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View Full Version : SI reporter gets Michelle Wie disqualified from her first pro tournament.


alnorth
10-17-2005, 06:38 AM
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,172428,00.html

On Saturday afternoon, Michelle Wie hit into a bush and had to take a drop for an unplayable lie. After the drop, she eyeballed it and determined the ball was not closer to the hole and played on. Michael Bamberger, a reporter for Sports Illustrated, watched the drop and thought it looked a bit closer to the hole, but said nothing. Tourney officials didnt watch any of this and a routine review of the drop on videotape convinced them that everything was proper.

On Sunday afternoon, Wie finished in 4th place and signed her scorecard. THEN, the SI reporter went to tournament officials and complained that Wie broke the rules by dropping the ball closer to the hole and playing on with only a 1-stroke penalty instead of a 2-stroke penalty.

Tournament officials took Michelle out to the bush and asked her to point to where the ball was under the bush and where she dropped the ball. After taking out the measuring tape and carefully measuring the distance it was determined that the drop was about 10 or 11 inches closer to the hole. Since she had signed her score card, she was disqualified for signing an incorrect scorecard.

Had the SI reporter whined and bitched about the drop on Saturday evening or Sunday morning, Wie would have been able to finish in 4th place.

Amnorix
10-17-2005, 06:42 AM
What in the world would possess a reporter to do this? I could care less about golf, but that's just being a sucky human being.

SCChief
10-17-2005, 06:43 AM
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,172428,00.html

On Saturday afternoon, Michelle Wie hit into a bush and had to take a drop for an unplayable lie. After the drop, she eyeballed it and determined the ball was not closer to the hole and played on. Michael Bamberger, a reporter for Sports Illustrated, watched the drop and thought it looked a bit closer to the hole, but said nothing. Tourney officials didnt watch any of this and a routine review of the drop on videotape convinced them that everything was proper.

On Sunday afternoon, Wie finished in 4th place and signed her scorecard. THEN, the SI reporter went to tournament officials and complained that Wie broke the rules by dropping the ball closer to the hole and playing on with only a 1-stroke penalty instead of a 2-stroke penalty.

Tournament officials took Michelle out to the bush and asked her to point to where the ball was under the bush and where she dropped the ball. After taking out the measuring tape and carefully measuring the distance it was determined that the drop was about 10 or 11 inches closer to the hole. Since she had signed her score card, she was disqualified for signing an incorrect scorecard.

Had the SI reporter whined and bitched about the drop on Saturday evening or Sunday morning, Wie would have been able to finish in 4th place.

Yeah. This pisses me off. This kid is a new pro, and prone to mistakes. I wonder which opposing golfer the reporter was pulling for, because he obviously decided to sabotage her the day after the incident. Especially when golf officials reviewed the tape and felt she was right the first day.

Objective reporter my butt.

Ultra Peanut
10-17-2005, 06:44 AM
Michael Bamberger = goatfelching assclown.

ZootedGranny
10-17-2005, 06:57 AM
I can't remember the exact situation, but a while back the officials DQ'd a guy for something similar after a regular joe watching the tournament called into the PGA and alerted them to a rule break.

In fact, it's happened more than once.

SCChief
10-17-2005, 07:01 AM
I can't remember the exact situation, but a while back the officials DQ'd a guy for something similar after a regular joe watching the tournament called into the PGA and alerted them to a rule break.

In fact, it's happened more than once.

Aye. It has.

Still ticks me off. If a fan of the Chiefs calls into league offices and complains about a documented bad referee call, do they forfeit that call afterwards? Nope.

I think that golf is a bass-acwards sport anyway, but this just proves it... when someone who is not a golf official can influence a tourney and cost someone 50k, you have to take a hard look at your sport.

Ultra Peanut
10-17-2005, 07:10 AM
Agreed. Golf is ****ing stupid.

