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Vegas_Dave
10-13-2005, 12:25 PM
So DLP is starting to become the Buzz in the TV market. Great commercials for the technology too!

I recently purchased a DLP TV and thought I would give my own review for those who were undecided.

First, I bought a Samsung 42" Widscreen DLP. Model is a HL-R4266W.

Basically, this is one of the lowest price HDTV Integrated TV's of its size. I got mine for a whopping $1500 + tax locally. While they have actually gone up a few hundred dollars since, they are bound to come back down for Christmas... plus I found that of all the places, RC Willey was the only one willing to be haggled on price. They actually matched an older sale price from Ulitmate Electronics even though Ultimates sale price was gone and Ultimate had gone up $250 since then.

This is a 4th Generation version of the DLP chip. I have looked at previous model series with older chips and frankly, they looked bad. So definately make sure that you are not getting a disontinued model as they use the older and inferior chips.

Picture : A-
Overall, for the price/size, it is unbeatable. However, it takes some getting used to watching the screen. For one, the DLP's do not use a typical 3 color square pixel like every other TV out there. instead, each pixel actually changes color as needed but doing it as a straight color.

cons
With DLP picture is that if you are too close, then the picture almost looks to "shimmer" as you can see the pixels individually changing causing this shimmer effect. However, after about the 1st week with the TV, the noticability of this has drastically gone away as my eyes have gotten used to wathcing it.

This shimmer effect remains visible on the brightest colors. Specifically white. However, the regular and darker colors do not have this effect.

pros
Detail. Wow. Now this particular TV is only a 720p (compared to the highest HDTV resoluation of 1080i). So it is not as clean a picture as the Samsung's upper model DLP offerings which do offer a tru 1080i picture. However, I have found that the 720p picture actually works best in the current TV market.

Since there are very few true High-Res 1080i/720p programs on the market and even fewer channels, the 1080i versions make the non high-res digital channels look quite bad whereas the 720p version is not as bad on the normal channels. So until the entire TV spectrum goes to at least a 720p picture or higher, I would not WANT a true 1080i capable TV.

When will that happen? Who knows. From the reports I have read, at least 5 more years and probably closer to 10. At which point, I will want a better TV anyways!!!



Everything else about the TV is great. I did make sure to upgrade my Cable box to a HDTV cable box and I noticed that the pictures from that box on the analog channels were much better then the pictures from my previous "digital" box's analog channels.

Also, by switching to a true HDTV components everywhere, I only have to have 1 cable going from my cable box to my TV. The HDMI (High Defenition Multimedia Interface) cable combines the video and audio through one cable in the highest bandwidth pure digital to digital format. I was able to see a noticeable difference in picture qulity compared to the standard Component cables.

Also, since my TV and Cable box did not share another style of digital audio input/output, the HDMI is also the only way that I could get the true digital audio from my Cable service which I then am able to export out to my surround sound using a true digital to digital Optical Audio cable.



Lastly, I am very impressed at the lower amount of cables that I now have to utilize. Since everything is now Digital to Digital, they can use computer style cables and get better bandwidth and combine everything into one cable.

My setup features the following cables:

From Cable Box to TV:
1 HDMI Cable - Video & Audio

From TV to Entertainment Unit (surround & DVD in one machine)
1 Optical Audio Cable

From Entertainment Unit to TV
1 Set of Component Cables

Thats it! 3 cables.

Bliss.

htismaqe
10-13-2005, 12:33 PM
720p is actually better quality that 1080i because it is non-interlaced.

http://alvyray.com/DigitalTV/Naming_Proposal.htm

Some of the issues you described can be dealt with by proper tweaking...I have a 4-year-old non-DLP HD set that looks just fine.

The one reason I wish I had a DLP? SIZE. My 50" is HUGE.

Dartgod
10-13-2005, 01:14 PM
The one reason I wish I had a DLP? SIZE. My 50" is HUGE.
That's probably the thing I like best about my 50" DLP, other than the picture quality.

The damn thing weighs only 78 lbs. :thumb:

htismaqe
10-13-2005, 01:40 PM
That's probably the thing I like best about my 50" DLP, other than the picture quality.

The damn thing weighs only 78 lbs. :thumb:

Holy God.

My 50" RP CRT weighs over 300 lbs.

The Bad Guy
10-13-2005, 01:59 PM
720p is actually better quality that 1080i because it is non-interlaced.

http://alvyray.com/DigitalTV/Naming_Proposal.htm

Some of the issues you described can be dealt with by proper tweaking...I have a 4-year-old non-DLP HD set that looks just fine.

The one reason I wish I had a DLP? SIZE. My 50" is HUGE.

