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View Full Version : Lovely, gas $3.09 in OP, KS


memyselfI
08-31-2005, 09:44 PM
I drove by a QT on 87th street on my way to drop off videos. The price was $2.96. Upon my return, the price had risen to $3.09 in 15 minutes... :shake: :banghead: :cuss: :mad:

Luckily, I found a gas station with gas still at $2.85 on the corner of 87th and Quivira. But to rise .12 in 15 minutes...

insanity.

Of course this news won't help:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20050831/pl_afp/usweatheroilgulfrigs_050831213716

20 oil rigs missing in Gulf of Mexico: US Coast Guard Wed Aug 31, 5:37 PM ET



WASHINGTON (AFP) - At least 20 oil rigs and platforms are missing in the Gulf of Mexico and a ruptured gas pipeline is on fire after Hurricane Katrina tore through the region, a US Coast Guard official said.

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"We have confirmed at least 20 rigs or platforms missing, either sunk or adrift, and one confirmed fire where a rig was," Petty Officer Robert Reed of the Louisiana Coast Guard told AFP.

All of the missing rigs were in the Gulf of Mexico, Reed said citing Coast Guard overflights of the area and information from oil companies.

He could not confirm the location of the blaze but said it would "eventually burn out" and no fire-fighting intervention was needed.

"We are of course working on the environmental side of things but right now we are still concentrating on search-and-rescue missions to save as many lives as possible on land," said Reed, whose own Coast Guard team has been evacuated from the flooded city of New Orleans to Alexandria, Louisiana.

According to the latest tally Wednesday from the federal Minerals Management Service, a total of 561 platforms and rigs have been evacuated in the Gulf of Mexico, which accounts for a quarter of US oil production.

Over 91 percent of normal daily crude oil production in the Gulf -- 1.5 million barrels -- is now shut down, and more than 83 percent of natural gas production, the MMS said.

Among the firms reporting missing rigs was Newfield Exploration Company, which said an aerial survey of its operations in the eastern Gulf showed that one of its platforms at Main Pass 138 "appears to have been lost in the storm".

"As of this morning, boats and helicopters are mobilizing to better access damages, identify any environmental impacts and begin the repair process," Newfield said in a statement.

Noble Corp. said its semi-submersible rig Noble Jim Thompson, which was contracted to a unit of Anglo-Dutch giant Shell, had broken loose and was 17 miles (27 kilometers) adrift of its normal Gulf location.

Shell's giant Mars platform was said by analysts to have suffered "extensive damage".

"Some of our facilities have been damaged and production is halted while we begin assessments and run checks," Shell chief executive Jeroen van der Veer said.

On shore, at least eight refineries have been shut down on the coasts of Louisiana and Mississippi since Katrina roared ashore early Monday just east of New Orleans.

Many other refineries are struggling to cope with shortfalls of crude caused by the closure of major port terminals and pipelines from evacuated and missing rigs in the Gulf of Mexico.

In response, the US government prepared Wednesday to open its emergency oil reserves for the first time in a year to keep supplies running to those refineries still operating.

The United States keeps 700 million barrels of oil stored in four underground salt caverns on the Texas and Louisiana coasts to cushion oil markets during supply disruptions.

The Strategic Petroleum Reserve, which was created during the 1970s oil shocks, was last used after Hurricane Ivan in September 2004, when five million barrels of crude oil were released.

"It's really getting critical in some situations," PFC Energy analyst Seth Kleinman said.

"Until refiners are up and running, and pipelines have power and get product up here, it's looking very precarious," he said.

The government said that Katrina, one of the most powerful storms ever to hit the United States, would have only a "modest" impact on the economy. But analysts were not so sure.

As gasoline prices jumped across the United States, Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman said the White House decided late Tuesday to tap the reserve following a request from the oil industry.

"Last night I approved a company's request for loan from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. I fully expect that the details of that loan will be released later today," Bodman told a press conference.

Industry analysts expected the oil to be shipped to refineries further west in Texas, which escaped unscathed from Katrina but are now running low on crude supplies because of production interruptions in the Gulf of Mexico region.