If they can't make sure officials are there to make sure every single thing is by the letter, then they shouldn't be disqualifying someone for being less than a foot off in their eyeball estimation.

Brock
10-17-2005, 07:22 AM
Craig Stadler got disqualified for kneeling on a towel. Turned me off of golf forever.

jidar
10-17-2005, 07:22 AM
That reporter is a shithead. No doubt.

That said, I find it hard to critisize Golf for this sort of thing. One way to look at it is that they take the rules seriously enough to allow anyone to alert them of a rules infraction. It's shitty for people who get pinched later and can't go back and undo what has happened, but it does give a great incentive to every Golfer to play it as straight as possible.

In most other sports someone is always trying to put one over on the officials or cheat the system somehow, golf doesn't really have that problem so they must be doing something right.

Ultra Peanut
10-17-2005, 07:24 AM
Yeah... golf just retroactively punishes people for doing something they didn't know was wrong in the first place. GO GOLF!

Ari Chi3fs
10-17-2005, 07:27 AM
I dont even like golf, but this guy sounds like a total cockhead... a real goatfelching assclown.

jspchief
10-17-2005, 07:28 AM
So if Wie had taken the time to get out her tape measure and determine for herself if the ball was actually closer to the hole, how many stroke penalty would she have received for slow play?


The notion that those 11 inches actually affected the outcome, and the idea that she's somehow supposed to recognize an 11 inch discrepency from hundreds of feet away is absurd.

donkhater
10-17-2005, 07:29 AM
Yeah... golf just retroactively punishes people for doing something they didn't know was wrong in the first place. GO GOLF!
Michelle Wie is a professional glofer.

I, donkhater, being at best a 16 handicap, know that a free drop cannot be closer to the hole.

Michelle Wie disqualified herself. It was a VERY amatuerish mistake on her part.

SCChief
10-17-2005, 07:36 AM
So if Wie had taken the time to get out her tape measure and determine for herself if the ball was actually closer to the hole, how many stroke penalty would she have received for slow play?


The notion that those 11 inches actually affected the outcome, and the idea that she's somehow supposed to recognize an 11 inch discrepency from hundreds of feet away is absurd.

Exactly. I have great depth perception, but a little ball from hundreds of feet away?

Ultra Peanut
10-17-2005, 07:38 AM
I, donkhater, being at best a 16 handicap, know that a free drop cannot be closer to the hole.
If she had known it was closer to the hole by that imperceptibly small amount, she wouldn't have ****ing dropped it there.

jspchief
10-17-2005, 07:38 AM
"I learned a great lesson," Wie said. "From now on, I'll call a rules official no matter where it is, whether its 3 inches or 100 yards. I respect that."
That should be great for Pro golf. Maybe they can drag out these tournaments by having everyone getting out their tape measures to make sure they don't lose a bunch of money for not being able to spot an 11 inch discrepency. Should make for entertaining television.

Ultra Peanut
10-17-2005, 07:39 AM
That should be great for Pro golf. Maybe they can drag out these tournaments by having everyone getting out their tape measures to make sure they don't lose a bunch of money for not being able to spot an 11 inch discrepency. Should make for entertaining television.On the bright side, it's not like it can get any less entertaining.

Amnorix
10-17-2005, 08:48 AM
As someone famous (can't recall who) once said: Golf is a good walk spoiled.

Amnorix
10-17-2005, 08:49 AM
On the bright side, it's not like it can get any less entertaining.

Good point, that.

Cochise
10-17-2005, 08:49 AM
As someone famous (can't recall who) once said: Golf is a good walk spoiled.

Mark Twain.

As for this story, so what? She broke a rule and got DQ'd. Happens all the time doesn't it?

philfree
10-17-2005, 09:59 AM
I think they need to make a new rule for this kind of BS. The rule should state that people who aren't a PGA or LPGA official or a competitor in the event should not have any bearing on what happens. It should be up to the officials or one's playing partners to decide what is correct and what is not. If all the players in the group said that's fine Weezy then it should be fine or if an official says that's fine it should fine. Reporters or spectators should have no bearing on the outcome and people who watch on TV and call in shouldn't either.

