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View Full Version : W lied to Dianne Sawyer/The Media is mad as hell...


memyselfI
09-02-2005, 11:24 PM
After seeing DUHbya lie to Diane Sawyer and make his dumbazz remark regarding Trent Lott's house, I get the feeling he will not be doing a news conference anytime soon.

Watch him lie here:

DUHbya lies about breach of levies (http://mediamatters.org/items/200509020001 )

I don't think anybody anticipated the breach of the levees. They did anticipate a serious storm. But these levees got breached, and as a result, much of New Orleans is flooded. And now we are having to deal with it and will

Again, if you saw Fox News from the 7-8:20 pm CT period you saw the most fair and balanced reporting the network has ever done. Shepherd Smith and Geraldo Rivera ON THE SCENE at the Superdome trying to convince Bill O'Reilly and Sean Hannity, both sitting on their asses in studio, that they were presenting the real story and their descriptions needed no 'perspective' adjustments. :clap: I cannot stand either Smith or Rivera and yet they made for some of the most disgusted and distraught reporting that I've seen on this story.

Here is more anger aimed at the WH and/or the response to this tragedy. Unfortunately, this compilation does not include recent angry rants from Jack Cafferty or Lou Dobbs, both who have been regular supporters of the administration in the past.

http://radaronline.com/web-only/media/2005/09/fighting-words.php

Fighting Words
Awakened by the devastation in New Orleans, a once timid press corps is pursuing the administration with a surprising show of force. The president, of course, is responding in his usual, articulate, well-informed manner. Scenes from a media maelstrom.

by Radar Staff

Anderson Cooper 360
From an exchange with Louisiana senator Mary Landrieu over the federal government’s response, as Landrieu gratefully listed federal efforts in the wake of the disaster.

COOPER: Excuse me, Senator, I’m sorry for interrupting. I haven’t heard that, because, for the last four days, I’ve been seeing dead bodies in the streets here in Mississippi. And to listen to politicians thanking each other and complimenting each other, you know, I got to tell you, there are a lot of people here who are very upset, and very angry, and very frustrated. And when they hear politicians slap—you know, thanking one another, it just, you know, it kind of cuts them the wrong way right now, because literally there was a body on the streets of this town yesterday being eaten by rats because this woman had been lying in the street for 48 hours. And there’s not enough facilities to take her up. Do you get the anger that is out here?

LANDRIEU: Anderson, I have the anger inside of me…

COOPER: Well, who are you angry at?

LANDRIEU: I’m not angry at anyone…. And I have every confidence that this country is as great and as strong as we can be due to that…

COOPER: Well, I mean, there are a lot of people here who are kind of ashamed of what is happening in this country right now, what is—ashamed of what is happening in your state, certainly…. I mean, I know you say there’s a time and a place for, kind of, you know, looking back, but this seems to be the time and the place. I mean, there are people who want answers, and there are people who want someone to stand up and say, “You know what? We should have done more. Are all the assets being brought to bear?”

Scarborough Country
Joe Scarborough, reporting from Biloxi, Mississippi

SCARBOROUGH: And here in Biloxi, a place where, when we traveled around, we couldn’t find enough federal agents, enough state agents, enough emergency personnel around to even begin to take care of those young children and elderly adults that are still without food, still without water, still without the most basic of necessities…. Friends, it’s a disgrace here….The scene in New Orleans keeps getting more apocalyptic by the day, and many Americans on both political sides of the American scene are wondering where Washington politicians and where Louisiana politicians are…. It is amateur hour, and it has been amateur hour over the past four or five days. This is completely different, friends, from the way the crises were handled in Florida last year, four hurricanes, two of them major; it was handled with ruthless efficiency. I know. I was there. That is not happening tonight in New Orleans. You know, friends, I was in public office. I was a member of Congress. I understand how difficult some of these situations are. But don’t you believe in the coming days that this storm caught people by surprise. We knew in Pensacola, Florida, that this was going to be a killer storm. It was going to be a category 4. We were saying on Friday it would be a historic storm. So any politician in Louisiana, Alabama, or Mississippi that tells you they were surprised, well, they don’t deserve your trust or your vote next time.

CNN American Morning
Soledad O’Brien grilling FEMA director Mike Brown about his lack of on-the-ground information

O’BRIEN: How is it possible that we’re getting better intel than you’re getting? We had a crew in the air. We were showing live pictures of the people outside of the Convention Center. We had a National Guardsman who was talking to us, who was telling us he estimated the crowd at 50,000 people. That was at eight in the morning yesterday. And also we’ve been reporting that officials have been telling people to go to the Convention Center if they want any hope of relief. I don’t understand how FEMA cannot have this information.

BROWN: Well, we’re busy doing lifesaving and life-rescue efforts. We rely upon the state to give us that information. And, Soledad, I learned about it listening to the news reports.

