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Rain Man
09-24-2005, 11:04 PM
Only a few days ago, I stood before you as a gentrified city boy, jostling my way to work amidst a million other Japanese commuters, unable to identify where beef comes from, and being able to navigate at night only by knowing that satellite dishes always face south.

Today, after countless hours in the harsh wilderness, my face wizened by a two-day growth of beard, I come before you a mountain man, following in the moccasin-clad footsteps of men like Jim Bridger, Kit Carson, bwana, and otter.

How, you might ask, did such a transformation occur? Did I have an epiphany? A life-changing event that caused me to return to the warm but unforgiving embrace of nature? Not exactly. Like many men, greatness was thrust upon me, namely by the fact that my wife got a business trip to Yellowstone National Park. Unable to resist the lure of the last great frontier, I tagged along. I am currently searching the history books, but I believe that we are the first consulting couple ever to enter Yellowstone together with twin laptops.

I saw many things during my time in the Park. I learned from the Indians, from the animals, from the Eastern European cafeteria workers in the lodge. But mostly, I reached inside myself and learned that I can be a strong, independent hotel guest even in a place as unforgiving as the Snow Lodge of the Old Faithful resort complex.

Yes, it was rough, my friends. It was rough. There was no TV. The Internet connection was only a 42k dialup. There were no in-room massage services. And I had only four restaurants to choose from, one of them serving nothing but pizza. But I persevered. I never gave up, never lost hope. And I came out of it a better man.

Sure, there were times that were difficult. The cruelty of man was evident. On one of my days there, we had a strong, cold rain, yet for some reason, the Park staff did not bring the buffalo herds inside. The poor animals were stuck outside, getting cold and wet, and even my most vigorous complaints were met with unbelieving stares by the rangers. The rangers also placed signs predicting geyser eruptions, and adamantly refused to adjust the schedules even when I explained it for the hundredth time. Simple logic would have told these people that a geyser eruption at noon was inconvenient, requiring guests to choose between lunch and viewing. But no, they would not deign to provide customer service and move it up a few hours. I am saddened by man's inhumanity to man.

Of course, there were good times, too. I am pleased to say that Yellowstone is great vacation spot for those with flatulence. One shift of the wind when you're standing at a bubbling pot of sulphur water, and any personal transgression was watered down to insignificance. At no time during my four days did I rise above #8 on the list of local noxious gas producers, and I can't recall the last time that happened. Add that to a preponderence of slender blonde Eastern European hotel staff, and you've got the makings of a great working vacation, even if you're the only one typing on a laptop in front of Old Faithful.

I left not knowing if I would survive. But I did, and I did it grandly. I didn't get gored by a buffalo. I didn't fall into any pools of boiling water. I didn't provoke that odd guy who kept looking at me in the lobby. I even learned that I can live in Grizzly country without harm, as long as I make sure to get a second-floor room and store the Cheetos on the other side of the room.

Yes, my friends. It was a challenge. It wasn't always easy, and I think a weaker person might have cracked under the strain. I am proud to say that I have proven my mettle, though. I showed that I can survive in the greatest remaining wilderness left in these United States. Emboldened by that success, I may up the ante now. Does anyone know if there's a nice hotel in Yosemite?

Count Alex's Wins
09-24-2005, 11:09 PM
Rain Man!

Raa-hey-hain Man!

King of the wild frontier!

Posted him a poll when he was only three.

4th and Long
09-24-2005, 11:11 PM
After reading that, all I can say is, You Poor Son Of A Bitch.

Dave Lane
09-24-2005, 11:16 PM
Damn Kevin you crack me up! ROFL

Dave

chiefs4me
09-24-2005, 11:39 PM
Awesome story.......:thumb:






and let's Thank God for your safe return...;)

Otter
09-29-2005, 01:20 PM
:clap:
Kevin my good man, you're ready to ride horseback a couple miles back into the Montana Mountains hunting for elk with nothing but a trusty rifle, some jerky and a bottle of whiskey. Contact Bwana, for he is the coordinator.

Just remember; if you hear the bells hung around the horses necks start going off at night - run! There's a 90% chance there's a grizzly, mountain lion or coyote pack within a rocks throw.

You don't have to be the fastest, you just can't be the slowest.

Don't forget an extra battery for the laptop.

PastorMikH
09-29-2005, 01:27 PM
Kevin is the only one on the Planet that can post a story like that and I don't go googling to see where the poster got that story.

NICE READ Kevin!

bogie
09-29-2005, 01:40 PM
They left their Buffalo out in the cold rain?!? How could you sit back and let that happen?

Bwana
09-29-2005, 01:52 PM
Lewis and Clark would be proud. :D

Rain Man
09-29-2005, 03:05 PM
I really feel like I'm one of the guys now.

I even went out snipe-watching one day. The hotel staff told me the best place to see them, but unfortunately I didn't spot one all day. It was tough because it was that real cold and rainy day, and apparently snipe like to hang out near those really smelly geysers.

Skip Towne
09-29-2005, 03:30 PM
Meh, the story was OK. I'd rather know what my post count was two years ago though.