At least eight refineries have been shut down on the coasts of Louisiana and Mississippi since Katrina roared ashore early Monday just east of New Orleans.

Many other refineries are struggling to cope with shortfalls of crude caused by the closure of pipelines from rigs in the Gulf of Mexico, where oil production has ground to a virtual halt, and of major ports.

Two of the Louisiana tanker terminals hit by the hurricane -- Port Fourchon and the Louisiana Offshore Oil Port -- combined handle more than 20 percent of all the crude oil imported into the United States.

While additional supplies of oil will be helpful in keeping crude prices from reaching 80 dollars a barrel, the real supply constraints are with refined products made from crude, said Wachovia economist Jason Schenker.

"There is no strategic government reserve of natural gas or refined products, and right now the biggest concerns in the marketplace are for products," Schenker said.

"At the end of the day, it may not matter for gasoline and heating oil prices how much crude comes out of the SPR," he said.

Oil prices have soared to new record highs above 70 dollars a barrel in the hurricane's wake.

The decision to open the US petroleum reserve calmed prices Wednesday, but analysts said the government's move would make little difference and prices could easily rebound.

"It is unknown how extensive the damage to the refineries is," said Tony Nunan, manager for energy risk management with Mitsubishi Corp's international petroleum business in Tokyo.

"If you don't have enough refining capacity, it doesn't help you with the crude oil," he said.

But Ben Bernanke, chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers in the White House, said opening the reserves would help companies "produce more gasoline and help alleviate some of the shortages".

Speaking on the CNBC network, he acknowledged that times were "tough" for US consumers and businesses as petrol pump prices shoot up even more as a result of Katrina.

"My guess is though that as long as we find that the energy impact is only temporary, and there is no permanent damage to the infrastructure ... the effects in the overall economy will be fairly modest," he said.

Philadelphia Federal Reserve president Anthony Santomero said the effects of Katrina were likely to impede but not halt the economy.

"The US economy has proven to be surprisingly capable of absorbing such shocks, and after a short period, the effects of Katrina are likely to slow but not stall the forward progress of the national economy," he said.

Several economists, however, fretted that Katrina could hurt growth in the third quarter to September.

JOhn
08-31-2005, 09:47 PM
George Bush was advised of Hurricane Katrina's potential by a NOAA representative all throughout the weekend and did nothing to prevent her strike on the Gulf Coast.
ROFL ROFL


Rep

ArrowheadHawk
08-31-2005, 09:48 PM
well we have three dollars / gallon i hope that four is a long ways out

memyselfI
08-31-2005, 09:48 PM
George Bush was advised of Hurricane Katrina's potential by a NOAA representative all throughout the weekend and did nothing to prevent her strike on the Gulf Coast.

And you, Mr. Moderator, accuse people of making threads political? :hmmm: And then move them when they do ... Nice.

http://www.paganshopping.com/Merchant2/graphics/00000001/tea-kettle-witches-tea-time.jpg.w180h192.jpg

memyselfI
08-31-2005, 09:50 PM
well we have three dollars / gallon i hope that four is a long ways out


Weren't we saying this about $3.00 when we hit $2.00? :hmmm:

Phobia
08-31-2005, 09:51 PM
Wrong picture, Denise.

http://www.coyleandsharpe.com/gallery/crystal_ball_MED.jpg

memyselfI
08-31-2005, 09:53 PM
Wrong picture, Denise.

http://www.coyleandsharpe.com/gallery/crystal_ball_MED.jpg

Wow, that is just what I imagined you look like...

even without a crystal ball. :p

Phobia
08-31-2005, 09:54 PM
My head is very nearly that big without the funny hat.

tk13
08-31-2005, 10:05 PM
I've seen prices as high as $3.50 in Indiana today, and on CNN they said prices in Atlanta were upwards of $5.

cdcox
08-31-2005, 10:16 PM
Gas has gone up $0.60 a gallon here. Thank goodness Bush had enough vision to go into Iraq and steal all that gas from them, otherwise things could be much worse.

CHIEF4EVER
08-31-2005, 10:17 PM
George Bush was advised of Hurricane Katrina's potential by a NOAA representative all throughout the weekend and did nothing to prevent her strike on the Gulf Coast.

