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jspchief
08-26-2005, 11:00 AM
I just bought a big bag of chinese rice because I like the flavor of the sticky stuff you get in chinese restaurants. The problem is, there are no cooking directions.

Up until now, all I've ever cooked is Minute rice, and I'm pretty sure that method won't work on this stuff.

Anyone know how to cook this stuff?

Phobia
08-26-2005, 11:04 AM
Is is white or brown rice?

Generally you put in a cup to a cup 1/2 for every half cup of rice. Bring the water to a boil. Cover and Reduce it to simmer for 20 minutes for white rice.

Brown hulled rice is double that amount of time.

I usually throw in a splash of olive oil to prevent sticking.

siberian khatru
08-26-2005, 11:05 AM
How to cook rice?


Have Jake Plummer throw to him.

Katipan
08-26-2005, 11:11 AM
Perfect rice.

And I should know. I'm part flip and eat white rice with every meal of the day. :P

Equal cups of rice to water. Plus add a cup of water. Sooo for 2 cups of rice, you put in 3 cups of water.

Heat it all to a low boil, cover and reduce the heat LOW.

Then leave it alone. Don't touch it or stir it or prod it. Just walk away for 20 minutes. It'll come out perfect.

And don't ever pour butter on it. Or my family will cut you.

Frosty
08-26-2005, 11:15 AM
Good Eats recently did an episode on sushi and talked about how to cook the sticky-type rice. It was different from the regular way to cook rice. You might pop over to foodtv.com and check the Good Eats section to see if they have the procedure there

Phobia
08-26-2005, 11:16 AM
Yeah. Listen to Mer. Not me.

jspchief
08-26-2005, 11:18 AM
Perfect rice.

And I should know. I'm part flip and eat white rice with every meal of the day. :P

Equal cups of rice to water. Plus add a cup of water. Sooo for 2 cups of rice, you put in 3 cups of water.

Heat it all to a low boil, cover and reduce the heat LOW.

Then leave it alone. Don't touch it or stir it or prod it. Just walk away for 20 minutes. It'll come out perfect.

And don't ever pour butter on it. Or my family will cut you.Couple questions...

1. Do you presoak it?
2. Do you add the rice to boiling water, or put it all in the pan and let it all heat up at once?

Count Alex's Wins
08-26-2005, 11:19 AM
Important - do NOT take the lid off to "check" it. You will ruin it.

Simplex3
08-26-2005, 11:19 AM
http://www.target.com/gp/search.html/ref=sr_bx_1/601-9738939-3979334?field-keywords=rice+cooker&url=index%3Dtarget&x=0&y=0

Phobia
08-26-2005, 11:21 AM
Couple questions...

1. Do you presoak it?
2. Do you add the rice to boiling water, or put it all in the pan and let it all heat up at once?

I think presoaking it is a preference for some people, but not necessary.
#2 is only important for pasta, where you add it to boiling water. Rice goes in the pot with the cold water.

Why am I still answering?

Otter
08-26-2005, 11:22 AM
Getting hungry for sushi...:drool:

If you eat alot of rice do yourself a favor and buy a rice cooker. http://img.nextag.com/imagefiles/small/000/000/744/087/74408700.jpg

Phobia
08-26-2005, 11:23 AM
Okay, I have an associated question. I prefer the health qualities of brown rice over white. Is there a way to use brown rice to make sushi?

jspchief
08-26-2005, 11:24 AM
http://www.target.com/gp/search.html/ref=sr_bx_1/601-9738939-3979334?field-keywords=rice+cooker&url=index%3Dtarget&x=0&y=0Heh. I've imposed a moratorium on myself in regards to buying kitchen appliances that have a singular purpose. We only have so much cabinet space.

Simplex3
08-26-2005, 11:26 AM
Heh. I've imposed a moratorium on myself in regards to buying kitchen appliances that have a singular purpose. We only have so much cabinet space.
Yeah, a rice cooker is worth it's weight in gold if you're going to eat rice 3 or 4 times a week like I do.

Simplex3
08-26-2005, 11:28 AM
Okay, I have an associated question. I prefer the health qualities of brown rice over white. Is there a way to use brown rice to make sushi?
Odds are you can't get brown rice here that is any healthier than the white. Something to do with length it can be stored or something. I'd have to ask that Japanese guy again, but he's in Japan and I'm not.

Katipan
08-26-2005, 11:33 AM
I think presoaking it is a preference for some people, but not necessary.
#2 is only important for pasta, where you add it to boiling water. Rice goes in the pot with the cold water.

Why am I still answering?

listen to Phobia :D

Personally, I think bringing the water up to a boil with the rice helps reduce the simmering time. But it's totally a preference thing.

Otter
08-26-2005, 11:36 AM
Since we're on the subject...

Anyone make their own sushi? Not a cucumber roll but raw salmon or somthing of that nature.