After so much time had passed I have a hard time believing that they could accuractely measure the distances from where the ball lay in the bush and where it was dropped. And where hell was the LPGA officials at? Somebody really messed up but it wasn't Weezy!

PhilFree:arrow:

Thig Lyfe
10-17-2005, 10:12 AM
What a jerkhead.

Rain Man
10-17-2005, 10:12 AM
Is Michelle Wie the next Romanowski?

redhed
10-17-2005, 10:29 AM
The reporter is a real choadchoker, but rules is rules. Poor wittle Wie will have to get her 50 grrr (pocket change) a little later. The lesson hath been learned, expensively so.

DanT
10-17-2005, 10:38 AM
Here's an AP story on the event. I have no problem whatsoever with this ruling. It's not difficult to execute a drop so that the ball is further away than the original lie. If you're not sure, you can drop it again or get an official to make a ruling at the time. Michelle Wie made a mistake while playing a sport that takes its rules and the spirit of honor that infuses those rules very seriously.

She's got a great future ahead of her. The impact she makes on the game should arise from her excellence, not from an unnecessary change to Golf's longstanding rules in order to accommodate sloppy technique.

http://sports.yahoo.com/golf/pga/news?slug=ap-samsungchampionship&prov=ap&type=lgns

A big win by Sorenstam gets lost by Wie DQ

By DOUG FERGUSON, AP Golf Writer
October 17, 2005

AP - Oct 16, 9:54 pm EDT



PALM DESERT, Calif. (AP) -- Michelle Wie walked off the 18th green with her head held high. It wasn't her best golf, but it was good enough for fourth place -- a respectable way to start her professional career.

Nearly two hours later, with a stunned look on her face and the tears still not dry, she tried to explain a bizarre sequence of events that made her debut memorable for all the wrong reasons.

Wie thought she would be cashing her first check. Instead, she was embroiled in a rules dispute that got her disqualified Sunday in the Samsung World Championship.

``I'm pretty sad, but, you know, I think I'm going to get over it,'' Wie said. ``I learned a lot from it. It's obviously not the way I wanted to begin, but it's all right.''

Everything went all wrong when she finished with a 2-over 74, leaving her 10 shots behind Annika Sorenstam.

Sorenstam, as dominant as she has been all year, responded to all the hype around the 16-year-old phenom from Hawaii by turning a four-shot lead into nine shots at the turn, building it as large as 10 shots and then closing with a double bogey from the desert for a 3-under 69.

Wie's troubles stemmed from the day before, when she took a drop from a Gold Lantana bush to the left of the par-5 seventh green, took a penalty drop for an unplayable lie, and escaped with a par.


Two rules officials escorted her to the seventh green after her final round Sunday, and she was asked to show where the ball disappeared into the bush, and where she took her drop.

They determined it was too close to the hole -- 3 inches too close according to Wie, about a foot according to the rules officials. That's a two-shot penalty, so she should have added two strokes to her third-round 71.

Ultimately, she was disqualified for signing an incorrect card, which cost her $53,126 in prize money.

``I learned a great lesson,'' Wie said. ``From now on, I'll call a rules official no matter where it is, whether it's 3 inches or 100 yards. I respect that.''

Michael Bamberger, a reporter for Sports Illustrated, told tour officials Sunday afternoon that he was concerned about the drop. Rules officials Jim Haley and Robert O. Smith reviewed tape from NBC Sports before taking Wie and caddie Greg Johnston to the seventh green after the tournament ended Sunday.

``If I had to make the ruling based on the videotape, to me it was inconclusive,'' Smith said.

He had Johnston and Wie show him where the ball was in the bushes, then where they dropped. They paced it off, then used string to measure the distance and determined it to be slightly closer.