Dammit George!!!!!! :cuss: ROFL

memyselfI
08-31-2005, 10:18 PM
Gas has gone up $0.60 a gallon here. Thank goodness Bush had enough vision to go into Iraq and steal all that gas from them, otherwise things could be much worse.

I know. We might actually be holding the oil companies responsible for THEIR looting the way many want to hold da folks responsible for theirs. Whew, good thing we've spent so many billions and all those thousands of people have died for our 'cheaper' oil.

petegz28
08-31-2005, 10:23 PM
George Bush was advised of Hurricane Katrina's potential by a NOAA representative all throughout the weekend and did nothing to prevent her strike on the Gulf Coast.


He should of gone to the UN!

petegz28
08-31-2005, 10:24 PM
Maybe this will finally convince everyone to tell the Green-Peace freaks to bug off and start building\re-opening refineries!

cdcox
08-31-2005, 10:25 PM
I know. We might actually be holding the oil companies responsible for THEIR looting the way many want to hold da folks responsible for theirs. Whew, good thing we've spent so many billions and all those thousands of people have died for our 'cheaper' oil.

Actually, I was joking. After adjusting for inflation, gas in 1981 was $3.11 per gallon in today's dollars. We are just now reaching record prices for gasoline, despite peoples complaining over the last several months over the prices.

Uatu
08-31-2005, 10:26 PM
Trying to think of this rationally here...we've got

-increased demand in other parts of the world
-the summer driving season
-steadly rising per-consumer consumption here in the US
-The hurricane shutting down 10% (?) of our refining capacity

Realistically, the oil companies are private entities, motivated to maintain their profit margins to meet shareholder expectations, and passing the cost on to consumers. Since demand seems to be outpacing supply at the moment, prices would naturally increase.

How rapidly and everything is a debate on the intricacies of a market probably none of us are qualified to discuss with any authority, but it seems to me that eventually, consumers motivated to save when costs seem too high, will adjust consumption accordingly.

Vehicles are something with a multiyear turnover for most people though so it might not correct rapidly, but you can see the market forces at work too, if you attempt to look at it objectively. To ask a private company to go against profit is to ask it to go against its nature.

Not that I like this situation one bit, but consumers need a kick in the arse to adjust themselves, and they weren't going to give up their big majestic guzzlers until cost of ownership hit them in the wallet.

Uatu
08-31-2005, 10:27 PM
He should of gone to the UN!

If only France and Germany had been on board, the hurricane could have been averted.

Bush lied wallets died :p

alnorth
08-31-2005, 10:30 PM
I know. We might actually be holding the oil companies responsible for THEIR looting the way many want to hold da folks responsible for theirs. Whew, good thing we've spent so many billions and all those thousands of people have died for our 'cheaper' oil.

What looting? Our oil production in the Gulf is shot. More importantly, many of our refineries are wiped out for a while. We didnt have extra refineries available because of the enviro-nuts who wish everyone would ride to work on a pack mule were against it. Combined with the legal and red tape headache, it takes a long-ass time for an extra refinery to be profitable. If you want extra refining capability, you need to encourage businesses to build them with incentives, not punish it.

If you dont want extra refining ability, then do not bitch when a disaster disturbs the perfect balance that must be maintained when we have no margin for error.

memyselfI
08-31-2005, 10:31 PM
If only France and Germany had been on board, the hurricane could have been averted.

Bush lied wallets died :p

We know that the hurricane could NOT have been averted but if some money would have been spent in the area (vs. the cuts outlined below) the aftermath might have been lessened...as this blogger has illustrated.

http://www.phxnews.com/fullstory.php?article=24745

The 2006 Budget slashes funding for the US Army Corps of Engineers, NO Districts, by $71.2 million dollars. Additionally, a study to determine ways to protect the area from a Category 5 hurricane was cancelled.

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4200/is_20050606/ai_n14657367

I know some of you will say "It's 2005..those cuts haven't happened yet". To you I say, I'm only getting started.

Beginning in 2001, the Bush administration has consistently cut federal disaster mitigation programs run by FEMA. I guess the policy of ABC includes disaster preparedness.

