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Ultra Peanut
08-30-2005, 10:38 PM
Since some genius decided that an 800-post thread -- of which maybe 2% was politically-motivated -- detailing the biggest natural disaster this nation has ever faced should be relocated to a forum a large portion of the members of this site ignore, here's the new thread.

At the very least, the old one should have been locked and a new one started in its place, if you were too lazy to pluck the Denise bitchfests out and move those posts to DC.

Halfcan
08-30-2005, 10:41 PM
It is unbelievable how much damage this storm did. My prayers go out to them.

WoodDraw
08-30-2005, 10:43 PM
One of the more interesting (in the sad, sick kind of way) aspects of this to watch over the coming week will be how this area can respond to an actual refugee crisis. The US have never had to deal with millions of people no longer having places to live.

The storm may be over but the problems are just now beginning. Things are going to get a hell of a lot worse before they get better.

BigRedChief
08-30-2005, 10:44 PM
http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/interactive/weather/0508/gallery.katrina.tues.pm/01.01.ap.jpg
Water from the broken levee spilling into downtown New Orleans

Phobia
08-30-2005, 10:47 PM
I know you're going through a stressful time, Psicosis. Have you ever tried to "split" an 800 post thread? I don't have all night. The politicizing of that thread wasn't only Denize and it wasn't the first time it had been done. A new Katrina thread won't hurt anything. Keep the politics where they belong, people. Denize, maybe you should just keep your thoughts in DC instead of buttonpushing on this thread. If you bring politics into this thread as well, you'll be going to D.C. instead of the thread.

Ultra Peanut
08-30-2005, 10:47 PM
http://today.reuters.co.uk/news/NewsArticle.aspx?type=topNews&storyID=2005-08-31T034223Z_01_ROB586049_RTRUKOC_0_UK-WEATHER-KATRINA.xml

New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin reported bodies floating in the floodwaters, which may have measured 20 feet (6 metres) deep in places.

Officials said a 3-foot (0.9-metre) shark had been spotted cruising the flooded streets.

"What I saw today is equivalent to what I saw flying over the tsunami in Indonesia. There are places that are no longer there," said Sen. Mary Landrieu of Louisiana after flying over the damaged area.

Ultra Peanut
08-30-2005, 10:50 PM
I know you're going through a stressful time, Psicosis. Have you ever tried to "split" an 800 post thread? I don't have all night. The politicizing of that thread wasn't only Denize and it wasn't the first time it had been done. A new Katrina thread won't hurt anything. Keep the politics where they belong, people. Denize, maybe you should just keep your thoughts in DC instead of buttonpushing on this thread. If you bring politics into this thread as well, you'll be going to D.C. instead of the thread.Denise is an instigator, without a doubt, but effectively ruining any chance of latecomers being able to see and have easy access to a thread rife with all sorts of important information is not a good thing. I saw maybe fifteen posts, total, with political content in them.

Another really unfortunate thing is the timing. The information collected in that thread is, for the most part, all we'll know until tomorrow morning. And now it's buried.

ZootedGranny
08-30-2005, 10:53 PM
http://home.kc.rr.com/mkbaslee/notmypic_thatsracist.gif

Demonpenz
08-30-2005, 10:54 PM
yeah are adjusters from our cat team won't be there for 4-10 weeks

Ultra Peanut
08-30-2005, 10:55 PM
http://img362.imageshack.us/img362/9104/thatsracist6iq.gifYeppers, saw a mention of the divergent descriptions in those captions a few hours ago.

Surprising? No-siree-Bob.

HOLY SHIT, A WONDER SHOWZEN CLIP! Nice gif.

BigRedChief
08-30-2005, 10:56 PM
Some amazing pictures of the damage in this thread:

Click Me (http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?threadid=85598&perpage=25&pagenumber=1)

Halfcan
08-30-2005, 10:56 PM
Holy crap big red-that pic is just unbelievable.

A shark in the streets feeding on bodies??

US has a lot of work to do right now to rebuild two states.

BigRedChief
08-30-2005, 11:02 PM
CNN article on evacuating the NO shelters:
http://www.cnn.com/2005/WEATHER/08/30/katrina/index.html

Deteriorating conditions in New Orleans will force authorities to evacuate the thousands of people at city shelters, including the Superdome, where a policeman told CNN unrest was escalating.
The officer expressed concern that the situation could worsen overnight after three shootings, looting and a number of attempted carjackings during the afternoon. (See video of the looting -- 1:25 (javascript:cnnVideo('play','/video/us/2005/08/30/von.la.looting.various.affl'');) )

Phobia
08-30-2005, 11:03 PM
Uh - carjackings on the rise is a little surprising. I'd be jacking yachts down there. Know what I mean?

WoodDraw
08-30-2005, 11:05 PM
Here is another great slide show of the damage from a local news station:

Click Me (http://www.wwltv.com/sharedcontent/breakingnews/slideshow/083005_dmnkatrina/1.html)

Demonpenz
08-30-2005, 11:06 PM
for once "great" is actually used properly

BigRedChief
08-30-2005, 11:06 PM
Holy crap big red-that pic is just unbelievable.

A shark in the streets feeding on bodies??

US has a lot of work to do right now to rebuild two states.

They have ordered every single person out of New Orleans. Complete evacuation of a major american city. No BS.

alnorth
08-30-2005, 11:08 PM
WTF. Moving that thread, especially when it gets to that size, which had absolutely nothing to do with politics whatsoever, was dumb and/or lazy. That was a hell of a lot of good informative content deep-6'd in a thread that was not even a little bit political. If some people consistently breaks the rules, perhaps they should be banned or isolated.

BigRedChief
08-30-2005, 11:08 PM
Inmates from a flooded parish jail were relocated to a freeway on-ramp, where they sat out in the sun, under the watch of armed officers.

BigRedChief
08-30-2005, 11:10 PM
Here is another great slide show of the damage from a local news station:

Click Me (http://www.wwltv.com/sharedcontent/breakingnews/slideshow/083005_dmnkatrina/1.html)

Holy Chit WoodDraw what a find! :clap:

Halfcan
08-30-2005, 11:14 PM
Awesome post wooddraw that it unfreakinbelievable!! I just can't imagine it that hit here.

BigRedChief
08-30-2005, 11:17 PM
Wanna help?
The Federal Emergency Management Agency lists these organizations for those seeking to assist victims of Hurricane Katrina:
Donate cash

American Red Cross (800) HELP NOW (435-7669) English; (800) 257-7575 Spanish

Operation Blessing (800) 436-6348
America's Second Harvest (800) 344-8070
To donate cash or volunteer

Adventist Community Services (800) 381-7171
Catholic Charities, USA (703) 549-1390
Christian Disaster Response (941) 956-5183 or (941) 551-9554
Christian Reformed World Relief Committee (800) 848-5818
Church World Service (800) 297-1516
Convoy of Hope (417) 823-8998
Lutheran Disaster Response (800) 638-3522
Mennonite Disaster Service (717) 859-2210
Nazarene Disaster Response (888) 256-5886
Presbyterian Disaster Assistance (800) 872-3283
Salvation Army (800) SAL-ARMY (725-2769)
Southern Baptist Convention -- Disaster Relief (800) 462-8657, ext. 6133
United Methodist Committee on Relief (800) 554-8583

KingPriest2
08-30-2005, 11:19 PM
Now this is sad and bad



Tuesday, August 30, 2005



Children's Hospital under seige

Tuesday, 11:45 p.m.

Late Tuesday, Gov. Blanco spokeswoman Denise Bottcher described a disturbing scene unfolding in uptown New Orleans, where looters were trying to break into Children's Hospital.

Bottcher said the director of the hospital fears for the safety of the staff and the 100 kids inside the hospital. The director said the hospital is locked, but that the looters were trying to break in and had gathered outside the facility.

The director has sought help from the police, but, due to rising flood waters, police have not been able to respond.

Bottcher said Blanco has been told of the situation and has informed the National Guard. However, Bottcher said, the National Guard has also been unable to respond.

KingPriest2
08-30-2005, 11:23 PM
Here is some good news

Wednesday, August 31, 2005



DEQ flyover finds few environmental problems

Wednesday, 12:04 a.m.

Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality officials flew over
flooded southeastern Louisiana on Tuesday, looking for oil and chemical
spills and other environmental threats, said department spokesman Daniel
Mann.

While what looked like a slight oily sheen was found around at least
one refinery in Chalmette, few other problems were spotted in the initial
fly-over, Mann said.

Officials will make a second inspection from the air today.
The environmental agency also has issued an emergency declaration
reducing regulatory requirements resulting from problems caused by Katrina
in southeastern parishes stretching from East Baton Rouge to Plaquemines
and as far west as St. Martin.

“After such a terrible disaster, the No. 1 priority is human health and
emergency response,” said DEQ Secretary Mike McDaniel. “This
authorization will allow areas impacted by the hurricane to recover, cleanup and
rebuild faster because the regulatory process will be reduced.”

The order is intended to expedite repairs to facilities like sewage and
water treatment plants, and to speed clean-up of solid wastes, burning
debris and animal carcasses without DEQ’s oversight.
Meanwhile, the federal Environmental Protection Agency reminded
businesses that they’re required to report any spills of hazardous chemicals
at (800) 424-8802 or (202) 267-2675.

Logical
08-30-2005, 11:24 PM
Denise is an instigator, without a doubt, but effectively ruining any chance of latecomers being able to see and have easy access to a thread rife with all sorts of important information is not a good thing. I saw maybe fifteen posts, total, with political content in them.

Another really unfortunate thing is the timing. The information collected in that thread is, for the most part, all we'll know until tomorrow morning. And now it's buried.I can understand your frustration, but buried? It really is not that hard to go to the Washington DC forum and the thread is near the top over there.

Nzoner
08-30-2005, 11:25 PM
Wow

http://tinyurl.com/c857q

Demonpenz
08-30-2005, 11:25 PM
i really want to post something about bush on here but i know that phobia can and will put me in an arm lock of some sort

SoCalBronco
08-30-2005, 11:41 PM
I must say the concept of Sharks patrolling the waters in the streets of the city in addition to snakes and im sure many other parade of horribles as well is extremely scary to say the least.

ROYC75
08-30-2005, 11:42 PM
I know we all are able to pitch in on our own, anybody think we should take up a collection and send it by way of the planet or the foundation to the Red Cross ?

Rest assure they get it quicker if we just send it individually .

Thoughts ?

Frazod
08-30-2005, 11:42 PM
The floating clumps of fire ants really messes me up. I'm gonna have nightmares about those goddamn things.

Nzoner
08-30-2005, 11:43 PM
http://tinyurl.com/bbr63

ROYC75
08-30-2005, 11:46 PM
It's going to take years to restore that town.

That damn lake needs to be blocked off in the east and drained . Install a complete new wall around the lake, much stronger and higher with a better drainage system than what they have now.

tk13
08-30-2005, 11:51 PM
It's going to take years to restore that town.

That damn lake needs to be blocked off in the east and drained . Install a complete new wall around the lake, much stronger and higher with a better drainage system than what they have now.
Supposedly I've read they weren't too far off from doing just that. Well, reinforcing most of the levees anyway. Too late now.

Frazod
08-30-2005, 11:51 PM
It's going to take years to restore that town.

That damn lake needs to be blocked off in the east and drained . Install a complete new wall around the lake, much stronger and higher with a better drainage system than what they have now.

Should they even bother? The city sinks a bit lower into the swamp every year. Eventually, this will happen again. If towns in flood plains aren't rebuilt, should a city situated below sea level that is surrounded by water on three sides be rebuilt?

carlos3652
08-30-2005, 11:52 PM
for some reason Im thinking Saddom and Gomorra (sp?)

Frazod
08-30-2005, 11:53 PM
For some reason I'm thinking Monty Python and the Holy Grail.

ROYC75
08-30-2005, 11:57 PM
Should they even bother? The city sinks a bit lower into the swamp every year. Eventually, this will happen again. If towns in flood plains aren't rebuilt, should a city situated below sea level that is surrounded by water on three sides be rebuilt?


As big as a port hub it is ........ YES. Way too much harbor industry comes from there. The Mississippi River handles a very large flow of barge traffic that must be unloaded and reloaded at the port.

It will take years to rebuild, but the country needs it due to the port.

My revenue will drop about 20 % due to this hurricane. Rest assure the Houston ports will have to handle a larger load now. But it will affect my business for awhile.

Add in the increased fuel charges for trucks at the pumps....... :(

Frazod
08-31-2005, 12:02 AM
As big as a port hub it is ........ YES. Way too much harbor industry comes from there. The Mississippi River handles a very large flow of barge traffic that must be unloaded and reloaded at the port.

It will take years to rebuild, but the country needs it due to the port.

My revenue will drop about 20 % due to this hurricane. Rest assure the Houston ports will have to handle a larger load now. But it will affect my business for awhile.

Add in the increased fuel charges for trucks at the pumps....... :(

I understand we need the port on the Mississippi River. But perhaps we could relocate it upstream a bit. Granted, I don't know much about the terrain in southern Louisiana, but I assume there's some place somewhere they could built a port city that isn't below sea level and surrounded by water on three sides.

ROYC75
08-31-2005, 12:07 AM
I understand we need the port on the Mississippi River. But perhaps we could relocate it upstream a bit. Granted, I don't know much about the terrain in southern Louisiana, but I assume there's some place somewhere they could built a port city that isn't below sea level and surrounded by water on three sides.

Where ? Are we going to call Donaldsonville, LA the new New Orleans, just rename the city and build there. It's only 25 miles upstream of Nawlins now......

Ya can't just go to Baton Rouge and rename it , it's the state capital.

I guess we can always forget about New Orleans ..... abandon the city, tear it down and leave it. But that just won't happen.

Frazod
08-31-2005, 12:15 AM
Where ? Are we going to call Donaldsonville, LA the new New Orleans, just rename the city and build there. It's only 25 miles upstream of Nawlins now......

Ya can't just go to Baton Rouge and rename it , it's the state capital.

I guess we can always forget about New Orleans ..... abandon the city, tear it down and leave it. But that just won't happen.
Probably won't happen. But I think long term rebuilding New Orleans as it existed is a losing proposition. Certainly no one in their right mind would build a major city from scratch in such a place today. I don't look at it as the people abandoning the New Orleans, but more to the point as the ground beneath the city abandoning New Orleans.

But I'm sure no one who matters will ask me.

Ultra Peanut
08-31-2005, 12:16 AM
This is just... ****ED.

They're interviewing a woman from Tulane Hospital on WDSU. She said there are looters with guns walking around in fur coats. She said that there are around 8 armed looters in a fishing boat looting the cars of the people running the hospital.

NOLA.com:

Children's Hospital under seige
Tuesday, 11:45 p.m.

Late Tuesday, Gov. Blanco spokeswoman Denise Bottcher described a disturbing scene unfolding in uptown New Orleans, where looters were trying to break into Children's Hospital.

Bottcher said the director of the hospital fears for the safety of the staff and the 100 kids inside the hospital. The director said the hospital is locked, but that the looters were trying to break in and had gathered outside the facility.

The director has sought help from the police, but, due to rising flood waters, police have not been able to respond.

Bottcher said Blanco has been told of the situation and has informed the National Guard. However, Bottcher said, the National Guard has also been unable to respond.I know there are a ton of impoverished, utterly disenfranchised people down there who know nothing other than lives full of crime and death, but still... you'd think something like this could make someone stop and consider their situation for a minute.

Is it some sort of fatalistic "**** it, we're free/going to die anyways, let's do everything we've always wanted to do" way of dealing with this? Is it a way of trying to stick it to the Man? Whatever it is, it is ****ed up beyond the telling of it.

ROYC75
08-31-2005, 12:23 AM
I understand the low lying, sinking effect you are talking about. Rest assure they will rebuild it where it is. It's home to a million people and and a very large port hub.