Interesting. I'm going to switch my settings back to 720p then.

I have a Sony 55'' LCD that I'm in love with.

Frosty
10-13-2005, 03:52 PM
Do you ever watch standard TV on it? How does that look?

Swanman
10-13-2005, 04:09 PM
Holy God.

My 50" RP CRT weighs over 300 lbs.

My 65" Mitsu weighs in around 350. When I sell my current house in the next 5 years, that damn thing is staying with it.

The Bad Guy
10-13-2005, 04:43 PM
Do you ever watch standard TV on it? How does that look?

I do. It looks grainy and pixelated.

Some channels worse than others. Some look good, some doesn't.

I would have waited on getting my TV had I not gotten a sweet deal. The TV I bought retails for 2850. I got the TV, a 5-year warranty and the stand for 2800. The stand alone retails fro 500 at best buy and the warranty is 400 for 4 years there.

I saved about 9 hundred bones.

Pants
10-13-2005, 04:53 PM
I do. It looks grainy and pixelated.

Some channels worse than others. Some look good, some doesn't.

I would have waited on getting my TV had I not gotten a sweet deal. The TV I bought retails for 2850. I got the TV, a 5-year warranty and the stand for 2800. The stand alone retails fro 500 at best buy and the warranty is 400 for 4 years there.

I saved about 9 hundred bones.

Wow, that's extremelly cheap for a 55" LCD TV. I saw some 42 inchers for 3K.

BigMeatballDave
10-14-2005, 01:08 AM
At the risk of sounding like a tool, what does 'DLP' stand for?

Miles
10-14-2005, 02:42 AM
At the risk of sounding like a tool, what does 'DLP' stand for?

Digital light processing.

Baby Lee
10-14-2005, 06:38 AM
720p is actually better quality that 1080i because it is non-interlaced.

http://alvyray.com/DigitalTV/Naming_Proposal.htm

Some of the issues you described can be dealt with by proper tweaking...I have a 4-year-old non-DLP HD set that looks just fine.

The one reason I wish I had a DLP? SIZE. My 50" is HUGE.
1. Mastering is still the stronger benchmark than format. ie, pristine 1080i beats crappy 720p and vice versa.
2. Is there is a dynamic, it's that 720p is better for rapid motion [ie sports] and 1080 is better for static detail or slow scrolling motion [ie, IMAX from a helicopter panning over the rain forest].

htismaqe
10-14-2005, 07:13 AM
1. Mastering is still the stronger benchmark than format. ie, pristine 1080i beats crappy 720p and vice versa.
2. Is there is a dynamic, it's that 720p is better for rapid motion [ie sports] and 1080 is better for static detail or slow scrolling motion [ie, IMAX from a helicopter panning over the rain forest].

Very true. And you'll notice that the link I posted mentions both things.

Frosty
10-14-2005, 09:57 AM
I do. It looks grainy and pixelated.

Thanks. That's what I've heard and is holding me back. My TV watching is all standard def and DVD.

I looked into getting a large screen TV during the summer but they all seem to have issues. I don't have room for the behemoth RPTV's. The DLP look like crap on standard def. I see way too much blur on LCD. Plasma is expensive and has some possible issues with burn-in and getting dim over time.

For my needs, right now, the best bang for the buck seemed to be ED plasma. Looks great on standard def tv as well as DVDs. Would also do HD later on, though not as well as a HDTV would, obviously, but still pretty nice.

In the end, I decided to stick with my tube TV for regular TV and my ED DLP projector for DVDs and wait a bit more to see how things shake out. My projector does a pretty fair job on standard TV. I can go to about 55" diagonal before objectionable distortion starts appearing.

BigMeatballDave
10-15-2005, 12:08 AM
Digital light processing.Ah, Thanks...

Cave Johnson
10-16-2005, 07:15 PM
For my needs, right now, the best bang for the buck seemed to be ED plasma.

Same for me. I'm buying the newest Panasonic 42" ED plasma in the near future. $1250, plus $200 for shipping is a pretty good deal. It'll do for a few years until I can afford a 60" HD plasma.

The burn-in and dimming issue is completely overblown, based on what I've read. Most new models have screensavers that help prevent burn-in, and it's really only an issue in the 1st 150 hours or so. The half life on the newest plasmas is 60,000 hours, which equates to something like 30 years if used 5 hours a day.

htismaqe
10-16-2005, 07:39 PM
Same for me. I'm buying the newest Panasonic 42" ED plasma in the near future. $1250, plus $200 for shipping is a pretty good deal. It'll do for a few years until I can afford a 60" HD plasma.

