WHORES WHORES WHORES WHORES WHORES WHORES WHORES WHORES WHORES WHORES WHORES WHORES!

Calcountry
08-25-2005, 12:27 PM
"Moneyball" by Michael Lewis.

Oh by the way, the A's are pounding the Tigers right now 9-0. The bats are awake again. :)

Rain Man
08-25-2005, 12:35 PM
Where can I buy your novel, Kevin?


Thanks for blowing my cover.


Seriously, this novel is the novel I'd like to write. It's great.*




* Okay, there's a part in the middle that's bad, depending on which version you buy. In an odd situation, there are two versions of the book. The first version is shorter and is what the publishing company wanted to publish. The second version (which I read) has about another 30 pages added to the middle of the book at the author's request, which massively changes the book. It's interesting in concept, but the writing is boring, and the publishing company's version is more entertaining, albeit slightly less thought-provoking.

Frosty
08-25-2005, 12:51 PM
Is anybody reading Dean Koontz's "Frankenstein" series? I like his work, and was wondering if it is worthy of being picked up.

I used to read his stuff, until about the mid-'90s, when it seemed like suddenly everything he did sucked.

On a whim, I picked up the book he put out last year, The Taking , at a used book store. I'm in the middle of it right now and have been pleasantly surprised. I moght have to check out his new stuff.

AZORChiefFan
08-25-2005, 01:13 PM
I am currently reading "A Confederacy of Dunces". Very funny and well written though the protagonist in the book is a bit hard to like. The author John Kennedy Toole's commited suicide a few years after trying to get it published. His mom kept showing it around and finally got it published. I believe it won a pulitzer?? If you like to read about a miserable, lying, egocentric, hypochondriac fat guy that live with their mom I this is the book for you.

chappy
08-25-2005, 01:14 PM
Best books ever!!!!

Choke - Chuck Palahniuk <~~~~best book i ever read

Illusions - Richard Bach

breakfast of champions - Kurt Vonnegut

i recommend reading anything by Chuck Palahniuk

he is who wrote Fight Club the book puts the movie to shame

Frazod
08-25-2005, 01:16 PM
The last book I read was David McCullough's 1776. Great read if you like history.

Amnorix
08-25-2005, 01:41 PM
The last book I read was David McCullough's 1776. Great read if you like history.

Yes, very good book. Easy read, easy to relate too, etc. Definitely recommend just about anything by McCullough.

bgguitarman
08-25-2005, 02:10 PM
Anything by Dan Brown...including The DaVinci Code

Miles
08-25-2005, 03:48 PM
"Moneyball" by Michael Lewis.

Oh by the way, the A's are pounding the Tigers right now 9-0. The bats are awake again. :)

Just finished reading Moneyball. It was a really enjoyable read and had some great humor.

Bowser
08-25-2005, 03:52 PM
Anything by Dan Brown...including The DaVinci Code

I also enjoyed Deception Point, except for the love story he forced into it. You could say the same for the DaVinci Code, as well.

Miles
08-25-2005, 04:00 PM
"Armageddon: The Battle for Germany" - Max Hastings

Great book covering the last year of WWII from the point of viewpoint of the US, Russia and Germany. It reads fairly quick for a nonfiction history book.

I have also been reading some stuff by Tom Robbins. His humor and style is kind of similar to Vonnegut and Joseph Heller but it reads more fluidly. The last I read, "Jitterbug Perfume" was very good.

chief52
08-25-2005, 04:03 PM
Rammer Jammer Yellow Hammer by Warren St. John

St. John sets out to find out what it is that makes fans so fanatical. He joins in the RV community that follows the Alabama Crimson Tide to every game and documents the season...from the tail gate end. While it is a football related book, it is not a football book. Very little of the story takes place on the field and even then only to show how the fans react. It is very humerous, entertaining and thought provoking all at the same time.

What is it that makes fans do what they do?