It will take years and billions of dollars to do. Will it be able to withstand another major storm ? Probally not, but it will be able to fair better than what this one did.

The sad part is, they have known for years the big one will devastate the community...... all they did was talk about it.

Joe Seahawk
08-31-2005, 12:24 AM
Probably won't happen. But I think long term rebuilding New Orleans as it existed is a losing proposition. Certainly no one in their right mind would build a major city from scratch in such a place today. I don't look at it as the people abandoning the New Orleans, but more to the point as the ground beneath the city abandoning the New Orleans.

But I'm sure no one who matters will ask me.


There are a lot of really old buildings in NOLA, I think I heard the other day that this is only the 2nd major cane to hit there since 1852 or something like that.

Ultra Peanut
08-31-2005, 12:24 AM
The sad part is, they have known for years the big one will devastate the community...... all they did was talk about it.They've been working on the levee systems the past few years.

The improvements for the 17th St. Canal were due to be completed in about a month's time.

4th and Long
08-31-2005, 12:25 AM
There are a lot of really old buildings in NOLA, I think I heard the other day that this is only the 2nd major cane to hit there since 1852 or something like that.
And the moral to that story is, "It only takes one."

Joe Seahawk
08-31-2005, 12:28 AM
And the moral to that story is, "It only takes one."

That is right.. So Los Angeles, San Diego San Francisco, Seattle should never be rebuilt if a major quake or Volcano devestates them.. My point is, NO has it's own disaster risk just like a lot of other major cities..

I say fix the dikes and rebuild the city to be the great city it is and deserves to be..

4th and Long
08-31-2005, 12:32 AM
That is right.. So Los Angeles, San Diego San Francisco, Seattle should never be rebuilt if a major quake or Volcano devestates them..
I can't speak for Seattle but for the rest of the cities listed, no. It's California for crying out loud. I wish the damn thing would hurry up and slide off into the ocean already. :p
My point is, NO has it's own disaster risk just like a lot of other major cities..
I know what your point was. Stop trying to ruin my comedy piece. :p

Ultra Peanut
08-31-2005, 12:34 AM
I can't speak for Seattle but for the rest of the cities listed, no. It's California for crying out loud. I wish the damn thing would hurry up and slide off into the ocean already. :pWHY DO YOU HATE AMERICA?

4th and Long
08-31-2005, 12:35 AM
WHY DO YOU HATE AMERICA?
There's nothing American about California anymore. Look who's running that state for cripes sake. :D

Joe Seahawk
08-31-2005, 12:39 AM
I can't speak for Seattle but for the rest of the cities listed, no. It's California for crying out loud. I wish the damn thing would hurry up and slide off into the ocean already. :p

I know what your point was. Stop trying to ruin my comedy piece. :p

:) I knew that was coming..;)


I'm quite confident New Orleans will be hosting a Superbowl in the somewhat near future.. That is why this is the greatest country on earth.. We adapt and overcome extremely well.. :thumb:

Joe Seahawk
08-31-2005, 12:41 AM
WHY DO YOU HATE AMERICA?

chill... We all hurt for the people in NOLA.. But don't lose that great sense of humor you have.

luv
08-31-2005, 12:46 AM
What about the French Quarters? Mardi Gras? There are some great things about New Orleans that will be lost now. They can be rebuilt or somewhat restored, but they just won't be the same. :( I feel bad for the people there.

Ultra Peanut
08-31-2005, 12:56 AM
chill... We all hurt for the people in NOLA.. But don't lose that great sense of humor you have.I was a-keeding.

tk13
08-31-2005, 12:56 AM
Here's a Q&A about how long it might take to get water out of New Orleans.

http://www.wwltv.com/local/stories/083005cccawwlunwatering.45718845.html

Also, somebody over on the Saints forum just said there was a 2nd suicide in the Superdome. I haven't seen an article or anything confirming it yet though.

Joe Seahawk
08-31-2005, 01:00 AM
I was a-keeding.

whew! :)

Demonpenz
08-31-2005, 01:01 AM
Here's a Q&A about how long it might take to get water out of New Orleans.

http://www.wwltv.com/local/stories/083005cccawwlunwatering.45718845.html

Also, somebody over on the Saints forum just said there was a 2nd suicide in the Superdome. I haven't seen an article or anything confirming it yet though.


They must have announced Aaron brooks is the starting qb

Ultra Peanut
08-31-2005, 01:08 AM
They must have announced Aaron brooks is the starting qbSo wrong...

So funny.

el borracho
08-31-2005, 01:09 AM
Isn't present day Seattle built on top of old Seattle? I imagine something like that as a possibility for New Orleans if for some reason it cannot be restored as it was. Either way, I predict that New Orleans will be back in more or less the same location in time for Mardi Gras, 2006.

|Zach|
08-31-2005, 01:42 AM
From June 23 - 27 of 2002, the New Orleans Times-Picayune published a series of articles under the heading, “Washing Away: How south Louisiana is growing more vulnerable to a catastrophic hurricane.”

An article in Part 2, “The Big One (http://www.nola.com/hurricane/index.ssf?/washingaway/thebigone_1.html)” predicted the exact scenario which played out yesterday - a major hurricane that grazes the city:
In concert with state and local officials, FEMA is studying evacuation procedures, postdisaster rescue strategies, temporary housing and technical issues such as how to pump out water trapped inside the levees, said Michael Lowder, chief of policy and planning in FEMA’s Readiness, Response and Recovery directorate. A preliminary report should be completed in the next few months.

Louisiana emergency management officials say they lobbied the agency for years to study how to respond to New Orleans’ vulnerability, finally getting attention last year.

With computer modeling of hurricanes and storm surges, disaster experts have developed a detailed picture of how a storm could push Lake Pontchartrain over the levees and into the city.

“The worst case is a hurricane moving in from due south of the city,” said Suhayda, who has developed a computer simulation of the flooding from such a storm. On that track, winds on the outer edges of a huge storm system would be pushing water in Breton Sound and west of the Chandeleur Islands into the St. Bernard marshes and then Lake Pontchartrain for two days before landfall.

“Water is literally pumped into Lake Pontchartrain,” Suhayda said. “It will try to flow through any gaps, and that means the Inner Harbor Navigation Canal (which is connected to Breton Sound by the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet) and the Chef Menteur and the Rigolets passes.

“So now the lake is 5 to 8 feet higher than normal, and we’re talking about a lake that’s only 15 or 20 feet deep, so you’re adding a third to a half as much water to the lake,” Suhayda said. As the eye of the hurricane moves north, next to New Orleans but just to the east, the winds over the lake switch around to come from the north.

“As the eye impacts the Mississippi coastline, the winds are now blowing south across the lake, maybe at 50, 80, 100 mph, and all that water starts to move south,” he said. “It’s moving like a big army advancing toward the lake’s hurricane-protection system. And then the winds themselves are generating waves, 5 to 10 feet high, on top of all that water. They’ll be breaking and crashing along the sea wall.”

Soon waves will start breaking over the levee.

“All of a sudden you’ll start seeing flowing water. It’ll look like a weir, water just pouring over the top,” Suhayda said. The water will flood the lakefront, filling up low-lying areas first, and continue its march south toward the river. There would be no stopping or slowing it; pumping systems would be overwhelmed and submerged in a matter of hours.

“Another scenario is that some part of the levee would fail,” Suhayda said. “It’s not something that’s expected. But erosion occurs, and as levees broke, the break will get wider and wider. The water will flow through the city and stop only when it reaches the next higher thing. The most continuous barrier is the south levee, along the river. That’s 25 feet high, so you’ll see the water pile up on the river levee.”

It is awful to contemplate, but it is exactly what happened Monday. Katrina moved a bit to the east and hit Mississippi and then the levees failed.

The article then goes on to discuss the potential impact of such a flood. It is devastating and just as is unfolding right now:
Amid this maelstrom, the estimated 200,000 or more people left behind in an evacuation will be struggling to survive. Some will be housed at the Superdome, the designated shelter in New Orleans for people too sick or infirm to leave the city. Others will end up in last-minute emergency refuges that will offer minimal safety. But many will simply be on their own, in homes or looking for high ground.

Thousands will drown while trapped in homes or cars by rising water. Others will be washed away or crushed by debris. Survivors will end up trapped on roofs, in buildings or on high ground surrounded by water, with no means of escape and little food or fresh water, perhaps for several days.

“If you look at the World Trade Center collapsing, it’ll be like that, but add water,” Eichorn said. “There will be debris flying around, and you’re going to be in the water with snakes, rodents, nutria and fish from the lake. It’s not going to be nice.”
. . .
Contaminated food or water used for bathing, drinking and cooking could cause illnesses including salmonella, botulism, typhoid and hepatitis. Outbreaks of mosquito-borne dengue fever and encephalitis are likely, said Dr. James Diaz, director of the department of public health and preventive medicine at LSU School of Medicine in New Orleans.

“History will repeat itself,” Diaz said. “My office overlooks one of the St. Louis cemeteries, where there are many graves of victims of yellow fever. Standing water in the subtropics is the breeding ground for mosquitoes.”

ZootedGranny
08-31-2005, 02:03 AM
I hope this dude and his dog make it...it's so ****in precious.

Man & his dog "Cuddles" (http://news.yahoo.com/photos/ss/events/ts/080304tropicalweathe/im:/050830/1913/w083029ajpg;_ylt=Auvzp9SfqPCIZvv58.W8NjxiWscF;_ylu=X3oDMTA3dmhrOGVvBHNlYwNzc20-)

luv
08-31-2005, 02:06 AM
I hope this dude and his dog make it...it's so ****in precious.

Man & his dog "Cuddles" (http://news.yahoo.com/photos/ss/events/ts/080304tropicalweathe/im:/050830/1913/w083029ajpg;_ylt=Auvzp9SfqPCIZvv58.W8NjxiWscF;_ylu=X3oDMTA3dmhrOGVvBHNlYwNzc20-)
I heard an ad on the radio today from the Humane Society. They are collecting money, food, and such to send down there. Could you imagine all the pets that died? :(

Logical
08-31-2005, 02:28 AM
Isn't present day Seattle built on top of old Seattle? I imagine something like that as a possibility for New Orleans if for some reason it cannot be restored as it was. Either way, I predict that New Orleans will be back in more or less the same location in time for Mardi Gras, 2006.That is very optimistic, let's hope you are right.

Logical
08-31-2005, 02:31 AM
That is right.. So Los Angeles, San Diego San Francisco, Seattle should never be rebuilt if a major quake or Volcano devestates them.. My point is, NO has it's own disaster risk just like a lot of other major cities..

I say fix the dikes and rebuild the city to be the great city it is and deserves to be..I would much rather our money be spent on that, than on Iraq and I don't mean this in a political way. Just we owe it to our citizens first.

|Zach|
08-31-2005, 02:38 AM
http://photos31.flickr.com/38774368_7681c5bd9a.jpg?v=0

siberian khatru
08-31-2005, 06:14 AM
That is right.. So Los Angeles, San Diego San Francisco, Seattle should never be rebuilt if a major quake or Volcano devestates them.. My point is, NO has it's own disaster risk just like a lot of other major cities..

I say fix the dikes and rebuild the city to be the great city it is and deserves to be..

Or St. Louis and Memphis and everything else that would be destroyed by another New Madrid earthquake.

siberian khatru
08-31-2005, 06:15 AM
It's becoming Lord of the Flies in NOLA.

Brock
08-31-2005, 06:51 AM
http://home.kc.rr.com/mkbaslee/notmypic_thatsracist.gif


That's awesome. :clap:

memyselfI
08-31-2005, 06:56 AM
Since some genius decided that an 800-post thread -- of which maybe 2% was politically-motivated -- detailing the biggest natural disaster this nation has ever faced should be relocated to a forum a large portion of the members of this site ignore, here's the new thread.

At the very least, the old one should have been locked and a new one started in its place, if you were too lazy to pluck the Denise bitchfests out and move those posts to DC.

Considering the affected states are now having to import 30 thousand National Guard troops (because 30-40% of theirs are outside of their states) and that the media is starting to say for themselves that they made errors in their reporting...


I digress. I may have made both observations TOO SOON. :hmmm:

I do believe that in the next couple of days (as Aaron Brown said last night) that questions will be asked about the preparedness level given those studies that were being presented as worst case scenarios.

A large number of people left. But how many returned once they thought N/O had 'dodged the bullet' only to have the levy situation catch them by surprise?

Brock
08-31-2005, 06:58 AM
yeah....great.....this thread will be ruined in a couple of hours too....

memyselfI
08-31-2005, 07:04 AM
I know you're going through a stressful time, Psicosis. Have you ever tried to "split" an 800 post thread? I don't have all night. The politicizing of that thread wasn't only Denize and it wasn't the first time it had been done. A new Katrina thread won't hurt anything. Keep the politics where they belong, people. Denize, maybe you should just keep your thoughts in DC instead of buttonpushing on this thread. If you bring politics into this thread as well, you'll be going to D.C. instead of the thread.

Phil, ANYTHING can be construed as 'political' and in this case people jumped on the chance when there was nothing there. Do not blame me if I asked a relevant question, not to mention one with foresight, even before the issue became known. Re: the national guard.

jspchief
08-31-2005, 07:07 AM
The national guard should set up patrols with orders to shoot anyone who's looting (except food stores).

Pennywise
08-31-2005, 07:16 AM
I feel bad for the people in New Orleans. But this is what happens when you build a city in a bathtub and take your chances with Ma nature.

Sooner or later she bites you in the ass.

I garonteeee.

Bootlegged
08-31-2005, 07:17 AM
I think keeping the pig in the pigpen is a great idea. Nice work, Phobs.

Amnorix
08-31-2005, 07:36 AM
I can't really even wrap my brains around the scale of this disaster.

Seems to me that even if the water gets pumped out pretty quick, all those buildings that are stuck in standing water for days or weeks are going to be structurally unsound, no? Aren't they going to half to bull-doze most of New Orleans and rebuild huge portions of the city from scratch?

Unbelievable.

jynni
08-31-2005, 07:43 AM
This was emailed to me.

VOLUNTEERS MOBILIZE
by Keri Kirby

* * *The Shreveport Times, August 29, 2005: Sitting safely in his
Shreveport home Sunday, Chris Riser flipped from channel to channel
listening to news of the disastrous and deadly potential of Hurricane Katrina.
* * *"They were saying the shelters will not take pets and they're turning
people away with pets," he said. "I was ready to rent a U-Haul and head to
New Orleans to save the pets that cannot go to the shelter."
* * *A pet owner himself, Riser said he could not imagine the additional
anguish of being forced to leave a pet behind.
* * *"It makes me feel very sad," he said. "If a hurricane hit here and I
had a choice of leaving my home and being safe and letting my animals die,
I'd stay with my children, which are my animals. I'd have to die with them.
I would not go to a shelter that would not take my children."
* * *Knowing that, Shreveport animal lovers are doing their part to
accommodate both two-and four-legged creatures displaced by the storm. The
Krewe of Barkus & Meoux, along with the Humane Society and several local
veterinarians organized a tent to shelter animals of those evacuees being
housed at the American Red Cross shelter in the LSUS Health and Physical
Education Building.
* * *"This is the first time we've had an animal shelter available to us,"
said Michelle Davidson with the northwest Louisiana chapter of the Red
Cross. "They've been growing just as fast as we are." And that's a relief
for both Davidson and the people she and Red Cross volunteers want to help.
* * *"That is often an obstacle for people to overcome when it comes to
getting them to evacuate," she said. "Unfortunately, we can't accept
animals (in Red Cross shelters)." Having their pets so close by has been a
great comfort for many evacuees, Davidson said.
* * *"They have appreciated the opportunity," she said. "A lot go out and
play with the animals to make them feel a little better and I think it
probably soothes them as much as the animals."
* * *Nancy Bardwell with the Northwest Louisiana Humane Society said the
community support of the evacuees and their pets has been tremendous.
* * *"We can accommodate a lot more than what's here," she said of the 30
animals including a parrot and a canary they were housing Sunday evening.
"If we run over, there are local animal shelters and horse stables that are
ready to step in and help. We've gotten so many donations, we can hold out
as long as we need to."
* * *The Caddo Commission's animal services division sent several cages to
the shelter at LSUS and also opened up its doors to help house evacuees'
pets. The parish began accepting dogs and cats free of charge about noon
Sunday and would continue to do so until they filled up the 60 vacancies
they had available, said Anita Mills, spokeswoman for the division.
* * *"The last time there was a major hurricane there were about 350
animals that came into the area. They all did not come in to the shelter"
Mills said. "But they're expecting many more than that this time because of
the severity of this storm."
It's always been a concern of mine. What do the people do with their pets? Some will not evacuate because shelters will not take their pets.