The burn-in and dimming issue is completely overblown, based on what I've read. Most new models have screensavers that help prevent burn-in, and it's really only an issue in the 1st 150 hours or so. The half life on the newest plasmas is 60,000 hours, which equates to something like 30 years if used 5 hours a day.

The burn-in on all the sets is overblown.

For one thing, the sets are setup in the store to "blow you away" which is the worst thing you can do for a set.

For example, my RPTV came from the store with brightness at 100 and contrast at 100. After using the Avia tools, I found that the optimal settings for my set were TWENTY FIVE FOR BOTH.

I play XBox/PS2 on my set all the time, have for the 2 years I've had it. ZERO burn-in.

Swanman
10-17-2005, 07:08 AM
The burn-in on all the sets is overblown.

For one thing, the sets are setup in the store to "blow you away" which is the worst thing you can do for a set.

For example, my RPTV came from the store with brightness at 100 and contrast at 100. After using the Avia tools, I found that the optimal settings for my set were TWENTY FIVE FOR BOTH.

I play XBox/PS2 on my set all the time, have for the 2 years I've had it. ZERO burn-in.

The same thing happened with my Mitsubishi 65". All of the settings were at 100 ("torch mode") and I brought them down considerably with Avia. One of the few ways you can have burn-in is to always watch tv in the 4:3 ratio with bars on the side, which will screw up the sides of the screen, but with the advent of more HD programming people shouldn't really be watching 4:3 programming more than 50% of the time.

htismaqe
10-17-2005, 10:15 AM
The same thing happened with my Mitsubishi 65". All of the settings were at 100 ("torch mode") and I brought them down considerably with Avia. One of the few ways you can have burn-in is to always watch tv in the 4:3 ratio with bars on the side, which will screw up the sides of the screen, but with the advent of more HD programming people shouldn't really be watching 4:3 programming more than 50% of the time.

I watch everything in 16:9 mode now, even the traditional NTSC stuff, I've just gotten used to it.

Every once in a while I have to switch modes just to make sure, because it makes every chick look about 20 pounds heavier than she really is. :D

ExtremeChief
07-03-2006, 10:55 AM
I'm not sure if I'm catching this correctly...

Do some sets give you the option of viewing in 720 or 1080????

If not, I would think I would be better off getting an EDTV set since I can't receive any over the air HD signals and my set will be used for Dish Network and some gaming and DVD viewing.

Vegas_Dave
07-03-2006, 11:19 AM
I'm not sure if I'm catching this correctly...

Do some sets give you the option of viewing in 720 or 1080????

If not, I would think I would be better off getting an EDTV set since I can't receive any over the air HD signals and my set will be used for Dish Network and some gaming and DVD viewing.

Most modern sets will have the ability to display in both 1080i (interlaced) as well as 720p (progressive) and it will depend on the input signal as to what will really be displayed.

Some of the newer sets on the market now also support 1080p(progressive).

ExtremeChief
07-03-2006, 01:54 PM
Sorry for all the questions. I can't receive any OTA HD broadcasts, so is there any reason to get a tv with an HDTV tuner when my dishnetwork receiver will be used as my tuner??

Baby Lee
07-03-2006, 02:00 PM
Sorry for all the questions. I can't receive any OTA HD broadcasts, so is there any reason to get a tv with an HDTV tuner when my dishnetwork receiver will be used as my tuner??
If your Dish Box is HD ready, the only reason would be to be able to watch something in HD while the Direct Box Tuners are otherwise engaged [ie, recording].

ExtremeChief
07-03-2006, 02:10 PM
If your Dish Box is HD ready, the only reason would be to be able to watch something in HD while the Direct Box Tuners are otherwise engaged [ie, recording].


ok... thanks


I think this is the one....


http://www.plasmahouse.com/SAMSUNG-HP-S4253-PLASMA-TV/HPS4253.HTML


It's 2499 at Crutchfield

Vegas_Dave
07-03-2006, 03:06 PM
Sorry for all the questions. I can't receive any OTA HD broadcasts, so is there any reason to get a tv with an HDTV tuner when my dishnetwork receiver will be used as my tuner??

I would say yes. Doenst Dish Network have HD programming? In which case you can get your HD programming.

The only reason I would recommend an EDTV would be for small screens (under 23") that are going to not have any HD capable input.

For instance, in our den, right above the treadmill, I have a 15" Sharp Aquos EDTV mounted to the wall that has just the Basic Cable coming in and a DVD player hooked up.

I plan on putting one in my bedroom in my new house (6 months away) and will go like 27" HDTV.

You will find that once you get HD programming, you will almost refuse to watch SD if there is at least ANYTHING palatable available on HD.