Bowser
08-25-2005, 04:09 PM
I'm reading Michael Crichton's Timeline right now. My interest is kind of waning in it. I have a book waiting in the wings called Raising Atlantis by Thomas Greanias. Apparently, this is his first book. If Timeline doesn't pick up, I might have to give Atlantis a try.

Hydrae
08-25-2005, 05:19 PM
Timeline is probably my favorite Crichton of all time. It does get a little slow but the story concept itself is great.

I recently finished the first of Koontz's Frankenstien stories. Very interesting and a much different look at an old story. If you liked Koontz in the past (I agree, I quit reading him for several years, he couldn't finish a book decently to save his life!), I think it is time to try him again. He seems to have been learning from his mistakes.

I have been enjoying Robert Parker lately. He wrote the Spenser stories. Yes, the ones that lead to the television show. Not exactly deep books but okay mysteries and a very fun main character.

JOhn
08-25-2005, 05:28 PM
I am currently reading "The Hidden Hand: Britain, America and Cold War Secret Intelligence", and highly recommend it with one strong caveat -- it is NOT what I would call easy or leisurely reading. If you don't have a reasonably high threshold for relatively "dry" reading, then you won't make it past the first 100 pages or so, after which it gets easier (or else I'm getting used to the style).

The book reviews allied intelligence during WWII in order to build the groundwork for post-war intelligence, with a particular focus on England and its intelligence services and relationships with the US. It's hardly as if the US is ignored, but it is given in the context of a UK point of view, in respects.

My main reasons for liking this book:

1. I have learned many fascinating things that simply are not dealt with in anything else I have read. Some came as quite a shock. The biggest of these is that by the end of WWII, 1 out of every 8 members of the German military forces (or maybe it was limited ot the Wehrmacht) was a NON-German. Usually these were Ukrainians.

2. The writer is very intelligent, very well versed in the subject matter, able to give clear insight into myopic topics, and presents all sides of various issues very fairly. He points to strengths and weaknesses for what they are, and isn't afraid to heap praise or criticism, with supporting evidence.

3. He puts EVERYTHING into the context of the developing Cold War (I'm up to the Korean War now). Never are random bits of information simply given without presenting why it matters in the larger context of what the US/UK are struggling with.

In short, if you are a serious history student, in particular relating to 20th century history, I highly recommend it. It gives an excellent backdrop to a number of matters that I've not seen elsewhere.
Sounds good, will look for it next payday. :thumb:

JOhn
08-25-2005, 05:32 PM
Just re-read The Last Citadel, by David L. Robbins. Really good book about the Battle of Kursk. It's a fictionalized account of the battle from the both the German & Russian points of View. It's historically accurate and very engrossing.

Baby Lee
08-25-2005, 06:04 PM
I usually read nonfiction, but I read a novel a little while back that I really liked. "You Shall Know Our Velocity", by David Eggers (sp?), is about a screwed-up guy who decides to travel around the world giving away some money that he got in a windfall. It's very well-written and clever.
Did you read 'A heartbreaking work of staggering genius?' His first novel. Pulitzer finalist. Very Joyceian stream of consciousness, but Gen-X-ified, if you will.

Baby Lee
08-25-2005, 06:07 PM
Best books ever!!!!

Choke - Chuck Palahniuk <~~~~best book i ever read

Illusions - Richard Bach

breakfast of champions - Kurt Vonnegut

i recommend reading anything by Chuck Palahniuk

he is who wrote Fight Club the book puts the movie to shame
Love Chuck!!! But I hate how even his paperbacks are the oversized type that runs $15. Then I found warezed e-books on Limewire. :thumb:

I've read Fight Club, Survivor, Guts, and Diary.

Ari Chi3fs
08-25-2005, 06:12 PM
Thanks for blowing my cover.


Seriously, this novel is the novel I'd like to write. It's great.*




* Okay, there's a part in the middle that's bad, depending on which version you buy. In an odd situation, there are two versions of the book. The first version is shorter and is what the publishing company wanted to publish. The second version (which I read) has about another 30 pages added to the middle of the book at the author's request, which massively changes the book. It's interesting in concept, but the writing is boring, and the publishing company's version is more entertaining, albeit slightly less thought-provoking.


in 14 posts you will have 33,333 that will be a special day.