4th and Long
08-31-2005, 07:45 AM
Those of you that are more concerned about friggin dogs and cats than your fellow man need to have your collective heads examined.

ROYC75
08-31-2005, 07:46 AM
I can't really even wrap my brains around the scale of this disaster.

Seems to me that even if the water gets pumped out pretty quick, all those buildings that are stuck in standing water for days or weeks are going to be structurally unsound, no? Aren't they going to half to bull-doze most of New Orleans and rebuild huge portions of the city from scratch?

Unbelievable.

You are correct, Any house / building with water damage is subject to a life threating mole, mildew that can cause long term affects.

Complete breakdown/ tear down and start over from the ground up..... but only after the Lake has been drained to a point that new walls and levees can be built to withstand anything bigger than this one..... Much bigger.

4th and Long
08-31-2005, 07:49 AM
You are correct, Any house / building with water damage is subject to a life threating mole, mildew that can cause long term affects.
Life threatening moles?
http://www.redpath-museum.mcgill.ca/Qbp/Images/mammals/mole,%20starnosed.jpg
RUN FOR YOUR LIVES!

StcChief
08-31-2005, 07:49 AM
Take this opportunity to move to high ground.
Don't rebuild it there.

Create a newer 'New Orleans' up river.

jspchief
08-31-2005, 07:52 AM
Those of you that are more concerned about friggin dogs and cats than your fellow man need to have your collective heads examined.Hmmm. This superhero appears to have two identities.

Those people that live on the coast/along the Gulf have had ample warning and time to evacuate. The ones that die will be from sheer stupidity for not leaving. That's also known as cleaning up the gene pool.

Little late to get on your high horse you f*cking hypocrite.

Amnorix
08-31-2005, 07:52 AM
Aren't they going to half to bull-doze most of New Orleans and rebuild huge portions of the city from scratch?


I cannot believe I wrote that.... :eek: :eek: :eek:

Amnorix
08-31-2005, 07:55 AM
Complete breakdown/ tear down and start over from the ground up..... but only after the Lake has been drained to a point that new walls and levees can be built to withstand anything bigger than this one..... Much bigger.


Agreed. IMHO there are ONLY two choices -- abandon NO altogether and relocate the major port facilities upriver to where it's not below sea level, or redo the entire city's protections against water so that they can definitely withstand even a category 5 hurricane.

4th and Long
08-31-2005, 07:55 AM
Hmmm. This superhero appears to have two identities.



Little late to get on your high horse you f*cking hypocrite.
Let it go Nancy. I spared you a neg rep festival of the ages last time. Don't press your luck today.

ROYC75
08-31-2005, 08:00 AM
Take this opportunity to move to high ground.
Don't rebuild it there.

Create a newer 'New Orleans' up river.

This was asked last night........ I ask you, Where ?


Quote:
Originally Posted by frazod
I understand we need the port on the Mississippi River. But perhaps we could relocate it upstream a bit. Granted, I don't know much about the terrain in southern Louisiana, but I assume there's some place somewhere they could built a port city that isn't below sea level and surrounded by water on three sides.

Quote by ROYC75

Where ? Are we going to call Donaldsonville, LA the new New Orleans, just rename the city and build there. It's only 25 miles upstream of Nawlins now......

Ya can't just go to Baton Rouge and rename it , it's the state capital.

I guess we can always forget about New Orleans ..... abandon the city, tear it down and leave it. But that just won't happen.

__________________

It's just not easy to move the Big Easy....

ndbbm
08-31-2005, 08:01 AM
The looting is just sad. I saw some jackass carrying 69 pairs on nikes out of a footlocker. I can understand people taking food....I don't condone it, but i understand it. There's no reason for that assbag to be stealing shoes.

4th and Long
08-31-2005, 08:02 AM
This was asked last night........ I ask you, Where ?


Quote:
Originally Posted by frazod
I understand we need the port on the Mississippi River. But perhaps we could relocate it upstream a bit. Granted, I don't know much about the terrain in southern Louisiana, but I assume there's some place somewhere they could built a port city that isn't below sea level and surrounded by water on three sides.

Quote by ROYC75

Where ? Are we going to call Donaldsonville, LA the new New Orleans, just rename the city and build there. It's only 25 miles upstream of Nawlins now......

Ya can't just go to Baton Rouge and rename it , it's the state capital.

I guess we can always forget about New Orleans ..... abandon the city, tear it down and leave it. But that just won't happen.

__________________

It's just not easy to move the Big Easy....
They would be better off to just fill in the existing soup bowl with dirt and start over before trying to find a new place to relocate.

ROYC75
08-31-2005, 08:03 AM
Agreed. IMHO there are ONLY two choices -- abandon NO altogether and relocate the major port facilities upriver to where it's not below sea level, or redo the entire city's protections against water so that they can definitely withstand even a category 5 hurricane.

Oscar Goldman :
Gentlemen, we can rebuild it............

But 6 million isn't going to do it. More like 60 billion ( or more ) for the cleanup and rebuilding that whole area that got hit by the huuricane.

Brock
08-31-2005, 08:03 AM
‘Nightmare’ worsens: more flooding, and death
Superdome evacuees going to Astrodome; Mississippi coastline ‘obliterated’

David J. Phillip / AP
NEW ORLEANS - With the city still flooding after levees failed, officials on Wednesday made plans to bus evacuees at the Superdome and other shelters to Houston's Astrodome.

New Orleans was filling with water after an initial attempt to stop one leaking levee failed, while police fought to stop widespread looting in the stricken city.

Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Blanco said everyone still in the city, now huddled in the Superdome and other rescue centers, needs to leave. She said she wanted the Superdome evacuated within two days.

“We need to evacuate the people in the Superdome and other shelters and in the hospitals,” she told NBC’s “Today” show on Wednesday. “Those are our basic missions today.”

Houston officials later said those evacuees would be sent via 475 buses to the city's Astrodome. The stadium's schedule was cleared through December to make it available.

Blanco said that trying to fix the levees has been “an engineering nightmare,” with sandbags dropped from the air simply falling “into the eternal black hole.”

“This is a nightmare,” she added, “but one that will give us an opportunity for rebirth.”

Hundreds dead?
Officials said it was simply too early to estimate a death toll. In Mississippi, officials confirmed that at least 100 people had died in the killer storm and said the toll was almost certain to go much higher.

Vincent Creel, a spokesman for Biloxi, Miss., said that in that city alone the death toll is “going to be in the hundreds.”

A 30-foot storm surge in Mississippi wiped away 90 percent of the buildings along the coast at Biloxi and Gulfport, leaving a scene of destruction that Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour said was “like there’d been a nuclear weapon set off.”

Many areas were “absolutely obliterated,” he told NBC’s “Today” show, making it tough for rescue crews. “You can't see any asphalt because the streets are covered with lumber and shingles and furniture. And so it’s one house at a time; most places it’s not really a house, it's digging through three, four, five feet of rubble to see if anybody’s under there.”

New Orleans: Dead pushed aside
U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu said she had heard at least 50 to 100 people were dead in New Orleans, where rescue teams were so busy saving people stranded in homes they had to leave bodies floating in the high waters.

Mayor Ray Nagin said hundreds, if not thousands, of people may still be stuck on roofs and in attics, and so rescue boats were bypassing the dead.

“We’re not even dealing with dead bodies,” he said. “They’re just pushing them on the side.”

Rescuers in boats and helicopters plucked bedraggled flood refugees from rooftops and attics. Louisiana Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu said 3,000 people have been rescued by boat and air, some placed shivering and wet into helicopter baskets. They were brought by the truckload into shelters, some in wheelchairs and some carrying babies, with stories of survival and of those who didn’t make it.

“I’m alive. I’m alive,” shouted one joyous woman as she was ferried from a home nearly swallowed by the rising waters.

Katrina, one of the most punishing storms to hit the United States in decades, struck Louisiana on Monday with 140 mile per hour winds, then slammed into neighboring Mississippi and Alabama.

New Orleans at first appeared to have received a glancing blow from the storm, but the raging waters of Lake Pontchartrain tore holes in the levee system that protects the low-lying city, then slowly filled it up.

Nagin said at least 80 percent of the city, much of it below sea level, was covered with water that was in places 20 feet deep.

In Jefferson Parish, one of the hardest-hit areas, parish president Aaron Broussard said a complete rebuilding would be required. “Jefferson Parish as we knew it is gone forever,” he told reporters.

4th and Long
08-31-2005, 08:04 AM
The looting is just sad. I saw some jackass carrying 69 pairs on nikes out of a footlocker. I can understand people taking food....I don't condone it, but i understand it. There's no reason for that assbag to be stealing shoes.
All looters should be shot on sight. Period. If you're that hungry, you wade out into the swamp like a real man a wrestle a gator for your meal.

Brock
08-31-2005, 08:06 AM
All looters should be shot on sight. Period. If you're that hungry, you wade out into the swamp like a real man a wrestle a gator for your meal.

That's pretty unreasonable.

Amnorix
08-31-2005, 08:07 AM
Oscar Goldman :
Gentlemen, we can rebuild it............

But 6 million isn't going to do it. More like 60 billion ( or more ) for the cleanup and rebuilding that whole area that got hit by the huuricane.


$23 billion in INSURABLE losses alone. I'm figuring, given that NO/Louisiana is a pretty poor state, that the vast majority of residences don't have flood insurance unless it's required by law (which I doubt).

Then you've got vast amounts of infrastructure repair.

I'm thinking $60B might be a little light... :shake:

ndbbm
08-31-2005, 08:07 AM
All looters should be shot on sight. Period. If you're that hungry, you wade out into the swamp like a real man a wrestle a gator for your meal.

I want to see a cop hop onto a stack of tires and start Taser'ing the water. Zzap!

jspchief
08-31-2005, 08:07 AM
Let it go Nancy. I spared you a neg rep festival of the ages last time. Don't press your luck today.Sorry. I suppose you don't like it when someone points out that you are a fraud when you pretend to have compassion for these victims.

Here's another gem from the Mother Thereasa of Chiefsplanet:
This sucks and all but lets think about this for a moment. They purposely built a city below sea level. People made a conscience decision to live there, knowing full well that they are subject to hurricanes and their effects. Now they want to us to feel sorry for them?


Oh, and you can take your scary neg rep threats and shove them up your ass. Rep is simply a way to give and get feedback on posts. I don't give two f*cks if my boxes are red or green. If you don't have anything better to do than have a jircle jerk on my rep, go for it, you pathetic excuse for a human.

chagrin
08-31-2005, 08:08 AM
The looting is just sad. I saw some jackass carrying 69 pairs on nikes out of a footlocker. I can understand people taking food....I don't condone it, but i understand it. There's no reason for that assbag to be stealing shoes.


He now has more "street cred"

Brock
08-31-2005, 08:09 AM
$23 billion in INSURABLE losses alone. I'm figuring, given that NO/Louisiana is a pretty poor state, that the vast majority of residences don't have flood insurance unless it's required by law (which I doubt).

Then you've got vast amounts of infrastructure repair.

I'm thinking $60B might be a little light... :shake:

I've heard 89 billion. It will probably be higher.

Amnorix
08-31-2005, 08:12 AM
That's pretty unreasonable.


4th and Long is a pretty unreasonable guy, from what I can see. :shrug:


Looting basic necessities in order to survive is fine and understandable. Most food, certainly, would likely not be good to eat anyway when the owners returned. Even if it was, it's still acceptable to loot if necessary to live.

People heisting TVs out of Wal-Mart, or Nikes or whatever, should be treated pretty severely. It's becomign Lord of the Flies.

Amnorix
08-31-2005, 08:13 AM
Oh, and you can take your scary neg rep threats and shove them up your ass. Rep is simply a way to give and get feedback on posts. I don't give two f*cks if my boxes are red or green. If you don't have anything better to do than have a jircle jerk on my rep, go for it, you pathetic excuse for a human.

Wait, you mean you're not trembling in fear of his mighty rep weapon skewering you alive?!?


ROFL

Amnorix
08-31-2005, 08:17 AM
I've heard 89 billion. It will probably be higher.

That seems like a good, conservative, low-end estimate. I'd be expecting to see ranges of something like $75B to $125B or so in order to completely rebuild/recover.

The extent of the devastation is really hard to fathom at the moment.

jspchief
08-31-2005, 08:18 AM
4th and Long is a pretty unreasonable guy, from what I can see. :shrug:


Looting basic necessities in order to survive is fine and understandable. Most food, certainly, would likely not be good to eat anyway when the owners returned. Even if it was, it's still acceptable to loot if necessary to live.

People heisting TVs out of Wal-Mart, or Nikes or whatever, should be treated pretty severely. It's becomign Lord of the Flies.There's something seriously wrong with a person if, while thier city is in complete ruin, all they can think to do is steal material luxuries. Scum of the earth, that don't deserve the oxygen this planet provides.

siberian khatru
08-31-2005, 08:19 AM
Looting basic necessities in order to survive is fine and understandable. Most food, certainly, would likely not be good to eat anyway when the owners returned. Even if it was, it's still acceptable to loot if necessary to live.

People heisting TVs out of Wal-Mart, or Nikes or whatever, should be treated pretty severely. It's becomign Lord of the Flies.

Right on.

Ultra Peanut
08-31-2005, 08:20 AM
There's something seriously wrong with a person if, while thier city is in complete ruin, all they can think to do is steal material luxuries.They've probably never had anything, and see this as their only chance.

It's just so messed up, all the way around.

Someone stealing shoes to put on their wet feet is a different story, by the way.

jynni
08-31-2005, 08:22 AM
People heisting TVs out of Wal-Mart, or Nikes or whatever, should be treated pretty severely.
I guess, I don't understand the looters line of thinking - "I'm gonna grab five TVs, a DVD player 100CDs and a Playstation - I'm gonna be set!".

Sure you dumb nbfsker - have you even stopped to notice that the water is rising around you? Just how the hell do you plan on running all your new electronics - the city's not going to have power for months.

Not to mention that these idiots are wading around in toxic waters infested with sharks, poisonous snakes, fire ants and gators. I sure hope they didn't have any open wounds 'cause contaminated water + broken skin = some lovely infection.

I'm guessing Mother Nature will hand out some of her own punishment.

BigRedChief
08-31-2005, 08:26 AM
There was reports that they were trying to loot the frigging Childrens hospital with kid patients, Dr.'s and nurses in it caring for the kids.

Amnorix
08-31-2005, 08:30 AM
They've probably never had anything, and see this as their only chance.

It's just so messed up, all the way around.

Someone stealing shoes to put on their wet feet is a different story, by the way.


Yes. Trench foot is a serious problem. Looting socks/shoes to replace wet ones is definitely within my view of "okay".

60 pairs of Air Jordans or whatever... uh-uh.

chagrin
08-31-2005, 08:31 AM
I am willing to bet that they are not stealing NIKE shoes to put on their wet feet. There are stores that sell shoes every 10 feet in N.O. that was a choice, to take that particular shoe. Whatever, I don't want to analyze that any further.

4th and Long
08-31-2005, 08:31 AM
Sorry. I suppose you don't like it when someone points out that you are a fraud when you pretend to have compassion for these victims.