``The Rules of Golf are based on facts,'' Smith said. ``They had to tell us where it was. The fact was, the ball was closer to the hole by 12 to 15 inches.''


Bamberger was on the seventh hole Saturday when Wie took her drop, then paced off the distance from the hole after Wie, in the final group that day, went to the eighth tee. He asked her after the third round how she determined where to drop the ball, and Wie said she used ``the triangle thing to make sure that you're not closer.''

Even after her disqualification, she felt she did nothing wrong.

``I was honest out there,'' she said. ``I did what I thought was right. I was pretty confident. If I did it again, I'd still do that. It looked right to me. But I learned my lesson.''

Johnston, who has spent the last 12 years caddying for Juli Inkster, got into a heated discussion with Bamberger as Wie and her family left Bighorn in a steady rain.

Johnston was bothered that Bamberger, who was at the seventh green when Wie took the drop, waited a day before raising it with tour officials. Had she been notified Saturday before signing her card, she wouldn't have been disqualified.

Bamberger said he paced it off after Wie, playing in the final group Saturday, finished the hole.

``I did it in crude way -- `Let's see what she has to say.' I was hopeful she could convince me,'' in the Saturday interview, Bamberger said. ``I thought about it more and was just uncomfortable that I knew something. Integrity is at the heart of the game. I don't think she cheated. I think she was just hasty.''

Asked why he didn't bring it up before the third round ended, Bamberger said, ``That didn't occur to me. I was still in my reporter's mode. I wanted to talk to her first.''

The DQ stole all the attention from Sorenstam's impressive victory.

It was announced about an hour after the 35-year-old Swede left Bighorn with the trophy, satisfied with her eighth victory of the year, especially since it happened amid enormous hype surrounding Wie's pro debut.

Sorenstam cares more about winning than sending emphatic statements, yet managed to do both Sunday.

``It's obviously very satisfying,'' Sorenstam said. ``It's a big week for many reasons.''

Asked about those reasons, she talked about joining Mickey Wright as the only players to win the same tournament five times since the LPGA Tour began in 1950 and clinching the money title.

But there was more.

``I want to play well when everyone is talking about someone else,'' she said. ``I'm very competitive.''

She started with a four-shot lead over Gloria Park, built her lead to nine shots at the turn and led by as many as 10 shots until hitting into the desert and making double bogey on the last hole for a 3-under 69.

Even that became a mess.

The LPGA Tour posted her score as a 68 with a bogey on the last hole, and no one knew she made double bogey until her press conference. The volunteer keeping score didn't realize Sorenstam took a penalty shot for an unplayable lie, and while Sorenstam signed for the right score, it wasn't verified because the rules officials were busy with Wie.

Sorenstam finished at 18-under 270 to finish eight shots ahead of 19-year-old rookie Paula Creamer, and earn $212,500, pushing her over $2 million for the fifth straight season.

Creamer, whose two victories this year include a seven-shot win in France, holed a wedge shot for eagle on the 12th hole and shot a 70 to finish second.

``I know what it feels like now to be just crushed,'' Creamer said. ``Annika was probably just sending a statement to the world saying, `I'm still here. I'm still the best player.'''

But it still wasn't enough to be in the spotlight.

Updated on Monday, Oct 17, 2005 4:38 am EDT

kepp
10-17-2005, 10:38 AM
I suppose that, since she did break a rule, the DQ was justified. But the way it happened and the timing was pretty stupid. It sounds to me like this reporter had a friend or aquaintence that finished one spot out of the $$ or something and then felt it was his "duty" to bring up the infraction. Of course, that's probably reading WAY too far into it.

Simplex3
10-17-2005, 10:43 AM
If I ever become a professional athlete, own a team, whatever, I'm not letting anyone from SI anywhere near me or my team. No photoss, no interviews, no nothing.

