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cdcox
10-25-2005, 12:10 AM
I'm reading this very cool book, America's Game by Michael McCambridge. It basically chronicals the on-and-off-field history of the NFL from post WWII to the present.

I'm going to post a tidbit per day. If you end up deciding to read the book, stop reading this thread, cause it will take away a good bit of the fun. I'm not going to cover the real innovations and trends, just the trivia:

Factoid #1: During the early '40s officials wore color coded shirts:
referees: black and white
umpires: red and white
linesman: orange and white
field judge: green and white

Rain Man
10-25-2005, 12:29 AM
Cool. This ought to be good.

Saggysack
10-25-2005, 12:30 AM
I never knew that.

Douche Baggins
10-25-2005, 12:32 AM
A good read? 552 pages is certainly attractive.

cdcox
10-25-2005, 12:46 AM
A good read? 552 pages is certainly attractive.

If you like reading about the history of sports it's compelling.

Page count = 449
+ epilogue
+ afterword
+ acknowledgements
+source notes
+bibliographic essay
+ index
= 558 pages. ROFL

Douche Baggins
10-25-2005, 12:53 AM
I'll give it a try. Found it on Ebay for 9 bucks.

ENDelt260
10-25-2005, 01:03 AM
I bet Skip knew that.

Boise_Chief
10-25-2005, 02:14 AM
Skip remembers when the refs wore fur and bronco fans threw bones.

Buster's Dad
10-25-2005, 05:32 AM
Skip remembers when the refs wore fur and bronco fans threw bones.


No sirre bob, the dinosaurers had not started to dump thier turds in the mountains,hence no bronco fans.but the furs were color coded. I answered for Skip cause Iam older and wiser :clap: :clap:

stevieray
10-25-2005, 07:45 AM
linesman wore ORANGE?

well there you go.

cdcox
10-26-2005, 07:10 AM
Tidbit #2 in honor of the late Wellington Mara:

In the mid-50's Vince Lombardi was the OC (before the title existed) for the Giants (Tom Landry was the DC). Wellington Mara, son of owner Tim Mara, would sit in the press box taking Polaroids of the defensive alignments during a game. He would lower them to the field by a string tied to a rock-weighted sock with the Polaroids inside.

Skip Towne
10-26-2005, 07:14 AM
I remember when penalty flags were red.

Saulbadguy
10-26-2005, 07:15 AM
linesman wore ORANGE?

well there you go.
ROFL

Skip Towne
10-26-2005, 07:16 AM
No sirre bob, the dinosaurers had not started to dump thier turds in the mountains,hence no bronco fans.but the furs were color coded. I answered for Skip cause Iam older and wiser :clap: :clap:
You're retardeder.

Braincase
10-26-2005, 08:04 AM
Factoid #1: During the early '40s officials wore color coded shirts:
referees: black and white
umpires: red and white
linesman: orange and white
field judge: green and white

Pixie Stix!

journeyscarab
10-26-2005, 09:16 AM
Tidbit #2 in honor of the late Wellington Mara:

In the mid-50's Vince Lombardi was the OC (before the title existed) for the Giants (Tom Landry was the DC). Wellington Mara, son of owner Tim Mara, would sit in the press box taking Polaroids of the defensive alignments during a game. He would lower them to the field by a string tied to a rock-weighted sock with the Polaroids inside.

Interesting. Keep 'em coming. :thumb:

milkman
10-26-2005, 09:19 AM
Tidbit #2 in honor of the late Wellington Mara:

In the mid-50's Vince Lombardi was the OC (before the title existed) for the Giants (Tom Landry was the DC). Wellington Mara, son of owner Tim Mara, would sit in the press box taking Polaroids of the defensive alignments during a game. He would lower them to the field by a string tied to a rock-weighted sock with the Polaroids inside.

I remember reading this little tidbit years ago in the paper after Lombardi's death.

cdcox
10-27-2005, 07:30 AM
Tidbit #3: During WWII 638 NFL players served in the armed forces. Some teams had trouble fielding a full team. In 1943 the Steelers and Philadelphia merged for a single seaon, and called them selves the Steagles. A year later, Philly fielded its own team, so Pittsburgh merged with the Chicago Cards. Shown in the standings as "Card.-Pitt", they quickly became known as the Carpets.

cdcox
10-28-2005, 05:49 AM
Tidbid #4: In 1948, Los Angeles Ram's tailback and former art student Fred Gehrke came up with the idea of painting the now-familiar spiral horn logo on their helments. He hand-painted the original ones in his garage, for which the Ram's paid him $1 a piece.

Amnorix
10-28-2005, 06:31 AM
Tidbit #3: During WWII 638 NFL players served in the armed forces. Some teams had trouble fielding a full team. In 1943 the Steelers and Philadelphia merged for a single seaon, and called them selves the Steagles. A year later, Philly fielded its own team, so Pittsburgh merged with the Chicago Cards. Shown in the standings as "Card.-Pitt", they quickly became known as the Carpets.

I knew about the Steagles, but I didn't know about the Carpets. ROFL

Skip Towne
10-28-2005, 07:24 AM
The Steelers were once so low budget they could only afford decals for one side of their helmets. They have only one decal to this day.

Douche Baggins
10-28-2005, 05:16 PM
The book is in the mail.

SLAG
10-30-2005, 01:48 AM
Im Waiting for todays NFL insight

onescrewleftuntwisted
10-30-2005, 02:15 AM
sounds complicatied, how do you get your reffers: black and white


oh yeah this was brought to you bye another achochle induced morning

Marco Polo
10-30-2005, 08:24 AM
Give me more tidbits!

