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alnorth
08-27-2005, 04:04 PM
For several years, the Federal Emergency Management Agency has listed "a major hurricane hitting New Orleans" as one of the top 3 most catastrophic potential disasters facing the United States.

As many know, New Orleans is below sea level, and sinks about 1 inch per year into the Mississippi delta. It is often described as a large fish bowl that could easily fill up with water, leaving trapped residents with no way out. We have chosen to live in an area that is not very well-suited to modern infrastructre, and we rely on a huge series of levies surrounding the city to keep the water out of the city.

In terms of potential disasters, the US insurance industry has long identified New Orleans as one of the most highly vulnerable cities in America. Some insurance firms have estimated that if a category 4
hurricane ever slams directly into New Orleans, the entire city could quickly flood under up to 20 feet of water, causing nearly $200 billion in damage, drowning huge numbers of people, and taking literally months to pump all the water out of the city.

Civil engineers warn that “The worst case scenario, would be one in which a hurricane would be formed in the Gulf of Mexico and be a relatively weak storm, and then very rapidly spin up to a category 4 or 5, and thereby not allow people to evacuate from the city. So in that particular case, we may have a million people in the actual metropolitan area that would not be safe if that storm took that critical path and flooded the city with 20 feet of water.”

Donger
08-27-2005, 04:09 PM
For several years, the Federal Emergency Management Agency has listed "a major hurricane hitting New Orleans" as one of the top 3 most catastrophic potential disasters facing the United States.

As many know, New Orleans is below sea level, and sinks about 1 inch per year into the Mississippi delta. It is often described as a large fish bowl that could easily fill up with water, leaving trapped residents with no way out. We have chosen to live in an area that is not very well-suited to modern infrastructre, and we rely on a huge series of levies surrounding the city to keep the water out of the city.

In terms of potential disasters, the US insurance industry has long identified New Orleans as one of the most highly vulnerable cities in America. Some insurance firms have estimated that if a category 4
hurricane ever slams directly into New Orleans, the entire city could quickly flood under up to 20 feet of water, causing nearly $200 billion in damage, drowning huge numbers of people, and taking literally months to pump all the water out of the city.

Civil engineers warn that “The worst case scenario, would be one in which a hurricane would be formed in the Gulf of Mexico and be a relatively weak storm, and then very rapidly spin up to a category 4 or 5, and thereby not allow people to evacuate from the city. So in that particular case, we may have a million people in the actual metropolitan area that would not be safe if that storm took that critical path and flooded the city with 20 feet of water.”

The track sure doesn't look good.

Good luck, Big Easy.

Ari Chi3fs
08-27-2005, 04:16 PM
at least the hookers who live in the top floors of the brothels will be okay.

alnorth
08-27-2005, 04:17 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,132423,00.html

It looks like that as of right now, New Orleans may still escape a total disaster. If the eye of a cat 4 or 5 hurricane hit east of N.O. as expected so far, the city would likely escape flooding, but if the storm track drifts just a little bit to the west of the city, then the counter-clockwise winds would drive the strongest storm surges directly into the big fish bowl.

Bowser
08-27-2005, 04:19 PM
Hopefully the city will survive, but get enough rain to wash the stink off of Bourbon Street.

Donger
08-27-2005, 04:20 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,132423,00.html

It looks like that as of right now, New Orleans may still escape a total disaster. If the eye of a cat 4 or 5 hurricane hit east of N.O. as expected so far, the city would likely escape flooding, but if the storm track drifts just a little bit to the west of the city, then the counter-clockwise winds would drive the strongest storm surges directly into the big soup bowl.

The latest track shows a virtual dead hit. It looks like the eye will go right over New Orleans.

Let's hope (and it probably will) the track changes more easterly.

Bwana
08-27-2005, 04:20 PM
Wow, it could get ugly fast.

Donger
08-27-2005, 04:22 PM
Here's the latest track: http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/ftp/graphics/AT12/refresh/AL1205W5+GIF/1A.gif

IIRC, they update every six hours, on 4 and 10.

siberian khatru
08-27-2005, 04:27 PM
Ignatius J. Reilly has assured that all is well.

4th and Long
08-27-2005, 04:27 PM
This sucks and all but lets think about this for a moment. They purposely built a city below sea level. People made a conscience decision to live there, knowing full well that they are subject to hurricanes and their effects. Now they want to us to feel sorry for them?

Isn't this like having a buddy who's gal cheated on him and then he runs back to her after the fact, only to have her cheat on him again? It's kinda HIS fault for going back isn't it? Do we feel sorry for him? No! We tell him, "That's YOUR FAULT for being a dumbass and going back to her!"

What am I missing here? :p

Rain Man
08-27-2005, 04:30 PM
Wow, that latest track shows a dead-on hit. Perhaps one of us should give New Orleans a call.

Donger
08-27-2005, 04:30 PM
This sucks and all but lets think about this for a moment. They purposely built a city below sea level. People made a conscience decision to live there, knowing full well that they are subject to hurricanes and their effects. Now they want to us to feel sorry for them?

Isn't this like having a buddy who's gal cheated on him and then he runs back to her after the fact, only to have her cheat on him again? It's kinda HIS fault for going back isn't it? Do we feel sorry for him? No! We tell him, "That's YOUR FAULT for being a dumbass and going back to her!"

What am I missing here? :p

Peh. I'd feel as sorry for them as I would/do when folks in Kansas get splatted by tornadoes.

Bwana
08-27-2005, 04:30 PM
What am I missing here? :p

The fact the EVERYONE will have their insurance rates go up if this bad boy nails N.O. with a direct hit.

Donger
08-27-2005, 04:32 PM
Wow, that latest track shows a dead-on hit. Perhaps one of us should give New Orleans a call.

I spoke with a friend there earlier today. They decided to evacuate after they saw the 10am track.

alnorth
08-27-2005, 04:36 PM
It has gotten to the point where not only is everyone in New Orleans ordered to evacuate (if they can), but the governor of Louisiana has asked everyone in N.O. who has extra room in their cars to check their neighbors to see if they have a ride out of the city.

Bowser
08-27-2005, 04:37 PM
It has gotten to the point where not only is everyone in New Orleans ordered to evacuate (if they can), but the governor of Louisiana has asked everyone in N.O. who has extra room in their cars to check their neighbors to see if they have a ride out of the city.

When are they predicting landfall?

go bowe
08-27-2005, 04:38 PM
twenty feet would just about put the french quarter under water...

major bummer...

Bwana
08-27-2005, 04:38 PM
When are they predicting landfall?Early Monday.

Katrina was a Category 3 storm with 115 mph sustained wind Saturday, but the hurricane center said it was likely to strengthen over the Gulf of Mexico, where the surface water temperature was as high as 90 degrees — high-octane fuel for hurricanes. It could become a Category 4 storm with wind of at least 131 mph before landfall early Monday, the center said.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,167211,00.html

Donger
08-27-2005, 04:42 PM
When are they predicting landfall?

Monday around noon. That's about the only good news.

alnorth
08-27-2005, 04:43 PM
The fact the EVERYONE will have their insurance rates go up if this bad boy nails N.O. with a direct hit.

I'm one of those evil people who calculates risk and helps to set new Car and Home Insurance rates. :evil: Thankfully, the insurance company I work for doesnt write business in Louisiana yet, that would have been a very interesting project for '06, but we are planning to expand into that state.

Count Alex's Losses
08-27-2005, 04:44 PM
It's a cesspool anyway. Good riddance.

Pitt Gorilla
08-27-2005, 04:45 PM
This sucks and all but lets think about this for a moment. They purposely built a city below sea level. People made a conscience decision to live there, knowing full well that they are subject to hurricanes and their effects. Now they want to us to feel sorry for them?

Isn't this like having a buddy who's gal cheated on him and then he runs back to her after the fact, only to have her cheat on him again? It's kinda HIS fault for going back isn't it? Do we feel sorry for him? No! We tell him, "That's YOUR FAULT for being a dumbass and going back to her!"

What am I missing here? :pThat is sort of my view. People who live in risky places have to pay the consequences. I feel for them, but they made their bed.

Donger
08-27-2005, 04:47 PM
It's a cesspool anyway. Good riddance.

You know, New Orleans is not my favorite place either, and if it weren't for the people, I'd tend to agree.

But since there are over 1,000,000 people in the area, go f*ck yourself.

Pitt Gorilla
08-27-2005, 04:47 PM
I'm one of those evil people who calculates risk and helps to set new Car and Home Insurance rates. :evil: Thankfully, the insurance company I work for doesnt write business in Louisiana yet, that would have been a very interesting project for '06, but we are planning to expand into that state.That's good to know. It would seem that people will flock to companies who don't have to pay for the damage. Is that how it works?

gblowfish
08-27-2005, 04:54 PM
Louisianans Told: Head for Higher Ground

By MARY FOSTER, Associated Press Writer 3 minutes ago

NEW ORLEANS - Coastal residents jammed freeways and gas stations Saturday as they rushed to get out of the way of Hurricane Katrina, a vicious storm that is threatening to gain even more strength and make a direct hit on the New Orleans area.

"Ladies and gentlemen, this is not a test. This is the real deal," New Orleans Mayor C. Ray Nagin said at a news conference. "Board up your homes, make sure you have enough medicine, make sure the car has enough gas. Do all things you normally do for a hurricane but treat this one differently because it is pointed towards New Orleans."

Katrina was a Category 3 storm with 115 mph sustained wind Saturday, but the hurricane center said it was likely to gain force over the Gulf of Mexico, where the surface water temperature was as high as 90 degrees — high-octane fuel for hurricanes. It could become a Category 4 storm with wind of at least 131 mph before landfall early Monday, the center said. A hurricane watch extended from Louisiana to the Florida Panhandle, and large-scale evacuations were under way Saturday along the coast.

Katrina could be especially devastating if it strikes New Orleans because the city sits below sea level and is dependent on levees and pumps to keep the water out. A direct hit could wind up submerging the city in several feet of water.

Making matters worse, at least 100,000 people in the poverty-stricken city lack the transportation to get out of town. Nagin said the Superdome might be used as a shelter of last resort for people who have no cars, with city bus pick-up points around New Orleans.

"I know they're saying `Get out of town,' but I don't have any way to get out," said Hattie Johns, 74. "If you don't have no money, you can't go."

The storm formed in the Bahamas and ripped across South Florida earlier in the week before moving into the Gulf of Mexico. The storm was blamed for seven deaths in Florida.

Louisiana and Mississippi made all lanes northbound on interstate highways. Mississippi declared a state of emergency and Alabama offered assistance to its neighbors. Some motels as far inland as Jackson, Miss., 150 miles north of New Orleans, were already booked up.

"At this juncture, all we can do is pray it doesn't come this way and tear us up," said Jeannette Ruboyianes, owner of the Day Dream Inn at Grand Isle, Louisiana's only inhabited barrier island.

By 5 p.m. EDT Saturday, the eye of the hurricane was located about 380 miles southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River and about 240 miles west of Key West, Fla. It was moving west at nearly 7 mph, the hurricane center said.

"We know that we're going to take the brunt of it," Gov. Kathleen Blanco said. "It does not bode well for southeastern Louisiana."

Some tourists heeded the warnings and moved up their departures, and lines of tourists waited for cabs on New Orleans' famed Bourbon Street.

"The problem is getting a taxi to the airport. There aren't any," said Brian Katz, a salesman from New York.

Others tried but couldn't make it.

"We tried to move it up, but they told us they were all booked up," said Terry Evans of Cleveland, whose flight was supported to leave Monday morning. "We may end up sleeping at the airport."

Katrina was a Category 1 storm with 80 mph wind when it hit South Florida on Thursday, and rainfall was estimated at up to 20 inches. Risk modeling companies have said early estimates of insured damage range from $600 million to $2 billion.

South Florida utility crews were still working Saturday to restore power to 733,000 customers, down from more than 1 million. Residents waited in lines that stretched for miles to reach state-operated centers distributing free water and ice for those without electricity.

Florida has been hit by six hurricanes since last August. The Panhandle was slammed by Hurricane Ivan last year, then again by Hurricane Dennis this year, both Category 3 storms.

Katrina is the 11th named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season, which began June 1. That's seven more than typically have formed by now in the Atlantic, Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico, the hurricane center said. The season ends Nov. 30.

milkman
08-27-2005, 04:54 PM
While I am not completely ambivalent to the situation in N.O., I'm wonderin', could this big wind blow the Saints to LA? :hmmm: :)

alnorth
08-27-2005, 04:57 PM
That's good to know. It would seem that people will flock to companies who don't have to pay for the damage. Is that how it works?

Rates may go up for people living in New Orleans. We dont just raise rates on the whole country or state because a few people on Bourbon Street are exposed to a spectacular amount of risk, we narrow it down to the zip code, and jack up their rates. Otherwise, our safer customers would leave us for companies that rewarded them for being better risks.