From another article- http://www.bestofneworleans.com/dispatch/2004-09-28/cover_story.html

"...Among emergency specialists, 'mitigation' -- the measures taken in advance to minimize the damage caused by natural disasters -- is a crucial part of the strategy to save lives and cut recovery costs. But since 2001, key federal disaster mitigation programs, developed over many years, have been slashed and tossed aside. FEMA's Project Impact, a model mitigation program created by the Clinton administration, has been canceled outright. Federal funding of post-disaster mitigation efforts designed to protect people and property from the next disaster has been cut in half. Communities across the country must now compete for pre-disaster mitigation dollars.

<snip>

In addition, the White House has pushed for privatization of essential government services, including disaster management, and merged FEMA into the Department of Homeland Security -- where, critics say, natural disaster programs are often sidelined by counter-terrorism programs. Along the way, morale at FEMA has plummeted, and many of the agency's most experienced personnel have left for work in other government agencies or private corporations..."

Ahhh... privatization. The only other word besides 'tax cuts' that this administration knows.

From a followup to that article, we find this.. http://www.bestofneworleans.com/dispatch/2004-10-05/commentary.html

"Before FEMA was condensed into Homeland Security ä it responded much more quickly," says Walter Maestri, director of Jefferson Parish's Office of Emergency Management. Maestri has worked with FEMA for eight years. "Truthfully, you had access to the individuals who were the decision-makers. The FEMA administrator had Cabinet status. Now, you have another layer of bureaucracy. FEMA is headed by an assistant secretary who now has to compete with other assistant secretaries of Homeland Security for available funds. And elevating houses is not as sexy as providing gas masks."

Maestri is still awaiting word from FEMA officials as to why Louisiana, despite being called the "floodplain of the nation" in a 2002 FEMA report, received no disaster mitigation grant money from FEMA in 2003 ("Homeland Insecurity," Sept. 28). Maestri says the rejection left emergency officials around the state "flabbergasted

Phobia
08-31-2005, 11:03 PM
If you focused half the energy you spend being Bush's watchdog on something productive, you'd be a front page fundraiser, Denise. Congratulations on your wasted efforts.

Mr. Kotter
08-31-2005, 11:19 PM
If you focused half the energy you spend being Bush's watchdog on something productive, you'd be a front page fundraiser, Denise. Congratulations on your wasted efforts.

Are you offerin' her a job? :spock:

Phobia
08-31-2005, 11:21 PM
If she can fundraise, I'll give her a job.

Mr. Kotter
08-31-2005, 11:23 PM
If she can fundraise, I'll give her a job.

My only concern would be.... she might embezzle the funds and funnel them....well, "elsewhere"....heh.

BigMeatballDave
09-01-2005, 02:35 AM
$3.09 here, too...

alanm
09-01-2005, 05:12 AM
A patriotic American in this crisis would have ridden their bike to the video store instead of wasting precious gasoline for such a trival thing. :)

alanm
09-01-2005, 05:14 AM
George Bush was advised of Hurricane Katrina's potential by a NOAA representative all throughout the weekend and did nothing to prevent her strike on the Gulf Coast.
Shit.. And all that money spent on Star Wars technology down the shitter.
Damn that doppler radar. :cuss: :cuss:

RedDread
09-01-2005, 05:44 AM
I dodged a bullet. I pulled into a 66 here in Norman and it was $3.09 for premium. After I went down the block to grab something from osco the dude was replacing the numbers

Premium $3.24

Saggysack
09-01-2005, 06:49 AM
2.99-3.09 Wichita

It will be 3.19 or 3.29 before the day is done. 3.50 by Sat.

SNR
09-01-2005, 06:57 AM
My only concern would be.... she might embezzle the funds and funnel them....well, "elsewhere"....heh.At least the children helped by 37 Forever would get the Richbrators they so sorely need.

Calcountry
09-01-2005, 11:53 AM
A patriotic American in this crisis would have ridden their bike to the video store instead of wasting precious gasoline for such a trival thing. :)agreed, it would be better for your health.

Skip would argue, that you could forgo the trip to the video store altogether by simply purchasing a satellite movie and recording it on your TIVO.