SCChief
10-17-2005, 10:48 AM
If I ever become a professional athlete, own a team, whatever, I'm not letting anyone from SI anywhere near me or my team. No photoss, no interviews, no nothing.

Wasn't Green the SI cover boy the week that we lost to the Bengals for our first loss of the season in '03?

siberian khatru
10-17-2005, 10:57 AM
I saw Jack Nicklaus do the exact same thing at a tourney in 1974. No one caught it then, but I'm blowing the whistle now. That fugger better cough up the $72,164 he won -- WITH INTEREST.

Frankie
10-17-2005, 11:20 AM
This type of stuff is why I hope Golf will go the way of Boxing in my lifetime. Not to mention it is f#@king boring to watch.

leviw
10-17-2005, 11:32 AM
What a jerkhead.

I think you are all going a little overboard with Bamberger, because, right now, nobody knows what happened. He's a reporter and he's doing his job. He saw Wie do what she did, which was clearly a rules violation.

Now, assuing he went by the book as a reporter, he went and asked Wie about the drop. If she doesn't comment on it or says she doesn't know, the next logical step is to go ask a rules official. The rules official then goes to the tape, sees Wie indeed broke the rules, and the officials follow up on the DQ, etc., then there is absolutley nothing wrong with what he did. He's doing his job in clarifying what happened what he saw and what the rules are.

What's the difference between this and a reporter having a belief that a coach/athlete is cheating, then doing the proper investigations and then reporting it? There is none.

If he questioned the officials about what he saw, he's perfectly innocent on all accounts. On the other hand, if he campaigned to officials for her disqualification, then he's an asshole.

beavis
10-17-2005, 11:44 AM
I heard she was on 'roids.

chiefqueen
10-17-2005, 11:47 AM
The reporter is a real choadchoker, but rules is rules. Poor wittle Wie will have to get her 50 grrr (pocket change) a little later. The lesson hath been learned, expensively so.

Under that logic ND should be declared the winner b/c Bush admits he tried to push Lienart in.

Also, if you look @ yesterday's fumble return for a TD very closely it does appear DJ tapped a Redskin on the back. I guess we'll have to forfiet the game after Shanahan sees the highlight & notifies the league office.

chiefqueen
10-17-2005, 11:52 AM
I think you are all going a little overboard with Bamberger, because, right now, nobody knows what happened. He's a reporter and he's doing his job. He saw Wie do what she did, which was clearly a rules violation.



Then why didn't he admit it immediately after it occurred so Michele could adjust her scorecard accordingly. She was not DQ'ed for an illegal drop but signing an incorrect scorecard.

leviw
10-17-2005, 11:57 AM
Then why didn't he admit it immediately after it occurred so Michele could adjust her scorecard accordingly. She was not DQ'ed for an illegal drop but signing an incorrect scorecard.

Probably the same reason a reporter wouldn't run out of the court and tell a referee that he saw Allen Iverson carrying the ball. From my perspective, he could have cared less whether Wie had her scorecard right or not. He was just trying to get all the facts right for his story, so he asked Wie, then he asked an official. Things just took off from there.

ChiefFripp
10-17-2005, 01:57 PM
She deserves it for playing golf.

Shag
10-17-2005, 02:46 PM
I think you are all going a little overboard with Bamberger, because, right now, nobody knows what happened. He's a reporter and he's doing his job. He saw Wie do what she did, which was clearly a rules violation.

Now, assuing he went by the book as a reporter, he went and asked Wie about the drop. If she doesn't comment on it or says she doesn't know, the next logical step is to go ask a rules official. The rules official then goes to the tape, sees Wie indeed broke the rules, and the officials follow up on the DQ, etc., then there is absolutley nothing wrong with what he did. He's doing his job in clarifying what happened what he saw and what the rules are.

What's the difference between this and a reporter having a belief that a coach/athlete is cheating, then doing the proper investigations and then reporting it? There is none.