So, I would expect people in New Orleans, and maybe Louisiana to a much lesser extent, to pay for the added hurricane risk. If it were me, I would figure out how often we could expect this sort of thing to happen in the Big Easy, what the damage would be, and then spread it all out so that people in N.O. are paying just a little extra over a period of x-1 calm years to pay for the hurricane that hits in x years from now.

Thats just for the future though. As far as this hurricane is concerned, if the company hadnt already budgeted for this possibility in their rates, they would probably have to eat all the unexpected losses. Thats why we pay for "re-insurance". Re-insurance is insurance for insurance companies. Our company would basically take out a contract where if we really miss badly on how much we expected to lose every year, the re-insurance company would accept some of the loss.

Donger
08-27-2005, 04:57 PM
Wow. The water temperature in the Gulf is 90 degrees F?

Thig Lyfe
08-27-2005, 04:58 PM
Wow, that latest track shows a dead-on hit. Perhaps one of us should give New Orleans a call.

I don't have their number.

mlyonsd
08-27-2005, 04:59 PM
It's a cesspool anyway. Good riddance.

Blaspehmy!

Ultra Peanut
08-27-2005, 05:01 PM
Hopefully the city will survive, but get enough rain to wash the stink off of Bourbon Street.You could set off an H-Bomb there and, long after, the most notable feature of the Bourbon Street area would be, "Mmm, that delightful urine-vomit smell!"

God, I love New Orleans...

Peh. I'd feel as sorry for them as I would/do when folks in Kansas get splatted by tornadoes.'Zactamundo. Most of the same people mocking those who live in earthquake- and hurricane-vulnerable areas live in places in which it's quite possible that a storm could pop up virtually out of nowhere in the next few days and produce something that could wipe their homes from existence.

Katipan
08-27-2005, 05:03 PM
I'm never complaining about Arizona again.

Donger
08-27-2005, 05:04 PM
I'm never complaining about Arizona again.

It'll be even better when Arizona Bay shows up.

Rain Man
08-27-2005, 05:06 PM
Thats just for the future though. As far as this hurricane is concerned, if the company hadnt already budgeted for this possibility in their rates, they would probably have to eat all the unexpected losses. Thats why we pay for "re-insurance". Re-insurance is insurance for insurance companies. Our company would basically take out a contract where if we really miss badly on how much we expected to lose every year, the re-insurance company would accept some of the loss.

There's something about re-insurance that has always seemed kind of cannibalistic to me.

Are you an actuary, alnorth?

Skip Towne
08-27-2005, 05:08 PM
This sucks and all but lets think about this for a moment. They purposely built a city below sea level. People made a conscience decision to live there, knowing full well that they are subject to hurricanes and their effects. Now they want to us to feel sorry for them?

Isn't this like having a buddy who's gal cheated on him and then he runs back to her after the fact, only to have her cheat on him again? It's kinda HIS fault for going back isn't it? Do we feel sorry for him? No! We tell him, "That's YOUR FAULT for being a dumbass and going back to her!"

What am I missing here? :p
No, they didn't, they made a conscious effort.... I let you go for doing the same thing yesterday. I don't allow it two days in a row.

Rain Man
08-27-2005, 05:09 PM
I'm never complaining about Arizona again.


Until what will come to be known as "The Summer of Giant Spiders and Scorpions".

alnorth
08-27-2005, 05:10 PM
There's something about re-insurance that has always seemed kind of cannibalistic to me.

Are you an actuary, alnorth?

Hopefully in 4 or 5 years I will be a Property & Casualty Actuary, but I still need to pass 6 more professional exams which are only offered a couple times a year. Right now my company calls me an "Actuarial Assistant"

Rain Man
08-27-2005, 05:11 PM
Actuarial stuff is cool. I think I would've enjoyed doing that.

4th and Long
08-27-2005, 05:13 PM
No, they didn't, they made a conscious effort.... I let you go for doing the same thing yesterday. I don't allow it two days in a row.
Whatcha gunna do old timer? Spank me?

Conscience, conscious ... whatever. :p They made their bed knowing full well it could happen. And I said decision, not effort. Put your glasses on Grandpa.

alnorth
08-27-2005, 05:14 PM
Actuarial stuff is cool. I think I would've enjoyed doing that.

I love my job. Some days are boring, but I often face problems that have no clear solution. We are the weathermen of insurance. The only drawback are the 9 professional exams, which each usually require 200+ hours of study. I have and will continue to give up many a weekend. It does serve as a significant barrier to entry though, few actuaries = nice salaries.

Skip Towne
08-27-2005, 05:19 PM
Whatcha gunna do old timer? Spank me?

Conscience, conscious ... whatever. :p They made their bed knowing full well it could happen. And I said decision, not effort. Put your glasses on Grandpa.
They are two different words, birdbrain. If I keep reading your posts I'll get as dumb as you and I can't let that happen.

chefsos
08-27-2005, 05:20 PM
Whatcha gunna do old timer? Spank me?

Conscience, conscious ... whatever. :p They made their bed knowing full well it could happen. And I said decision, not effort. Put your glasses on Grandpa.

I'm crestfallen. Superheroes are generally more humble and respectful than this.

Who are you, and what did you do to Planet Man?!!??

4th and Long
08-27-2005, 05:22 PM
I'm crestfallen. Superheroes are generally more humble and respectful than this.

Who are you, and what did you do to Planet Man?!!??
My apologies, Good Citizen. Ninjaman slipped some offshoot of Kryptonite into my Post Toasties this morning and it's had me off center all day long. I shall make a concerted effort to right myself ASAP.

JimNasium
08-27-2005, 05:23 PM
Having been a three-year resident of New Orleans I will be saddened if it does get hit. I do realize that it is inevitable though. I hope the major landmarks of this culturally rich city survive.

Baby Lee
08-27-2005, 05:34 PM
I'm one of those evil people who calculates risk and helps to set new Car and Home Insurance rates. :evil: Thankfully, the insurance company I work for doesnt write business in Louisiana yet, that would have been a very interesting project for '06, but we are planning to expand into that state.
Ned Ryerson!!!
How the heck-diddly-eck are ya? Don't say you don't remember me, cause I sure as heckfire remember you.

ROFL ROFL

4th and Long
08-27-2005, 05:41 PM
Ned Ryerson!!!
How the heck-diddly-eck are ya? Don't say you don't remember me, cause I sure as heckfire remember you.

ROFL ROFL
ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL

Count Alex's Losses
08-27-2005, 05:43 PM
Ned Ryerson!!!
How the heck-diddly-eck are ya? Don't say you don't remember me, cause I sure as heckfire remember you.

ROFL ROFL

Yeah that joke is only six years old. You're not funny.

Baby Lee
08-27-2005, 05:46 PM
Yeah that joke is only six years old. You're not funny.
Well folks we're at a crossroads. After all these years, I've finally been constrained to consider whether to give a flying f@ck about something gochoad posted. . .

Done.

And, no.

gblowfish
08-27-2005, 06:03 PM
Ned! Ryerson! Neddle-nose Ned. Ned the Head. Case Western High! Ned Ryerson. I did the whistling belly-button trick at the high school talent show. Bing! Ned Ryerson. Got the shingles real bad senior year almost didn't graduate. Bing! Again. Ned Ryerson. I dated your sister, Mary Pat, until you told me not to any more. Well?

Thig Lyfe
08-27-2005, 06:06 PM
Yeah that joke is only six years old. You're not funny.

What? You're an idiot.

Ultra Peanut
08-27-2005, 06:10 PM
http://www.nola.com/hurricane/images/goingunder_jpg.jpg

Count Alex's Losses
08-27-2005, 06:10 PM
What? You're an idiot.

There's absolutely no proof of that.

JimNasium
08-27-2005, 06:27 PM
Ned! Ryerson! Neddle-nose Ned. Ned the Head. Case Western High! Ned Ryerson. I did the whistling belly-button trick at the high school talent show. Bing! Ned Ryerson. Got the shingles real bad senior year almost didn't graduate. Bing! Again. Ned Ryerson. I dated your sister, Mary Pat, until you told me not to any more. Well?
LOL, I just saw this very same guy on a rerun of "That '70s Show."

Donger
08-27-2005, 06:31 PM
http://www.nola.com/hurricane/images/goingunder_jpg.jpg

Thanks for that. That looks disturbingly like the track of Katrina.

alnorth
08-27-2005, 06:39 PM
Thanks for that. That looks disturbingly like the track of Katrina.

Keep in mind, in this scenario, the storm is a category 3 when it hits near the mouth of the Mississippi, moves over to N.O., and stalls there while weakening to a Category 1. The computers predict about half the city flooded in 4-8 foot waters.

Katrina is predicted to directly smack N.O. head-on at a category 4. This would potentially cause floods up to 20 feet to sink almost the entire city.

Baby Lee
08-27-2005, 06:43 PM
LOL, I just saw this very same guy on a rerun of "That '70s Show."
Where hasn't he been. A regular on Deadwood, on The Closer just this week, The DA on CSI Miami, The West Wing.

Huh! Someone on here will find this interesting.

[quote-IMDB]Was the lead singer in the first band formed by guitar legend Stevie Ray Vaughan. They went to school together in Dallas.[quote]

JimNasium
08-27-2005, 06:46 PM
Where hasn't he been. A regular on Deadwood, on The Closer just this week, The DA on CSI Miami, The West Wing.True, he's a great character actor. Loved him in Deadwood.

Thig Lyfe
08-27-2005, 06:54 PM
There's absolutely no proof of that.

http://www.chiefsplanet.com/BB/search.php?searchid=84009

Baby Lee
08-27-2005, 06:58 PM
True, he's a great character actor. Loved him in Deadwood.
Classic scene;
Whore: Well, whatever were you aimin’ at?
Hugo: Your titties! (Playful blubbering, whore snorts, the door opens and Cy enters. Hugo looks at himself in a mirror –bubbles on his head but not covering his eye!)
Cy: Any chance in here of an imminent [i](we see Hugo, this time with bubbles covering his eye!) finish, commissioner? My thought bein’ you might want to deliver our newspaper editor a certain document before he’s too drunk to make it out.
Hugo: (Takes his glasses off, we can now see both eyes) I think not, until my bath is finished.
Cy: Uh-huh. And I think a finish would involve (looks at the whore) you blowin’ some of them bubbles underwater, Honey.

Ugly Duck
08-27-2005, 07:04 PM
New Orleans faces their absolute worst nightmare.
Whoa.... From the title, I thought this was about their upcoming game against Oakland! Here's to hoping that the storm loses power before making landfall. Our SouthEast got plenty battered last season - they've had enough for a while.....

Thig Lyfe
08-27-2005, 07:06 PM
Whoa.... From the title, I thought this was about their upcoming game against Oakland! Here's to hoping that the storm loses power before making landfall. Our SouthEast got plenty battered last season - they've had enough for a while.....

Actually, the city of Oakland is number 5 on the national disaster list.

Ugly Duck
08-27-2005, 07:14 PM
Actually, the city of Oakland is number 5 on the national disaster list.What.... riots or drivebys or something?

chagrin
08-27-2005, 07:26 PM
This sucks and all but lets think about this for a moment. They purposely built a city below sea level. People made a conscience decision to live there, knowing full well that they are subject to hurricanes and their effects. Now they want to us to feel sorry for them?

Isn't this like having a buddy who's gal cheated on him and then he runs back to her after the fact, only to have her cheat on him again? It's kinda HIS fault for going back isn't it? Do we feel sorry for him? No! We tell him, "That's YOUR FAULT for being a dumbass and going back to her!"

What am I missing here? :p


I am not going to bash you for having your opinion, and I enjoy the heck out of most of your posts. :thumb:

I have both family and friends that live IN the city, and I am scared for their safety and feel bad for anyone that loses their homes, etc. Nobody has asked you to feel sorry for them, but insinuating that people somehow deserve to die or suffer for choosing to live in such a place, is a bit absurd. Obviously you have the right to your opinion and I won't dispute it, just giving you mine.

Thankfully, my family and friends are smart enough to have left already though :)

4th and Long
08-27-2005, 07:32 PM
I am not going to bash you for having your opinion, and I enjoy the heck out of most of your posts. :thumb:

I have both family and friends that live IN the city, and I am scared for their safety and feel bad for anyone that loses their homes, etc. Nobody has asked you to feel sorry for them, but insinuating that people somehow deserve to die or suffer for choosing to live in such a place, is a bit absurd. Obviously you have the right to your opinion and I won't dispute it, just giving you mine.

Thankfully, my family and friends are smart enough to have left already though :)
It was a little tongue in cheeck bud. Note the :p at the end of the last sentence?

In all seriousness, this sucks for them but I must point out that if you make a choice to put yourself in harms way by living on the coast, these things can and will happen.

chagrin
08-27-2005, 07:40 PM
I'm sorry dude, I misinterpreted (as usual) I didn't notice the tongue wagging, I'm sorry.