Ari Chi3fs
08-25-2005, 06:23 PM
I recently read Illusions by Richard Bach which was very deep and incredible.

I am reading 'Urban Shaman' by Serge Kahili King currently, which describes how shamans interpret what happens in 'reality' as a dream, and how the dream world symbols are used as a guide to help interpret your reality. It dives into the ancient Polynesian science of Huna, which is very intriguing to me.

I recently read Power vs. Force: The Hidden Determinants of Human Behavior
by David R. Hawkins, which was mind blowing.

A book called 'The Kundalini Yoga Experience' arrived yesterday, which has some great yoga poses that are simple for easy meditations... I did 30 minutes worth last night. Very worthwhile.

I have a few others that I havent been able to read yet.

Secret Science Behind Miracles by Max Freedom Long [ also about Huna ]

Reverse Aging by Sang Whang

Wisdom of the Mystic Masters, by Joseph J Weed - which displays a bunch of esoteric information that the Rosicrucians have used for centuries.

As you can see by the books Im reading, Im searching for deeper shit. Knowledge and enlightenment fuel my existence.

WisChief
08-25-2005, 06:31 PM
As you can see by the books Im reading, Im searching for deeper shit. Knowledge and enlightenment fuel my existence.

Have you read any Thich Nhat Hanh? VERY deep stuff. He's a Buddhist Monk who has written many many self awareness and "growth" books.

This really isn't so much my "thing" but since I'm going thru a divorce right now and the main issue is my inability to deal with ANGER :cuss: a friend of mine bought me one of his books.

"Anger - Wisdom for Cooling the Flames"

I'm struggling thru it, but I'm trying to give it a chance. We'll see...

Baby Lee
08-25-2005, 06:37 PM
Have you read any Thich Nhat Hanh?
No, but his crotch is good friends with Hiss Raht Hanh.

WisChief
08-25-2005, 06:44 PM
No, but his crotch is good friends with Hiss Raht Hanh.

Cool - nice to meet you Hiss Raht Hanh.

:p

Amnorix
08-25-2005, 06:46 PM
I'm reading Michael Crichton's Timeline right now. My interest is kind of waning in it. I have a book waiting in the wings called Raising Atlantis by Thomas Greanias. Apparently, this is his first book. If Timeline doesn't pick up, I might have to give Atlantis a try.

Never heard of any of these. I have read a fair number o fhis books, however, and found them all enjoyable.

Ari Chi3fs
08-25-2005, 06:49 PM
Have you read any Thich Nhat Hanh? VERY deep stuff. He's a Buddhist Monk who has written many many self awareness and "growth" books.

This really isn't so much my "thing" but since I'm going thru a divorce right now and the main issue is my inability to deal with ANGER :cuss: a friend of mine bought me one of his books.

"Anger - Wisdom for Cooling the Flames"

I'm struggling thru it, but I'm trying to give it a chance. We'll see...

Sorry to hear about your divorce, but remember this, 'It is all working out perfectly.' It may not seem like it right now, but it truly is. Work out the anger and be thankful that she is out of your life, as you are on to better things.

wow. sounds interesting.

The Miracle of Mindfulness (Paperback)
by Thich Nhat Hanh 5 stars from 19 reviews.

Baby Lee
08-25-2005, 06:49 PM
I'm reading Michael Crichton's Timeline right now. My interest is kind of waning in it.
Having read all his books, Timeline and Prey sit at the bottom of the list. But I was heartened that his most recent [name escapes me, about PR people, activists and attorneys conspiring to spark panic about climate change] was a welcome return to form.

EDIT: State of Fear (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0066214130/qid=1125017444/sr=8-1/ref=pd_bbs_1/002-6274468-3916023?v=glance&s=books&n=507846)

Ari Chi3fs
08-25-2005, 06:50 PM
No, but his crotch is good friends with Hiss Raht Hanh.