Just think of all the gasoline I have saved doing that!

Calcountry
09-01-2005, 11:54 AM
2.99-3.09 Wichita

It will be 3.19 or 3.29 before the day is done. 3.50 by Sat.I have a question. Would you rather it say 1.99 and they have a sign up in front that says "NO GAS"?

Purely a hypothetical question.

Bowser
09-01-2005, 11:57 AM
I have a question. Would you rather it say 1.99 and they have a sign up in front that says "NO GAS"?

Purely a hypothetical question.

I'm confused. Does getting gouged on gas prices magically create more gas?

RedDread
09-01-2005, 12:00 PM
I'd rather OPEC stop creating an artificial supply shortage

MOhillbilly
09-01-2005, 12:01 PM
people are gonna panic and stockpile,the price at the pump will surge.
you aint seen nothin yet.

Chief Henry
09-01-2005, 12:11 PM
Trying to think of this rationally here...we've got

-increased demand in other parts of the world
-the summer driving season
-steadly rising per-consumer consumption here in the US
-The hurricane shutting down 10% (?) of our refining capacity

Realistically, the oil companies are private entities, motivated to maintain their profit margins to meet shareholder expectations, and passing the cost on to consumers. Since demand seems to be outpacing supply at the moment, prices would naturally increase.

How rapidly and everything is a debate on the intricacies of a market probably none of us are qualified to discuss with any authority, but it seems to me that eventually, consumers motivated to save when costs seem too high, will adjust consumption accordingly.

Vehicles are something with a multiyear turnover for most people though so it might not correct rapidly, but you can see the market forces at work too, if you attempt to look at it objectively. To ask a private company to go against profit is to ask it to go against its nature.

Not that I like this situation one bit, but consumers need a kick in the arse to adjust themselves, and they weren't going to give up their big majestic guzzlers until cost of ownership hit them in the wallet.



I was wondering, when was the last refinery built and how many different grades of gasoline have to be refined for each state?
Too bad we just can't have just 3 grades of gas.

Dartgod
09-01-2005, 12:12 PM
Wait a minute!

Did Duh-nese just blame the death and destruction in New Orleans on Bush?

Donger
09-01-2005, 12:13 PM
I was wondering, when was the last refinery built

1976. And we've closed, IIRC, about 150 since then as well.

KCTitus
09-01-2005, 12:15 PM
I'm confused. Does getting gouged on gas prices magically create more gas?

It suppresses demand...when people become price conscious they will cut back.

Donger
09-01-2005, 12:22 PM
Refining/Downstream
The United States experienced a steep decline in refining capacity between 1981 and the mid-1990s. Between 1981 and 1989, the number of U.S. refineries fell from 324 to 204, representing a loss of 3 million bbl/d in operable capacity (from 18.6 million bbl/d to 15.7 million bbl/d), while refining capacity utilization increased from 69% to 87%. Much of the decline in U.S. refining capacity resulted from the 1981 deregulation (elimination of price controls and allocations), which effectively removed the major prop from underneath many marginally profitable, often smaller, refineries.

Refinery closures have continued since 1989, bringing the total number of operable U.S. refineries to 149 in 2003. In general, refineries that have closed have been relatively small and have had less favorable economics than other refineries in their market area. Also, in recent years, some smaller, less-economic refineries that had faced additional investments for environmental reasons in order to stay in business found closing preferable because they predicted that they could not stay competitive in the long term.

While some refineries have closed, and no new refineries have been built in nearly 30 years, many existing refineries have expanded their capacities. As a result of capacity creep," whereby existing refineries create additional refining capacity from the same physical structure, capacity per operating refinery increased by 28% over the 1990 to 1998 period, for example. Overall, since the mid-1990s, U.S. refinery capacity has increased from 15.0 million bbl/d in 1994 to 16.9 million bbl/d in September 2004. Also in September 2004, utilization of operating capacity at U.S. refineries was averaging around 90%, down from 97% in July and August. Although financial, environmental, and legal considerations make it unlikely that new refineries will be built in the United States, expansion at existing refineries likely will increase total U.S. refining capacity in the long-run.