:sulk:

BigOlChiefsfan
08-27-2005, 08:25 PM
< yatspeak > Where yat, dahlin? Where'd I put my inflatable sheep doll, dollface? Put your shoit on, we may have to float outta heah. But hey....hurricane party at Red Stick! < /yatspeak >

JimNasium
08-27-2005, 08:40 PM
< yatspeak > Where yat, dahlin? Where'd I put my inflatable sheep doll, dollface? Put your shoit on, we may have to float outta heah. But hey....hurricane party at Red Stick! < /yatspeak >
You can bet that there will be some dumb bastards in Chalmette planning on trying to ride this thing out. :shake:

Ultra Peanut
08-27-2005, 10:01 PM
Here's to hoping that the storm loses power before making landfall. Scary thing is, it's already looking like a beast (by which I mean, kinda strange and potentially up there with the "biggies," historically speaking), and there's nothing between the storm and landfall to slow it down. If it actually does head right for NOLA... yikes.

Also, a Google search for "Katrina" returns this as the first result:

Katrina and the Waves
The band's official site with histories and discography.
www.katw.com/ - 1k - Aug 26, 2005 - Cached - Similar pages

alnorth
08-27-2005, 10:23 PM
The storm is nudging ever-so-slightly east, but not enough. If the hurricane flies as predicted as of 10pm tonight, it will be a disaster.

4th and Long
08-27-2005, 10:29 PM
http://www.rap.ucar.edu/weather/satellite/g12.2005240.0315_smGOM_irbw.jpg

4th and Long
08-27-2005, 10:30 PM
http://www.rap.ucar.edu/weather/satellite/g12.2005240.0315_smUS_wv.jpg

Ultra Peanut
08-27-2005, 10:31 PM
How's this for frightening?

As I write this message, the people of southeast Louisiana are staring at potentially THE greatest U.S. natural disaster right in the face. If Katrina stikes southeast Louisiana as forecast, and there's a good chance that it will, then there may be little left of that area come Monday evening. A Category 4 (or maybe 5) hurricane hitting New Orleans could put the city underwater for months. Of those who do not evacuate, it's estimated 20-30% will die. You live in a big bowl, and if/when the sides collapse (levees), the water will quickly rush in and cover the tops of your homes.

If I were living in New Orleans, then I would get out NOW, ASAP! If the storm tracks as forecast, then plan on NOT returning to New Orleans until perhaps 3-4 months. It'll probably take that long to pump out the city, inspect and repair all damage to the electrical supply, and remove the tens of thousands of bodies. You probably will have nothing left to come home to, so take what's most important to you in your evacuation.

Heed your local officials' warnings, but do not delay. If you wait to leave until Sunday, then I fear you'll be stuck in the most massive traffic jam that you've ever seen - and you'll probably die in your cars if the storm hits as forecast.

If it sounds like I'm trying to scare you, I AM! I don't sound the alarm here on this forum very often (ok, never), but this is one case that gives ME the shivers. All we can do now is to pray that something happens to divert or weaken the hurricane. Do not complain if you evacuate New Orleans and the storm weakens or veers to one side or the other, be very thankful you have you lives and your homes.

I need to get to work now to forecast the hurricane. If I see anything today that indicates a landfall other than New Orleans, I'll chime in.

NOAA sez (http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/text/refresh/MIATCPAT2+shtml/280245.shtml):

HURRICANE FORCE WINDS EXTEND OUTWARD UP TO 45 MILES FROM THE
CENTER...AND TROPICAL STORM FORCE WINDS EXTEND OUTWARD UP
TO 160 MILES.

LATEST MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE REPORTED BY AN AIR FORCE PLANE WAS
939 MB...27.73 INCHESEek.

4th and Long
08-27-2005, 10:36 PM
How's this for frightening?
Frightening is watching these 42 frames of the last 12 hours of this ol girl. http://www.rap.ucar.edu/weather/satellite/displaySat.php?region=GOM&itype=irbw&size=small&endDate=20050828&endTime=-1&duration=12 Watch the eye form. Scary man, scary.

alnorth
08-27-2005, 10:48 PM
which MB was that from, psicosis?

Ultra Peanut
08-27-2005, 11:01 PM
which MB was that from, psicosis?Saw it on FARK, but it was copied from a meteorological forum.

Out of curiosity, I decided to check the NOLA webcams.

<img src="http://www.nola.com/cgi-bin/nph-cachecam.cgi?camid=bourbon&ols=nolalive&ts=20050827235605&ct=20" style="width: 444px; height: 333px; border: 0" alt="" />

These people? Batshit insane.

Hurricane Center director warns New Orleans: This is really scary
By Mark Schleifstein
Times-Picayune Staff Writer

National Hurricane Center Director Max Mayfield said Saturday afternoon that Hurricane Katrina will be at least a Category 4, with winds of 145 mph when it approaches the New Orleans area, and that it could be a Category 5, with winds of 155 mph or higher.

Meanwhile, computer model runs conducted by a team of Louisiana State University scientists indicate that even if Katrina had winds of only 115 mph, levees protecting Kenner, Metairie and New Orleans on the east bank will be overtopped by a 10- to 12-foot storm surge, topped by waves at least half that high, in some locations along Lake Pontchartrain.

"The guidance we get and common sense and experience suggests this storm is not done strengthening," Mayfield said in a telephone call from Miami-Dade County, which was hit by a Category 1 Katrina earlier in the week.

"This is really scary," he said. "This is not a test, as your governor said earlier today. This is the real thing."

Mayfield warned residents intent on not leaving in advance of Katrina to learn from the storm's effects in south Florida.

"We think this was a solid Category 1 when it made landfall here," he said. "But we had windows in new homes that blew in when they were designed for 145 mph winds."

Mayfield also warned people not to focus on the eye of the storm, as atmospheric conditions are perfect for Katrina's intensity to stretch far to the east and west of its eye.

"This thing is like Hurricane Opal," he said, referring to a huge 1995 hurricane that hit the Florida panhandle as a Category 3 storm. "We're seeing 12-foot seas along the Louisiana coast already."

Ivor van Heerden, a scientist at the LSU Hurricane Center, said he's also concerned that the waves atop the surge in Lake Pontchartrain could weaken levees and cause additional overtopping.

"The bottom line is this is a worst-case scenario and everybody needs to recognize it," he said. "You can always rebuild your house, but you can never regain a life. And there's no point risking your life and the lives of your children." Contraflow (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contraflow_lane_reversal_program) started at 4 PM.

From Weather Underground (http://www.wunderground.com):

After this phase of rapid deepening, another eyewall replacement cycle will occur, and the timing of that cycle will be worth billions of dollars and perhaps many lives. There is no way to predict when this eyewall replacement cycle will occur. Another major factor will be the timing of the tides--if Katrina hits at high tide, there will be billions more in damage. There is still the possibility, too, that the trough that is now steering Katrina to the north will also create enough shear to reduce her to a Category 3 storm at landfall. This is what happened to Hurricane Ivan last year.

New Orleans finally got serious and ordered an evacuation, but far too late. There is no way everyone will be able to get out of the city in time, and they may be forced to take shelter in the Superdome, which is above sea level. If Katrina makes a direct hit on New Orleans as a Category 4 hurricane, the levees protecting the city will be breached, and New Orleans, which is 6 - 10 feet below sea level, will fill with water. On top of this 6 feet of water will come a 15 foot storm surge, and on top of that will be 20 foot waves, so the potential for high loss of life is great. Given the current track and intensity forecast, I'd put the odds of this at about 20%.

Dr. Jeff Masters

gblowfish
08-27-2005, 11:06 PM
This is the masthead story in the New Orleans newspaper right now. I'd turn the Superdome into an ark:


Saturday, August 27, 2005



Region braces for Hurricane Katrina
Bush declares state of emergency; Nagin says 'this is not a test'

Hurricane warnings were issued late Saturday for the entire Southeastern Louisiana area from Morgan City eastward - including metro New Orleans and Lake Ponchartrain - and extending eastward to the Mobile area.

The 10 p.m. forecast also placed a tropical storm warning and hurricane watch as far east as Destin, Fla., and as far west as Intracoastal City, La.

With most of Southeastern Louisiana under evacuation orders - voluntary or mandatory - federal forecasts and computer models late Saturday continued to show deadly Hurricane Katrina on a course that would take it directly over metro New Orleans on Monday.

The hurricane at 9:30 p.m. was a Category 3, with winds in the 115 mph range, but forecasters predicted it could reach Category 4, or even Category 5 status before making landfall on the Southeastern Louisiana coast early Monday afternoon. Hurricane watches extended from Intracoastal City, LA, to the Alabama-Florida state line, but for almost 24 hours, the center of the projected path has bobbled only slightly between the New Orleans/Metairie line and Slidell.

President Bush late Saturday declared a state of emergency in Louisiana, following a request earlier by Gov. Kathleen Blanco, a move that frees up federal emergency aid for the storm. Bush also urged residents to follow the advice of forecasters, and flee the storm.

Also Saturday evening, the head of the National Hurricane Center made a personal call to The Times-Picayune's veteran hurricane beat writer, Mark Schleifstein, to voice his concern about New Orleans. (Read full story)

Across the area, city and parish officials spent the day warning residents to prepare for the storm. At 4 p.m., the multistate contraflow plan went into full operations, with outbound interstates turned to one-way roads north and west.

""Ladies and gentlemen, this is not a test. This is the real deal," New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin said at a midday news conference. "I don't want to panic you, but I want to make sure you understand there's a major hurricane in Gulf of Mexico and most of the meteoroligists are predicting it will hit somewhare around New Orleans.

"Board up your homes, make sure you have enough medicine, make sure the car has enough gas. Do all things you normally do for a hurricane but treat this one differently because it is pointed towards New Orleans."

Because the storm is so big, Nagin said, the Superdome may be used as a shelter of last resort for people who have no cars, with city bus pick-up points around New Orleans.

Katrina, the 11th named storm of a busy season, was upgraded to Category 3 as it moved deeper into the Gulf of Mexico, after crossing Florida on Thursday. Homes were flooded, fallen trees blocked roads and utility crews scrambled to restore power to more than 1 million homes and businesses Friday as South Floridians coped with Hurricane Katrina's messy aftermath.

Seven deaths were blamed on the storm as it crossed Florida. Much of the seven hours Katrina spent over land Thursday was over the moist Florida Everglades, allowing for only slight weakening.

BigOlChiefsfan
08-27-2005, 11:37 PM
http://www.brendanloy.com/

NOLA Mayor plans 'mandatory evacuation' Sunday a.m. Should have announced it tonite, I'm thinking. Hope all my former-in-laws GTF out of there, pronto. I-10 west out of the city ought to be...interesting about noon tomorrow.

tk13
08-28-2005, 01:08 AM
Latest info has it firmly in a Category 4 now... 145 mph winds, 170 mph wind gusts. Only 10 mph from Cat 5... and it's still 300 miles from land.

Ultra Peanut
08-28-2005, 02:50 AM
Live streaming coverage from Atlantis:

http://www.wwltv.com/perl/common/video/wmPlayer.pl?title=beloint_wwltv&props=livenoad

REPEATING THE 1 AM CDT POSITION...25.1 N... 86.8 W. MOVEMENT
TOWARD...WEST-NORTHWEST NEAR 8 MPH. MAXIMUM SUSTAINED
WINDS...145 MPH. MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE... 935 MB.Very, very, very bad.

Rausch
08-28-2005, 02:52 AM
So Deuce isn't holding out...Right?

Ultra Peanut
08-28-2005, 02:58 AM
THE NUCE IS LOOSE!

tk13
08-28-2005, 06:10 AM
According to the weather channel, it's at 150 mph sustained winds now, just shy of a Category 5 storm. Pressure is 915 mb. That's stronger than Hurricane Andrew, at least according to this.

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pastint.shtml

275 miles from land. Hurricane force winds over a very large area, could affect LA, MS, and AL. Lots of people out on the roads in Louisiana even at this hour.

tk13
08-28-2005, 06:28 AM
Weather Channel, MSNBC, and CNN both have all jumped in and updated. Winds are now 160 mph, gusts obviously much higher than that. It is a now officially a Category 5 hurricane. This is bad news. Something needs to slow this thing down or it's gonna be an unbelievable disaster.

RedDread
08-28-2005, 06:46 AM
Hurricane Katrina is an extremely dangerous Category 5 storm on the Saffir-Simpson scale. Maximum sustained winds have now been greatly increased to 160 mph. Katrina continues not only grow stronger, but it continues to grow larger. Hurricane force winds extend 75 miles from the center in all but the southwest quadrant of the system. The center of Katrina was 275 miles from the mouth of the Mississippi River at 4am CDT, but the hurricane force winds are only 200 miles from the coast.


This could be one of those once in a lifetime hurricanes, It still has 1-2 days to strengthen and it's already topped the saffir simpson scale out. Some meteorologists are saying that the rain bands could fill the ENTIRE GULF by the time it makes landfall.

I think I see the 4 horsemen off in the distance...

RedDread
08-28-2005, 07:03 AM
This may be the worst hurricane in my lifetime but this still cracks me up:

http://www.weather.com/multimedia/index.html?clip=328&collection=topstory

4th and Long
08-28-2005, 07:27 AM
The pressure is now 908 milibars, which makes it the second bad ass hurricane of all time, placing it ahead of Andrew (922 milibars) and Camile (909 milibars).