If he questioned the officials about what he saw, he's perfectly innocent on all accounts. On the other hand, if he campaigned to officials for her disqualification, then he's an asshole.

His job is to be a rules official for golf? Odd.

Sounds to me like it's a reporter who wanted his name in the headlines. Convenient timing, considering how long he sat on it...

leviw
10-17-2005, 03:21 PM
His job is to be a rules official for golf? Odd.

Sounds to me like it's a reporter who wanted his name in the headlines. Convenient timing, considering how long he sat on it...

Did you read what I wrote??? He wasn't trying to be a rules official, he was trying to clarify what he saw. That's Journalism 101.

Pitt Gorilla
10-17-2005, 03:40 PM
I saw Jack Nicklaus do the exact same thing at a tourney in 1974. No one caught it then, but I'm blowing the whistle now. That fugger better cough up the $72,164 he won -- WITH INTEREST.
Give them a call. They'll have to drag Jack out there and measure stuff. I mean, if they give this clownpuncher credibility, they'll have to believe you.

Rain Man
10-17-2005, 03:57 PM
This type of stuff is why I hope Golf will go the way of Boxing in my lifetime. Not to mention it is f#@king boring to watch.


It'd be interesting to see Wie try to bite off Sorenstam's ear.

chiefqueen
10-17-2005, 04:37 PM
I think you are all going a little overboard with Bamberger, because, right now, nobody knows what happened. He's a reporter and he's doing his job. He saw Wie do what she did, which was clearly a rules violation.

Now, assuing he went by the book as a reporter, he went and asked Wie about the drop. If she doesn't comment on it or says she doesn't know, the next logical step is to go ask a rules official. The rules official then goes to the tape, sees Wie indeed broke the rules, and the officials follow up on the DQ, etc., then there is absolutley nothing wrong with what he did. He's doing his job in clarifying what happened what he saw and what the rules are.

What's the difference between this and a reporter having a belief that a coach/athlete is cheating, then doing the proper investigations and then reporting it? There is none.

If he questioned the officials about what he saw, he's perfectly innocent on all accounts. On the other hand, if he campaigned to officials for her disqualification, then he's an asshole.

One problem with your logic.........what was his motive in staying silent 24 hours. Why not tell immediately, allow her to add the penalty (1 or 2 strokes), and be in good standing on Sun?

leviw
10-17-2005, 06:04 PM
One problem with your logic.........what was his motive in staying silent 24 hours. Why not tell immediately, allow her to add the penalty (1 or 2 strokes), and be in good standing on Sun?

Why should he have? He's a reporter. It's not his job to make sure she's doing it by the rule book. It's his job to get the facts straight and the rules straight. And with her being a professional right in the middle of competition, it's not like he can walk up to her and be like "I don't think that's right."

Plain and simple: If anyone is to blame here, it's Wie for not abiding by a rule that any weekend hacker knows. Brandenberg was just doing his job.

alnorth
10-17-2005, 06:21 PM
Why should he have? He's a reporter. It's not his job to make sure she's doing it by the rule book. It's his job to get the facts straight and the rules straight. And with her being a professional right in the middle of competition, it's not like he can walk up to her and be like "I don't think that's right."

Plain and simple: If anyone is to blame here, it's Wie for not abiding by a rule that any weekend hacker knows. Brandenberg was just doing his job.

If you think that its a coincidence that he just happened to talk to officials minutes after she signed her scorecard, I've got a bridge to sell ya.

The truth is, he saw a potential for a big sexy story if Wie gets disqualified. However, unless he waits over a day to mention it, then no one cares. So this asshole decided he would wait untill Wie signed her scorecard before approaching tourney officials in the hopes of seeing her disqualified for a nice headline story.

I understand Wie should have been more careful, I get that. I have no problem with reporters asking the tough questions, thats their job. I even dont have a problem with him approaching tourney officials about this. However, when he sits on this untill right after she entered the clubhouse in the hopes of creating a story to write, that treads into the realm of the unethical.

leviw
10-17-2005, 06:49 PM
If you think that its a coincidence that he just happened to talk to officials minutes after she signed her scorecard, I've got a bridge to sell ya.