O’BRIEN: But it begs the question, why are you discovering this now? It’s five days that FEMA has been on the ground. The head of police says it’s been five days that FEMA has been there. The mayor, the former mayor, putting out SOS’s on Tuesday morning, crying on national television, saying, “Please send in some troops.” So the idea that—yes, I understand that you’re feeding people and trying to get in there now, but it’s Friday. It’s Friday.

ABC News Nightline
Ted Koppel questioning FEMA director Mike Brown on his belated response to the crisis in the Superdome

KOPPEL: During the course of this evening, on a number of interviews [you’ve said] you just found out about it today. Don’t you guys watch television? Don’t you guys listen to the radio? Our reporters have been reporting about it for more than just today.

BROWN: We learned about it factually today that that’s what existed. We’ve been so focused on doing rescue and lifesaving missions and evacuating people from the Superdome that when we first learned about it, of course, my first gut instinction, instinct was, get somebody in there, get me truth on the ground, let me know, because if it’s true we’ve got to help those people.

KOPPEL: You’ve got chaos and anarchy breaking out in a number of different places in New Orleans. It would seem to me that the first thing you need to do is to get some good solid combat troops like the 82nd Airborne or the 101st in there. These are guys who are ready to move immediately. Instead you’re sending National Guardsmen in there and it’s taking time. You don’t have time…. Mr. Brown, some of these people are dead. They’re beyond your help. Some of these people have died because they needed insulin and they couldn’t get it. Some of the people died because they were in hospitals and they couldn’t get the assistance that they needed. You say you were surprised by the fact that so many people didn’t make it out. It’s no surprise to anyone that you had at least 100,000 people in the city of New Orleans who are dirt poor. Who don’t have cars, who don’t have access to public transportation, who don’t have any way of getting out of the city simply because somebody says, “You know, there’s a force five storm coming; you ought to get out.” If you didn’t have buses there to get them out, why should it be a surprise to you that they stayed?

BROWN: Well, Ted, you know, we’re, I’m not going to sit here and second-guess why or when evacuation orders were given or why or why not the city didn’t have buses available. You know, that’s just not the thing that we need to do right now. Frankly, if they, if they had, if they had put buses there…

KOPPEL: Not the city, not the city. I’m not asking you, I’m not asking you, Mr. Brown, why the city didn’t have buses available, I’m asking you why you didn’t have National Guards in there with trucks to get them out of there. Why you didn’t have people with flatbed trailers if that’s what you needed. Why you didn’t, you know, simply get Greyhound buses from as many surrounding states as you could lay your hands on to get those people out of there, why you haven’t done it to this day?

CNN Live Today
William Schneider, CNN senior political analyst

SCHNEIDER: That’s right. It’s five days into the crisis. Where has the president been?… That is a failure of government, period. There has been a visible vacuum of leadership. Even though it’s clear that state and local authorities have done their best, when Americans see this kind of lawlessness, this kind of desperation, they wonder, Where is the government? And in that kind of situation, they expect the president of the United States to step in.

ABC News Special Report
Diane Sawyer in a rare interview with President George W. Bush

SAWYER: And in fact, Mr. President, this morning, as we speak, as you say, there are people with signs saying, “Help, come get me.”

PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH: Right.

SAWYER: People still in the attic, waving. Nurses are phoning in saying the situation in hospitals is getting ever more dire.

BUSH: Yeah.

SAWYER: That the nurses are getting sick now because of no clean water. And some of the things they have asked our correspondents to ask you is, they expected, they say to us, that the day after this hurricane that there would be a massive and visible armada of federal support. There would be boats coming in, there would be food, there would be water, and it would be there within hours.

BUSH: Yeah.

SAWYER: They wondered, What’s taking so long? But given the fact that everyone anticipated a hurricane five, a possible hurricane five hitting shore, are you satisfied with the pace at which this is arriving and which it was planned to arrive?

BUSH: Well, I fully understand people wanting things to have happened yesterday. I mean, I…I understand the anxiety of people on the ground. I can—I just can’t imagine what it’s like to be waving a sign that said, “Come and get me now.” So, there is…there…there is frustration, but I want people to know there’s a lot of help coming.

SAWYER: National security, another problem, and security in the region. We’ve seen the looting before. National Guard troops, as we have said, are now up to 22,000, I think, by tomorrow, coming in. But people have worried that the National Guard is stretched too thin. So many overseas.

BUSH: Yeah.

SAWYER: And the governors themselves, bipartisan numbers of governors, have worried out loud that with so many National Guard deployed in so many places, they don’t have the full quadrant it may take.

BUSH: I…I…I…

SAWYER: Some people, Democratic critics…have begun to say that they were surprised that you didn’t come back to the White House on Tuesday and start to organize this—

BUSH: Yeah.