Terribilis
08-28-2005, 08:05 AM
This may be the worst hurricane in my lifetime but this still cracks me up:

http://www.weather.com/multimedia/index.html?clip=328&collection=topstory

hello Lt. Nicole

Gaz
08-28-2005, 08:23 AM
I do not wish to come across as completely insensitive to the suffering of my fellow man, but the boneheads built and live in a city below sea level located right next to the ocean.

I reserve my sympathy for people who do not knowingly participate in their own misfortune.

xoxo~
Gaz
Hard, hard man.

JimNasium
08-28-2005, 08:28 AM
I do not wish to come across as completely insensitive to the suffering of my fellow man, but the boneheads built and live in a city below sea level located right next to the ocean.

I reserve my sympathy for people who do not knowingly participate in their own misfortune.

xoxo~
Gaz
Hard, hard man.

Well it was built by the French so what do you expect.

Ari Chi3fs
08-28-2005, 09:08 AM
looks like its too late. :-(

http://www.nola.com/cgi-bin/nph-cachecam.cgi?camid=bourbon&ols=nolalive&ts=20050828100516&ct=20

Donger
08-28-2005, 09:22 AM
When I saw that the water temp was 90 degrees, I had a bad feeling that she'd get to 5.

I'd fill up your gas tanks today, FWIW.

Donger
08-28-2005, 09:30 AM
Whoa. The Mayor of New Orleans expects the levee system to be breached.

Braincase
08-28-2005, 09:33 AM
When I saw that the water temp was 90 degrees, I had a bad feeling that she'd get to 5.

I'd fill up your gas tanks today, FWIW.

Weather channel shows Katrina is a 5. Damn.

On the positive side, come Wednesday, Bourbon Street will smell better than it has in years.

Donger
08-28-2005, 09:36 AM
Weather channel shows Katrina is a 5. Damn.

On the positive side, come Wednesday, Bourbon Street will smell better than it has in years.

No, it won't. It may be full of sewage, at the least.

Marco Polo
08-28-2005, 09:36 AM
How much do you this gas will go up?

Donger
08-28-2005, 09:39 AM
How much do you this gas will go up?

I'd imagine you should expect a good 15 to 20 cents. Much higher if the track shifts west (doubtful) and hits the Texas coast. Right now, I'd gladly take that over a Cat5 hit on New Orleans.

This could kill a lot of people.

bringbackmarty
08-28-2005, 09:52 AM
This sucks and all but lets think about this for a moment. They purposely built a city below sea level. People made a conscience decision to live there, knowing full well that they are subject to hurricanes and their effects. Now they want to us to feel sorry for them?

Isn't this like having a buddy who's gal cheated on him and then he runs back to her after the fact, only to have her cheat on him again? It's kinda HIS fault for going back isn't it? Do we feel sorry for him? No! We tell him, "That's YOUR FAULT for being a dumbass and going back to her!"

What am I missing here? :p
It was built by the spanish in the 1600's before the river was permanantly changed, before modern cartography, airplanes, satellites, cars and the like. It had a great local source of food, and access to the gulf of mexico and the mississippi. where else ya gonna build a city, where there is no year round food supply and no way to get any where except to walk? Information at that time about hurricanes was limited. I lived there for about seven years total. I have seen flooding bad enough from just lots of rain that I know this hurricane shit is not joke. Why do we chose to live in tornado alley dumbass, or californians on earthquakevile? Or new yorkers in target numero uno? You gotta live somewhere, and New orleans is the place for about 2 million people.

unlurking
08-28-2005, 10:00 AM
It was built by the spanish in the 1600's before the river was permanantly changed, before modern cartography, airplanes, satellites, cars and the like. It had a great local source of food, and access to the gulf of mexico and the mississippi. where else ya gonna build a city, where there is no year round food supply and no way to get any where except to walk? Information at that time about hurricanes was limited. I lived there for about seven years total. I have seen flooding bad enough from just lots of rain that I know this hurricane shit is not joke. Why do we chose to live in tornado alley dumbass, or californians on earthquakevile? Or new yorkers in target numero uno? You gotta live somewhere, and New orleans is the place for about 2 million people.
Also take into account that many people (including myself) have moved to cities they didn't want to be in to follow jobs.

Donger
08-28-2005, 10:02 AM
My god. What a monster.

Max sustained winds of 175 mph. That means that there are gusts of 200 mph.

htismaqe
08-28-2005, 10:07 AM
Comparable in strength to 69 Camille, but 1.5 times the size.

**** me.

Donger
08-28-2005, 10:09 AM
Comparable in strength to 69 Camille, but 1.5 times the size.

**** me.

THE AIR FORCE HURRICANE HUNTER PLANE RECENTLY MEASURED A MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE OF 907 MB...26.78 INCHES.

That's just nuts. I think Camille was 909 MB.

Thig Lyfe
08-28-2005, 10:09 AM
My god. What a monster.

Max sustained winds of 175 mph. That means that there are gusts of 200 mph.

Shit.

bringbackmarty
08-28-2005, 10:10 AM
I do not wish to come across as completely insensitive to the suffering of my fellow man, but the boneheads built and live in a city below sea level located right next to the ocean.

I reserve my sympathy for people who do not knowingly participate in their own misfortune.

xoxo~
Gaz
Hard, hard man.

So living in tornado alley is not "knowingly participating" in your own misfortune. You are an idiot, people have to live somewhere. If you knew the real problem with New Orleans, understood that there are gonna be a quarter of a million people in the city when this thing hits who can't leave because they either don't have the means (no car or place to go), or have to stay because it's there job (hospitals, cops, fire dept). A lot of them are gonna die. How many of them were there when the spanish built the city, moron. You are a true asshole, and this post proves not only that, but your gross stupidity as well. If it hits I'm going down there to help out my friends get back on their feet, not act like I'm superior to anybody because I live in "dooBah lite" Kansas. One other point that deserves to be mentioned. Starting with Andrew, it seems like the number of major hurrricanes maing it's way into the northen gulf seems to have snowballed. It seems to have coincided with the drastic global climate change the planet is undergoing. New Orleanians did not cause global warming, which has caused this cycle of 3-5 major hurricanes in the gulf every season.

4th and Long
08-28-2005, 10:12 AM
THE AIR FORCE HURRICANE HUNTER PLANE RECENTLY MEASURED A MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE OF 907 MB...26.78 INCHES.

That's just nuts. I think Camille was 909 MB.
The pressure is now 907 milibars, which makes it the second strongest recorded hurricane (thus far) of all time, placing it ahead of Andrew (922 milibars) and Camile (909 milibars).

Skip Towne
08-28-2005, 10:13 AM
So living in tornado alley is not "knowingly participating" in your own misfortune. You are an idiot, people have to live somewhere. If you knew the real problem with New Orleans, understood that there are gonna be a quarter of a million people in the city when this thing hits who can't leave because they either don't have the means (no car or place to go), or have to stay because it's there job (hospitals, cops, fire dept). A lot of them are gonna die. How many of them were there when the spanish built the city, moron. You are a true asshole, and this post proves not only that, but your gross stupidity as well. If it hits I'm going down there to help out my friends get back on their feet, not act like I'm superior to anybody because I live in "dooBah lite" Kansas. One other point that deserves to be mentioned. Starting with Andrew, it seems like the number of major hurrricanes maing it's way into the northen gulf seems to have snowballed. It seems to have coincided with the drastic global climate change the planet is undergoing. New Orleanians did not cause global warming, which has caused this cycle of 3-5 major hurricanes in the gulf every season.
Gaz is none of the things you called him. You are a major league idiot.

Donger
08-28-2005, 10:15 AM
The pressure is now 907 milibars, which makes it the second strongest recorded hurricane (thus far) of all time, placing it ahead of Andrew (922 milibars) and Camile (909 milibars).

Yep, just looked it up. Hurricane Gilbert in 1988 had a 888 MB, but 'weakened' to a low Cat 5 before it hit the Yucatan.

4th and Long
08-28-2005, 10:17 AM
So living in tornado alley is not "knowingly participating" in your own misfortune. You are an idiot, people have to live somewhere. If you knew the real problem with New Orleans, understood that there are gonna be a quarter of a million people in the city when this thing hits who can't leave because they either don't have the means (no car or place to go), or have to stay because it's there job (hospitals, cops, fire dept). A lot of them are gonna die. How many of them were there when the spanish built the city, moron. You are a true asshole, and this post proves not only that, but your gross stupidity as well. If it hits I'm going down there to help out my friends get back on their feet, not act like I'm superior to anybody because I live in "dooBah lite" Kansas. One other point that deserves to be mentioned. Starting with Andrew, it seems like the number of major hurrricanes maing it's way into the northen gulf seems to have snowballed. It seems to have coincided with the drastic global climate change the planet is undergoing. New Orleanians did not cause global warming, which has caused this cycle of 3-5 major hurricanes in the gulf every season.
Your premise is slightly flawed phucktard. Those of us that live in the Midwest sometimes have ample warnings of impending tornadoes. Sometime, WE DON'T! Big difference there Skippy. Those people that live on the coast/along the Gulf have had ample warning and time to evacuate. The ones that die will be from sheer stupidity for not leaving. That's also known as cleaning up the gene pool.

Donger
08-28-2005, 10:24 AM
Those people that live on the coast/along the Gulf have had ample warning and time to evacuate. The ones that die will be from sheer stupidity for not leaving. That's also known as cleaning up the gene pool.[/FONT]

Some essential personnel (city, emergency management, fire, hospital staff, et al) will bravely stay behind to help. If they should die, I can't imagine anyone not feeling sorry for them.

4th and Long
08-28-2005, 10:28 AM
Some essential personnel (city, emergency management, fire, hospital staff, et al) will bravely stay behind to help. If they should die, I can't imagine anyone not feeling sorry for them.
That's a given. It goes along with the job. I myself am damn near expected to drive through a radiation cloud to get to the hospital if there's a disaster. And yes, those particular people I would feel sorry for. The ones that are not essential personnel that opt to stay home get no sympathy from me.

Darkwolfe
08-28-2005, 10:30 AM
One word warning for NO today...

INCOMING!

unlurking
08-28-2005, 10:57 AM
That's a given. It goes along with the job. I myself am damn near expected to drive through a radiation cloud to get to the hospital if there's a disaster. And yes, those particular people I would feel sorry for. The ones that are not essential personnel that opt to stay home get no sympathy from me.
True, if I were living in NO, there is no way I would be staying. In fact I would probably have left in time to be in KS to watch the game on some bar TV.

Donger
08-28-2005, 10:59 AM
For those not familiar why New Orleans is said to be a 'bowl,' here's a rather graphic graphic:

Ultra Peanut
08-28-2005, 11:03 AM
This is just... Oh my God.

Andrew made landfall as 922mb. This thing could get into the 890s. The lowest landfall ever recorded was the Labor Day storm in 1935 at 892mb. This is almost unprecedented.

Gaz is none of the things you called him. You are a major league idiot.Anyone who throws out something like "they deserve no sympathy; they made their own beds by choosing to live there," especially when they live in a place like KanYouKomeObliterateMeMrTornado, is an asshole.

The ones that are not essential personnel that opt to stay home get no sympathy from me.Again, there are a lot of people who have no place to go and don't have the means to get there. There are a TON of extremely poor people in New Orleans.

Donger
08-28-2005, 11:09 AM
Anyone who throws out something like "they deserve no sympathy; they made their own beds by choosing to live there," especially when they live in a place like KanYouKomeObliterateMeMrTornado, is an asshole.

Again, there are a lot of people who have no place to go and don't have the means to get there. There are a TON of extremely poor people in New Orleans.

Not to mention stranded tourists.

Again, those people that DO have means of leaving and are not required to stay are rolling the dice with their lives. If they lose, I will still feel badly for them, but they chose that.

For the others, I feel nothing but sympathy. This is extremely bad, folks, and it is not the time for jokes or cold-heartedness, That's just my opinion, but a lot of people could die because of this beast.

Ultra Peanut
08-28-2005, 11:09 AM
This is really farked up. If it actually hits NO, we could be watching a very real historic moment here on the order of a Vesuvius. People will dig through the rubble in 5000 years to find breast beads and bottles of 151 rum and try to decipher what sort of people really lived there.

Not to mention stranded tourists.

Again, those people that DO have means of leaving and are not required to stay are rolling the dice with their lives. If they lose, I will still feel badly for them, but they chose that.

For the others, I feel nothing but sympathy. This is extremely bad, folks, and it is not the time for jokes or cold-heartedness, That's just my opinion, but a lot of people could die because of this beast.Agreed wholeheartedly.

Saulbadguy
08-28-2005, 11:10 AM
Again, there are a lot of people who have no place to go and don't have the means to get there. There are a TON of extremely poor people in New Orleans.
"Why don't those people just get credit cards? Then they could buy anything they want."

"Maybe they're stupid."