Here's another gem from the Mother Thereasa of Chiefsplanet:


Oh, and you can take your scary neg rep threats and shove them up your ass. Rep is simply a way to give and get feedback on posts. I don't give two f*cks if my boxes are red or green. If you don't have anything better to do than have a jircle jerk on my rep, go for it, you pathetic excuse for a human.
That PMS is a bitch isn't it?

Funny really, since there were numerous people who posted their belief that staying in harms way was stupid, yet in your infinite wisdom, you pick me out of a crowd.

What's even more laughable is Mississippi had a far greater loss of life than New Orleans did yet you have said nary a word about it. Where's your love for them Mr Humanitarian?

Granted, you are entitled to your opinion but on that same line, so am I. You don't see me railing off on you for anything I disagree with, do you?

No. You don't. I'm a bigger person that that. I don't run around calling you a pathetic this or that. Unlike you, I don't drop you rep that looks like this.

http://www.chiefsplanet.com/BB/images/reputationneg.gif New Orleans faces their... 08-29-2005 08:41 AM jspchief You are a moron and a dickhead. It's very likely that children will be dying there "because they are too stupid". I hopw you get asshole and face cancer at the same time, you piece of sh*t. F*ck off.

Nope. I don't do that to you because in this great country of ours, the First Amendment reigns supreme.

What you fail to realize is, I see people die all the time. It's part of my job. I just happen to have a different perspective than you do. Death is the one constant in the universe. I take it at face value. People die from old age, disease, accidents, making poor choices, etc. Walk in my shoes for a day before you judge me. Witness a 14 month old drowning victim, ashen skin, bloated, rigor mortis has set in. Then witness the the father come running into the ER who has only been told that his child has been taken to the ER with no explanation. Listen to the man scream, "NOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!! MY BABYYYYYYYY!!!!!!!!" when he walks into the room to find his precious little girl, dead.

Is my perspective better or worse than yours? Nope. it's just different.

siberian khatru
08-31-2005, 08:35 AM
From the Times-Picayune website:

http://www.nola.com/newslogs/breakingtp/index.ssf?/mtlogs/nola_Times-Picayune/archives/2005_08.html

Those trapped in the city faced an increasingly lawless environment, as law enforcement agencies found themselves overwhelmed with widespread looting. Looters swarmed the Wal-mart on Tchoupitoulas Street, often bypassing the food and drink section to steal wide-screen TVs, jewelry, bicycles and computers. Watching the sordid display and shaking his head in disgust, one firefighter said of the scene: "It’s a f---- hurricane, what are you do with a basketball goal?" Police regained control at about 3 p.m., after clearing the store with armed patrol. One shotgun-toting Third District detective described the looting as "ferocious."

"And it’s going to get worse as the days progress," he said.

In Uptown, one the few areas that remained dry, a bearded man patrolled Oak Street near the boarded-up Maple Leaf Bar, a sawed-off shotgun slung over his shoulder. The owners of a hardware store sat in folding chairs, pistols at the ready.

Uptown resident Keith Williams started his own security patrol, driving around in his Ford pickup with his newly purchased handgun. Earlier in the day, Williams said he had seen the body of a gunshot victim near the corner of Leonidas and Hickory streets.

"What I want to know is why we don’t have paratroopers with machine guns on every street," Williams said.

Like-minded Art Depodesta sat on the edge of a picnic table outside Cooter Brown’s Bar, a chrome shotgun at his side loaded with red shells.

"They broke into the Shell station across the street," he said. "I walked over with my 12-gauge and shot a couple into the air."

The looters scattered, but soon after, another man appeared outside the bar in a pickup truck armed with a pistol and threatened Depodesta.

"I told him, ‘Listen, I was in the Army and I will blow your ass off,’" Depodesta said. "We’ve got enough trouble with the flood."

The man sped away.

"You know what sucks," Depodesta said. "The whole U.S. is looking at this city right now, and this is what they see."

In the Bywater, a supply store sported spray-painted signs reading "You Loot, I Shoot" and "You Bein Watched." A man seated nearby with a rifle in his lap suggested it was no idle threat. At the Bywater studio of Dr. Bob, the artist known for handpainted "Be Nice or Leave" signs, a less fanciful sentiment was painted on the wall: "Looters Will Be Shot. Dr. Bob."

Amnorix
08-31-2005, 08:37 AM
The floating clumps of fire ants really messes me up. I'm gonna have nightmares about those goddamn things.

Where did you see that? I'd be interested in seeing that (God knows why, but...)

ndbbm
08-31-2005, 08:37 AM
Yes. Trench foot is a serious problem. Looting socks/shoes to replace wet ones is definitely within my view of "okay".

60 pairs of Air Jordans or whatever... uh-uh.

Exactly.

On a side note...Sporting Goods store for a pair of chest waders might not be a bad idea. :hmmm:

siberian khatru
08-31-2005, 08:38 AM
Where did you see that? I'd be interested in seeing that (God knows why, but...)

Somebody posted a picture of one on the previous thread (now banished to the DC forum).

jspchief
08-31-2005, 08:40 AM
That PMS is a bitch isn't it?

Funny really, since there were numerous people who posted their belief that staying in harms way was stupid, yet in your infinite wisdom, you pick me out of a crowd.

What's even more laughable is Mississippi had a far greater loss of life than New Orleans did yet you have said nary a word about it. Where's your love for them Mr Humanitarian?

Granted, you are entitled to your opinion but on that same line, so am I. You don't see me railing off on you for anything I disagree with, do you?

No. You don't. I'm a bigger person that that. I don't run around calling you a pathetic this or that. Unlike you, I don't drop you rep that looks like this.

http://www.chiefsplanet.com/BB/images/reputationneg.gif New Orleans faces their... 08-29-2005 08:41 AM jspchief You are a moron and a dickhead. It's very likely that children will be dying there "because they are too stupid". I hopw you get asshole and face cancer at the same time, you piece of sh*t. F*ck off.

Nope. I don't do that to you because in this great country of ours, the First Amendment reigns supreme.

What you fail to realize is, I see people die all the time. It's part of my job. I just happen to have a different perspective than you do. Death is the one constant in the universe. I take it at face value. People die from old age, disease, accidents, making poor choices, etc. Walk in my shoes for a day before you judge me. Witness a 14 month old drowning victim, ashen skin, bloated, rigor mortis has set in. Then witness the the father come running into the ER who has only been told that his child has been taken to the ER with no explanation. Listen to the man scream, "NOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!! MY BABYYYYYYYY!!!!!!!!" when he walks into the room to find his precious little girl, dead.

Is my perspective better or worse than yours? Nope. it's just different.The reason I chose to repond to you is because you had the audacity to ridicule someone for feeling compassion for pets, pretending that you care about the same humans that you were trying to clean the gene pool of two days ago.

I don't even know what the hell your first amendment rant has to do with anything. I wasn't trying to tell you you can't voice your opnion. I was just pointing out what a douche you are for the opinion you have.

As for your job and whatever the hell that has to do with this... When that dad comes in screaming about his baby, do you tell him that he deserves it for not teaching his daughter to swim better, or just thank him for cleaning up the gene pool?

I'm dropping this. I don't want to be part of a Duhnise like hi-jack of an otherwise important thread.

Amnorix
08-31-2005, 08:41 AM
Somebody posted a picture of one on the previous thread (now banished to the DC forum).

Thanks. I'll hunt it down over there.

jynni
08-31-2005, 08:41 AM
Okay - just how many people are in the Superdome? First they were estimating up to 30K. After the storm hit it was between 9-10K. Now it's up to 25K.

Did 15K people find their way there since Monday?

Dartgod
08-31-2005, 08:51 AM
"You know what sucks," Depodesta said. "The whole U.S. is looking at this city right now, and this is what they see."

It's not just embarassing for them, rather our entire nation. Outsiders looking in may have sympathy for the residents of NO (and the rest of the gulf coast), but they most likely view The United States for what we have become; greedy bastards more interested in helping themselves than their fellow man. I sickens me to see this and I am embarrassed to be a citizen of this country in times like these.

Ultra Peanut
08-31-2005, 08:52 AM
Thanks. I'll hunt it down over there.
http://www.chiefsplanet.com/BB/showpost.php?p=2656066&postcount=21

Amnorix
08-31-2005, 09:02 AM
http://www.chiefsplanet.com/BB/showpost.php?p=2656066&postcount=21


Thanks. Waaaay creepy.

BigRedChief
08-31-2005, 09:04 AM
I'm hearing that some of the Wal-Marts have thrown open their doors and told people to take whatever they need. Don't know if its true. Just relaying a rumor I heard.

jspchief
08-31-2005, 09:06 AM
I'm hearing that some of the Wal-Marts have thrown open their doors and told people to take whatever they need. Don't know if its true. Just relaying a rumor I heard.I hope it isn't true. While they may have the right intentions, I think it would be better to donate whatever necessities they have to a concerted relief effort. Just throwing open the doors sounds like an invite for a riot.

BigRedChief
08-31-2005, 09:07 AM
http://www.foxnews.com/
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,167781,00.html

Rescuers Race to Save Katrina Victims
Wednesday, August 31, 2005
NEW ORLEANS — Rescuers along the hurricane-ravaged Gulf Coast pushed aside the dead to reach the living Tuesday in a race against time and rising waters, while New Orleans (search) sank deeper into crisis and Louisiana's governor ordered storm refugees out of this drowning city.
Two levees broke and sent water coursing into the streets of the Big Easy a full day after New Orleans appeared to have escaped widespread destruction from Hurricane Katrina (search). An estimated 80 percent of the below-sea-level city was under water, up to 20 feet deep in places, with miles and miles of homes swamped.
"The situation is untenable," Gov. Kathleen Blanco (search) said. "It's just heartbreaking."
One Mississippi county alone said its death toll was at least 100, and officials are "very, very worried that this is going to go a lot higher," said Joe Spraggins, civil defense director for Harrison County, home to Biloxi and Gulfport. In neighboring Jackson County, officials said at least 10 deaths were blamed on the storm.
Several victims in Harrison County were from a beachfront apartment building that collapsed under a 25-foot wall of water as Katrina slammed the Gulf Coast with 145-mph winds. And Louisiana officials said many were feared dead there, too, making Katrina one of the most punishing storms to hit the United States in decades.
After touring the destruction by air, Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour (search) said it is not of case of homes being severely damaged, "they're simply not there. ... I can only imagine that this is what Hiroshima looked like 60 years ago."
New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin (search) said hundreds, if not thousands, of people may still be stuck on roofs and in attics, and so rescue boats were bypassing the dead.
"We're not even dealing with dead bodies," Nagin said. "They're just pushing them on the side."
The flooding in New Orleans grew worse by the minute, prompting the evacuation of hotels and hospitals and an audacious plan to drop huge sandbags from helicopters to close up one of the breached levees. At the same time, looting broke out in some neighborhoods, the sweltering city of 480,000 had no drinkable water, and the electricity could be out for weeks.
At one point, two gunmen with AK-47s fired shots into a police station. No one was hurt, and the men fled into the city's French quarter section.
With water rising perilously inside the Superdome, Blanco said the thousands of refugees now huddled there would be evacuated within two days. She said officials are working on a plan to get the people to other shelters.
The dome, which became a shelter of last resort for some 20,000 people, is currently without electricity and has no air conditioning. Broken toilets have also made for extremely unsanitary conditions, Blanco said.
"Conditions are degenerating rapidly," she said. "It's a very, very desperate situation."
She asked residents to spend Wednesday in prayer.
"That would be the best thing to calm our spirits and thank our Lord that we are survivors," she said. "Slowly, gradually, we will recover; we will survive; we will rebuild."
A helicopter view of the devastation over the New Orleans area revealed people standing on black rooftops baking in the sunshine while waiting for rescue boats. A row of desperately needed ambulances were lined up on the interstate, water blocking their path. Roller coasters jutted out from the water at a Six Flags amusement park. Hundreds of inmates were seen standing on a highway because the prison had been flooded.
Sen. Mary Landrieu (news, bio, voting record) quietly traced the sign of the cross across her head and chest as she looked out at St. Bernard Parish, where only roofs peeked out from the water.
"The whole parish is gone," Landrieu said.
All day long, rescuers in boats and helicopters pulled out shellshocked and bedraggled flood refugees from rooftops and attics. Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu said that 3,000 people have been rescued by boat and air, some placed shivering and wet into helicopter baskets. They were brought by the truckload into shelters, some in wheelchairs and some carrying babies, with stories of survival and of those who didn't make it.
"Oh my God, it was hell," said Kioka Williams, who had to hack through the ceiling of the beauty shop where she worked as floodwaters rose in New Orleans' low-lying Ninth Ward. "We were screaming, hollering, flashing lights. It was complete chaos."
Frank Mills was in a boarding house in the same neighborhood when water started swirling up toward the ceiling and he fled to the roof. Two elderly residents never made it out, and a third was washed away trying to climb onto the roof.
"He was kind of on the edge of the roof, catching his breath," Mills said. "Next thing I knew, he came floating past me."
Across Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama, more than 1 million residents remained without electricity, some without clean drinking water. An untold number who heeded evacuation orders were displaced and 40,000 were in Red Cross shelters, with officials saying it could be weeks, if not months, before most will be able to return.
Emergency medical teams from across the country were sent into the region and President Bush cut short his Texas vacation Tuesday to return to Washington to focus on the storm damage.
Federal Emergency Management Agency director Mike Brown warned that structural damage to homes, diseases from animal carcasses and chemicals in floodwaters made it unsafe for residents to come home anytime soon. And a mass return also was discouraged to keep from interfering with rescue and recovery efforts.
That was made tough enough by the vast expanse of floodwaters in coastal areas that took an eight-hour pounding from Katrina's howling winds and up to 15 inches of rainfall. From the air, neighborhood after neighborhood looked like nothing but islands of rooftops surrounded by swirling, tea-colored water.
In New Orleans, the flooding actually got worse Tuesday. Failed pumps and levees apparently spilled water from Lake Pontchartrain into streets. The rising water forced hotels to evacuate, led a hospital to boatlift patients to emergency shelters, and drove the staff of New Orleans' Times-Picayune newspaper out of its offices.
Officials late Tuesday began the process of using helicopters to drop 3,000-pound sandbags and dozens of giant concrete barriers into the breach, and expressed confidence the problem could be solved. But if the water rose a couple feet higher, it could wipe out water system for whole city, said New Orleans' homeland security chief Terry Ebbert.
A clearer picture of the destruction in Alabama became to emerge Tuesday: cement slabs where homes once stood, a 100-foot shrimp boat smoldering on its side, people searching for swept-away keepsakes. The damage in some areas appears to be worse than last year's Hurricane Ivan.
In devastated Biloxi, Miss., areas that were not underwater were littered with tree trunks, downed power lines and chunks of broken concrete. Some buildings were flattened.
The string of floating barge casinos crucial to the coastal economy were a shambles. At least three of them were picked up by the storm surge and carried inland, their barnacle-covered hulls sitting up to 200 yards inland.
One of the deadliest spots appeared to be Biloxi's Quiet Water beach apartments, where authorities estimated 30 people were washed away, although the exact toll was unknown. All that was left of the red-brick building was a concrete slab.
"We grabbed a lady and pulled her out the window and then we swam with the current," 55-year-old Joy Schovest said through tears. "It was terrifying. You should have seen the cars floating around us. We had to push them away when we were trying to swim."
Said Biloxi Mayor A. J. Holloway: "This is our tsunami."
Looting became a problem in both Biloxi and in New Orleans, in some cases in full view of police and National Guardsmen. One police officer was shot in the head by a looter in New Orleans, but was expected to recover, Sgt. Paul Accardo, a police spokesman.
On New Orleans' Canal Street, which actually resembled a canal, dozens of looters ripped open the steel gates on clothing and jewelry stores, some packing plastic garbage cans with loot to float down the street. One man, who had about 10 pairs of jeans draped over his left arm, was asked if he was salvaging things from his store.
"No," the man shouted, "that's EVERYBODY'S store!"
Looters at a Wal-Mart brazenly loaded up shopping carts with items including microwaves, coolers and knife sets. Others walked out of a sporting goods store on Canal Street with armfuls of shoes and football jerseys.
Outside the broken shells of Biloxi's casinos, people picked through slot machines to see if they still contained coins and ransacked other businesses.
"People are just casually walking in and filling up garbage bags and walking off like they're Santa Claus," said Marty Desei, owner of a Super 8 motel.
Insurance experts estimated the storm will result in up to $25 billion in insured losses. That means Katrina could prove more costly than record-setting Hurricane Andrew in 1992, which caused an inflation-adjusted $21 billion in losses.
Oil prices jumped by more than $3 a barrel on Tuesday, climbing above $70 a barrel, amid uncertainty about the extent of the damage to the Gulf region's refineries and drilling platforms.
By midday Tuesday, Katrina was downgraded to a tropical depression, with winds around 35 mph. It was moving northeast through Tennessee at around 21 mph, with the potential to dump 8 inches of rain and spin off deadly tornadoes.
Katrina left 11 people dead in its soggy jog across South Florida last week, as a much weaker storm.