The truth is, he saw a potential for a big sexy story if Wie gets disqualified. However, unless he waits over a day to mention it, then no one cares. So this asshole decided he would wait untill Wie signed her scorecard before approaching tourney officials in the hopes of seeing her disqualified for a nice headline story.

I understand Wie should have been more careful, I get that. I have no problem with reporters asking the tough questions, thats their job. I even dont have a problem with him approaching tourney officials about this. However, when he sits on this untill right after she entered the clubhouse in the hopes of creating a story to write, that treads into the realm of the unethical.

Why would any reporter want to draw attention to himself in a story HE is going to write? Sure, it would be a sexy story, but no sexier than a 16-year old girl finishing in the top five in her first tournament as a pro.

I guarentee you Bramberger is embarrassed as hell that as a reporter he was the source of a major story, and not the author of it. As far as creating the story, I'll bet you the same bridge you want to sell me that IF SI runs a story, Brandenberg is not the author.

headsnap
10-17-2005, 07:00 PM
I guarentee you Brandenberg is embarrassed as hell that as a reporter he was the source of a major story, and not the author of it. As far as creating the story, I'll bet you the same bridge you want to sell me that IF SI runs a story, Brandenberg is not the author.

I highly doubt that...

http://www.chiefsplanet.com/BB/showthread.php?t=126720



how about that bridge, I take cash up front...

Mr. Flopnuts
10-17-2005, 07:03 PM
Why would any reporter want to draw attention to himself in a story HE is going to write? Sure, it would be a sexy story, but no sexier than a 16-year old girl finishing in the top five in her first tournament as a pro.

I guarentee you Brandenberg is embarrassed as hell that as a reporter he was the source of a major story, and not the author of it. As far as creating the story, I'll bet you the same bridge you want to sell me that IF SI runs a story, Brandenberg is not the author.


Your logic is good. However why wouldn't this question come up Saturday night instead of Sunday after the event was over? Seems to me that if this was truly just investigative reporting it would've happened BEFORE she came in 4th place in the tourney. I think some good investigative reporting would be to look into the relationship that guy may have with the golfers involved. I smell a rat.

leviw
10-17-2005, 07:10 PM
Your logic is good. However why wouldn't this question come up Saturday night instead of Sunday after the event was over? Seems to me that if this was truly just investigative reporting it would've happened BEFORE she came in 4th place in the tourney. I think some good investigative reporting would be to look into the relationship that guy may have with the golfers involved. I smell a rat.

Here's his quote:

"I did it in crude way _ 'Let's see what she has to say.' I was hopeful she could convince me," in the Saturday interview, Bamberger said. "I thought about it more and was just uncomfortable that I knew something. Integrity is at the heart of the game. I don't think she cheated. I think she was just hasty."

Asked why he didn't bring it up before the third round ended, Bamberger said, "That didn't occur to me. I was still in my reporter's mode. I wanted to talk to her first."

I feel bad for the guy. His rep is blemished forever for trying to do the right thing.

Ultra Peanut
10-18-2005, 01:29 AM
It's not his job to make sure she's doing it by the rule book.It's not his job to MAKE stories, either.

I feel bad for the guy. His rep is blemished forever for trying to do the right thing.Boo hoo. It's SUCH a noble profession. :rolleyes:

Miles
10-18-2005, 01:46 AM
Its not that big of a deal. Guess its a bit annoying how it happened but the rules are typically enforced more stringently in golf than any other sport. Basically the game has a history about being really strict with the rules.