Mr. Laz
08-28-2005, 11:44 AM
abandon ship...



mandatory evacuation of new orleans

Darkwolfe
08-28-2005, 12:12 PM
There's a huge difference between tornadoes and hurricanes. A big F4 tornado may have a 200 mph windspeed, but it's not likely to be more than 3/4 to a mile across on the ground. A giant F5 will be well over a mile wide on the ground and 250+mph winds, but those thankfully are rather rare.

A hurricane is way-the-hell-and-gone bigger. It doesn't compare at all. Trying to compare tornadoes to hurricanes is like comparing William Perry to a picnic ant.

Tornadoes to me, are prey. I've been an on and off storm chaser for most of my life.

Hurricanes on the other hand can be everything from a one day annoyance with some minor flooding and wind damage, to a major disaster that could level a city. By and large, stay outta the way.

Quit trying to compare the two.. They just don't match up.

Ultra Peanut
08-28-2005, 12:25 PM
NWS sez:

URGENT - WEATHER MESSAGE
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NEW ORLEANS LA
1011 AM CDT SUN AUG 28 2005


DEVASTATING DAMAGE EXPECTED

HURRICANE KATRINA
A MOST POWERFUL HURRICANE WITH UNPRECEDENTED
STRENGTH...RIVALING THE INTENSITY OF HURRICANE CAMILLE OF 1969.

MOST OF THE AREA WILL BE UNINHABITABLE FOR WEEKS...PERHAPS LONGER. AT
LEAST ONE HALF OF WELL CONSTRUCTED HOMES WILL HAVE ROOF AND WALL
FAILURE. ALL GABLED ROOFS WILL FAIL...LEAVING THOSE HOMES SEVERELY
DAMAGED OR DESTROYED.

THE MAJORITY OF INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS WILL BECOME NON FUNCTIONAL.
PARTIAL TO COMPLETE WALL AND ROOF FAILURE IS EXPECTED. ALL WOOD
FRAMED LOW RISING APARTMENT BUILDINGS WILL BE DESTROYED. CONCRETE
BLOCK LOW RISE APARTMENTS WILL SUSTAIN MAJOR DAMAGE...INCLUDING SOME
WALL AND ROOF FAILURE.

HIGH RISE OFFICE AND APARTMENT BUILDINGS WILL SWAY DANGEROUSLY...A
FEW TO THE POINT OF TOTAL COLLAPSE. ALL WINDOWS WILL BLOW OUT.

AIRBORNE DEBRIS WILL BE WIDESPREAD...AND MAY INCLUDE HEAVY ITEMS SUCH
AS HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES AND EVEN LIGHT VEHICLES. SPORT UTILITY
VEHICLES AND LIGHT TRUCKS WILL BE MOVED. THE BLOWN DEBRIS WILL CREATE
ADDITIONAL DESTRUCTION. PERSONS...PETS...AND LIVESTOCK EXPOSED TO THE
WINDS WILL FACE CERTAIN DEATH IF STRUCK.

POWER OUTAGES WILL LAST FOR WEEKS...AS MOST POWER POLES WILL BE DOWN
AND TRANSFORMERS DESTROYED. WATER SHORTAGES WILL MAKE HUMAN SUFFERING
INCREDIBLE BY MODERN STANDARDS.

THE VAST MAJORITY OF NATIVE TREES WILL BE SNAPPED OR UPROOTED. ONLY
THE HEARTIEST WILL REMAIN STANDING...BUT BE TOTALLY DEFOLIATED. FEW
CROPS WILL REMAIN. LIVESTOCK LEFT EXPOSED TO THE WINDS WILL BE
KILLED.

AN INLAND HURRICANE WIND WARNING IS ISSUED WHEN SUSTAINED WINDS NEAR
HURRICANE FORCE...OR FREQUENT GUSTS AT OR ABOVE HURRICANE FORCE...ARE
CERTAIN WITHIN THE NEXT 12 TO 24 HOURS.

ONCE TROPICAL STORM AND HURRICANE FORCE WINDS ONSET...DO NOT VENTURE
OUTSIDE!

LAZ038-040-050-056>070-282100-
ASSUMPTION-LIVINGSTON-LOWER JEFFERSON-LOWER LAFOURCHE-
LOWER PLAQUEMINES-LOWER ST. BERNARD-LOWER TERREBONNE-ORLEANS-
ST. CHARLES-ST. JAMES-ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST-ST. TAMMANY-TANGIPAHOA-
UPPER JEFFERSON-UPPER LAFOURCHE-UPPER PLAQUEMINES-UPPER ST. BERNARD-
UPPER TERREBONNE-
1011 AM CDT SUN AUG 28 2005Translation: "YOU HAVE NO CHANCE TO SURVIVE MAKE YOUR TIME."

:shake:

CosmicPal
08-28-2005, 12:25 PM
OK...enough with this "they chose to live there" crap, man.

There isn't a community that isn't living near some sort of natural or unnatural danger. Many of the island countries live right at the foot of a breathing volcano, ready to erupt at any moment. Some cultures live in the deserts. Everyone in the world knows San Francisco will be falling into the ocean someday. Some even say Memphis and St. Louis will lose millions to the New Madrid fault some day.

We chose to live in nature, and nature almost always wins. If you want to live next to bears and lions, don't be surprised when they come knocking on your door in the middle of the night for your food. Just the same as living in the city- don't be surprised when someone wants your wallet.

4th and Long
08-28-2005, 12:28 PM
I'm getting that tingling feeling again ...

My Super Powers tell me that Cosmic has just told us all to STFU

Ultra Peanut
08-28-2005, 12:33 PM
I'm getting that tingling feeling again ...

My Super Powers tell me that Cosmic has just told us all to STFU And a good job of doing so, he did.

jynni
08-28-2005, 12:41 PM
I never imagined New Orleans would get wiped out before San Fran or LA. I always figured one of those two would fall into the ocean first.

So how many people do they have holed up in the Superdome?

There was an article on one of the news sites talking about people who were going to try to ride it out because they had "seen hurricanes before" and etc, etc. Some idiots don't seem to grasp just how bad this is probably gonna get.

I'm in the group that would have packed up everything that would fit in the car and would've gotten outta there before Friday.

Just considering the potential devastation that Katrina might leave makes me shiver. I hope most people really took the warning seriously and took everything of any sentimental value (pictures, herilooms, pets, etc) with them because it most likely won't be there come Tuesday.

BigMeatballDave
08-28-2005, 12:46 PM
My god. What a monster.

Max sustained winds of 175 mph. That means that there are gusts of 200 mph.Jesus H. Christ! :shake:

Count Alex's Losses
08-28-2005, 12:49 PM
When are they going to rename it to "Hurricane Larry Johnson"?

alnorth
08-28-2005, 12:50 PM
Louisiana officials have now warned that they will not attempt to help anyone who tries to ride the storm out near the shoreline untill the hurricane has passed. They do not wish to send emergency workers on a suicide mission when the city begins to flood.

chiefqueen
08-28-2005, 12:51 PM
1 P.M. Numbers are out

winds are still @ 175 MPH

Moving NW @ 13 mph

Pressure dropped to 906 Mb (was at 907 @ 10 AM)

Next update @ 4:00 PM

Bowser
08-28-2005, 12:52 PM
Who are the ChiefsPlanet folks down in that area?

Red and Gold Mania
08-28-2005, 12:57 PM
I do not post here often, but I had to chip in on this one.

As a person who lived through many hurricanes including Andrew in 1992 (I was 15) I certainly do not wish anyone to experience what my family and I have witnessed that day. That 'freight train' sound is still in my memory, our destroyed house, about 30 neighbors crammed in the small closet holding the door and holding for dear life...Small tractors were picked up from the local orange plantation and slammed against the house 3-4 miles away. The boats were picked up from the marina and you could have found them on the highway. I have seen a small car in the tree. A tree that stood in my neighborhood (about hundred years old and very thick) was split in half by a wooden 2x4. An amazing sceene, that we videotaped. The entire neighborhood was leveled and you could see for miles. The looting, the shooting, the lack of power, water, the insurance scams (people were coming from West Virginia to promise my neighbors a fix for the house, only to take their money and never be seen again) - another story.

The official dead cound was about 43, but we think the unofficial was much higher. There was a migrant Mexican community near Homestead, living on orange plantations that part of the year. Many were illegal and could never be identified. My father has seen many bodybags then 43.

Some decided never to go through this again and left. You can still find destroyed houses in the neighborhood, as we are still rebuilding.

Others decided to rebuilt and move on. We know that we live in the high risk area, but a lot of folks come here for school, job, sick family etc. Hence, I will not comment on this "you have chosen your bed" saying.

We will be praying for Lousiana people.

bringbackmarty
08-28-2005, 01:03 PM
Your premise is slightly flawed phucktard. Those of us that live in the Midwest sometimes have ample warnings of impending tornadoes. Sometime, WE DON'T! Big difference there Skippy. Those people that live on the coast/along the Gulf have had ample warning and time to evacuate. The ones that die will be from sheer stupidity for not leaving. That's also known as cleaning up the gene pool.
okay so what you are saying is because these people who cannot evacuate are born into abject poverty, with there lives dependent upon a tourist\marine economy somehow have to find a way out of a situation that they were put in, with the fewest resouces availiable in the country to help them. My wife tutored low income kids in the orleans parish school district that were fourteen years old, and my then five year old kid could read better than them. So it's their fault for not leaving. Have you ever been to new orleans? "cleaning up the gene pool" sounds like some hitler\clan shit to me.
what's the matter, the clan meeting get cancelled this weekend? You are a ****ing nazi punk and it should be you getting hit by that hurricane, not the people of new orleans.

Baby Lee
08-28-2005, 01:04 PM
(people were coming from West Virginia to promise my neighbors a fix for the house, only to take their money and never be seen again)
Cool!! Travellers!! You could'a snagged you a pre-teen bride.

bringbackmarty
08-28-2005, 01:05 PM
Gaz is none of the things you called him. You are a major league idiot.

Gaz is so and I guess you just joined him in the let's clean out the "gene pool clan." shut yer goddamned mouth old man, and let gaz defend himself.

4th and Long
08-28-2005, 01:07 PM
okay so what you are saying is because these people who cannot evacuate are born into abject poverty, with there lives dependent upon a tourist\marine economy somehow have to find a way out of a situation that they were put in, with the fewest resouces availiable in the country to help them. My wife tutored low income kids in the orleans parish school district that were fourteen years old, and my then five year old kid could read better than them. So it's their fault for not leaving. Have you ever been to new orleans? "cleaning up the gene pool" sounds like some hitler\clan shit to me.
what's the matter, the clan meeting get cancelled this weekend? You are a ****ing nazi punk and it should be you getting hit by that hurricane, not the people of new orleans.
You should really brush up on your reading before calling people Hitler, Clansmen or Nazis. You slept through history class, didn't you? Given the number of misspellings in your post, I'll hedge my bet and guess that you slept through English class as well.

Skip Towne
08-28-2005, 01:09 PM
Gaz is so and I guess you just joined him in the let's clean out the "gene pool clan." shut yer goddamned mouth old man, and let gaz defend himself.
GFY, dipshit.

alnorth
08-28-2005, 01:33 PM
Emergency workers are going door to door to evacuate people near the shore to the Louisiana Superdome. Those who wish to remain behind are being told to sign a waiver. They arent fooling around anymore, people who stay behind are essentially saying "if I die, I wont hold the city at fault".

Ultra Peanut
08-28-2005, 01:35 PM
http://www.pbs.org/now/transcript/transcript_neworleans.html

DANIEL ZWERDLING: So basically the part of New Orleans that most people in the United States and around the world think of as New Orleans would disappear under water.

JOE SUHAYDA:: That's right. During the worst of the storm, most of this area would be covered by 15 to 20 feet of water.

DANIEL ZWERDLING: Do you expect this kind of hurricane and this kind of flooding to hit New Orleans in our lifetime?

JOE SUHUYDA:Well, there-- I would say the probability is yes. In terms of past experience, we've had three storms that were near-misses that could've done at least something close to this.

DANIEL ZWERDLING: So emergency management officials are trying to get ready... they're playing a hurricane version of war games.

WALTER MAESTRI: A couple of days ago we actually had an exercise where we brought a fictitious Category Five hurricane--

DANIEL ZWERDLING: The worst.

WALTER MAESTRI: --the absolute worst, into the metropolitan area

DANIEL ZWERDLING: Walter Maestri is basically the czar of public emergencies in Jefferson Parish. It's the biggest suburb in the region.

WALTER MAESTRI:Well, when the exercise was completed it was evident that we were going to lose a lot of people we changed the name of the storm from Delaney to K-Y-A-G-B... kiss your ass goodbye... because anybody who was here as that Category Five storm came across... was gone.

memyselfI
08-28-2005, 01:36 PM
Emergency workers are going door to door to evacuate people near the shore to the Louisiana Superdome. Those who wish to remain behind [B]are being told to sign a waiver. They arent fooling around anymore, people who stay behind are essentially saying "if I die, I wont hold the city at fault".