BigRedChief
08-31-2005, 09:22 AM
New Orleans mayor speaks:
There is way too many fricking ... cooks in the kitchen," Nagin said in a phone interview with WAPT-TV in Jackson, Mississippi, fuming over what he said were scuttled plans to plug a 200-yard breach near the 17th Street Canal, allowing Lake Pontchartrain to spill into the central business district.
An earlier breach occurred along the Industrial Canal in the city's Lower 9th Ward. ( Watch the video featuring Nagin's complaints about delayed sandbagging -- 0:56 (http://java script:cnnVideo('play','/video/us/2005/08/31/sot.magin.mad.affl','/us');) )
The rising flood waters overwhelmed pumping stations that would normally keep the city dry. About 80 percent of the city was flooded with water up to 20 feet deep after the two levees collapsed.
The Army Corps of Engineers is working to repair the levee breaches, the agency said Tuesday, but it gave no timetable for repairs. (See the video of water surging into the saturated city -- 1:53 (http://java script:cnnVideo('play','/video/tech/2005/08/30/foreman.katrina.levee.dangers.cnn','/tech');) )O mayer speaks:

JimNasium
08-31-2005, 09:29 AM
http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/interactive/weather/0508/gallery.katrina.tues.pm/01.01.ap.jpg
Water from the broken levee spilling into downtown New Orleans
I was stationed right at that very location. If you look directly below the lleft bridge tower you will see a series of buildings right on the Industrial Canal. I spent 3 years of my life right there. It saddens me to look at this picture. I am happy that nothing like this occured during my tour there.

ChiefsCountry
08-31-2005, 09:32 AM
Us here in the midwest should remember how bad floods are, remember 1993.

Bob Dole
08-31-2005, 09:32 AM
Our shelters here in Texarkana were still empty yesterday morning and we're being told today that they are filled to capacity.

While hindsight is always 20/20, as one looks at the photos of car dealerships and school bus lots full of ruined vehicles, one can't help but wonder why they weren't used to evacuate those that were unable to evacuate themselves.

Soupnazi
08-31-2005, 09:34 AM
Seems to me that even if the water gets pumped out pretty quick, all those buildings that are stuck in standing water for days or weeks are going to be structurally unsound, no? Aren't they going to half to bull-doze most of New Orleans and rebuild huge portions of the city from scratch?

Unbelievable.

They're talking about it being months before they get the water out of the city. Any wooden structure under water for that long would have to be demolished, I would think.

It's starting to sound like it's going to be cheaper just to build a whole new city of N.O.

Phobia
08-31-2005, 09:34 AM
Our shelters here in Texarkana were still empty yesterday morning and we're being told today that they are filled to capacity.

While hindsight is always 20/20, as one looks at the photos of car dealerships and school bus lots full of ruined vehicles, one can't help but wonder why they weren't used to evacuate those that were unable to evacuate themselves.

The leaders of that community provided ineffective contingency planning. Easy to say in hindsight, I guess.

Bob Dole
08-31-2005, 09:37 AM
The leaders of that community provided ineffective contingency planning. Easy to say in hindsight, I guess.

If the national media had sensationalized things more, perhaps community leaders would have realized how bad it could get and acted accordingly.

ROYC75
08-31-2005, 09:41 AM
While hindsight is always 20/20, as one looks at the photos of car dealerships and school bus lots full of ruined vehicles, one can't help but wonder why they weren't used to evacuate those that were unable to evacuate themselves.

You said it best....... hindsight is 20/20. I'm sure the car lot owners / dealerships didn't want all of there cars scattered across the country or stolen. Would insurance compaines cover them then ?

The alternative ? Alot of lost lives......

It's a sad situation anyway we look at it.

ROYC75
08-31-2005, 09:42 AM
Please stop it..... we don't need to go there. Please do not get her going again.

Iowanian
08-31-2005, 09:43 AM
I wonder how many national Insurance companies will be bankrupted by this? Ever be able to insure in NO again?

Its difficult to fathom the ripple effect of a disaster of this magnitude....yet as usual, someone's loss will be someone else's gain. I assume companies and jobs will relocate to other areas, there will be ALOT of jobs created for cleanup, planning, architects, supply, service and construction.......Buying stock in Home Depot might be a good idea.....someone, in the near future, will probably become a bajillionair just by starting up a portajohn company in that region.

Its just boggling to the mind, how much stuff is affected.

I have a cousin who was a diver who worked on oil rigs 6 months ago...when he sold his house on the gulf and moved to Iowa...........I'll bet he'll be digging that brass helmet out and heading south for a while soon.

Dartgod
08-31-2005, 09:45 AM
Info for anyone in the KC area that would like to help:

Today, Price Chopper at 119th & Metcalf is filling a Yellow Freight truck with donated bottled water to take to the victims of Hurricane Katrina.

BigRedChief
08-31-2005, 09:48 AM
Info for anyone in the KC area that would like to help:

Today, Price Chopper at 119th & Metcalf is filling a Yellow Freight truck with donated bottled water to take to the victims of Hurricane Katrina.

Don't forget about post #22 as an option either.

Dartgod
08-31-2005, 09:58 AM
Don't forget about post #22 as an option either.Yes, good idea. My wife and I plan to send something to the Red Cross. Perhaps the thread starter could put that info in the header so it doesn't get buried?

ROYC75
08-31-2005, 10:27 AM
Where would they put a refugee camp for a 1/2 to 1 million people at ? :shake:

Many people will have familes in other areas they can go to, some of them have families as well that were local that lost everything.

Can you say : Adopt a family ? Is this an option that is possible ?. Are there people in the US willing to open there own house to help a victimized Katrina family out for 2,3,4,maybe 6 months ? Many families will relocate, most won't. It's there home, they will rebuild in time.

Wrasse
08-31-2005, 10:28 AM
Oh, and you can take your scary neg rep threats and shove them up your ass. Rep is simply a way to give and get feedback on posts. I don't give two f*cks if my boxes are red or green. If you don't have anything better to do than have a jircle jerk on my rep, go for it, you pathetic excuse for a human.
ROFL

chagrin
08-31-2005, 10:31 AM
Let's see how generous Don Imus would be here. He's got thousands of acres

chagrin
08-31-2005, 10:32 AM
Seriously though ROY poses an interesting question: would anyone here put up a family for a few months?

ROYC75
08-31-2005, 10:50 AM
Seriously though ROY poses an interesting question: would anyone here put up a family for a few months?

I would if I had more room, I have full house now....... :(

With that being said,I would feel bad because I couldn't take in more to help out.


But is there a million ( if the # is that hight ) households in the US that would open there homes for awhile to help these people out that lost everything. Some people have no families to go to to help out ?

Make shift tents / camps suck..........

ROYC75
08-31-2005, 10:58 AM
I have a customer in Cadiz,Ky that just called begging for a truck due to price increase. One of thre local stations there went to $ 3.10 a gallon on gas, she is panicking ...... Send me a truck before next weeks price increase on Fuel Surcharge.

Folks, we all are going to pay for this destruction across the board. Gas, diesel, heating oil, natural gas, food, supplies, home / auto insurance ...... it's going to be wide spread increases across the board.

Ultra Peanut
08-31-2005, 10:58 AM
We have to realize that for many of the poor and disenfranchised, for better or worse, unless they lost loved ones, then this is the most exciting thing that ever happened to them. They didn't have much property anyway, and much of society was off-limits to them for most of their lives. Now everyone is equal. If class can be compared to a levee system, well "Levee Law" just breached, and "Lake Poor" has dumped into "Rich Orleans" and is destroying anything and everything gravity will allow. The longer anarchy reigns, the worse it will get.

What we need is the farking Army in there, tinfoil hats or not. And transjurisdictional police. This is not some manufactured governmental situation designed to desensitize us to martial law, this is a major, major catastrophe and there are effectively no police. This is about order, not political science.

Bowser
08-31-2005, 11:11 AM
I have a customer in Cadiz,Ky that just called begging for a truck due to price increase. One of thre local stations there went to $ 3.10 a gallon on gas, she is panicking ...... Send me a truck before next weeks price increase on Fuel Surcharge.

Folks, we all are going to pay for this destruction across the board. Gas, diesel, heating oil, natural gas, food, supplies, home / auto insurance ...... it's going to be wide spread increases across the board.

You said it. This is going to hit each and every one of us in one way or another - fuel prices, natural gas prices, insurance costs, entertainment, eating out - you name it. Our way of life has just changed, and most of us don't even realize it yet.

And I totally agree with you, Psicosis. They need to have a force in New Orleans to help stabilize the area and increase morale.

KCTitus
08-31-2005, 11:15 AM
Our way of life has just changed, and most of us don't even realize it yet.

Feh...mine isnt and wont. Sure we're going to pay more for things, but to say our 'way of life' will change is poppycock.

jynni
08-31-2005, 11:18 AM
I'm making little adjustments but I wouldn't say my way of life is changing. Of course once winter gets here it could be a whole other story.

luv
08-31-2005, 11:22 AM
Those of you that are more concerned about friggin dogs and cats than your fellow man need to have your collective heads examined.
You must not have lost a pet as a kid. I would do everything I could to save my pets. However if it came to them or my family, I would choose my family. But I would still try what I could.

Bowser
08-31-2005, 11:22 AM
Feh...mine isnt and wont. Sure we're going to pay more for things, but to say our 'way of life' will change is poppycock.

Yeah, reading it like that doesn't get my point across. I wasn't saying we would all convert to Buddhism, or anything like that.

My point was that prices across the board are going to skyrocket, and the way some of us live now could be influenced by those changes.

luv
08-31-2005, 11:25 AM
Yeah, reading it like that makes doesn't get my point across. I wasn't saying we would all convert to Buddhism, or anything like that.

My point was that prices across the board are going to skyrocket, and the way some of us live now could be influenced by those changes.
I agree. Maybe not for everyone, but for some. I know some people who are always running on fumes due to no gas money. They're either going to have to quit smoking to pay for gas, or not go as many places. Either way, that would be a change.

KCTitus
08-31-2005, 11:28 AM
My point was that prices across the board are going to skyrocket, and the way some of us live now could be influenced by those changes.

People will have less disposable income for a while. Priorities will be readjusted. Maybe driving a Ford Excursion isnt such a great idea unless you have 12 kids.

4th and Long
08-31-2005, 11:29 AM
You must not have lost a pet as a kid. I would do everything I could to save my pets. However if it came to them or my family, I would choose my family. But I would still try what I could.
I've had a dozen + dogs as pets. Now I have none. I've had to put a couple of them down. The rest died of natural causes.

ROYC75
08-31-2005, 11:30 AM
It's just not fuel here folks. Cost of living is going to climb, how you live now will be cost alot more within a month, But it just won't stop there, it will continue for several months, possibly years before it comes back down, if it ever does ?

ROYC75
08-31-2005, 11:33 AM
Your food, all supplies, anything you buy is going to rise, rather quickly. You'll see a small increase at first, but it will continue to rise and before you know it, it's costing you as much as 50 % more on some items or purchases.

KCTitus
08-31-2005, 11:34 AM
It's just not fuel here folks. Cost of living is going to climb, how you live now will be cost alot more within a month, But it just won't stop there, it will continue for several months, possibly years before it comes back down, if it ever does ?

another a little over the top...

Brock
08-31-2005, 11:37 AM
Lumber prices will certainly skyrocket. Maybe now those chicken littles who predicted the housing bubble will finally be right.

Frosty
08-31-2005, 11:38 AM
Maybe driving a Ford Excursion isnt such a great idea unless you have 12 kids.

It will definitely affect sales of new and used vehicles.

The problem for that current Excursion owner is - what do you do with it? Trade it off for a monumental loss? Who's going to buy it? If you do take a loss (easily $10K - 20K), how much gas can you buy for that much?

People that are in debt up to their eyeballs for all the toys and "status" vehicles are going to get hit very hard.

Brock
08-31-2005, 11:41 AM
It will definitely affect sales of new and used vehicles.

The problem for that current Excursion owner is - what do you do with it? Trade it off for a monumental loss? Who's going to buy it? If you do take a loss (easily $10K - 20K), how much gas can you buy for that much?

"Steal" it.

KCTitus
08-31-2005, 11:42 AM
People that are in debt up to their eyeballs for all the toys and "status" vehicles are going to get hit very hard.

declare bankruptcy before the laws change Oct. 1.

BigRedChief
08-31-2005, 11:42 AM
It will definitely affect sales of new and used vehicles.

The problem for that current Excursion owner is - what do you do with it? Trade it off for a monumental loss? Who's going to buy it? If you do take a loss (easily $10K - 20K), how much gas can you buy for that much?

People that are in debt up to their eyeballs for all the toys and "status" vehicles are going to get hit very hard.
So I guess me and Frazod are not too stupid going for the V6's in our pony's huh?

Frosty
08-31-2005, 11:48 AM
"Steal" it.

I imagine there will be a lot of that, further inflating our insurance costs.

ROYC75
08-31-2005, 12:07 PM
another a little over the top...

Sit back and watch...........

KCTitus
08-31-2005, 12:08 PM
Sit back and watch...........

Whatever. Watch out for that cloud, it's about to hit you.

ROYC75
08-31-2005, 12:18 PM
Think about it this way.....

As much as 911 was a tragedy, it had an economic effect on the economy we are still feeling.

This is a magnitude of much larger proportions, it's going to effect us in so many other ways. This damn thing is going to cost more than the 4 hurricanes that hit Florida last year combined.

Bob Dole
08-31-2005, 12:24 PM
Does anyone have a link to a good clear hi-res satellite or radar image of Katrina just before landfall?

Bob Dole needs a clear, hi-res version for a fundraiser flyer design.

jspchief
08-31-2005, 12:26 PM
Does anyone have a link to a good clear hi-res satellite or radar image of Katrina just before landfall?

Bob Dole needs a clear, hi-res version for a fundraiser flyer design. Not sure if this is what you're looking for, but it's a pretty good pic.


http://us.news3.yimg.com/us.i2.yimg.com/p/afp/20050830/capt.sge.daz03.300805123646.photo00.photo.default-398x249.jpg?x=380&y=237&sig=apqPK8Jf9_Dck3afLxYK7A--

BigRedChief
08-31-2005, 12:29 PM
Does anyone have a link to a good clear hi-res satellite or radar image of Katrina just before landfall?

Bob Dole needs a clear, hi-res version for a fundraiser flyer design.
National Hurricane Center Satellite Imagery page

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/satellite.shtml

Amnorix
08-31-2005, 12:36 PM
Think about it this way.....

As much as 911 was a tragedy, it had an economic effect on the economy we are still feeling.