While its a pretty damn minor thing she did, her or her caddy should have noticed it. If anything i would figure most golfers would be overly cautious and drop it a bit further back anyways.

leviw
10-18-2005, 10:56 AM
I highly doubt that...

http://www.chiefsplanet.com/BB/showthread.php?t=126720


For your next trick, you should compare apples and oranges.

leviw
10-18-2005, 10:59 AM
It's not his job to MAKE stories, either.

Boo hoo. It's SUCH a noble profession. :rolleyes:

He wasn't making a story. He was writing a story and checking the rules.

I take it you don't read the sports pages, don't watch ESPN and put the TV on mute when watching sports.

Ultra Peanut
10-18-2005, 11:32 AM
I take it you don't read the sports pages, don't watch ESPN and put the TV on mute when watching sports.I very rarely read the sports pages, I only watch ESPN if there's a game or the rare feature I'm interested in, and I tune out most announcers as best I can, leaving it on only because I want to hear the other noise associated with a game.

Even if I didn't, however, your argument that I must not pay attention to them if I look down upon them is far from a sound one.

Sports "journalists" are, by and large, assclowns. That's why I appreciate the ones who actually represent the profession well, like Grant Wahl and Mike DeCourcy, and look down upon the hordes of aforementioned shameless assclowns.

leviw
10-18-2005, 01:35 PM
I very rarely read the sports pages, I only watch ESPN if there's a game or the rare feature I'm interested in, and I tune out most announcers as best I can, leaving it on only because I want to hear the other noise associated with a game.

Even if I didn't, however, your argument that I must not pay attention to them if I look down upon them is far from a sound one.

Sports "journalists" are, by and large, assclowns. That's why I appreciate the ones who actually represent the profession well, like Grant Wahl and Mike DeCourcy, and look down upon the hordes of aforementioned shameless assclowns.

It's nice that you can bring down a whole profession with two sentences and not use either one of them to back up the "shameless assclown" claim. However, you seem to be at the pinnacle of knowledge regarding sports "journalists," so I'd love to hear/read your insight. Please share.

Ultra Peanut
10-18-2005, 01:44 PM
Good God, are you his MOTHER?

KChiefsQT
10-18-2005, 01:53 PM
She should've known better.

leviw
10-18-2005, 02:14 PM
Good God, are you his MOTHER?

You lose. I win.

Ultra Peanut
10-18-2005, 02:19 PM
You lose. I win.No.

YOU lose! I win!

leviw
10-18-2005, 02:21 PM
No.

YOU lose! I win!

Call it a draw?

Ultra Peanut
10-18-2005, 02:22 PM
Call it a draw?THERE CAN BE ONLY NONE!

http://bushchickenfries.ytmnd.com/

siberian khatru
10-18-2005, 02:23 PM
You're both loosers.*

:p








* ChiefsPlanet spelling

leviw
10-18-2005, 02:27 PM
You're both loosers.*

:p








* ChiefsPlanet spelling

Does that make you a tighter?

Ultra Peanut
10-18-2005, 02:29 PM
LEEEEEEEEEEVI! (http://iwillrapeyou.ytmnsfw.com/)

leviw
10-18-2005, 02:36 PM
LEEEEEEEEEEVI! (http://iwillrapeyou.ytmnsfw.com/)

I'm not sure how that's supposed to make me feel.

leviw
10-19-2005, 08:49 PM
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2005/golf/10/19/bamberger.qandq/index.html

Ok, I was content to let this thread die, but thought I'd post this so you can read what Bamberger had to say for himself.

After reading it, I have mixed opinions about it. I think he had the best of intentions when he did what he did, but I honestly don't think it would have kept him awake every night the rest of his life if he would have simply let it pass. Especially since Wie wasn't anywhere close to winning this thing.

If he was truly on the verge of an emotional breakdown and he HAD to tell somebody, then he went about it the right way (calling his editor, reviewing the tape, talking to an official to check the facts). But it sure would have been a lot easier to let it go without a word spoken or written. I'm sure he would have lived happily ever after. So would have Michelle.

Judge for yourself.