I wish they'd make people who insist on building on the shoreline of hurricane prone regions sign similiar documents. Frankly, I'm tired of tax dollars going to continually rebuild areas that are destroyed by hurricanes and I think insurance companies shouldn't have to foot the bill either.

If it should be buyer beware if someone wants to live or build in those areas.

That being said, let's hope they are working on the worst case scenario and it doesn't happen.

Ultra Peanut
08-28-2005, 01:40 PM
Oh my God, it's down to 902mb.

"Textbook radar representation and stadium effect." - Hurricane Hunters

Emergency workers are going door to door to evacuate people near the shore to the Louisiana Superdome. Those who wish to remain behind are being told to sign a waiver. They arent fooling around anymore, people who stay behind are essentially saying "if I die, I wont hold the city at fault".While not ideal, the Superdome is elevated and built for 200 MPH winds. I hope it can withstand what may be coming its way.

A photo I took of Pompeii, A.D. 77:

4th and Long
08-28-2005, 01:43 PM
I wish they'd make people who insist on building on the shoreline of hurricane prone regions sign similiar documents. Frankly, I'm tired of tax dollars going to continually rebuild areas that are destroyed by hurricanes and I think insurance companies shouldn't have to foot the bill either.

If it should be buyer beware if someone wants to live or build in those areas.

That being said, let's hope they are working on the worst case scenario and it doesn't happen.
If you build in a flood plain around here, no one will insure you for flooding. Seems to me that building on a shoreline should come with the same sort of deal where hurricanes are involved.

alnorth
08-28-2005, 01:46 PM
What some companies will do in these cases is exclude flooding from the standard policy, and then offer it as an optional endorsement... for a price.

chiefqueen
08-28-2005, 01:49 PM
BTW, I do have a cousin who I believe will have to stay behind because he's in the LA Nat'l Guard.

His parents & brothers are on the way to Houston.

Fairplay
08-28-2005, 01:51 PM
Im waiting for Pat Robertson to come out and say that New Orleans is going to get hit with the hurricane because of their sins.

Bwana
08-28-2005, 01:57 PM
okay so what you are saying is because these people who cannot evacuate are born into abject poverty, with there lives dependent upon a tourist\marine economy somehow have to find a way out of a situation that they were put in, with the fewest resouces availiable in the country to help them. My wife tutored low income kids in the orleans parish school district that were fourteen years old, and my then five year old kid could read better than them. So it's their fault for not leaving. Have you ever been to new orleans? "cleaning up the gene pool" sounds like some hitler\clan shit to me.
what's the matter, the clan meeting get cancelled this weekend? You are a ****ing nazi punk and it should be you getting hit by that hurricane, not the people of new orleans.

WTF? Someone forget their meds today.

htismaqe
08-28-2005, 02:01 PM
Oh my God, it's down to 902mb.

"Textbook radar representation and stadium effect." - Hurricane Hunters

While not ideal, the Superdome is elevated and built for 200 MPH winds. I hope it can withstand what may be coming its way.

A photo I took of Pompeii, A.D. 77:

902 millbars and sustained winds of 184mph. It's continuing to strengthen.

4th and Long
08-28-2005, 02:02 PM
WTF? Someone forget their meds today.

http://www.chiefsplanet.com/BB/attachment.php?attachmentid=46150&stc=1
ROFL

You're close except I think you picked the wrong med.

http://www.homegrocer.com/images/products/midol%20men%20complete.gif

:D

4th and Long
08-28-2005, 02:05 PM
902 millibars and sustained winds of 184mph. It's continuing to strengthen.
My amateur meteorology background tells me this thing will continue to strengthen until it makes landfall. If this thing drops another 10 millibars, it will match the worst hurricane to ever hit, the 1935 hurricane that flattened the Florida Keys.

Phobia
08-28-2005, 02:07 PM
There's no sense beating one another up over something we can't control. BBM lived in New Orleans until recently, so he's a little more attached to the situation than the rest of us. Those of us who have no connections to the place are clearly gonna be more callouse to what's going on. Clearly, none of us want people to die a horrible death during this storm. That's just ridiculous.

BigOlChiefsfan
08-28-2005, 02:11 PM
Shaping up like the storm that hit Galveston in 1900. That one killed 6000 people. Knocked the final trainload of refugees off the tracks & into the flood.

Good luck to all the folks in LA and MS. And to those amongst ya who seem to be enjoying this scheissenfest...bad luck on you.

htismaqe
08-28-2005, 02:12 PM
My amateur meteorology background tells me this thing will continue to strengthen until it makes landfall. If this thing drops another 10 millibars, it will match the worst hurricane to ever hit, the 1935 hurricane that flattened the Florida Keys.

There's nothing in the atmosphere right now that can serve to break the thing up. The only thing that may weaken it now is cooling water temps as it approaches the mouth of the Mississippi. Of course, by then it may be too late.

Ultra Peanut
08-28-2005, 02:14 PM
Shaping up like the storm that hit Galveston in 1900.That's the thought that's been running through my head, casualty-wise... and it could end up much, much worse. :shake:

Bwana
08-28-2005, 02:14 PM
There's nothing in the atmosphere right now that can serve to break the thing up. The only thing that may weaken it now is cooling water temps as it approaches the mouth of the Mississippi. Of course, by then it may be too late.
No good at all, so does it still have N.O. as its bullseye? When are they saying it's going to hit land now?

R&GHomer
08-28-2005, 02:18 PM
No good at all, so does it still have N.O. as its bullseye? When are they saying it's going to hit land now?


Sometime late tomorrow morning. If this thing tracks like they are predicting NO and anyone that doesn't make it out are in deep shite.

4th and Long
08-28-2005, 02:20 PM
Local New Orleans news cast on the web.
http://www.wwltv.com/perl/common/video/wmPlayer.pl?title=beloint_wwltv&props=livenoad
Dial up users need not bother.

gblowfish
08-28-2005, 02:29 PM
This could be worse than 9-11. New Orleans elevation is below two bodies of water on each side, the Miss river to the west, Lake Ponchatrain to the east. Storm surge and rain could put the entire city under 10 to 15 feet of water, and noplace for the water to go. It could shut down the city for a month.

Also, loss of electric will shut down pumps. Lots of oil rigs and refineries are also in the path. That will disrupt the gas supply. This thing will also work north and do a lot of damage as it heads inland over the next few days.

Better fill up with gas tonight. Unleaded could jump another .50 to .75 a gallon next week.

This is no laughing matter. This could be the greatest natural disaster in US History. Pray for people in the path.

CosmicPal
08-28-2005, 02:45 PM
Does this mean the saints are marching out? :shrug:

BigOlChiefsfan
08-28-2005, 02:46 PM
Wasn't that a mighty storm
Wasn't that a mighty storm in the morning, well
Wasn't that a mighty storm
That blew all the people all away

You know the year of 1900
Children, many years ago
Death came howling on the ocean
Death calls, you got to go
Now Galveston had a seawall
To keep the water down, and a
High tide from the ocean
Spread the water over the town

CHORUS:

You know the trumpets give them warning
You'd better leave this place
Now, no one thought of leaving
'til death stared them in the face
And the trains they all were loaded
The people were all leaving town
The trestle gave way to the water
And the trains they went on down

CHORUS:

Rain it was a' falling
Thunder began to roll
Lightning flashed like hell fire
The wind began to blow
Death the cruel master
When the wind began to blow
Rode in on a team of horses
I cried, "Death, won't you let me go"

CHORUS:

Hey, now trees fell on the island
And the houses give away
Some they strained and drowned
Some died in most every way
And the sea began to rolling
And the ships they could not stand
And I heard a captain crying
"God save a drowning man"

CHORUS

Death your hands are clammy
You got them on my knee
You come and took my mother
Won't you come back after me
And the flood it took my neighbor
Took my brother too
I thought I heard my father calling
And I watched my mother go

CHORUS

You know the year of 1900
Children, many years ago
Death came howling on the ocean
Death calls, you got to go

Darkwolfe
08-28-2005, 02:50 PM
I spent a good bit of time in New Orleans some years ago. The city is unique, both in its people and its architecture. Despite the odor that tends to cling to Bourbon Street (especially after Mardi Gras), it's a remarkable place.

I have spent hours in Presevation Hall, soaking up classic New Orleans jazz. I've watched street corner musicians that had unreal talent plying their trade just because they loved the music so much. The Quarter is just an all about cool place.

Like any city, it has good and bad points. Some places in the Quarter, you don't want the family near. Others are just great for the family.

There is a large amount of life and history there that could be lost in the next two days. Pray for those who make their homes there, have family there, or were just visiting at the wrong moment.

----------------------------------------

I notice that the newscasters from Ch 4 in New Orleans are beginning to loose their cool a bit. Still professional, but strained.

Ultra Peanut
08-28-2005, 02:51 PM
Just to reiterate what the NWS office in NOLA released earlier:

AIRBORNE DEBRIS WILL BE WIDESPREAD...AND MAY INCLUDE HEAVY ITEMS SUCH
AS HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES AND EVEN LIGHT VEHICLES. SPORT UTILITY
VEHICLES AND LIGHT TRUCKS WILL BE MOVED. THE BLOWN DEBRIS WILL CREATE
ADDITIONAL DESTRUCTION. PERSONS...PETS...AND LIVESTOCK EXPOSED TO THE
WINDS WILL FACE CERTAIN DEATH IF STRUCK.

POWER OUTAGES WILL LAST FOR WEEKS...AS MOST POWER POLES WILL BE DOWN
AND TRANSFORMERS DESTROYED. WATER SHORTAGES WILL MAKE HUMAN SUFFERING
INCREDIBLE BY MODERN STANDARDS.

THE VAST MAJORITY OF NATIVE TREES WILL BE SNAPPED OR UPROOTED. ONLY
THE HEARTIEST WILL REMAIN STANDING...BUT BE TOTALLY DEFOLIATED. FEW
CROPS WILL REMAIN. LIVESTOCK LEFT EXPOSED TO THE WINDS WILL BE
KILLED. This could be beyond horrific.

Darkwolfe
08-28-2005, 02:54 PM
Just to reiterate what the NWS office in NOLA released earlier:

This could be beyond horrific.


In 25 years of storm chasing, amatuer forecasting, etc., I have never seen the NWS put out a bulletin that so bluntly stated that you were likely to die from the weather.

gblowfish
08-28-2005, 02:57 PM
This message released this afternoon by the National Weather Service for the Greater New Orleans Area:

NWS outlines grim forecast of devastion expected across area
The National Weather Service has issued a special statement outlining the damage that might be caused if Hurricane Katrina makes landfall as a strong Category 4 or Category 5 storm.

“Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks, perhaps longer,” says the statement. “At least one-half of well-constructed homes will have roof and wall failure. All gabled roofs will fail, leaving those homes severely damaged or destroyed.

The statement says the majority of industrial buildings will become “non-functional,” with partial or complete wall and roof failure.

“All wood-framed low-rising apartments will sustain major damage, including some wall and roof failure,” the statement said. “Concrete block low-rise apartments will sustain major damage, including some wall and roof failure.”

The statement says high-rise office and apartment buildings will sway dangerously, “a few to the point of total collapse.” And all their windows will blow out.

Airborne debris will be widespread, and may include heavy items — household appliances and light cars and trucks —and even sport utility vehicles and trucks will be moved.

“The blown debris will create additional destruction,” the statement said. “Persons, pets and livestock exposed to the winds will face certain death if struck.”

Power outages will last for weeks because most power poles will be down and transformers will be destroyed. Most trees will be snapped or uprooted and even the heartiest, if they survive, will be stripped of all leaves.

Ultra Peanut
08-28-2005, 02:58 PM
I spent a good bit of time in New Orleans some years ago. The city is unique, both in its people and its architecture. Despite the odor that tends to cling to Bourbon Street (especially after Mardi Gras), it's a remarkable place.

I have spent hours in Presevation Hall, soaking up classic New Orleans jazz. I've watched street corner musicians that had unreal talent plying their trade just because they loved the music so much. The Quarter is just an all about cool place.

Like any city, it has good and bad points. Some places in the Quarter, you don't want the family near. Others are just great for the family.

There is a large amount of life and history there that could be lost in the next two days. Pray for those who make their homes there, have family there, or were just visiting at the wrong moment.I'm on the verge of tears just thinking about this. The potential loss of life trumps the potential loss of such an unbelievably wonderful, unique place, but bundled all together, it's just... mindblowing. I don't think anyone's really capable of processing that what may be about to happen really could happen.

Since making my first trip in 2003, I've always looked forward to going again sometime...

Mile High Mania
08-28-2005, 03:03 PM
So, are they really filling the football stadium up with people that cannot get out of town?

siberian khatru
08-28-2005, 03:03 PM
Watching Jim Cantore on Weather Channel now, in Biloxi, and he is deeply pessimistic.

This is really scary, folks.

siberian khatru
08-28-2005, 03:04 PM
In 25 years of storm chasing, amatuer forecasting, etc., I have never seen the NWS put out a bulletin that so bluntly stated that you were likely to die from the weather.