SAWYER: —this cabinet meeting that you did yesterday. Was—

BUSH: —You mean the one I organized on Wednesday? Well, I…I…I…I started organizing Tuesday when we realized the extent of the storm and I said, “Look, when I get back to Washington on Wednesday afternoon I want to have a report on my…on my desk and a cabinet meeting for you to tell me exactly what your departments are going to do to help alleviate the situation.”

SAWYER: I…

BUSH: By the way, I…I don’t…I…I hope people don’t, you know, point political, you know, play politics during this period of time.

SAWYER: I’m struck by the fact that the picture that we saw of you sitting and looking outside the plane at this disaster and the picture of 9/11 were so similar…

BUSH: Yeah.

Bwana
09-02-2005, 11:27 PM
NO! Not Diane Sawyer!! :eek:

Bush is doomed!!

dirk digler
09-02-2005, 11:34 PM
I am not going to get into any Bush bashing right now but I watched Fox in between the Chiefs game and I am very impressed with Shep Smith and Geraldo. Geraldo was crying he was so distraught for the kids. I think the media has done a very good job reporting this event and I am angry as hell too for the lack of support that they people are getting.

Count Alex's Losses
09-02-2005, 11:41 PM
Shepard Smith looked like someone had beaten him yesterday.

beavis
09-03-2005, 12:38 AM
How exactly did he lie?

Logical
09-03-2005, 12:42 AM
How exactly did he lie?Simple, he said we could not expect the levees to break when there have been many studies that said exactly that would happen.

Ugly Duck
09-03-2005, 02:18 AM
Wow. Sounds like the media is starting to do its job again. They've been pussy-footing and kid-gloving this administration ever since 9-11. Lets hope that this awakening of the media encouages the chicken-Dems to take their dang tails out from between their legs and start being Dems again.

Pitt Gorilla
09-03-2005, 02:26 AM
I gained a lot of respect for Smith after watching his reports. He wasn't blaming anyone. He merely told the people what was happening. It was very good journalism. I sort of wish this discussion wasn't happening in this thread. Smith deserves props.

BigMeatballDave
09-03-2005, 03:56 AM
Being wrong doesn't make you a liar. I heard reports that the levee system could withstand a Cat-3 storm. I don't know why he said that...

memyselfI
09-03-2005, 07:30 AM
Being wrong doesn't make you a liar. I heard reports that the levee system could withstand a Cat-3 storm. I don't know why he said that...

Being wrong that it was a CAT4 storm that doomed the city vs. a CAT3 is not the lie...

the lie was that they didn't anticipate problems with the levies. He is lying when he told her that.

memyselfI
09-03-2005, 07:31 AM
I gained a lot of respect for Smith after watching his reports. He wasn't blaming anyone. He merely told the people what was happening. It was very good journalism. I sort of wish this discussion wasn't happening in this thread. Smith deserves props.


Feel free to spin off because I happen to loathe SS but yet I am rethinking my opinion of him. He was trying VERY HARD NOT to point blame but he had to overcome any corporate bias he has and tell the truth. His 'I don't know' dispair seemed to be masking his 'I can't say' personal opinion. IMO.

StcChief
09-03-2005, 02:54 PM
The fish bowl of NO was bound to get a serious leak there is too much water around it.
CAT 3,4,5 doesn't matter. The storm surge force would cause problems somewhere

Hydrae
09-03-2005, 02:58 PM
Awakened by the devastation in New Orleans, a once timid press corps is pursuing the administration with a surprising show of force. The president, of course, is responding in his usual, articulate, well-informed manner.


I don't care who you voted for, that had me rolling on the floor literally! ROFL :LOL:

Calcountry
09-03-2005, 06:53 PM
Being wrong that it was a CAT4 storm that doomed the city vs. a CAT3 is not the lie...

the lie was that they didn't anticipate problems with the levies. He is lying when he told her that.And there you have it. Bush lied, people died.

gblowfish
09-03-2005, 07:42 PM
NO! Not Diane Sawyer!! :eek:

Logical
09-03-2005, 08:47 PM
I don't care who you voted for, that had me rolling on the floor literally! ROFL :LOL:Yes, what kind of dumbass would it take to call him articulate, that is beyond comprehension.

memyselfI
09-04-2005, 09:16 AM
Well Chertoff is on TV doing a complete and total spin job. Saying there was food, he had not heard of reports of people being killed or starving at the Superdome, and that no one anticipated the extent of the damage if the levies broke.

I hope they keep this up vs. actually apologizing and admitting their mistakes...they will undermine their already tumbling credibility ratings.

memyselfI
09-04-2005, 09:17 AM
Yes, what kind of dumbass would it take to call him articulate, that is beyond comprehension.

One SARCASTIC Mofo!!! ;)

memyselfI
09-04-2005, 09:18 AM
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

Chertoff is using the Media's 'dodged a bullet' coverage as the reason/excuse for the WH inaction.