Demonpenz
09-01-2005, 12:35 PM
For a person like me who has a Mits lancer i wouldn't mind rationed gas. I wouldn't mind forcing some people to change the way they drive because they probably won't do it on their own. Force some of bullshit people who say they need an suv for the snow to learn how to drive in the snow. Ahhh **** it just drive a huge car eat cheeseburgers all day i don't give a **** it's america get fat drive huge cars and **** bitches

Duck Dog
09-01-2005, 12:52 PM
$3.09 in BFE, MN.

I'm going to continue riding the 4wheeler to work. The F250 drinks way too much.

Duck Dog
09-01-2005, 12:54 PM
Refining/Downstream
The United States experienced a steep decline in refining capacity between 1981 and the mid-1990s. Between 1981 and 1989, the number of U.S. refineries fell from 324 to 204, representing a loss of 3 million bbl/d in operable capacity (from 18.6 million bbl/d to 15.7 million bbl/d), while refining capacity utilization increased from 69% to 87%. Much of the decline in U.S. refining capacity resulted from the 1981 deregulation (elimination of price controls and allocations), which effectively removed the major prop from underneath many marginally profitable, often smaller, refineries.

Refinery closures have continued since 1989, bringing the total number of operable U.S. refineries to 149 in 2003. In general, refineries that have closed have been relatively small and have had less favorable economics than other refineries in their market area. Also, in recent years, some smaller, less-economic refineries that had faced additional investments for environmental reasons in order to stay in business found closing preferable because they predicted that they could not stay competitive in the long term.

While some refineries have closed, and no new refineries have been built in nearly 30 years, many existing refineries have expanded their capacities. As a result of capacity creep," whereby existing refineries create additional refining capacity from the same physical structure, capacity per operating refinery increased by 28% over the 1990 to 1998 period, for example. Overall, since the mid-1990s, U.S. refinery capacity has increased from 15.0 million bbl/d in 1994 to 16.9 million bbl/d in September 2004. Also in September 2004, utilization of operating capacity at U.S. refineries was averaging around 90%, down from 97% in July and August. Although financial, environmental, and legal considerations make it unlikely that new refineries will be built in the United States, expansion at existing refineries likely will increase total U.S. refining capacity in the long-run.


Fugg the green weenies. Lower the STANDARDS!

MOhillbilly
09-01-2005, 12:55 PM
THE END IS NEAR!!!!!!!!!!



GIGGLES THAT CRAZY LITTLE GIGGLE

Uatu
09-01-2005, 01:09 PM
For a person like me who has a Mits lancer i wouldn't mind rationed gas. I wouldn't mind forcing some people to change the way they drive because they probably won't do it on their own. Force some of bullshit people who say they need an suv for the snow to learn how to drive in the snow. Ahhh **** it just drive a huge car eat cheeseburgers all day i don't give a **** it's america get fat drive huge cars and **** bitches

I am never a proponent of telling people that they can't have it because they dont "NEED" it. The government shouldn't do that.

But, maybe this will get people to buy closer to their needs. I see a ton of huge trucks in the parking lot of my office building whose tires probably never leave pavement.

The Rick
09-01-2005, 01:11 PM
$3.59 here in Milwaukee... :shake:

Calcountry
09-01-2005, 01:30 PM
I'm confused. Does getting gouged on gas prices magically create more gas?No, but if you impose a price ceiling below market equilibrium for gas, don't expect there to be any gas offered at that price. Shortage.

Don't shoot the messenger. I have a degree in Economics, I am just espousing what I know.

Calcountry
09-01-2005, 01:34 PM
people are gonna panic and stockpile,the price at the pump will surge.
you aint seen nothin yet.That is indicated by an outward shift in the Demand curve in the short term.

At the same time, we have a REAL supply disruption, so an inward shift in the Supply curve.

The price is adjusting to a new equilibrium. I can't change the law of gravity either, I am just explaining it. There is no need to panic. The best cure for this is to reduce demand by keeping a calm head, ride sharing, eliminating unnecessary trips.

And above all else, please, get out of your car and go inside when you visit a fast food restaurant. The elimination of drive thru's would probably save millions of gallons of gasoline.