I had the same reaction.

Chilling. Absolutely chilling.

Patriot 21
08-28-2005, 03:05 PM
Does this mean the saints are marching out? :shrug:

If that was supposed to be funny......it wasn't. :(

Red and Gold Mania
08-28-2005, 03:07 PM
Here in So.Fla, they are saying that some parts of the city could be uninhabitable for several months or even one year.

I spoke to my mom. She is reliving the Andrew experience, just walking in circles and crying all day long.

They will rebuilt and survive. I am positive about it. Keep the faith!

Ultra Peanut
08-28-2005, 03:07 PM
Watching Jim Cantore on Weather Channel now, in Biloxi, and he is deeply pessimistic.

This is really scary, folks.I'd try to throw out some remark about how he's probably just bummed he doesn't get to experience it in NOLA (I firmly believe that he will die in a hurricane someday, and with his dying breath, he'll be like, "WHERE ELSE WOULD YOU RATHER BE BUT RIGHT HERE, RIGHT NOW?"), but I can't even muster anything.

He was really, really pessimistic about the chances of those trying to get onto I-10 from Biloxi. :shake:

I have to agree with him when he said it almost looks fake. Someone from the Hurricane Hunters called it a "perfect storm" earlier.

Red and Gold Mania
08-28-2005, 03:10 PM
Psicosis, I think some of the outside media from like NY or Buffalo lives for this shit. They are wetting their pants whenever they see a storm on a horizon. I hate them more then Drew Rosenhaus!

Phobia
08-28-2005, 03:10 PM
So, are they really filling the football stadium up with people that cannot get out of town?

That scares me almost as much as anything else. What is the rationale there?

Mile High Mania
08-28-2005, 03:12 PM
They said almost 100,000 "stuck" in New Orleans and now there's a freaking line of folks outside the stadium.

4th and Long
08-28-2005, 03:16 PM
That scares me almost as much as anything else. What is the rationale there?
I'm guessing that their rationale is,
(1) The more people they put in the stadium, the less congested the roads out of town will be, and
(2) I believe the Super Dome was constructed to withstand 200 mph winds.

Just a guess.

Darkwolfe
08-28-2005, 03:16 PM
That scares me almost as much as anything else. What is the rationale there?

The rational is that the stadium is on a built up area above sea level and is designed to withstand 200mph winds before taking damage. The bad news is that the wind gust may well be above that mark.

Hope and pray that those who can't get out in time, can survive in the shelters. Both at the Superdome and elsewhere.

Ch4 New Orleans feed is running on that at this moment.

Red and Gold Mania
08-28-2005, 03:19 PM
The hurricane is making a jog west of the NHC track. Not good.

LINK below:

http://www.sfwmd.gov/org/omd/ops/weather/vortex.html

Ultra Peanut
08-28-2005, 03:19 PM
They said almost 100,000 "stuck" in New Orleans and now there's a freaking line of folks outside the stadium.From WWL:

"I think that we have no idea how many we're going to anticipate. . . it's going to be very unpleasant. We're not here to feed people, we're here to ensure that, come Tuesday morning, these people are alive. . . we're going to be flooded on the bottom level and out of electricity, so we'll have a security issue. There will probably be 25-30,000 people in full."

This is coming from my fairly uninformed perspective, and I don't mean to sound harsh in what is a ridiculously difficult situation for all, but the Superdome is looking like a rather unfit, unprepared shelter. Sad thing is, it's looking like one of the few feasible options for those left behind.

But again, the guy in the interview was trying to urge people to GET THE HELL OUT NOW, and saying everyone should expect the Superdome experience to be, and I quote, "a miserable night."

And after Tuesday morning, what?

FloridaChief
08-28-2005, 03:20 PM
I'm just old enough to remember Hurricane Camille in '69 and the damage it did in southern Louisiana. 280 or so deaths, IIRC.

Holy God, this one looks to dwarf that storm...

R&GHomer
08-28-2005, 03:21 PM
That scares me almost as much as anything else. What is the rationale there?


Because it's located on one of the highest points in the city, and it's designed to withstand winds in excess of 160 mph. At least that's what their saying. For the sake of all those people, I sure hope they are correct.

Phobia
08-28-2005, 03:23 PM
Okay - I didn't know the stadium was built that well. But, I'm concerned about evacuation afterwards. If the whole city is under water and will likely be under water for a month or more, how do you evacuate the dome?

Darkwolfe
08-28-2005, 03:24 PM
And after Tuesday morning, what?

After Tuesday morning, we discover if New Orleans still exists or not. :(

chefsos
08-28-2005, 03:24 PM
That scares me almost as much as anything else. What is the rationale there?

I'm puzzled by this idea, too.
It's been said here that the Superdome is on higher ground, but what if the water still rises above the doors and gets inside? Will those inside be trapped?
It's also claimed that the place can withstand 200mph winds. How the hell do you test that? What if it can't?
I suppose it's preferable being there than wandering the streets, but if the building goes down with thousands inside, that could end up becoming the lasting image of this potential tragedy.

4th and Long
08-28-2005, 03:26 PM
If the whole city is under water and will likely be under water for a month or more, how do you evacuate the dome?
Ummm .. boats? :shrug:

gblowfish
08-28-2005, 03:26 PM
Camille in 1969 hit just a little east of New Orleans. Check out this site:
http://www.maritimemuseum.org/camille/

R&GHomer
08-28-2005, 03:27 PM
Okay - I didn't know the stadium was built that well. But, I'm concerned about evacuation afterwards. If the whole city is under water and will likely be under water for a month or more, how do you evacuate the dome?


Got me.... Boats I guess. Wow, this could be really, really bad. My prayers are definetly going out to those that can't make it out of the city.

Nzoner
08-28-2005, 03:33 PM
Just want to say in advance I'm not making a joke here as I feel for evryone in the path of this monster but since this is a football board I'm just curious as to what the worst case scenario means for the Saints.

I was thinking a 16 game road schedule,however,there's a twist there as well as the Saints are scheduled to play the G-men in their home opener and the Jets will be in the Meadowlands that same weekend.

alnorth
08-28-2005, 03:36 PM
The hurricane is making a jog west of the NHC track. Not good.

LINK below:

http://www.sfwmd.gov/org/omd/ops/weather/vortex.html

Well, sh**. The best hope New Orleans had was if it drifted east. The worst part of the hurricane is its eastern side, the western side has slower wind speeds because of the counter-clockwise winds relative to the direction the storm moves.

Having the eye of that damned hurricane drift west of New Orleans is even worse than a head-on collision, unless it just keeps skewing way the hell to the west.

BigOlChiefsfan
08-28-2005, 03:39 PM
Time to start thinking about what the rest of us can do for these rascals soon-and please, no more talk about 'not caring because they chose to live there'. Bad things can happen to any of us, no matter where we live. We're all still Americans and who the hell ever helps the USA? Besides the rest of us Americans, that is.

In 48 hours, this just MIGHT be the equivalant of a 'US Tsunami'. A whole lot of rapid-response just might be called for. Start thinking, who do you trust to deliver your yankee dollar donations to a hard-luck creole queen? The Red Cross is my first choice, but if y'all have better ideas...I'm listening.

Meanwhile, a good day to whip up your own little 'bug out bag' in case bad things happen to hit 'where YOU foolishly chose to live'. raider happens.

gblowfish
08-28-2005, 03:41 PM
Here's the website of the Superdome.
http://www.superdome.com/site.php

Red and Gold Mania
08-28-2005, 03:42 PM
Absolutely right, alnorth. The NE quadrant is the worst. You add the sustained winds + the motion speed, to even get worse wind speeds. That quadrant statistically has the strongest tornado activities too.

Well, sh**. The best hope New Orleans had was if it drifted east. The worst part of the hurricane is its eastern side, the western side has slower wind speeds because of the counter-clockwise winds relative to the direction the storm moves.

Having the eye of that damned hurricane drift west of New Orleans is even worse than a head-on collision, unless it just keeps skewing way the hell to the west.

Red and Gold Mania
08-28-2005, 03:45 PM
Red cross is good, Chiefsfan. When we went through Andrew a lot of people donated can foods, but no can opener so they were useless. I would say water, can food, can opener, bug sprays, water purifiers...

I guess all you can think of. We are already mobilizing here...

Time to start thinking about what the rest of us can do for these rascals soon-and please, no more talk about 'not caring because they chose to live there'. Bad things can happen to any of us, no matter where we live. We're all still Americans and who the hell ever helps the USA? Besides the rest of us Americans, that is.

In 48 hours, this just MIGHT be the equivalant of a 'US Tsunami'. A whole lot of rapid-response just might be called for. Start thinking, who do you trust to deliver your yankee dollar donations to a hard-luck creole queen? The Red Cross is my first choice, but if y'all have better ideas...I'm listening.

Meanwhile, a good day to whip up your own little 'bug out bag' in case bad things happen to hit 'where YOU foolishly chose to live'. Raider happens.

JOhn
08-28-2005, 03:45 PM
WOW, just talked to a buddy of mine who works for the Power & Light company, and they are preparing to leave tonight to head for the N.O area.

They are told they will be staging about 300+ miles north of the coast, to be ready to assist in the cleanup area

Phobia
08-28-2005, 03:48 PM
In 48 hours, this just MIGHT be the equivalant of a 'US Tsunami'. A whole lot of rapid-response just might be called for. Start thinking, who do you trust to deliver your yankee dollar donations to a hard-luck creole queen? The Red Cross is my first choice, but if y'all have better ideas...I'm listening.

The red-cross is a beurocratic nightmare. Their overhead is out of this world. Your best bet is to find a Louisianna based charity where your dollar will have the biggest impact. Otherwise, 38 cents of every dollar is paying employees along the way.

Darkwolfe
08-28-2005, 03:49 PM
Ch 4 feed "Superdome is the shelter of last resort"

Phobia
08-28-2005, 03:49 PM
WOW, just talked to a buddy of mine who works for the Power & Light company, and they are preparing to leave tonight to head for the N.O area.

They are told they will be staging about 300+ miles north of the coast, to be ready to assist in the cleanup area

I'm actually considering it. I just don't know how I would find funding to pay my bills and my expenses while I'm down there.

Darkwolfe
08-28-2005, 03:50 PM
I'm actually considering it. I just don't know how I would find funding to pay my bills and my expenses while I'm down there.

Same thought here.

Red and Gold Mania
08-28-2005, 03:50 PM
5PM advisory soon.

Phobia
08-28-2005, 03:51 PM
Just want to say in advance I'm not making a joke here as I feel for evryone in the path of this monster but since this is a football board I'm just curious as to what the worst case scenario means for the Saints.

I was thinking a 16 game road schedule,however,there's a twist there as well as the Saints are scheduled to play the G-men in their home opener and the Jets will be in the Meadowlands that same weekend.

They discussed this last year and would likely play in Baton Rouge or the Astrodome.

BigOlChiefsfan
08-28-2005, 03:53 PM
http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000006&sid=a77xZXLAqpzY&refer=home

More bad news. Could be the most costly storm to ever hit the US.

Bloomberg/Reuters indicating that a lot of older offshore US oil/gas production isn't designed to withstand storms of this magnitude. The energy market writers are 'dismissing' about 25% of the Gulf production after Katrina in their price calculations.

What the heck, gasoline prices were just too low, anyway.

http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000006&sid=aF9SxgEvDm.Y&refer=home

Ultra Peanut
08-28-2005, 03:54 PM
Winds now "only" 165 mph, but the pressure is still 902mb, so it's most likely not weakening much, on the whole.

http://radar.weather.gov/radar/loop/DS.p20-r/si.klix.shtml

I hear the Jaws music. :(

This thing is already basically due south of NOLA, now. Barring a true "hand of God" type of eastward shift, this is really about to happen.

gblowfish
08-28-2005, 03:55 PM
Fox has been watching the line of people going into the Superdome. There was a guy wearing a Priest Holmes jersey.

They're still drinking on Bourbon Street.

There's estimated 150,000 to 200,000 still left in town.

This could get ugly.

Phobia
08-28-2005, 03:59 PM
They're still drinking on Bourbon Street.


Wow. I don't know what to say.

Red and Gold Mania
08-28-2005, 04:01 PM
They have no clue what is about to hit them.

VonneMarie
08-28-2005, 04:02 PM
Fox has been watching the line of people going into the Superdome. There was a guy wearing a Priest Holmes jersey.

They're still drinking on Bourbon Street.

There's estimated 150,000 to 200,000 still left in town.

This could get ugly.
Those people have no clue what's coming. :shake:

BigOlChiefsfan
08-28-2005, 04:03 PM
"Watching the TV footage of backed-up traffic trying to escape New Orleans, I'm surprised that they haven't switched the inbound lanes over to outbound as well. And listening to interviews of people stuck in New Orleans I'm struck by how many people don't understand that if you wait for orders to evacuate, by then everyone else will be trying to evacuate too and it will be much harder. I suspect, however, that part of people's slowness to respond stems from the overhyping of previous hurricanes."