This is a magnitude of much larger proportions, it's going to effect us in so many other ways. This damn thing is going to cost more than the 4 hurricanes that hit Florida last year combined.


I'm not sure that this is a much large magnitude than 9/11. 9/11 resulted in HUGE increases / delays in mass transit systems, airports, security at all levels, governmental infrastructure, underlying stocks (defense industry related, security industry related, etc.), and shut down the financial capital of the world for several days.

I don't believe the economic consequences of Katrina will be much higher than 9/11. The repair/rebuilding costs will be higher, no doubt, but the associated and indirect costs, such as convincing people not to travel for a LONG time, are much lower.

ROYC75
08-31-2005, 12:45 PM
I'm not sure that this is a much large magnitude than 9/11. 9/11 resulted in HUGE increases / delays in mass transit systems, airports, security at all levels, governmental infrastructure, underlying stocks (defense industry related, security industry related, etc.), and shut down the financial capital of the world for several days.

I don't believe the economic consequences of Katrina will be much higher than 9/11. The repair/rebuilding costs will be higher, no doubt, but the associated and indirect costs, such as convincing people not to travel for a LONG time, are much lower.


Now figure in long term fuel increases, oil, gas, heating fuels,etc. ... long term
How about electrical rates increase / natural gas increases.......
What about insurance rates increased...long term.
Transportation cost due to fuel increases .....
Increased cost of supplies, food, etc.
The repair of over a millions homes, business's and clean up efforts ....

Amnorix
08-31-2005, 12:51 PM
Now figure in long term fuel increases, oil, gas, heating fuels,etc. ... long term
How about electrical rates increase / natural gas increases.......
What about insurance rates increased...long term.
Transportation cost due to fuel increases .....
Increased cost of supplies, food, etc.
The repair of over a millions homes, business's and clean up efforts ....


Fuels etc. should equalize out within the next year. Long, long, long term, I don't think there's going to be much impact. I haven't heard anything about serious infrastructure damage to oil platforms or refineries.

Repair etc. and clean up efforts will probably be underwritten by the feds to an extent, which just means more damn debt piled on, which has indirect effects on interest rates, etc., but if you compare that to the cost of Iraq, which wouldn't have happened if 9/11 hadn't happened, etc. Now we're pretty far afield.

Electrical rates/natural gas is a regional effect at best. Not like the power from California or Boston is going to be re-routed to Louisiana.

Fuel is where it's at. I'm thinking it's a short term price spike due to uncertainty and short term damage. if there's serious infrastructure damage to drilling and refining, then you may be right.

Bob Dole
08-31-2005, 12:51 PM
National Hurricane Center Satellite Imagery page

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/satellite.shtml

Bob Dole has already been there and can't manage to wade through it all and find Katrina before landfall...

Dartgod
08-31-2005, 01:06 PM
Does anyone have a link to a good clear hi-res satellite or radar image of Katrina just before landfall?

Bob Dole needs a clear, hi-res version for a fundraiser flyer design.there are a bunch of them here:

http://www.nnvl.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/index.cgi?page=products&category=Year%202005%20Storm%20Events&event=Hurricane%20Katrina

http://www.nnvl.noaa.gov/images/109661_m.jpg

This is a low res, but they have high res too. Probably exactly what you want.

KCTitus
08-31-2005, 01:08 PM
This just in...here's a list of other countries coming to America's aid:

Bug
08-31-2005, 01:09 PM
I'm not too concerned about fuel prices, latest reports are that about 8% of the US refining capacity has been damaged, which is far, far less than anticipated. Prices will stabilize as soon as everyone gets over the jitters about supply being interupted, ect.
What IS concerning me is the situation in New Orleans, I don't see any way that the levies are going to be fixed, the breach is far too large, and I fully expect more levies to fail. I fear that the entire city will be underwater by this weekend. My prayers are with them, and godspeed to those who are helping the survivors.

KCTitus
08-31-2005, 01:12 PM
I'm not too concerned about fuel prices, latest reports are that about 8% of the US refining capacity has been damaged, which is far, far less than anticipated. Prices will stabilize as soon as everyone gets over the jitters about supply being interupted, ect.
What IS concerning me is the situation in New Orleans, I don't see any way that the levies are going to be fixed, the breach is far too large, and I fully expect more levies to fail. I fear that the entire city will be underwater by this weekend. My prayers are with them, and godspeed to those who are helping the survivors.

I just heard that the water level has finally stopped rising, because it's reached the same level of the lake.

EPA just announced they were lifting some of their restrictions--volatility and sulfur levels in diesel to help with distribution of refined gas to areas affected by the restrictions. That should help gas prices some.

Amnorix
08-31-2005, 01:18 PM
This just in...here's a list of other countries coming to America's aid:


This just in....you are, as usual, wrong.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20050829/pl_afp/usweathervenezuelaoil_050829234840


Edit: for the record, I realize this is more of a political statement than by a country that isn't much liked by BushCo, or that likes BushCo, but for whatever it is worth.

Besides, we are the richest, most powerful country in the history of planet Earth. If repair/recovery costs in the area are $200 billion (well above any estimate I have seen to date), then that represents less than 2% of the US Gross Domestic Product for 2004, as reported by the World Bank.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_GDP_%28nominal%29

KCTitus
08-31-2005, 01:21 PM
This just in....you are, as usual, wrong.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20050829/pl_afp/usweathervenezuelaoil_050829234840


Edit: for the record, I realize this is more of a political statement than by a country that isn't much liked by BushCo, or that likes BushCo, but for whatever it is worth.

Besides, we are the richest, most powerful country in the history of planet Earth. If repair/recovery costs in the area are $200 billion (well above any estimate I have seen to date), then that represents less than 2% of the US Gross Domestic Product for 2004, as reported by the World Bank.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_GDP_%28nominal%29

Feh...I was making a joke. I dont anticipate any help because we dont need any. I appreciate your running off and taking it as literally as you did.

Brock
08-31-2005, 01:22 PM
Edit: for the record, I realize this is more of a political statement than by a country that isn't much liked by BushCo, or that likes BushCo, but for whatever it is worth.]

Whatever it is worth is precisely nothing.

Amnorix
08-31-2005, 01:28 PM
Feh...I was making a joke. I dont anticipate any help because we dont need any. I appreciate your running off and taking it as literally as you did.


Ah, in the future I'd suggest that you use these things called "similes" or some other method to indicate that your subtle, yet brilliant, humor is being called into action.

Amnorix
08-31-2005, 01:29 PM
Whatever it is worth is precisely nothing.


:shrug: Like we need the help of third world dictators to deal with this...

KCChiefsFan88
08-31-2005, 01:30 PM
Here is a link to the newspaper in New Orleans, The Times-Picayune and some of their front pages the past few days. Pretty unreal what is going on there:

http://www.nola.com/hurricane/katrina/

KCTitus
08-31-2005, 01:31 PM
Ah, in the future I'd suggest that you use these things called "similes" or some other method to indicate that your subtle, yet brilliant, humor is being called into action.

Omitted on purpose so I can watch people act the jacka$$ over a absurd joke. I appreciate your participation.

Amnorix
08-31-2005, 01:34 PM
Omitted on purpose so I can watch people act the jacka$$ over a absurd joke. I appreciate your participation.

We can at least agree that your joke was absurd.

KCTitus
08-31-2005, 01:35 PM
We can at least agree that your joke was absurd.

Not nearly as your response, again, thanks for your participation.

BigRedChief
08-31-2005, 01:48 PM
From CNN:
http://www.cnn.com/2005/WEATHER/08/31/katrina.refugees.ap/index.html

HOUSTON, Texas (AP) -- At least 25,000 of Hurricane Katrina's refugees, a majority of them at the New Orleans Superdome, will travel in a bus convoy to Houston and will be sheltered at the Astrodome, which hasn't been used for professional sporting events in years.
Evacuees with special problems already have been evacuated to hospitals in other Louisiana cities, but the 23,000 people now confined to the stuffy, smelly Superdome, as well as some other refugees will go to Houston, about 350 miles away.
The marathon bus convoy should take two days, officials said. (See the video of the governor's plan to help the stranded -- 3:09 (javascript:cnnVideo('play','/video/us/2005/08/31/obrien.blanco.interview.ap');))
"Our view is the move to the Astrodome is temporary," said William Lokey, chief coordinator for the Federal Emergency Management Agency. "We're buying time until we can figure something out."
Ann Williamson, secretary of the Louisiana Department of Social Services who is working on the evacuation plans, said, "The remarkable offer from Texas did not have an end date."
FEMA will provide 475 buses for the transfer, and the Astrodome's schedule has been cleared through December for housing evacuees, said Kathy Walt, a spokeswoman for Texas Gov. Rick Perry.
The situation inside the dank and sweltering Superdome was becoming desperate: The water was rising, the air conditioning was out, toilets were broken, and tempers were rising. (See video of conditions inside the dimmed and damaged stadium -- 3:53 (javascript:cnnVideo('play','/video/us/2005/08/29/reams.superdome.leak.wdsu','/us');))
Word of the move -- a logistical nightmare at best -- had not reached the Superdome when The Associated Press told administrators about it.
The dome is still surrounded by flooded streets, and getting buses to the ramps will be difficult, if not impossible. The floodwaters are threatening the generators which are providing electricity for the remaining lighting. (Watch video of Lake Pontchartrain spilling into the city -- 1:52 (javascript:cnnVideo('play','/video/us/2005/08/31/vo.levee.breached.cnn','/us');))
There has been no air conditioning and only limited lights since city power went out during the hurricane arrived Monday.

4th and Long
08-31-2005, 01:53 PM
The last time I rolled through Houston, The Astrodome was being used for a concert. There were Backstreet Boys signs everywhere. At the base of the Astrodome was a large puddle. It's my belief that The Astrodome was actually crying.

chagrin
08-31-2005, 02:03 PM
there are a bunch of them here:

http://www.nnvl.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/index.cgi?page=products&category=Year%202005%20Storm%20Events&event=Hurricane%20Katrina

http://www.nnvl.noaa.gov/images/109661_m.jpg

This is a low res, but they have high res too. Probably exactly what you want.

IU haven't searched for right before landfall, but this is a cool site that shows all kinds of sat images. Including one real scary one of a Typhoon, followint the tail of a tropical storm off the coast of Japan

MODIS Rapid Repsons System (http:/rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/gallery/)

tk13
08-31-2005, 02:07 PM
On CNN they're saying a building is on fire in the French Quarter... on the corner of Canal and Bourbon St. I believe.... a police officer nearby is afraid the buildings are so close together the fire may spread.

KC Dan
08-31-2005, 02:08 PM
On CNN they're saying a building is on fire in the French Quarter... on the corner of Canal and Bourbon St. I believe.... a police officer nearby is afraid the buildings are so close together the fire may spread.
Let 'em burn. They are probably watered damaged and have to be bulldozed anyway.

BigRedChief
08-31-2005, 02:11 PM
Every neighborhood in NO looks like this today.
http://a.abcnews.com/images/Technology/nm_katrina_power_050830_ssv.jpg

KC Dan
08-31-2005, 02:12 PM
This guy could help solve their housing problem pretty cost-effectively & I am serious:

BigRedChief
08-31-2005, 02:12 PM
On CNN they're saying a building is on fire in the French Quarter... on the corner of Canal and Bourbon St. I believe.... a police officer nearby is afraid the buildings are so close together the fire may spread.

Canal and Bourbon? Nothing there. All the good "Gentelmens" clubs are up a block or two.

BigRedChief
08-31-2005, 02:16 PM
The military help starts. From CNN:
Some 3,000 members of the Mississippi National Guard who were activated after the storm were "using chainsaws to cut their way in to the coast," said Brad Mayo, a spokesman for the Mississippi agency.
The U.S. Coast Guard said Wednesday it had rescued 1,259 hurricane victims in the region as of midnight Tuesday and that its operations were continuing.
The Federal Emergency Management Agency also has deployed an array of resources to the storm-hit region to help rescuers who arrived before the Category 4 hurricane struck Monday.
Emergency teams include rescuers who specialize in searching collapsed buildings, giving medical attention to injured people and animals, and providing mortuary services for the dead.
FEMA issued a list of organizations for those seeking to assist victims. (How to help (http://www.cnn.com/2005/US/08/30/help.agencies/index.html))
The USS Shreveport -- one of four Navy ships scheduled to bring food, soap and medical supplies to the region -- departed port Wednesday from Norfolk, Virginia.
The USS Iwo Jima, Tortuga and the USNS Arctic also are expected to arrive on the Gulf Coast in about five days.
The Navy hospital ship USNS Comfort will depart from Baltimore, Maryland, to reach the region in about a week.
Already helping recovery off Louisiana is the amphibious assault ship USS Bataan, whose helicopters have been flying relief missions. The ship can produce large quantities of fresh water and also has a floating hospital with 600 beds.
More than 125,000 National Guard troops have been activated in 19 states and the District of Columbia to help local agencies with traffic control, security, food distribution and search and rescue efforts, a Guard spokesman said.
The U.S. Air Force said it was sending two large cargo planes to the region -- a C-5 Galaxy to Louisiana and a C-17 to Mississippi.
Besides humanitarian aid, the C-5 is bringing in swift boats, which can maneuver in shallow floodwaters to ferry rescue workers and victims. The C-17 is outfitted to evacuate 36 sick and injured people at a time.
The Air Force also deployed MH-60 Black Hawk helicopters to Mississippi for search and rescue efforts.

beavis
08-31-2005, 02:16 PM
Your food, all supplies, anything you buy is going to rise, rather quickly. You'll see a small increase at first, but it will continue to rise and before you know it, it's costing you as much as 50 % more on some items or purchases.
I heard this same kind of crap for months leading up to December 31, 1999.

Newsflash, my toaster didn't try to eat me.

Stinger
08-31-2005, 02:18 PM
From CNN:
http://www.cnn.com/2005/WEATHER/08/31/katrina.refugees.ap/index.html

HOUSTON, Texas (AP) -- At least 25,000 of Hurricane Katrina's refugees, a majority of them at the New Orleans Superdome, will travel in a bus convoy to Houston and will be sheltered at the Astrodome, which hasn't been used for professional sporting events in years.
Evacuees with special problems already have been evacuated to hospitals in other Louisiana cities, but the 23,000 people now confined to the stuffy, smelly Superdome, as well as some other refugees will go to Houston, about 350 miles away.
The marathon bus convoy should take two days, officials said. (See the video of the governor's plan to help the stranded -- 3:09 (http://java script:cnnVideo('play','/video/us/2005/08/31/obrien.blanco.interview.ap');))
"Our view is the move to the Astrodome is temporary," said William Lokey, chief coordinator for the Federal Emergency Management Agency. "We're buying time until we can figure something out."
Ann Williamson, secretary of the Louisiana Department of Social Services who is working on the evacuation plans, said, "The remarkable offer from Texas did not have an end date."
FEMA will provide 475 buses for the transfer, and the Astrodome's schedule has been cleared through December for housing evacuees, said Kathy Walt, a spokeswoman for Texas Gov. Rick Perry.
The situation inside the dank and sweltering Superdome was becoming desperate: The water was rising, the air conditioning was out, toilets were broken, and tempers were rising. (See video of conditions inside the dimmed and damaged stadium -- 3:53 (http://java script:cnnVideo('play','/video/us/2005/08/29/reams.superdome.leak.wdsu','/us');))
Word of the move -- a logistical nightmare at best -- had not reached the Superdome when The Associated Press told administrators about it.
The dome is still surrounded by flooded streets, and getting buses to the ramps will be difficult, if not impossible. The floodwaters are threatening the generators which are providing electricity for the remaining lighting. (Watch video of Lake Pontchartrain spilling into the city -- 1:52 (http://java script:cnnVideo('play','/video/us/2005/08/31/vo.levee.breached.cnn','/us');))
There has been no air conditioning and only limited lights since city power went out during the hurricane arrived Monday.