Nice.

WisChief
08-25-2005, 06:54 PM
Sorry to hear about your divorce, but remember this, 'It is all working out perfectly.' It may not seem like it right now, but it truly is. Work out the anger and be thankful that she is out of your life, as you are on to better things.

wow. sounds interesting.

The Miracle of Mindfulness (Paperback)
by Thich Nhat Hanh 5 stars from 19 reviews.


Thanks - it REALLY is tough right now. I didn't want this and that is tough - ya know - that whole rejection thing, but the absolute worse is not having my sons here every single day. They're 4 hours away and every other weekend really sucks. For them, I do realize that not seeing me and their mom arguing more than hugging is better - but I really miss 'em.

Ari Chi3fs
08-25-2005, 07:00 PM
Thanks - it REALLY is tough right now. I didn't want this and that is tough - ya know - that whole rejection thing, but the absolute worse is not having my sons here every single day. They're 4 hours away and every other weekend really sucks. For them, I do realize that not seeing me and their mom arguing more than hugging is better - but I really miss 'em.

Is your getting custody a possibility? If she shit the bed on you, then it is your right as a father to get custody... go for it.

But regardless, choose to be happy. Being angry will only age you and make you ill.

Keep in good contact with them, and show them how much you care, whenever you can. When they get older they will understand that mom was a bizzle, and may be mad at her for destroying the family.

WisChief
08-25-2005, 07:04 PM
Is your getting custody a possibility? If she shit the bed on you, then it is your right as a father to get custody... go for it.

But regardless, choose to be happy. Being angry will only age you and make you ill.

Keep in good contact with them, and show them how much you care, whenever you can. When they get older they will understand that mom was a bizzle, and may be mad at her for destroying the family.

:shrug: She's a wonderful mother and actually is a much better wife than I a husband.

Trust me though - I have moments where I think about wanting to tell 'em some day she did all this - but I just don't feel like that would accomplish much. nomesane?

Anyway - the CHIEFS are back and that will get me thru 5 more months! :D

Baby Lee
08-25-2005, 07:06 PM
Jaysus!!!

Start a book club, and the estrogen just FLOWS!!!

WisChief
08-25-2005, 07:09 PM
Jaysus!!!

Start a book club, and the estrogen just FLOWS!!!


ROFL



:deevee:



:D



Not far from how my days go!!! :p

mikey23545
08-25-2005, 08:01 PM
Never heard of any of these. I have read a fair number o fhis books, however, and found them all enjoyable.

Recently read Crichton's "Prey"...I would recommend it highly because of the way I was transfixed through all but the last couple of chapters...Then, right at the end, it kinda sagged...Still in all a riveting read...

BigOlChiefsfan
08-25-2005, 08:02 PM
"The Last Good Kiss", "The Wrong Case" & "Dancing Bear" by James Crumley
"Give Us A Kiss" & "Tomato Red" by Daniel Woodrell (a local boy, went to KU)
"Blood Meridian" - Cormac McCarthy
"Gates of Fire" - Steven Pressfield
"Death Angel's Shadow" & "Night Winds" - Karl Edward Wagner
"Latro in the Mist" "The Wizard Knight" - Gene Wolfe

jspchief
08-25-2005, 08:27 PM
I'm in the middle of the Aubrey Maturin series by Patrick O'Brien, which inspired the movie Master & Commander, Far Side of the World.

The first book is Master and Commander. The series basically follows the British royal navy career of Captain Jack Aubrey, and his friendship with scholar Stephen Maturin. They are short books, but the first one will read slow because there is so much nautical terminology. After a while, you learn to skim through whatever terminology you don't understand.

Great reads that center around the naval wars between the British, French, and Spanish during the Napoleonic era.

I've taken a break from reading due to my busy summer, but when I start up again, Ill have a hard time putting these books down.

Logical
08-25-2005, 08:41 PM
Anything by Dan Brown...including The DaVinci CodeI just got around to reading the DaVinci Code it was really excellent. I will check out some of his other works now.