Fish
09-29-2005, 03:36 PM
As an avid hunter and outdoorsman turned IT geek, it's good to get out under the stars and enjoy the silence once in a while. My hunting trips are the highlight of my year (comparable only to Chiefs games). I would suggest that next time, leave all electronics at home, aside from your GPS if you're afraid to get lost. But then again, sometimes getting lost is the only way to really find something special.....

Iowanian
09-29-2005, 03:43 PM
I got an email yesterday from my buddy, who is a marine, Mountain Recon instructor. He spent the last 10 days in the wilderness of Alaska....

Had a helicopter drop him off with a bow, tent and other basics, 400 miles from the nearest road......to take a bear, carribou and something else I can't recall.

Yesterday's email was a self portrait picture next to a very large, Blonde colored bear, with a caribou rack and wrapped meat.

I am an outdoorsman, but I don't think I'm up for that.

Rain Man
09-29-2005, 03:44 PM
Meh, the story was OK. I'd rather know what my post count was two years ago though.

I don't have sufficient fax to provide that information.

Skip Towne
09-29-2005, 03:46 PM
I don't have sufficient fax to provide that information.
Should I retransmit?

Rain Man
09-29-2005, 03:47 PM
I got an email yesterday from my buddy, who is a marine, Mountain Recon instructor. He spent the last 10 days in the wilderness of Alaska....

Had a helicopter drop him off with a bow, tent and other basics, 400 miles from the nearest road......to take a bear, carribou and something else I can't recall.

Yesterday's email was a self portrait picture next to a very large, Blonde colored bear, with a caribou rack and wrapped meat.

I am an outdoorsman, but I don't think I'm up for that.


I bet the third thing was wrapped meat.

Rain Man
09-29-2005, 03:49 PM
Should I retransmit?

Yeah. For some reason I never got it. Let me know when it goes, and I'll go check.

Skip Towne
09-29-2005, 03:51 PM
Yeah. For some reason I never got it. Let me know when it goes, and I'll go check.
About 5 minutes.

Otter
09-29-2005, 03:54 PM
I got an email yesterday from my buddy, who is a marine, Mountain Recon instructor. He spent the last 10 days in the wilderness of Alaska....

Had a helicopter drop him off with a bow, tent and other basics, 400 miles from the nearest road......to take a bear, carribou and something else I can't recall.

Yesterday's email was a self portrait picture next to a very large, Blonde colored bear, with a caribou rack and wrapped meat.

I am an outdoorsman, but I don't think I'm up for that.

That's hard core. I was always proud of being an avid outdoorsman and pretty rugid until I met some folks in my travels to places like Montana, Colorado and Alaska who size up with your buddy.

We're city slickers compared to some of those folks.

I really feel like I'm one of the guys now.

Pull my finger.

Skip Towne
09-29-2005, 03:56 PM
Done.

Iowanian
09-29-2005, 04:00 PM
I bet the third thing was wrapped meat.

I saw wrapped meat....I'm thinking he had a tag for some kind of sheep...like a Dahl sheep or something, but I'm not sure at all.

I might black out his face and post the pic.

Rain Man
09-29-2005, 04:00 PM
Done.

The Eagle has landed.

Area 51
09-29-2005, 04:02 PM
Rain Man,

It seems as if you have too much time on your hands and too ready access to a keyboard.

You should take up a hobby, like writing a story that can be printed in the place of Jason Whiploss.

Rain Man
09-29-2005, 04:03 PM
That's hard core. I was always proud of being an avid outdoorsman and pretty rugid until I met some folks in my travels to places like Montana, Colorado and Alaska who size up with your buddy.

We're city slickers compared to some of those folks.


He's not a hunter, but an acquaintance of mine is an oil exploration geologist, and he's kind of like this. He told me that his favorite experience was getting dropped off by a plane out on the North Slope of Alaska, where he spent a week on his own wandering around and doing tests. I would've been eaten by a seal on the first day.

Otter
09-29-2005, 04:04 PM
I saw wrapped meat....I'm thinking he had a tag for some kind of sheep...like a Dahl sheep or something, but I'm not sure at all.

I might black out his face and post the pic.

If you don't post, send me a copy if it's not too much trouble. Love to see that aftermath.

Iowanian
09-29-2005, 04:31 PM
Iowanian's pal(a bad, bad man) and some dead stuff

Hydrae
09-29-2005, 05:32 PM
How could he look at that cute face and kill that poor bear?

Bwana
09-29-2005, 05:37 PM
How could he look at that cute face and kill that poor bear?

How about this?

Bwana
09-29-2005, 05:39 PM
That's hard core. I was always proud of being an avid outdoorsman and pretty rugid until I met some folks in my travels to places like Montana, Colorado and Alaska who size up with your buddy.

We're city slickers compared to some of those folks.



Pull my finger.

Life is short Joe, Work hard, Play hard. :thumb:

onescrewleftuntwisted
09-29-2005, 05:43 PM
Yes, it was rough, my friends. It was rough. There was no TV. The Internet connection was only a 42k dialup. .





only 42k the horror, the inhumanity..................thats what i get at my house