Just a thought here could cruise ships ether in dry dock or rented from cruise lines not be used. I believe I remember that cruise ships were used in Jacksonville durring the Superbowl since they didn't have enough hotels? Might be a more logicestical way of trasporting people out or offing them shelter? Then again it may not just thinking out loud here.

MOhillbilly
08-31-2005, 02:18 PM
hell on earth

KCTitus
08-31-2005, 02:19 PM
Newsflash, my toaster didn't try to eat me.

ROFL

tk13
08-31-2005, 02:26 PM
A fire truck is on scene at that French Quarter fire... but in a cruel twist, they can't get any of the hydrants to work. So they can't get any water to put the fire out with, yet they're surrounded by water.

ZepSinger
08-31-2005, 02:48 PM
I vacationed at this very same time last year in Biloxi. We stayed at the Balmoral Inn, just 200 ft. off the shore (In fact, we had to cut our trip very short due to hurricane Ivan moving in).

I got to be good friends with the owner of the Inn, a guy named Mike. I've tried his cell phone many times, to no avail. I'm pretty concerned for him and his wife... wow, this is terrible.....

Z

htismaqe
08-31-2005, 02:53 PM
A fire truck is on scene at that French Quarter fire... but in a cruel twist, they can't get any of the hydrants to work. So they can't get any water to put the fire out with, yet they're surrounded by water.

Grand Forks, North Dakota...1997.

http://draves.com/gf/

TopJet2
08-31-2005, 07:50 PM
Why wouldnt we accept help from other nations? If your house was destroyed and your neighbor, that you dont get along with, offers assistance do you tell him to stick it up his arse? This could bea legitimate offer from Castro Jr. and may be a door for diplomacy. I would be more inclined to agree with Roy. I would imagine that prices for everything will increase and affect the way people live. There are a lot of families that live paycheck to paycheck and with increased money going out the ol budget gets fracked!

Bug
08-31-2005, 08:31 PM
Zepsinger, I hope your friend left before the storm hit, and his cell phone is out of area. If he stayed in the area, the cell phone isn't going to work for weeks.

Phobia
08-31-2005, 08:40 PM
Zepsinger, I hope your friend left before the storm hit, and his cell phone is out of area. If he stayed in the area, the cell phone isn't going to work for weeks.

I have a friend who moved from NO several months ago. He retained his NO number - probably because he didn't want to break his contract....

He's alive and well in KC. Didn't even get wet over the weekend. His cell has been unable to receive calls since Sunday.

I wouldn't sweat it.

WilliamTheIrish
08-31-2005, 09:55 PM
Children's Hospital under seige
Tuesday, 11:45 p.m.

Late Tuesday, Gov. Blanco spokeswoman Denise Bottcher described a disturbing scene unfolding in uptown New Orleans, where looters were trying to break into Children's Hospital.

Bottcher said the director of the hospital fears for the safety of the staff and the 100 kids inside the hospital. The director said the hospital is locked, but that the looters were trying to break in and had gathered outside the facility.

The director has sought help from the police, but, due to rising flood waters, police have not been able to respond.

Bottcher said Blanco has been told of the situation and has informed the National Guard. However, Bottcher said, the National Guard has also been unable to respond.

This may have already been stated in the thread (I didn't read past Psi's post), but 30 or so of the kids and presumably the parents) in that hospital are being airlifted to KCMO and Children's Mercy as we speak.

BigRedChief
08-31-2005, 11:17 PM
The musicians/celebrities/telethons start for the relief effort
http://www.cnn.com/2005/SHOWBIZ/08/31/katrina.concert/index.html

Ultra Peanut
09-01-2005, 01:09 AM
A soldier has been shot at the Superdome. This happened at 1:45 AM, per the voices on the Louisiana State Police scanner.

Holy shit. Holy ****ing shit.

Ultra Peanut
09-01-2005, 01:11 AM
"At approximately 0145 hours, soldier was shot in the upper leg. Soldier has medical personnel tending to him at present. The civilian that shot the soldier has been cornered in a locker room and personnel are attempting to extricate him at this time."

Ultra Peanut
09-01-2005, 01:39 AM
"Code 4 in the Dome, one apprehension."

KcMizzou
09-01-2005, 01:41 AM
"Code 4 in the Dome, one apprehension." Where are you getting this? I'm watching Fox news, and haven't heard anything yet.

Ultra Peanut
09-01-2005, 02:03 AM
The stream I'm listening to is:

http://205.252.89.181:8000/live

There was an accusation that it was a hoax (a claim I found spurious at best), due to the site this particular feed is being hosted on, but it's since been confirmed as the real deal.

From about fifteen minutes ago:

"I think someone ain't gonna be wakin' up in the morning."
"[garbled] You have an open mic. Repeat, you have an open mic."

That seemed to be an off-hand remark about the suspect they apprehended, from what I can tell.

The "Code 4 in the Dome" hopefully means the "all is taken care of, no further assistance needed" Code 4 rather than the "homicide" Code 4, but I honestly don't know enough to say.

RedDread
09-01-2005, 02:56 AM
Check this out! This dude is blogging from within a downtown New Orleans hotel that he and his "team" are seeking shelter in. They rode out the storm and have now secured the hotel against vandals and looters


Just amazing stuff, a true firsthand account from just before the hurricane to now.

http://www.livejournal.com/users/interdictor/

Sorry if this is a repost.

tk13
09-01-2005, 04:25 AM
Holy crap! That is unbelievable! It's amazing how he went from hopeful, hopeful, still hanging on for optimism, to now it's almost like they're in a war zone. It might be really ugly controlling these looters. I wasn't that concerned with the food and water stuff but from all of these observations there's some serious, serious military force that is going to have to be applied or they'll never get it under control. Very disheartening to see how the police came apart at the seams though. I can't imagine what the mayor is feeling, I bet he's about ready to jump off the Superdome.

Manila-Chief
09-01-2005, 06:38 AM
As big as a port hub it is ........ YES. Way too much harbor industry comes from there. The Mississippi River handles a very large flow of barge traffic that must be unloaded and reloaded at the port.

It will take years to rebuild, but the country needs it due to the port.

My revenue will drop about 20 % due to this hurricane. Rest assure the Houston ports will have to handle a larger load now. But it will affect my business for awhile.

Add in the increased fuel charges for trucks at the pumps....... :(

A month or so ago we received permission from our "company" for our crates to go via the port of Houston instead of N.O. When they arrive they will need to sit in storage until we buy a house. Sure am delighted we don’t have to worry about them being “baptized” in a N. O. warehouse.

Oh, saw a piece this morning about Brett Farve (sp?) being concerned about his parents who live at the end of the bay in Bay St. Louis, MS. My brother in law lives (or did live) 4 blocks off the beach. About midnight (CDT) we heard that he and his whole family were safe. It was certainly an anxious time and made worse from seeing/hearing the news. We believe it is a miracle they survived. Most of the houses around them are gone. The house survived the 1969 storm (before he bought it) and they falsely assumed that it would survive this one. They lost everything. Also, hee lost his insurance office and restaurant, but they retained the most important thing ... their lives.

BTW one of his sons had an extended serious illness a few years ago and Brett donated to the cause in a big way... building a special room onto the house, etc. Needless to say they are big G.B. or Brett fans.... I'm not a G.B. fan but I like Brett ... coz my baby brother coached DB when he played for Southern Miss. He said he had to tie his necktie for each road trip.

But, yes, it is going to take years before all those areas are back to where they were before the storm.

RedDread
09-01-2005, 07:05 AM
New Orleans is degrading into a warzone....



Superdome evacuation suspended after shots fired
ESPN.com news services

NEW ORLEANS -- The evacuation of the Superdome was suspended Thursday after shots were reported fired at a military helicopter and arson fires broke out outside the arena. No immediate injuries were reported.

Red Cross

The scene at the Superdome became increasingly chaotic, with thousands of people rushing from nearby hotels and other buildings, hoping to climb onto the buses taking evacuees from the arena, officials said. Paramedics became increasingly alarmed by the sight of people with guns.

Richard Zeuschlag, chief of the ambulance service that was handling the evacuation of sick and injured people from the Superdome, said it was suspending operations "until they gain control of the Superdome."

He said shots were fired at a military helicopter over the Superdome before daybreak.

He said the National Guard told him that it was sending 100 military police officers to restore order.

"That's not enough," Zeuschlag said. "We need a thousand."

Lt. Col. Pete Schneider of the Louisiana National Guard said the military -- which was handling the evacuation of the able-bodied from the Superdome -- had suspended operations, too, because fires set outside the arena were preventing buses from getting close enough to pick up people.

He said tens thousands of people started rushing out of other buildings when they saw buses pulling up and hoped to get on. But the immediate focus was on evacuating people from the Superdome, and the other refugees were left to mill around.

Zeuschlag said paramedics were calling him and crying for help because they were so scared of people with guns at the Superdome. He also said that during the night, when a medical evacuation helicopter tried to land at a hospital in the outlying town of Kenner, the pilot reported 100 people were on the landing pad, some with guns.

"He was frightened and would not land," Zeuschlag.

Evacuees with special problems already have been evacuated to hospitals in other Louisiana cities, but the more than 23,000 people now confined to the stuffy, smelly Superdome, as well as some other refugees will go to Houston, about 350 miles away.

The marathon bus convoy should take two days, officials said.

FEMA will provide 475 buses for the transfer, and the Astrodome's schedule has been cleared through December for housing evacuees, said Kathy Walt, a spokeswoman for Texas Gov. Rick Perry.

President Bush said Thursday that thousands more victims of Hurricane Katrina still need to be rescued and acknowledged the frustration of people who need food, water and shelter and are desperate for the federal government's massive relief effort to kick into high gear.

"I fully understand people wanting things to have happened yesterday," Bush said in a live interview in the Roosevelt Room of the White House with ABC's "Good Morning America" program. "I understand the anxiety of people on the ground. ... So there is frustration. But I want people to know there's a lot of help coming."

Bush, who spoke as the Superdome evacuation was taking place, expressed sympathy for those still stranded.

"Thousands have been rescued, there are thousands more to be rescued," he said.

"I just can't imagine waving a sign that says 'Come and get me now.'"

Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff, meanwhile, said one problem is that "we have an ongoing flood situation even as we're in the middle of recovering from the hurricane."

"We're in a position where there are additional people we have to look for," he said in an interview on NBC"s "Today" show. "We're hoping to get the most people out as we can in the next 12 hours and 24 hours, but we're going to continue to search until we're sure we've got everybody safe."

"We've got hundreds of thousands of people who have been displaced," Chertoff added. "This is unprecedented in this country's history and it's going to call for the kind of relief effort which we've been able to mount overseas, and we're now going to have to mount at home."

Bush has said the recovery will take years. He said the federal government has dispatched assistance to the Gulf Coast region, including 5.4 million precooked meals, 13.4 million liters of water, more than 1,000 search and rescue personnel and the floating hospital ship USNS Comfort. It was just the first trickle of help that Washington planned to provide to Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida, the president said.

An additional 10,000 National Guard troops from across the country began pouring into the Gulf Coast on Wednesday to shore up security, rescue and relief operations. The new units brought the number of troops dedicated to the effort to more than 28,000, in what may be the largest military response to a natural disaster.

The Pentagon was sending a broad contingent of ships, aircraft, trucks, medical support and other personnel to support federal agencies already providing aid to gulf region, including 60 helicopters to be used for search and rescue operations, damage assessment flights and the distribution of supplies.

The hurricane probably killed thousands of people in New Orleans, mayor Ray Nagin said Wednesday, an estimate that, if accurate, would make the storm the nation's deadliest natural disaster since at least the 1906 San Francisco earthquake.

"We know there is a significant number of dead bodies in the water," and other people dead in attics, Nagin said. Asked how many, he said: "Minimum, hundreds. Most likely, thousands."

The frightening estimate came as Army engineers struggled to plug New Orleans' breached levees with giant sandbags and concrete barriers, and authorities drew up plans to clear out the tens of thousands of people left in the Big Easy and practically abandon the flooded-out city.

There will be a "total evacuation of the city. We have to. The city will not be functional for two or three months," Nagin said. And he said people will not be allowed back into their homes for at least a month or two.

Nagin estimated 50,000 to 100,000 people remained in New Orleans, a city of nearly half a million. He said 14,000 to 15,000 a day could be evacuated.

If the mayor's estimate holds true, it would make Katrina the nation's deadliest hurricane since 1900, when a storm in Galveston, Texas, killed between 6,000 and 12,000 people. The death toll in the San Francisco earthquake and the resulting fire has been put at anywhere from about 500 to 6,000.

In addition to the Houston Astrodome solution, the Federal Emergency Management Agency was considering putting people on cruise ships, in tent cities, mobile home parks, and so-called floating dormitories -- boats the agency uses to house its own employees.

Power and air-conditioning would be no problem in the Astrodome, although there would be few comforts of home in the stadium seating.

"We want to accommodate those people as quickly as possible for the simple reason they have been through a horrible ordeal," said Rusty Cornelius, administrative coordinator for the Harris County (Texas) Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Management.

Cornelius said the refugees would be bused to Houston, but all would not necessarily be on the road at the same time. Specifics of the transport and housing for the refugees were still being worked out with Red Cross and state government officials, he said.

Texas also is looking at the possibility of using the Ford Center in Beaumont for some long-term housing for other evacuees from Louisiana who may be staying in hotels, motels and campgrounds.

Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.

BigRedChief
09-01-2005, 07:36 AM
They need to send in more troops right now. This is America not some third world country. We can't allow people to stop the military's evacuation of U.S. citizens who want to get to dry land. Damn these reports are discouraging.:cuss:

NEW ORLEANS, Louisiana (CNN) -- A private ambulance service says it is being hindered in its efforts to evacuate patients from New Orleans hospitals by the lawlessness in the city and appealed to President Bush to activate the military.
"If we don't have the federal presence in New Orleans tonight at dark, it will no longer be safe to be there, hospital or no hospital," Acadian Ambulance Services chief executive officer Richard Zuschlag told CNN.

RedDread
09-01-2005, 08:41 AM
Check this out! This dude is blogging from within a downtown New Orleans hotel that he and his "team" are seeking shelter in. They rode out the storm and have now secured the hotel against vandals and looters


Just amazing stuff, a true firsthand account from just before the hurricane to now.

http://www.livejournal.com/users/interdictor/

Sorry if this is a repost.

He's awake and posting again

BigRedChief
09-01-2005, 09:06 AM
He's awake and posting again

Amazing it is. Rep :clap:

MOhillbilly
09-01-2005, 09:24 AM
Streched thin on 3 fronts,now is the time to strike america if you are a terrorist.
See how thin shit gets then.

Bob Dole
09-01-2005, 09:41 AM
While there is no way to compile completely accurate statistics, local officials here estimate that we currently have around 10,000 additional people in Texarkana.

Many have accepted the fact that they won't be going back to where home was any time soon, and are enrolling their kids in school, and seeking employment and permanent housing.

KCTitus
09-01-2005, 09:45 AM
While there is no way to compile completely accurate statistics, local officials here estimate that we currently have around 10,000 additional people in Texarkana.

Many have accepted the fact that they won't be going back to where home was any time soon, and are enrolling their kids in school, and seeking employment and permanent housing.

A wise move...if it were me, I would do that. Going back only asks for it to happen again, sadly.

Brock
09-01-2005, 09:49 AM
A wise move...if it were me, I would do that. Going back only asks for it to happen again, sadly.

I don't think there will be any going back for a lot of people. I think a large part of that city will be deemed wetlands.

Rain Man
09-01-2005, 09:52 AM
Wow, it's going post-holocaust there.

It's scary to think of how fragile civilization is. We're lucky that there are places where people can be taken to get food and clean sheets and stuff. Imagine a huge meteor strike or something that caused this problem in half the world.