BigOlChiefsfan
08-25-2005, 08:41 PM
They are short books, but the first one will read slow because there is so much nautical terminology. After a while, you learn to skim through whatever terminology you don't understand.

Yez may find this useful...


http://www.io.com/gibbonsb/pob/

http://www.patrickobrian.com/

http://www.hmssurprise.org/

http://mat.tepper.cmu.edu/POB/

jspchief
08-25-2005, 08:58 PM
Yez may find this useful...


http://www.io.com/gibbonsb/pob/

http://www.patrickobrian.com/

http://www.hmssurprise.org/

http://mat.tepper.cmu.edu/POB/


Actually, what I've learned is that it's not imperative to know the exact location of the jib sail to enjoy the book. You begin to understand a lot of the terminology as you read more, but there's ton of detail about these old ships that while adding color to the writing, is not terribly important to the story.

ChiefsFanatic
08-25-2005, 09:39 PM
General note -- anyone interested in murder/mystery type books would do very well with Caleb Carr's "The Alienist". Just a wee bit on the gruesome side, but a very good read.

I liked that book very much. I recently finished reading The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova.
The Historian (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0316011770/qid=1125027137/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/102-2521570-3100120?v=glance&s=books) It was one of those books that you just can't put down because you have to see what happens next. It is about vampires, but the real story is the mystery.

If you like The Alienist, you will like this book. Do yourself a favor and read it.

I read a book about every week, anything from McCollough (John Adams, 1776) to Stephen King (currently reading the unedited version of The Stand)

I could give endless recommendations. Just give me a genre.

chappy
08-25-2005, 11:59 PM
Baby Lee you got to read Choke by chuck it is his best

Ali Chief you should read 'Conversations With God book 1,2, and 3' by Neale Donald Walsch
and
'The Four Agreements' by Don Miguel Ruiz
if you like the deep and mindful stuff

Mr. Flopnuts
08-26-2005, 12:19 AM
I don't know if it's been mentioned I didn't read through the thread. However I recently finished Parts I and II of Shogun by James Clavell (sp?) and thought it was brilliant. It is a long book, but well worth it. I couldn't put it down after about 50 pages.

NewChief
08-26-2005, 10:00 PM
Forgot to mention it earlier, but I did read a few decent things this summer:

The New New Journalism (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/140003356X/102-3258614-7548136?v=glance) by Robert Boynton.
This contains some great interviews and summaries of what this author calls New New Journalists. People like Schlosser, Conover, LeBlanc, etc. who go out and submerge themselves in their subject. This book led me to read...

Newjack (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0375726624/qid=1125114902/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/102-3258614-7548136?v=glance&s=books) by Ted Conover
This guy wanted to write about the New York Dept. of Corrections training Academy. They didn't want him to do it, so he enrolled in the Academy and became a guard for a year at Sing Sing. These are his writings from that year as a guard. Highly intriguing stuff. This, then, led me to read...

Cold New World (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0375753826/qid=1125115002/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/102-3258614-7548136?v=glance&s=books) by William Finnegan.
This books is about disaffected youth in four very different towns. From urban gangsters in Conn. to rural crackheads in Texas to immigrant teens in Oregon to racist skinheads in Cali, he covers the gamut drawing interesting comparisons between the groups and painting a revealing and fascinating portrait into each.

Finally, I hit the infamous Fast Food Nation (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0060938455/qid=1125115137/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/102-3258614-7548136?v=glance&s=books) by Eric Schlosser.
I really loved this book. It has some dull moments, but it is definitely worth the read. You will never look at a Big Mac the same, guaranteed.

So that was pretty much my summer reading list. Enjoy and let me know if you decide to read one of these.

Halfcan
08-26-2005, 11:46 PM
Ghost Rider by Neil Peart. The legendary drummer for Rush writes about losing his 19 year old daughter and then his wife in back to back tragedies. Losing the will to live he jumps on his motorcycle and takes off for 55,000 miles over a year and a half. It is an incredible book of survival and the best travel type book ever.