PDA

View Full Version : How to removed the "textured" crap from a ceiling?


jAZ
10-01-2005, 04:50 PM
We are looking at repainting two bedrooms and they have that hanging texture crap on the ceilling... for the do-it-yourself types here, what's the best way to remove that stuff and so that it looks decent and is repaintable (without replacing the drywall)?

OldTownChief
10-01-2005, 04:52 PM
We are looking at repainting two bedrooms and they have that hanging texture crap on the ceilling... for the do-it-yourself types here, what's the best way to remove that stuff and so that it looks decent and is repaintable (without replacing the drywall)?

Wide puddy knife, comes right off.

mlyonsd
10-01-2005, 04:53 PM
Man, other than sanding I don't know what other options you have. That texture is basic drywall mud.

Bwana
10-01-2005, 04:56 PM
A nice flame thrower? :shrug:

luv
10-01-2005, 04:58 PM
You should watch home decorating shows on TLC like Trading Spaces. I agree with both of these guys. Get a puddy knife for the big stuff, then sand it down. I would highly recommend covering your flooring, hair and eyes. And be ready for some aching muscles. :)

OldTownChief
10-01-2005, 04:59 PM
1. Determine what you have - There are three common types of wall and ceiling texturing. Sand paint is made by mixing very fine sand into paint before it is brushed or rolled onto the surface. It feels like sandpaper, as the name implies. Swirled finishes may be a final coat of plaster, or may be made of drywall mud trowled onto gypsum board. Soft textures such as "popcorn" ceilings are applied by spraying them onto the surface.

2. Check for asbestos - If you have a texture that you think might have been sprayed on - especially if it's on the ceiling - and you do not know for certain that it was applied after 1978, you should have it tested for asbestos. Unlike flooring products with asbestos, sprayed-on wall and ceiling textures applied before that date, if they contains asbestos, hold the fibers very loosely. That means the asbestos easily becomes airborne. Have it tested - and removed, if positive - by professionals.

3. Remove the furniture - This job is going to get wet or dusty before you're through - maybe both. There's really no good way to protect the stuff inside the room, and besides, you're going to want to be able to move freely.

4. Protect the floor - If you're going to refinh the floor, or install a new floor, this may not be critical. Otherwise, you should protect it. And this is not like protecting a floor while painting. A drop cloth is probably not good enough. To really protect a floor from water or dust, cover it with heavy plastic sheeting. Overlap all seams by one foot (30 cm) and tape them with wide plastic tape. At the wall, turn the plastic up, trim it to the top of the baseboard, and tape it with masking tape.

5. Remove faceplates and fixtures - If it's a wall that you need to clean up, remove the faceplates from all the switches and receptacles. Tape over the devices themselves with wide masking tape. Let the tape extend to the edge of the opening for each device. Remove any wall sconces too. If you have other light in the room, put a wire nut on the "hot" wire, push the wires back in the box, and stuff plastic on top. If you need the light, hang "pigtail" sockets, with cages to protect the light bulbs.

6. Remove ceiling fixtures - If you're going to remove non-asbestos-containing texture from the ceiling, you can take the fixtures down and replace them with rubber pigtails. If the ceiling fixtures are hung from chains, you can, as an alternative, lower the canopy and tape a cone of clear plastic over the fixture - provided, of course, that the plastic can't contact any light bulbs. Ceiling fans should always be removed and stored in another room until the work is finished.

7. Sand paint - This treatment can be very difficult to remove. It is often faster, cheaper and easier to skim over this finish with drywall compound. Sand the surface with medium-grit sandpaper on a sanding pole. Vacuum the dust off the wall. Wet the wall slightly. Mix or thin the compound to a consistency thicker than gravy. Starting in an upper corner, use the widest drywall knife you can comfortably work with to skim the wall, working across and then down. Let it dry and sand it smooth.

8. Stucco - If it's real, it's made of very hard plaster or thin concrete, and it's a part of the wall. I would consider cleaning and sealing it instead of "removing" it. It's not going to come off anyway. You'll have to skim over it in the same manner used for sand paint. If it was faked by troweling drywall compound onto the wall, sand it to break the surface. Soak it with hot water with a drop or two of dishwashing detergent added. Then skim it off with a broad knife and drop it into a mud tray.

9. Sprayed-on textures - These are easy to remove completely. If the surface has been sealed with paint, score a reasonably-sized work area with the corner of a comfortably-wide drywall knife. Spray the area with hot water with a drop or two of dishwashing detergent added. After the water has soaked in, hold a mud tray in your "off" hand. Set your knife at a 45 degree angle against the wall or ceiling and push it away from you. Clean the knife with the mud tray. Repeat as needed.

10. Sand the surface - No matter how careful you've been, there will be irregularities in the surface. It probably wasn't perfect to begin with. Besides, you need to provide "tooth" for the next step.

11. Skim and fill the surface - Using drywall compound mixed or thinned enough to be quickly workable, add one coat over the entire wall or ceiling. Push the compound into any low places.

12. Remove the dust - No matter which technique you've used, there is now a fair amount of dust on the walls and floor. Use a sturdy vacuum cleaner to suck that up.

13. Seal it up - If you're preparing to paint, prime the surface. If you're preparing to hang paper, size it.

Dave Lane
10-01-2005, 05:08 PM
Its easier to tear out the old sheetrock and rehang. Pretty quick job in a small area.

Dave

OldTownChief
10-01-2005, 05:10 PM
Its easier to tear out the old sheetrock and rehang. Pretty quick job in a small area.

Dave


Agreed

StcChief
10-01-2005, 05:53 PM
The spray on bubble crap on ceil is allows cheap finish to avoid a clean tape and drywall mud and sanding job.

When it is removed. the taping lines will likely stand out lie a sore thumb.

Typical quick construction technique to save on labor costs.

ChiefsFire
10-01-2005, 06:39 PM
found what looked like about a 12inch wide "scraper" that went onto the end of a broom handle or extension handle at the local lumber yard.Even was designed with a bar around it to hang a bag on to catch the droppings.

Filled a pump up sprayer with warm water and wetted down an area,let it soak and the damn popcorn stuff came off in sheets.Worked great,wasnt impressed with the bag holder though.Put down dropclothes and just let the chit fall.

Came with a warning to check for asbestos if finish was put on prior to 1978.Would be worth checking into.
Would still recommend investing in a good respirator though,that stuff is nasty.

kccrazzi
10-01-2005, 08:18 PM
Spray with fabrick softner and water first 50/50 mix works great. let soak about 20min. then scrape. Went through 2 rooms of this last year, it's a pain but well worth it. Try not to dig into the sheetrock or tape, the fabrick softner works great. Gave up season tickets for this remodel but I was told that's ok. Yeah.

donkhater
10-01-2005, 08:33 PM
Yep. Simple as pie. Get a pump sprayer and soak it, and it slides right off. Messy as hell, but simple. I took it down in our kitchen then replaced it with painted beadboard. Looks great.