Yes, this. NOLA folk I knew were notorious for considering a hurricane warning as an excuse to have a party. 9 times out of 10, they're right to ignore the warnings and have fun. That 10th time may just kill 'em. And I've been wondering when they were gonna open the 'inbound' lanes for outbound traffic. People are gonna run out of gas and DIE sitting on the tarmac waiting to GTF out of town.

Darkwolfe
08-28-2005, 04:03 PM
Uh oh.. The major highways out of New Orleans have turned into parking lots. They think they still have time to get out, but the thought of all those people getting caught by the storm on the road is chilling.

R&GHomer
08-28-2005, 04:05 PM
I don't normally get too worked up over natural disasters, but I really have a bad feeling about this one.

BigOlChiefsfan
08-28-2005, 04:06 PM
Let's not forget...everyone who runs a gas station has closed up and headed for higher ground as well. You've got the gas in your tank to get to where you're going. That's it, amigo.

R&GHomer
08-28-2005, 04:06 PM
Now their reporting that the police are starting to close off the highways....

VonneMarie
08-28-2005, 04:07 PM
They're closing the bridges in and out to NO.

RedDread
08-28-2005, 04:07 PM
First rain bands are hitting NO Winds 50-75, dropping up to 2 inches of rain per hour in some places.

memyselfI
08-28-2005, 04:08 PM
Has anyone heard how large numbers of the National Guard being out of the country might impact the post hurricane cleanup and security in the Gulf Area.

mlyonsd
08-28-2005, 04:08 PM
ABC just reported if there was a category 6 hurricane this one would qualify.

Godspeed to anyone that has to face it.

Darkwolfe
08-28-2005, 04:08 PM
Hurricane generated tornadoes are beginning. Warning in Mobile, AL.


"..but I really have a bad feeling about this one."

Yeah me too..

Ch 4 stream... "The pumps will be underwater and useless."

RedDread
08-28-2005, 04:11 PM
Question: Are they talking about the water just coming over the top of the levees, or is there a possibility of the levees collapsing entirely?

mlyonsd
08-28-2005, 04:12 PM
Has anyone heard how large numbers of the National Guard being out of the country might impact the post hurricane cleanup and security in the Gulf Area.

You're pathetic.

I'm betting Americans will help other Americans, just like we always do.

Phobia
08-28-2005, 04:13 PM
When does the local media leave?

I'm guessing those locals would pay a whole lot more attention if they turned on the idiot box to an empty newsdesk.

You want to help people evacuate? Ditch the station and open up people's eyes.

R&GHomer
08-28-2005, 04:14 PM
Question: Are they talking about the water just coming over the top of the levees, or is there a possibility of the levees collapsing entirely?


I think they are predicting the storm surge to go over the levees, enough to submerge NO in over 25 feet of water.

Donger
08-28-2005, 04:14 PM
Has anyone heard how large numbers of the National Guard being out of the country might impact the post hurricane cleanup and security in the Gulf Area.

Give it a f*cking rest.

Phobia
08-28-2005, 04:14 PM
Question: Are they talking about the water just coming over the top of the levees, or is there a possibility of the levees collapsing entirely?I doubt the levees collapse. Once the "bowl" begins accumulating water, the pressure on the levees will be equalized.

Darkwolfe
08-28-2005, 04:14 PM
Question: Are they talking about the water just coming over the top of the levees, or is there a possibility of the levees collapsing entirely?

Over the top. The levees are extremely thick, so collapse is unlikely. If that were to happen, there would be no chance of the city surviving.

memyselfI
08-28-2005, 04:15 PM
You're pathetic.

I'm betting Americans will help other Americans, just like we always do.

Pathetic?

Really? If there is a curfew and only uniformed people are allowed on the streets how will other Americans help?

You are talking rescue missions in addition to protecting property from looters. The amount of trained people needed might be in the tens of thousands.

siberian khatru
08-28-2005, 04:15 PM
Question: Are they talking about the water just coming over the top of the levees, or is there a possibility of the levees collapsing entirely?

Cue Led Zeppelin.

Ultra Peanut
08-28-2005, 04:15 PM
"It's not gonna miss us this time, folks. This isn't a time when where going to get a last-minute reprieve." -- WWL weatherman

"At this point, we're almost numb." -- WWL anchor

Uh oh.. The major highways out of New Orleans have turned into parking lots. They think they still have time to get out, but the thought of all those people getting caught by the storm on the road is chilling.I know someone who was caught on I-40 in Memphis during "Hurricane (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memphis_Summer_Storm_of_2003) Elvis (http://blogcritics.org/archives/2004/07/22/024342.php)," the derecho (http://www.spc.noaa.gov/misc/AbtDerechos/casepages/kc1982mem2003pwrpage.htm) that blasted the city with 100+ mph winds in 2003 and left unbelievable amounts of damage in its wake. He said it was utterly horrifying.

That was sudden and unexpected. I cannot imagine what it would be like to have a Category 5 hurricane closing in and knowing you're stuck...

The shots of the mobs of people standing outside the Superdome are heartbreaking.

Jenny Gump
08-28-2005, 04:17 PM
This is sad. I hope a bunch of people don't die.

jynni
08-28-2005, 04:18 PM
You are talking rescue missions in addition to protecting property from looters. The amount of people needed might be in the tens of thousands.
Well - they way it's looking, the city will be underwater for a month so they'll have plenty of time to mobilze.

Though, I guess the looters could always get scuba gear.

Red and Gold Mania
08-28-2005, 04:18 PM
Are there a lot of folks stuck in the city that DID heed the warning and tried to evacuate?

4th and Long
08-28-2005, 04:19 PM
Cue Led Zeppelin.
If it keeps on rainin', levee's goin' to break,
If it keeps on rainin', levee's goin' to break,
When The Levee Breaks I'll have no place to stay.

Mean old levee taught me to weep and moan,
Mean old levee taught me to weep and moan,
Got what it takes to make a mountain man leave his home,
Oh, well, oh, well, oh, well.

Don't it make you feel bad
When you're tryin' to find your way home,
You don't know which way to go?
If you're goin' down South
They go no work to do,
If you don't know about Chicago.

Cryin' won't help you, prayin' won't do you no good,
Now, cryin' won't help you, prayin' won't do you no good,
When the levee breaks, mama, you got to move.

All last night sat on the levee and moaned,
All last night sat on the levee and moaned,
Thinkin' about me baby and my happy home.
Going, going to Chicago... Going to Chicago... Sorry but I can't take you...
Going down... going down now... going down....

alnorth
08-28-2005, 04:19 PM
The levees are not likely to actually break, if that happened, Lake Pontchartrain to the north of New Orleans would rush in and swallow the city. As it is, we are looking at water rushing over the top of the levees and creating a bowl filled with water that we'd have to bail out for months. For the walls of the bowl itself to actually collapse is unthinkable.

TopJet2
08-28-2005, 04:20 PM
I spent some time last year in Pensacola helping rebuild the cable system there. Ivan was a smaller storm and I was totally in awe as to the damage there. I can only imagine what it will be like in NO. In fact there were a few COX guys from there that helped out in Pensacola. Hope they all got the hell out.

Ultra Peanut
08-28-2005, 04:21 PM
God, this really could be like something out of a horrible disaster movie. Cholera and other water-borne illnesses, immense potable water shortages, floating corpses (both "fresh" and from the above-ground tombs)... I would not wish being stuck in this storm or its aftermath on anyone.

Well - they way it's looking, the city will be underwater for a month so they'll have plenty of time to mobilze.

Though, I guess the looters could always get scuba gear.Indeed. Looting is not even close to being a major concern. In fact, if widespread looting is possible, it might very well be great news.

VonneMarie
08-28-2005, 04:25 PM
The Super Dome rules. If they are being unruly, they will kick them out into the elements. ROFL

Donger
08-28-2005, 04:26 PM
Wow. 20 to 30,000 are expected at the Superdome.

alnorth
08-28-2005, 04:27 PM
Damn, I'm now hearing that the National Guard authorities for the Louisiana Superdome are telling people who seek shelter that they need to behave themselves and follow all the basic laws of civility we've come to expect.

They dont have a large police force or an ability to forceably restrain criminals, people who become unruly and dangerous to others will be kicked out of the Superdome to face the elements, even during the storm.

Bwana
08-28-2005, 04:28 PM
They're still drinking on Bourbon Street.


I caught that myself, dumb shits. Sitting around the street waiting for the storm sucking down cocktails. By the time they catch a clue, they are going to die. :shake:

memyselfI
08-28-2005, 04:29 PM
Damn, I'm now hearing that the National Guard authorities for the Louisiana Superdome are telling people who seek shelter that they need to behave themselves and follow all the basic laws of civility we've come to expect.

They dont have a large police force or an ability to forceably restrain criminals, people who become unruly and dangerous to others will be kicked out of the Superdome to face the elements, even during the storm.


Apparently last time there was some unruliness and looting at the end of the shelter stay.

BigOlChiefsfan
08-28-2005, 04:29 PM
"when the miscreant realized the ramifications of his nefarious actions, he was totally blown away"

memyselfI
08-28-2005, 04:46 PM
With all of the hysteria of what might happen as far as predictions, has anyone said what are the chances of it dissipating (even by miracle) to a lesser hurricane before it hits landfall?

Hoping for a miracle...

Katipan
08-28-2005, 04:52 PM
They're predicting it will be a cat 4 by NO

mikey23545
08-28-2005, 04:57 PM
My heart goes out to all of the people in the path of this storm...

Best of luck to all of them...

Ultra Peanut
08-28-2005, 05:02 PM
I always think of Mike Seidel when I think of Slidell, LA.

royr17
08-28-2005, 05:06 PM
If I was people in New Orleans i'd hurry up and get out of New Orleans, RIGHT NOW, as big as that thing is and it looks as if its projected path is headin towards New Orleans, this is goin to end up being a catastropic disaster, probably one of the worst to come in a long long time.

Skip Towne
08-28-2005, 05:06 PM
I always think of Mike Seidel when I think of Slidell, LA.
I always think of Bobby Rydell.

alnorth
08-28-2005, 05:08 PM
With all of the hysteria of what might happen as far as predictions, has anyone said what are the chances of it dissipating (even by miracle) to a lesser hurricane before it hits landfall?

Hoping for a miracle...

Theres a chance that it could weaken down to a Category 4, but that would still be way too strong. The levies were designed to hold back water churned up by a category 3 storm, its pretty much all but certain that the city will flood, its just a matter of how badly.

Braincase
08-28-2005, 05:29 PM
I always think of Bobby Rydell.

I think of Rydell High, and the principal their, Eve Arden.

Summer Nights, had me a blast...

gblowfish
08-28-2005, 05:35 PM
Here's another website on Camille in 1969. Awesome.
http://www.geocities.com/hurricanene/hurricanecamille.htm

Frazod
08-28-2005, 05:46 PM
Watching the Darwin hopefuls on FoxNews right now. Amazingly stupid people who will likely be dead very soon. :shake:

chiefsfan987
08-28-2005, 05:47 PM
I'm watching that too. What a bunch of idiots!

R&GHomer
08-28-2005, 05:52 PM
Absolutely fuggin incredible. I heard some one cuss and get rude with a reporter when asked why he hasn't left. I just hope that everyone that wants to leave can. The others can just help clean up the local gene pool.

mlyonsd
08-28-2005, 05:57 PM
Pathetic?

Really? If there is a curfew and only uniformed people are allowed on the streets how will other Americans help?

You are talking rescue missions in addition to protecting property from looters. The amount of trained people needed might be in the tens of thousands.

You were trolling and were caught.

There won't be any consequences of NG out of state and you know it.

JOhn
08-28-2005, 05:57 PM
I'm actually considering it. I just don't know how I would find funding to pay my bills and my expenses while I'm down there.
There sending 2 crews from this area and he said that his Bro in law who's a contractor is making plans to head out monday or tuesday, after he has a better idea were the need is greatest.

KChiefs1
08-28-2005, 05:57 PM
By the next afternoon (17 August), reconnaissance aircraft reached Hurricane Camille about 2:00 p.m. CDT, 100 miles south of the Mississippi coast. Historic conditions now existed in the tightly knotted vortex of Camille. The aircraft had measured a barometric pressure of 905 mb (26.73). This was one of the lowest barometric pressure readings ever measured by aircraft up to that time. Only two supertyphoons in the Pacific - Ida in 1958 (873 mb/25.90), and Marge in 1951(895 mb/26.20), had a lower barometric pressure been measured (JTWC 1976). Sustained winds had now increased to an incredible 190 mph. Camille was now estimated to make landfall along the Mississippi coast around midnight on the 17th.

Katrina is actually worse than Camille...latest readings I've seen are 902 mb's & 28 feet storm surge.

R&GHomer
08-28-2005, 05:58 PM
I'm reminded of a Ron White skit. It's not that the wind is blowin..... It's what the wind is blowin! If you get hit by a Volvo, it really doesn't matter how many situps you did that morning.