ExtremeChief
07-03-2006, 03:32 PM
I would say yes. Doenst Dish Network have HD programming? In which case you can get your HD programming.

The only reason I would recommend an EDTV would be for small screens (under 23") that are going to not have any HD capable input.

For instance, in our den, right above the treadmill, I have a 15" Sharp Aquos EDTV mounted to the wall that has just the Basic Cable coming in and a DVD player hooked up.

I plan on putting one in my bedroom in my new house (6 months away) and will go like 27" HDTV.

You will find that once you get HD programming, you will almost refuse to watch SD if there is at least ANYTHING palatable available on HD.

Dish Network doesn't have a bad package, but I won't be able to get any of the networks in HD, yet anyway. I guess I just don't want to spend money on technology that I'm not going to be able to use. I read somewhere that viewing SD in 1080 looks worse than it would in 720 for instance. As long as I have the ability to change it, I guess that would be ok. I really like what I've read about the Samsung plasma TV's, and think I'll probably go with the one above, or something very similar. I'd like to stay under 2 grand, and if I could save some money on the tv I could sneak a new home theatre system in there too..



thanks for all the help

Vegas_Dave
07-03-2006, 04:39 PM
Dish Network doesn't have a bad package, but I won't be able to get any of the networks in HD, yet anyway. I guess I just don't want to spend money on technology that I'm not going to be able to use. I read somewhere that viewing SD in 1080 looks worse than it would in 720 for instance. As long as I have the ability to change it, I guess that would be ok. I really like what I've read about the Samsung plasma TV's, and think I'll probably go with the one above, or something very similar. I'd like to stay under 2 grand, and if I could save some money on the tv I could sneak a new home theatre system in there too..



thanks for all the help

You may want to talk to Dish Network about their HD box first.

Most of the TV's will not actually let you decide whether or not you are seeing 1080i or 720p. They simply will disply only what is coming in.

So if you box defaults to only show 1080i, then thats how it will be. For instance, my Cable box is set to display in 1080i in EVERY circumstance by default. However, I was able to find a setup routine (not given to me by my cable company - but rather directly for the box manufacturer) that made it possible to also display 720p.

So now, if the input source is 720p (FOXHD, ABCHD, ESPNHD), then my box will output it to my tv as 720p. However, for EVERYTHING else, it is 1080i.

I even tried to disable the 1080i support to see if it would then output everything in 720p, but that was a no go as the box defaulted back to allowing 1080i.

ExtremeChief
07-03-2006, 08:36 PM
Here's the specs...

The ViP622 DVR™ is cutting-edge TV sophistication with a digital video recorder and high-definition receiver that supports two TVs. It’s another example of DISH Network setting the standard for better TV.


Supports two TVs – one HDTV and one SDTV

Record up to 200 hours of standard-definition programming, up to 30 hours of high-definition programming, or a combination of the two1

View and record HD over the air digital2

TV1 display supports four resolutions: 480i, 480p, 720p, 1080i

TV2 display resolution is 480i
HD content is down-converted

Two Satellite tuners allow you to select from two viewing options
Single Mode: Picture-In-Picture (PIP) available on any TV
Dual Mode: Independently view and record programming on two televisions

Supports Dolby® Digital 5.1 Surround Sound

Widescreen Electronic Program Guide with easy search features

Convenient On-Screen Caller ID3 with history

DishHOME Interactive TV for watching six screens at once and on demand entertainment, games, shopping, news, sports, weather and customer service


So I assume it will switch to whatever the source is... I hope anyway

Vegas_Dave
07-03-2006, 09:01 PM
Here's the specs...

The ViP622 DVR™ is cutting-edge TV sophistication with a digital video recorder and high-definition receiver that supports two TVs. It’s another example of DISH Network setting the standard for better TV.


Supports two TVs – one HDTV and one SDTV

Record up to 200 hours of standard-definition programming, up to 30 hours of high-definition programming, or a combination of the two1

View and record HD over the air digital2

TV1 display supports four resolutions: 480i, 480p, 720p, 1080i

TV2 display resolution is 480i
HD content is down-converted

Two Satellite tuners allow you to select from two viewing options
Single Mode: Picture-In-Picture (PIP) available on any TV
Dual Mode: Independently view and record programming on two televisions

Supports Dolby® Digital 5.1 Surround Sound

Widescreen Electronic Program Guide with easy search features

Convenient On-Screen Caller ID3 with history

DishHOME Interactive TV for watching six screens at once and on demand entertainment, games, shopping, news, sports, weather and customer service


So I assume it will switch to whatever the source is... I hope anyway

Yes, I would agree that it "SHOULD" display whatever the source is coded. But no guarantee of that.