If so, where did you get the fish cuts from? I'd have a real hard time heading down to the local Giant and making sushi out of what I bought there.

DaneMcCloud
08-26-2005, 11:39 AM
My wife is Asian and I too always wondered how the rice in Asian restaurants was prepared. The answer is simple: Asian rice and a rice cooker. I think you can buy a Salton rice cooker for about $15.

Put the rice in the metal bowl, and fill the rest with water and put on the lid. Gently swish the rice around to remove the excess starch and drain (that can be done by hand as well). Put the metal bowl with the lid on in the rice cooker. 15 mintues later, perfect rice!

Brown rice is better for your digestive system and less starchy than white rice (especially if you're watching your weight). If you really want to get adventurous, fry a couple eggs, cut 3 or 4 green onions and throw that and the rice into a good sized pot with about a 3/4 cup of Lo Sodium Soy sauce. Cook for about 15-20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Fried rice at home!

Dane

Katipan
08-26-2005, 11:42 AM
Since we're on the subject...

Anyone make their own sushi? Not a cucumber roll but raw salmon or somthing of that nature.

If so, where did you get the fish cuts from? I'd have a real hard time heading down to the local Giant and making sushi out of what I bought there.

I used to in CA. :( I don't trust the fish that has to be shipped anywhere. At least, not the fish I can afford to buy. :D

Best tip I guess is that sushi should never smell like fish. In fact, it shouldn't have much smell at all except for what you add to it.

Fish that smells is already too old.

If you're getting whole fish, look for clear eyes.

Phobia
08-26-2005, 11:46 AM
Brown rice is better for your digestive system and less starchy than white rice (especially if you're watching your weight). If you really want to get adventurous, fry a couple eggs, cut 3 or 4 green onions and throw that and the rice into a good sized pot with about a 3/4 cup of Lo Sodium Soy sauce. Cook for about 15-20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Fried rice at home!

Well, it's not quite that simple.... Heh heh. I make fried rice sometimes. In fact, I make fried rice with a Tex-Mex twist. I think it's pretty darn good.

KCFalcon59
08-26-2005, 11:51 AM
I like to go to the asian grocery nearby. I buy these dried fish flakes. I sprinkle them on the hot rice with some soy sauce. mmm good.

DaneMcCloud
08-26-2005, 12:05 PM
Hey Phobia

You might be right about the fried rice part. My wife usually only makes it as drunk food at 2:00 in the morning. What seems like 15-20 minutes to me may in fact be much longer!

Dane

Phobia
08-26-2005, 12:09 PM
Well, as long as the rice is prepared, the 15-20 minutes part is accurate. My point is that it's not quite as simple as throwing all those ingredients in a pan. Heh heh.

For instance, the green onion only goes on just before the rice is served. The egg goes in after the rice as been frying a couple minutes. Depending on your choice of meat and veggies, there are specific times to throw that into the mix as well.

Frosty
08-26-2005, 01:25 PM
I don't think you can use brown rice for sushi because you need the higher starch content for the sticky rice. Non-sticky rice will just fall apart.

Here's the recipe from Good Eats:

Sushi Rice

2 cups sushi or short grain rice
2 cups water, plus extra for rinsing rice
2 tablespoons rice vinegar
2 tablespoons sugar
1 tablespoon kosher salt

Place the rice into a mixing bowl and cover with cool water. Swirl the rice in the water, pour off and repeat 2 to 3 times or until the water is clear.

Place the rice and 2 cups of water into a medium saucepan and place over high heat. Bring to a boil, uncovered. Once it begins to boil, reduce the heat to the lowest setting and cover. Cook for 15 minutes. Remove from the heat and let stand, covered, for 10 minutes.

Combine the rice vinegar, sugar and salt in a small bowl and heat in the microwave on high for 30 to 45 seconds. Transfer the rice into a large wooden or glass mixing bowl and add the vinegar mixture. Fold thoroughly to combine and coat each grain of rice with the mixture. Allow to cool to room temperature before using to make sushi or sashimi.

Goapics1
08-26-2005, 01:32 PM
We bake white rice 2-3 times a week. Very simple.

Set oven at 350
3/4 cup rice
1 1/2 cup hot water
1 tablespoon butter (optional)

bake for 30-35 minutes, stir before serving.

Katipan
08-26-2005, 01:34 PM
We bake white rice 2-3 times a week. Very simple.

Set oven at 350
3/4 cup rice
1 1/2 cup hot water
1 tablespoon butter (optional)

bake for 30-35 minutes, stir before serving.

thats a horrible thing to tell people

Goapics1
08-26-2005, 01:37 PM
thats a horrible thing to tell people
Why?