Did I not say their coverage was irresponsible and took major criticism for doing so. Now these morons are using it as their CYA. :banghead: :mad: :shake: :cuss:

WilliamTheIrish
09-04-2005, 02:33 PM
If the NY Times were any more flip floppy....

Here is the link D'Nice provoded in the thread starter.

http://mediamatters.org/items/200509030001

After reading it you would think that NY Times had bee backing the Army Corps Of Engineers since .... well... forever.

But upon further scrutiny the NY Times said this:

We don't need no stinking levee's (http://mediamatters.org/items/200509030001)

[Paul Krugman]
"Second question: Why wasn't more preventive action taken? After 2003 the Army Corps of Engineers sharply slowed its flood-control work, including work on sinking levees. "The corps," an Editor and Publisher article says, citing a series of articles in The Times-Picayune in New Orleans, "never tried to hide the fact that the spending pressures of the war in Iraq, as well as homeland security - coming at the same time as federal tax cuts - was the reason for the strain."

But when the devastating flood of 1993 hit, the NY Times had this to say about levee repair:

Mother Nature and Ol' Man River

The billions of Federal dollars spent to construct dams and levees have doubtless prevented billions of dollars of damage to the areas they serve. But a dam or a levee in one place creates problems somewhere else. Also, by offering protection, they encourage people to live and work and develop farming in flood plains that are inherently risky.

Budget constraints and environmental concerns have slowed new flood control projects in recent years. Congress should resist pressure to spend more now because of this year's floods; these projects need closer evaluation than they've gotten in the past.And in 2003: Another NY Times editorial:

Another editorial dated June 24, 2003 states:

House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure has a rare opportunity tomorrow to strike a blow for both fiscal sanity and the environment. Before the committee is a bill that would bring a measure of discipline and independent oversight to the Army Corps of Engineers, an incorrigibly spendthrift agency whose projects over the years have caused enormous damage to the nation's streams, rivers and wetlands.

And finally on April 13 of this year:

Anyone who cares about responsible budgeting and the health of America's rivers and wetlands should pay attention to a bill now before the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works. The bill would shovel $17 billion at the Army Corps of Engineers for flood control and other water-related projects -- this at a time when President Bush is asking for major cuts in Medicaid and other important domestic programs. Among these projects is a $2.7 billion boondoggle on the Mississippi River that has twice flunked inspection by the National Academy of Sciences.

PastorMikH
09-04-2005, 03:04 PM
I should know better than this...


First off, we knew here 2 -3 days before the storm hit that there was a good chance that NO would be hit by a MAJOR storm. Yet people decided to stay in their homes instead of evacuating then.

There were A LOT of people - engineers included that thought those levies would hold.

What has happened is bad, but using it to blast someone you hate is worse yet. The people of New Orleans have become a pawn for the democrats in the upcoming elections.

go bowe
09-04-2005, 03:35 PM
I should know better than this...


First off, we knew here 2 -3 days before the storm hit that there was a good chance that NO would be hit by a MAJOR storm. Yet people decided to stay in their homes instead of evacuating then.

There were A LOT of people - engineers included that thought those levies would hold.

What has happened is bad, but using it to blast someone you hate is worse yet. The people of New Orleans have become a pawn for the democrats in the upcoming elections.you're right, of course...

but many, if not most, of those who stayed didn't have any choice...

tens of thousands have been evacuated since the levees broke, and i seriously doubt that very many of them could have left the area without some form of public transportation...

there was an enormous population of poor people in new orleans, together with the sick and/or elderly...

the evacuation plan should have included providing transportation to those who were unable to leave on their own...

iirc, the levees were designed to withstand a cat 3 hurricane, but not storm surges like katrina produced (and katrina was a cat 4 when she hit the gulf coast)...

but you're right about the elections, this will be a big issue...

PastorMikH
09-04-2005, 04:26 PM
you're right, of course...



but you're right about the elections, this will be a big issue...


Of course I am! Now, tell my wife that.:D:D


I think that price of fuel will be the biggest and I am thinking that every incumbent holding a national office (Republicans and Democrats) will be facing a stiff fight to keep their jobs if something doesn't drastically change quickly.

Calcountry
09-07-2005, 05:19 PM
I should know better than this...


First off, we knew here 2 -3 days before the storm hit that there was a good chance that NO would be hit by a MAJOR storm. Yet people decided to stay in their homes instead of evacuating then.

There were A LOT of people - engineers included that thought those levies would hold.

What has happened is bad, but using it to blast someone you hate is worse yet. The people of New Orleans have become a pawn for the democrats in the upcoming elections.The media got lots of footage with Black refugees. We get it, Rodney King. Just keep showing them till the anger gets to a fever pitch, then demand a political head to satisfy the anger.