Bowser
09-01-2005, 09:53 AM
I don't think there will be any going back for a lot of people. I think a large part of that city will be deemed wetlands.

I'm not familiar with the layout of New Orleans. From what you've seen, what part of the city could be lost?

Brock
09-01-2005, 09:54 AM
Wow, it's going post-holocaust there.

It's scary to think of how fragile civilization is. We're lucky that there are places where people can be taken to get food and clean sheets and stuff. Imagine a huge meteor strike or something that caused this problem in half the world.

Willis/Affleck already showed how to handle that.

Brock
09-01-2005, 09:58 AM
I'm not familiar with the layout of New Orleans. From what you've seen, what part of the city could be lost?

I couldn't say in particular. But I would guess there will be large areas that will be so contaminated that there won't be any building going on there for years, at least.

Dick Bull
09-01-2005, 09:58 AM
Willis/Affleck already showed how to handle that.


Let's not forgot the Aerosmith music playing in the background. That's what will inspire to greatness.

RedDread
09-01-2005, 10:00 AM
I believe the worst part right now is the north side that runs up against lake ponchatrain (sp) The biggest levee breach seems to be along a canal connected to the lake.

Brock
09-01-2005, 10:36 AM
As evidence floods, criminal cases likely collapse

Basement also housed thousands of appeals

By Michael Perlstein
and Trymaine D. Lee

New Orleans criminal justice officials cringed Wednesday at another disaster evolving in the wake of Hurricane Katrina: the possible long-term collapse of the city’s criminal justice system.

With the flooding of the police department’s evidence and property room in the basement of police headquarters, evidence and records in hundreds of criminal cases appeared to be irretrievably lost, police spokesman Marlon Defillo said.

Evidence in the most serious, pending cases, from murder to rape to robbery, was housed in the basement, Defillo said.
“We lost thousands of documents and untold evidence,” Defillo said. “We lost everything.”

The floodwaters in the basement of criminal court at Tulane Avenue and Broad Street also inundated old evidence in thousands of old cases under appeal. The lost evidence could reopen cases that otherwise had little chance of getting back into trial court.

“We’re in serious trouble,” Defillo said.

Officials averted a separate crisis by transporting about 3,000
inmates out of Orleans Parish Prison. Under heavy armed guard, inmates who lined Interstate 10 above the flooded surface streets were loaded onto buses from the Dixon Correctional Center and other state lockups.

While the inmates were successfully evacuated, the ongoing
shutdown of criminal court could lead to the unavoidable release of dozens of suspects awaiting charges. By law, suspects must be tried within 30 days of a misdemeanor arrest and within 45 days of a felony arrest or they are automatically released from any bond obligation.

Even with the potential long-range problems facing the court
system, officials were more concerned Wednesday with citywide crimes and looting sprouting amid the storm’s chaotic aftermath.

Terry Ebbert, the city’s homeland security director, said police
received numerous reports of armed groups of marauders robbing scores of people throughout the hard-hit parts of the city. Authorities were unable to patrol the most lawless areas of the city, and it appeared police had little chance of investigating much of the unchecked crime.

KCTitus
09-01-2005, 10:38 AM
ohhh...that's bad. Didnt even cross my mind.

tomahawk kid
09-01-2005, 12:25 PM
Just saw some stuff on MSNBC that was just astounding.

One of their camera men went into the NewOrleans convention center and filmed what he saw. People are getting desperate. They contend that the National Guard has abandoned them, and they had no food or water for 4 days.

People (and children) both in the center and in the streets are dying of dehydration. It's incredible. Something that I never thought I would see in the United States in 2005.

According to another reporter, there are THOUSANDS of buses lined up outside New Orleans that refuse to go in because of the lawlessness. It sounds like those national guard reinforcements can't get there fast enough.

Rain Man
09-01-2005, 12:28 PM
Wow. There's a part of me that's horrified, and a part of me that says a good National Guard company and a lot of ammo will lower crime rates in that area for the next ten years.

jspchief
09-01-2005, 12:29 PM
I'm sure I have no idea what it takes to get the national guard mobilized, but I must say I'm disappointed in the overall reaction time in responding to this.

The notion that TV crews can get to these enormous crowds of stranded people to report and get video, but no one can get them food and water is absurd IMO.

tomahawk kid
09-01-2005, 12:33 PM
I'm sure I have no idea what it takes to get the national guard mobilized, but I must say I'm disappointed in the overall reaction time in responding to this.

The notion that TV crews can get to these enormous crowds of stranded people to report and get video, but no one can get them food and water is absurd IMO.

Doesn't quite add up, does it?

Donger
09-01-2005, 12:37 PM
I'm sure I have no idea what it takes to get the national guard mobilized, but I must say I'm disappointed in the overall reaction time in responding to this.

The notion that TV crews can get to these enormous crowds of stranded people to report and get video, but no one can get them food and water is absurd IMO.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20050901/ap_on_go_ca_st_pe/katrina_security_hk1

WASHINGTON -
Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff said Thursday that 1,400 National Guard troops per day are being sent to New Orleans to control looting and lawlessness, quadrupling its regular police force by the weekend.

Already, 2,800 National Guardsmen are in the city to help local police since Hurricane Katrina produced devastating floods in New Orleans, Chertoff said at a news conference with Attorney General Alberto Gonzales. Another 1,400 Guard troops and military police units are being added daily, he said.

tomahawk kid
09-01-2005, 12:41 PM
You guys see footage of the 2 police women looting the Wal-Mart w/ the other people?

True testament to the NOPD if you ask me.

jspchief
09-01-2005, 12:44 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20050901/ap_on_go_ca_st_pe/katrina_security_hk1

WASHINGTON -
Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff said Thursday that 1,400 National Guard troops per day are being sent to New Orleans to control looting and lawlessness, quadrupling its regular police force by the weekend.

Already, 2,800 National Guardsmen are in the city to help local police since Hurricane Katrina produced devastating floods in New Orleans, Chertoff said at a news conference with Attorney General Alberto Gonzales. Another 1,400 Guard troops and military police units are being added daily, he said.So why aren't any of those guardsmen at the conventiuon center where I'm watching footage of thousands of people, surrounded by the bodies of those that have already passed? One duece 1/2 could carry enough water to at least give them some relief. It would take less than 100 guardsmen to set up a purification system so those people could be getting drinking water from the flood water.

I'm sure it's a lot more difficult than I can fathom, but I don't notice any reporters dying of thirst or the elements.

Everytime a see some woman holding another lethargic baby, I get that much more pissed about the lack of progess in the relief effort.

siberian khatru
09-01-2005, 12:49 PM
So why aren't any of those guardsmen at the conventiuon center where I'm watching footage of thousands of people, surrounded by the bodies of those that have already passed? One duece 1/2 could carry enough water to at least give them some relief. It would take less than 100 guardsmen to set up a purification system so those people could be getting drinking water from the flood water.

I'm sure it's a lot more difficult than I can fathom, but I don't notice any reporters dying of thirst or the elements.

Everytime a see some woman holding another lethargic baby, I get that much more pissed about the lack of progess in the relief effort.

I share your views 100%.

I thought after 9/11 we were going to be more prepared to respond quickly to urban disasters (terrorist or natural). And unlike a terrorist attack, Katrina at least gave some advance warning of her approach, so we at least should've been preparing to mobilize resources and moving them in immediately.

I know I read on several web sites that I respect that that's an unrealistic expectation -- it's a freaking hurricane with humongous devastation, we're moving as fast as we can, etc. But I just can't believe that we can't even drop some bottled water and food to these people baking to death on the overpasses, or airlift within 3 days a few hundred Guardsmen in to maintain order.

Donger
09-01-2005, 12:55 PM
So why aren't any of those guardsmen at the conventiuon center where I'm watching footage of thousands of people, surrounded by the bodies of those that have already passed? One duece 1/2 could carry enough water to at least give them some relief. It would take less than 100 guardsmen to set up a purification system so those people could be getting drinking water from the flood water.

I'm sure it's a lot more difficult than I can fathom, but I don't notice any reporters dying of thirst or the elements.

Everytime a see some woman holding another lethargic baby, I get that much more pissed about the lack of progess in the relief effort.

I would imagine that they are trying to regain control at the Superdome first. In fact, Blanco just said that the situation there is under control again, and evacuations are resuming.

JimNasium
09-01-2005, 01:08 PM
I'm not familiar with the layout of New Orleans. From what you've seen, what part of the city could be lost?
In my opinion giant portions of St. Bernard Parrish, the 9th Ward and portions of New Orleans East need to be abandoned. It would be nice if they would focus solely on protecting the economic and cultural heart of the city. That would include the Central Business District (CDB), the French Quarter, the riverfront, the Garden District and a few other areas. You could focus your resources on making a levee system that would withstand a Cat-5. The people of Lousiana will never go for this though. Trust me, they are among the most stubborn people in the United States and will demand that the city be restored as it once was. The more interesting question for me is whether FEMA will make funds available for people to rebuild in some of the more flood prone areas like St. Bernard Parrish.

Dartgod
09-01-2005, 01:34 PM
NEW ORLEANS, Louisiana (CNN) -- New Orleans' Charity Hospital halted efforts to evacuate its patients after it came under sniper fire, according to Dr. Tyler Curiel, who witnessed the incidents.
The attack came as New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin issued "a desperate SOS" for the thousands of people stranded in an around the city's convention center with no food or water and fading hope.
Curiel and his National Guard escorts, were returning to the hospital after dropping off patients at nearby Tulane Medical Center, when someone started shooting at their convoy of Humvees.
"We were coming in from a parking deck at Tulane Medical Center, and a guy in a white shirt started firing at us," Curiel said. "The National Guard (troops), wearing flak jackets, tried to get a bead on this guy. "
The incident happened around 11:30 a.m. (12:30 p.m. ET). About an hour later, another gunman opened fire at the back of Charity Hospital.
"We got back to Charity Hospital with with food from Tulane and we said, 'OK the snipers are behind us, let's move on,'" Curiel said. "We started loading patients (for transport) and 20 minutes later, shots rang out."
The National Guard soldiers told staff to get away from the windows, and evacuations were halted.
Charity Hospital has no electricity, no water and the only food available is couple of cans of vegetables and graham crackers.
Evacuations by boat were halted after armed looters threatened medics, and overturned one of their boats.
The sniper attacks were the latest incidents of violence that have disrupted efforts to help people in the flooded city.

http://www.cnn.com/2005/WEATHER/09/01/katrina.impact/index.html

:shake:

siberian khatru
09-01-2005, 01:36 PM
NEW ORLEANS, Louisiana (CNN) -- New Orleans' Charity Hospital halted efforts to evacuate its patients after it came under sniper fire, according to Dr. Tyler Curiel, who witnessed the incidents.
The attack came as New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin issued "a desperate SOS" for the thousands of people stranded in an around the city's convention center with no food or water and fading hope.
Curiel and his National Guard escorts, were returning to the hospital after dropping off patients at nearby Tulane Medical Center, when someone started shooting at their convoy of Humvees.
"We were coming in from a parking deck at Tulane Medical Center, and a guy in a white shirt started firing at us," Curiel said. "The National Guard (troops), wearing flak jackets, tried to get a bead on this guy. "
The incident happened around 11:30 a.m. (12:30 p.m. ET). About an hour later, another gunman opened fire at the back of Charity Hospital.
"We got back to Charity Hospital with with food from Tulane and we said, 'OK the snipers are behind us, let's move on,'" Curiel said. "We started loading patients (for transport) and 20 minutes later, shots rang out."
The National Guard soldiers told staff to get away from the windows, and evacuations were halted.
Charity Hospital has no electricity, no water and the only food available is couple of cans of vegetables and graham crackers.
Evacuations by boat were halted after armed looters threatened medics, and overturned one of their boats.
The sniper attacks were the latest incidents of violence that have disrupted efforts to help people in the flooded city.

http://www.cnn.com/2005/WEATHER/09/01/katrina.impact/index.html

:shake:


That guy(s) should be drawn and quartered between two deuce-and-a-halfs.

chagrin
09-01-2005, 01:38 PM
In my opinion giant portions of St. Bernard Parrish, the 9th Ward and portions of New Orleans East need to be abandoned. It would be nice if they would focus solely on protecting the economic and cultural heart of the city. That would include the Central Business District (CDB), the French Quarter, the riverfront, the Garden District and a few other areas. You could focus your resources on making a levee system that would withstand a Cat-5. The people of Lousiana will never go for this though. Trust me, they are among the most stubborn people in the United States and will demand that the city be restored as it once was. The more interesting question for me is whether FEMA will make funds available for people to rebuild in some of the more flood prone areas like St. Bernard Parrish.


My friends in Chalmette, Metarie, Kenner, and family in Kentwood have not been heard from in days. Chalemette has about 40,000 houses underwater, this is a Southern Louisiana (I am not 'not including' Mississippi, Alabama and other places to be mean) problem. I would like to see some news reports about these areas as well.

JimNasium
09-01-2005, 01:44 PM
My friends in Chalmette, Metarie, Kenner, and family in Kentwood have not been heard from in days. Chalemette has about 40,000 houses underwater, this is a Southern Louisiana (I am not 'not including' Mississippi, Alabama and other places to be mean) problem. I would like to see some news reports about these areas as well.
Have you been following the reports on NOLA.com? Chalmette and all of St. Bernard Parrish are in big trouble. The Parrish Council is working out of the Chevron refinery and the shelters in the high schools are flooded. Sounds pretty grim. Hopefully you'll hear some positive news soon.

Dartgod
09-01-2005, 01:45 PM
That guy(s) should be drawn and quartered between two deuce-and-a-halfs.
What's a "deuce-and-a-half"? I've seen that referenced before.

Donger
09-01-2005, 01:46 PM
What's a "deuce-and-a-half"? I've seen that referenced before.

A two and a half ton truck.

siberian khatru
09-01-2005, 01:47 PM
What's a "deuce-and-a-half"? I've seen that referenced before.


http://www.deltaforce.net/deuce/drside.jpg

chagrin
09-01-2005, 01:50 PM
You guys see footage of the 2 police women looting the Wal-Mart w/ the other people?

True testament to the NOPD if you ask me.


I didn't see it, and I am not trying to argue, but are you certain that they were looting, was it like shoes and shit or was it equipment that they might need? I'm just curious

chagrin
09-01-2005, 01:51 PM
Have you been following the reports on NOLA.com? Chalmette and all of St. Bernard Parrish are in big trouble. The Parrish Council is working out of the Chevron refinery and the shelters in the high schools are flooded. Sounds pretty grim. Hopefully you'll hear some positive news soon.


I hadn't been, and thank you

Jenny Gump
09-01-2005, 01:51 PM
Just got an email from my Hospital's System Admin. They are deploying teams to LA and asking for nurses. I wish I could go.

Dartgod
09-01-2005, 01:51 PM
A two and a half ton truck.
http://www.deltaforce.net/deuce/drside.jpg
Gotcha. :thumb:

the Talking Can
09-01-2005, 01:53 PM
I didn't see it, and I am not trying to argue, but are you certain that they were looting, was it like shoes and shit or was it equipment that they might need? I'm just curious

I heard reports that police were "looting" ammunition to keep it off the streets.

jspchief
09-01-2005, 01:54 PM
What's a "deuce-and-a-half"? I've seen that referenced before. .

Dr. Facebook Fever
09-01-2005, 01:54 PM
I feel like this thread no longer has the right to include the words "new thread" in the title.

Rain Man
09-01-2005, 01:56 PM
Evacuations by boat were halted after armed looters threatened medics, and overturned one of their boats.
The sniper attacks were the latest incidents of violence that have disrupted efforts to help people in the flooded city.



Okay, I know some people will get offended, but...drug addicts wanting drugs?

tomahawk kid
09-01-2005, 01:56 PM
I didn't see it, and I am not trying to argue, but are you certain that they were looting, was it like shoes and shit or was it equipment that they might need? I'm just curious

It was women's clothing.