Otter
08-26-2005, 01:39 PM
I used to in CA. :( I don't trust the fish that has to be shipped anywhere. At least, not the fish I can afford to buy. :D

Best tip I guess is that sushi should never smell like fish. In fact, it shouldn't have much smell at all except for what you add to it.

Fish that smells is already too old.

If you're getting whole fish, look for clear eyes.

Thanks.

I think I'll stick to going out for sushi however, somthing tells me the cons outweigh the benefits in this particular food of doing it yourself.

Katipan
08-26-2005, 01:40 PM
Why?

it's like spearing a Brat to turn it! :)

Katipan
08-26-2005, 01:41 PM
Thanks.

I think I'll stick to going out for sushi however, somthing tells me the cons outweigh the benefits in this particular food of doing it yourself.

you could find fresh salmon and do a hand roll easy enough. :)

Goapics1
08-26-2005, 01:47 PM
it's like spearing a Brat to turn it! :)
You're shitting me.

morphius
08-26-2005, 01:48 PM
Who would have thought that this topic would ever stay on topic, and Phobia can't give away tickets to a game.

This is truly F'd up and disturbing.

Morphius
I blame myself.

Scaga
08-26-2005, 01:54 PM
I still like Phob's original answer about having Plummer throw to him.
That's some funny $hit right there. ROFL

Frankie
08-26-2005, 03:29 PM
Perfect rice.
Huh.....No.
:shake:

Katipan
08-26-2005, 03:33 PM
Huh.....No.
:shake:

How could a thread not reach this massive amount of replies with such clever repartee?!

Knob
08-26-2005, 05:16 PM
I eat Thai sticky rice all the time:

The trick to it all is the variety of rice. Try sweet rice, thai purple (black) sticky rice, or Thai jasmine rice.

I mostly use the sweet rice otherwise known as glutinous rice.

I take 2 cups of sweet rice and place them in a bowl with eight cups of water on top of them. Let it sit for 8 to 24 hours

Next drain rice and rinse. Then place the rice in a cheesecloth (gauze) Place the rice w/ gauze wrapping in a bamboo steamer and then place both ontop of a sticky rice steamer pot. Finally place a pan cover over rice and steam for 45 min. Then when done take sticky rice quickly out of gauze and serve.............. :drool:

Bamboo pot and steamer and supplies can all be had at the local asian marketplace

Also try this rice with a sweet and sour chile sauce :)

Phobia
08-26-2005, 05:19 PM
I eat Thai sticky rice all the time:

The trick to it all is the variety of rice. Try sweet rice, thai purple (black) sticky rice, or Thai jasmine rice.

I mostly use the sweet rice otherwise known as glutinous rice.

I take 2 cups of sweet rice and place them in a bowl with eight cups of water on top of them. Let it sit for 8 to 24 hours

Next drain rice and rinse. Then place the rice in a cheesecloth (gauze) Place the rice w/ gauze wrapping in a bamboo steamer and then place both ontop of a sticky rice steamer pot. Finally place a pan cover over rice and steam for 45 min. Then when done take sticky rice quickly out of gauze and serve.............. :drool:

Bamboo pot and steamer and supplies can all be had at the local asian marketplace

Also try this rice with a sweet and sour chile sauce :)

Do you think you could have that ready in time for dinner? I'm hungry.

Katipan
08-26-2005, 05:24 PM
jasmine rice.

thats our rice of choice.
the wonderful aroma fills the house better than brownies do

Frankie
08-26-2005, 06:43 PM
thats our rice of choice.
the wonderful aroma fills the house better than brownies do

Basmati or bust.

jspchief
08-26-2005, 08:56 PM
Thanks for the tips everyone.

I made a batch over lunch, and it turned out good, but a little mushy. I'll back off the cooking time a bit next time.

I ate a little for lunch, but used the majority to make chicken fried rice for dinner. Lots of big chicken chunks cooked in a little stir fry sauce, a couple eggs, some green onion and mushroom. It turned out very good, but of course was still a bit mushy.

Katipan
08-26-2005, 09:05 PM
awwww

less water or more cooking time, lower heat :)

jspchief
08-26-2005, 09:08 PM
awwww

less water or more cooking time, lower heat :)I cooked it on the lowest setting on the stove. I think the fact that I soaked it first softened it up enough that I didn't need to go a full 20 minutes.

I used 1 1/2 cup of rice and 2 cups water.

Next time I'll probably skip the soak, and go about 16-18 and see how it turns out.

As it was, it was still good. Thanks again.

Phobia
08-26-2005, 09:14 PM
Here's another tip. A lot of people cook their rice the day before they need it. Then it chills overnight and is supposedly better for many applications.

ChiefsFire
08-26-2005, 09:21 PM
Here's another tip. A lot of people cook their rice the day before they need it. Then it chills overnight and is supposedly better for many applications.
sounds like you got a rice fetish

Phobia
08-26-2005, 09:23 PM
Are you talking literally or figuratively?