Rain Man
10-30-2005, 11:01 AM
Tidbits! More tidbits!

http://www.sitnews.us/PhotoGallery/MatthewDraper/052404_birds_ft.jpg

cdcox
10-31-2005, 05:52 AM
Tidbit #5: During the overtime triumph of the Colts over the Giants in the classic 1958 title game, television screens of 45M fans went blank in the middle of the game winning drive due to an unplugged cable. As the game played on, it was briefly delayed as three of NYC’s finest chased down and handcuffed a drunken fan who charged onto the field. Soon after the delay in the on the field action, the unplugged cable was repaired just in time for the nation to see the final two plays of Unitas’ decisive touchdown drive in the NFL’s first ever overtime game. Only years later was it revealed that the “drunken fan” who provided the timely delay was in fact NBC business manager Stan Rotkiewicz.

Dartgod
10-31-2005, 07:02 AM
Tidbit #5: During the overtime triumph of the Colts over the Giants in the classic 1958 title game, television screens of 45M fans went blank in the middle of the game winning drive due to an unplugged cable. As the game played on, it was briefly delayed as three of NYC’s finest chased down and handcuffed a drunken fan who charged onto the field. Soon after the delay in the on the field action, the unplugged cable was repaired just in time for the nation to see the final two plays of Unitas’ decisive touchdown drive in the NFL’s first ever overtime game. Only years later was it revealed that the “drunken fan” who provided the timely delay was in fact NBC business manager Stan Rotkiewicz.
And thus, the "TV timeout" was born.

Douche Baggins
10-31-2005, 03:48 PM
I got the book today. I may contribute to the thread.

cdcox
11-01-2005, 06:11 AM
Tidbit #6: In the second half of the 1940's an upstart leage, the All-American Football League was formed. (Trivia: name the 3 present NFL teams that came from that league). Paul Brown had too many good players for his 33 man roster. Rather than let them go to other NFL teams, he formed a secret plan with the owner McBride, who also owned the Zone/Yellow taxi cab company in Cleveland. Players that were cut landed jobs as taxi drivers, with there schedules kept free during practice time. Hence the taxi squad, the forerunner of today's practice sqad.

Calcountry
11-01-2005, 10:27 AM
I remember when penalty flags were red."I like the Wizard of Oz."

Calcountry
11-01-2005, 10:28 AM
"I like the Wizard of Oz.""I like the Tin Man".

chefsos
11-01-2005, 10:50 AM
Tidbit #6: In the second half of the 1940's an upstart leage, the All-American Football League was formed. (Trivia: name the 3 present NFL teams that came from that league). Paul Brown had too many good players for his 33 man roster. Rather than let them go to other NFL teams, he formed a secret plan with the owner McBride, who also owned the Zone/Yellow taxi cab company in Cleveland. Players that were cut landed jobs as taxi drivers, with there schedules kept free during practice time. Hence the taxi squad, the forerunner of today's practice sqad.

Off the top of my head, Browns and Niners and....Rams? (Wow, thinking about this, I realized the entire NFC South is comprised of expansion teams.)

cdcox
11-01-2005, 11:22 AM
Off the top of my head, Browns and Niners and....Rams? (Wow, thinking about this, I realized the entire NFC South is comprised of expansion teams.)

Browns (obviously) and 49'ers are correct! Rams were not an AAFC team, but it was a good guess. Anyone know (or guess) who was the third AAFC team to be incorporated into the NFL?

Since you brought it up, here is the story on the Rams (Tidbit #8). They were the Cleveland Rams, but even though they won the league championship in '45 they lost a good bit of money. The next year the Cleveland Browns of the AAFC would be competing for fans and they were putting together a first class operation with Paul Brown as coach. The Rams owner Dan Reeves (no not that Dan Reeves) wanted to move the team to LA any way. They finally got the go ahead from the NFL in the AAFC's first year. At the time, there were no MLB teams on the west coast so the NFL became America's first truely national (coast-to-coast) sports league. Incidently, the Rams and Browns were the first teams to sign African American players to the roster in '46, several months before Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in MLB. (Actually many NFL teams were integrated for a period in the '20s).

Garcia Bronco
11-01-2005, 11:34 AM
Skip remembers when the refs wore fur and bronco fans threw bones.

Man...those bones were awesome

cdcox
11-11-2005, 10:47 AM
Off the top of my head, Browns and Niners and....Rams? (Wow, thinking about this, I realized the entire NFC South is comprised of expansion teams.)

Wrapping this up, the third team to make the migration from the AAFL to the NFL was the Baltimore Colts.

I got some time to pick up the book again this week and came across a whole bunch more good stuff:

Tidbit #9: The original team name announced by the owner of Oakland franchise was the Señors. He changed it to the Raiders after about 30 days of public ridicule.

cdcox
12-06-2005, 02:48 PM
Tidbit #10: The extreme cold of the famous 1967 NFL championship game between the Packers and Cowboys yielded a couple of interesting tidbits. Cowboys' RB Dan Reeves (later to be the Broncos and Falcons head coach) had his facemask broken on a vicious hit. He also bit his lip on the play, causeing some bruising to his face. Several minutes later, as he was standing by a heater, blood poured from the wound onto his jersey.

The famous shot of Jerry Kramer blocking Jethro Pugh to spring Starr's immortal QB sneak for the winning score almost didn't happen. Everyone thought that on 3rd down with :16 left that the Packers would try a roll-out pass to allow for a game-tieing FG on an incomplete pass. The camera in question was supposed to follow the WR on the play, but couldn't move because it was frozen to its tripod, thereby capturing the golden moment forever.

Dartgod
12-06-2005, 03:22 PM
Tidbit #9: The original team name announced by the owner of Oakland franchise was the Señors. He changed it to the Raiders after about 30 days of public ridicule.
Followed by more than 30 years of the same...