StcChief
09-01-2005, 01:39 PM
That is indicated by an outward shift in the Demand curve in the short term.

At the same time, we have a REAL supply disruption, so an inward shift in the Supply curve.

The price is adjusting to a new equilibrium. I can't change the law of gravity either, I am just explaining it. There is no need to panic. The best cure for this is to reduce demand by keeping a calm head, ride sharing, eliminating unnecessary trips.

And above all else, please, get out of your car and go inside when you visit a fast food restaurant. The elimination of drive thru's would probably save millions of gallons of gasoline.

Here is a thought....

Get out of your car.

Forget fast food, stay home cook a decent meal, go for a walk, ride a bike.

It's amazing what you could find to do besides drive somewhere.

Radar Chief
09-01-2005, 01:51 PM
Wait a minute!

Did Duh-nese just blame the death and destruction in New Orleans on Bush?

Shocking ainít it? ;)

MOhillbilly
09-01-2005, 01:51 PM
That is indicated by an outward shift in the Demand curve in the short term.

At the same time, we have a REAL supply disruption, so an inward shift in the Supply curve.

The price is adjusting to a new equilibrium. I can't change the law of gravity either, I am just explaining it. There is no need to panic. The best cure for this is to reduce demand by keeping a calm head, ride sharing, eliminating unnecessary trips.

And above all else, please, get out of your car and go inside when you visit a fast food restaurant. The elimination of drive thru's would probably save millions of gallons of gasoline.

yeah dude im not in a panic. Filled up every gas can i had at 2.47
im saying once it sinks in the sheep might stampede.

Radar Chief
09-01-2005, 01:55 PM
$3.09 in BFE, MN.

I'm going to continue riding the 4wheeler to work. The F250 drinks way too much.

Iím just glad the weather has finally cleared up here in KS so I can ride my scoot to work.
It still takes the premium but at least 3-4 gallons gets me to work a back for over a week.

Calcountry
09-01-2005, 02:05 PM
For a person like me who has a Mits lancer i wouldn't mind rationed gas. I wouldn't mind forcing some people to change the way they drive because they probably won't do it on their own. Force some of bullshit people who say they need an suv for the snow to learn how to drive in the snow. Ahhh **** it just drive a huge car eat cheeseburgers all day i don't give a **** it's america get fat drive huge cars and **** bitchesNow that is a quality post.

Duck Dog
09-01-2005, 05:09 PM
Iím just glad the weather has finally cleared up here in KS so I can ride my scoot to work.
It still takes the premium but at least 3-4 gallons gets me to work a back for over a week.


At this point I'd ride through a rain storm. The gas prices are going to cause me to save beaucoup dollars this fall and winter.

Strange how that works.

Duck Dog
09-01-2005, 05:11 PM
For a person like me who has a Mits lancer i wouldn't mind rationed gas. I wouldn't mind forcing some people to change the way they drive because they probably won't do it on their own. Force some of bullshit people who say they need an suv for the snow to learn how to drive in the snow. Ahhh **** it just drive a huge car eat cheeseburgers all day i don't give a **** it's america get fat drive huge cars and **** bitches


You should see how much gas the bass boat uses up. You gonna regulate my use on that too? :p

BigMeatballDave
09-02-2005, 02:50 AM
I'm confused. Does getting gouged on gas prices magically create more gas?I've wondered this, too. I know the price increase is in hopes that people use less. But, if people have to drive, they have to drive...

Logical
09-02-2005, 02:53 AM
If you have doubts about the gouging going on. Here in San Diego average Reg is probably around 3.10 but Costco is 2.75, Premium at Costco is 2.95

Saggysack
09-02-2005, 05:50 AM
I have a question. Would you rather it say 1.99 and they have a sign up in front that says "NO GAS"?

Purely a hypothetical question.

What does that have to do with the price of tea in China? In otherwords, your question to me doesn't have any relation to my post. I'm kinda perplexed. Should I answer, or shouldn't I answer it... :hmmm:

Oh what the hell.

Sure, I wouldn't mind seeing $1.99 and a NO GAS sign. Atleast then I know I'm not forcing myself to be raped up the ass by someone elses greed.