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Rain Man
11-01-2005, 06:45 PM
Interesting song. I wonder why he chose to write a shipwreck song about a freighter on the Great Lakes that was transporting a load of steel to Cleveland. It's a great song, but I would think that there are more sexy shipwrecks out there.


The legend lives on from the Chippewa on down
Of the big lake they call Gitche Gumee
The lake, it is said, never gives up her dead
When the skies of November turn gloomy.

With a load of iron ore - 26,000 tons more
Than the Edmund Fitzgerald weighed empty
That good ship and true was a bone to be chewed
When the gales of November came early

The ship was the pride of the American side
Coming back from some mill in Wisconson
As the big freighters go it was bigger than most
With a crew and the Captain well seasoned.

Concluding some terms with a couple of steel firms
When they left fully loaded for Cleveland
And later that night when the ships bell rang
Could it be the North Wind they'd been feeling.

The wind in the wires made a tattletale sound
And a wave broke over the railing
And every man knew, as the Captain did, too,
T'was the witch of November come stealing.

The dawn came late and the breakfast had to wait
When the gales of November came slashing
When afternoon came it was freezing rain
In the face of a hurricane West Wind

When supper time came the old cook came on deck
Saying fellows it's too rough to feed ya
At 7PM a main hatchway caved in
He said fellas it's been good to know ya.

The Captain wired in he had water coming in
And the good ship and crew was in peril
And later that night when his lights went out of sight
Came the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald.

Does anyone know where the love of God goes
When the words turn the minutes to hours
The searchers all say they'd have made Whitefish Bay
If they'd fifteen more miles behind her.

They might have split up or they might have capsized
They may have broke deep and took water
And all that remains is the faces and the names
Of the wives and the sons and the daughters.

Lake Huron rolls, Superior sings
In the ruins of her ice water mansion
Old Michigan steams like a young man's dreams,
The islands and bays are for sportsmen.

And farther below Lake Ontario
Takes in what Lake Erie can send her
And the iron boats go as the mariners all know
With the gales of November remembered.

In a musty old hall in Detroit they prayed
In the Maritime Sailors' Cathedral
The church bell chimed, 'til it rang 29 times
For each man on the Edmund Fitzgerald.

The legend lives on from the Chippewa on down
Of the big lake they call Gitche Gumee
Superior, they say, never gives up her dead
When the gales of November come early.

tk13
11-01-2005, 06:47 PM
I like it. I can't wait to hear SNR chime in though.

siberian khatru
11-01-2005, 06:49 PM
It's the mystery behind it. They still don't know what happened.

Plus, the fact that it happened on a lake -- albeit a really big lake -- made it more unusual; you expect ships to be swamped by oceans.

Finally, it's by a Canadian folk singer, and folk songs often seem to be inspired by smaller events. I think they appear more accessible. The sinking of the Titanic is too vast to get a good folk song around; you need Celine Dion to tackle it.

siberian khatru
11-01-2005, 06:50 PM
Oh, this is a poll. Neat. It's WAY COOL. One of my all-time favorite songs. Loved it the minute it came out, when I was a kid.

Watched a cable documentary on the sinking a few years ago. Fascinating stuff. There's some good websites on it too.

Cochise
11-01-2005, 06:51 PM
The sinking of the Titanic is too vast to get a good folk song around; you need Celine Dion to tackle it.

I would rather she tried to tackle a grizzly bear.

Rain Man
11-01-2005, 06:53 PM
I like it. I can't wait to hear SNR chime in though.

Why? Did he have a relative on board? Or perhaps a load of steel?

tk13
11-01-2005, 06:55 PM
Why? Did he have a relative on board? Or perhaps a load of steel?
I forget the exact reason, I just remember him a long time ago stating he was sick of the song... he had to listen to it or perform it or something... and it's my job to harrass SNR, so I had to say it.

Rain Man
11-01-2005, 06:55 PM
Oh, this is a poll. Neat. It's WAY COOL. One of my all-time favorite songs.

Me, too. It came on the radio as I was parking today, and I had to sit in the car and listen to the whole thing. It has a haunting quality about it that's quite unique.

DanT
11-01-2005, 06:56 PM
Here's a good newspaper story on it, complete with pictures of its launch and of its final resting place.

http://info.detnews.com/history/story/index.cfm?id=114&category=events

siberian khatru
11-01-2005, 06:59 PM
In a similar fashion (on a much smaller scale) is the story of the fishing boat in "The Perfect Storm."

WilliamTheIrish
11-01-2005, 07:03 PM
Hella song.

I agree with the haunting quality part.

chefsos
11-01-2005, 07:06 PM
Way cool. This is one of those weird little songs that always make me stop and listen.

The wind in the wires made a tattletale sound
And a wave broke over the railing
And every man knew, as the Captain did, too,
T'was the witch of November come stealing.

This part usually makes the hair on the back of my neck stand up. I'll think, now these guys know they're in deep trouble and all they can do is look at each other, because they're in it, and no one can help them or do anything about it.

cdcox
11-01-2005, 07:13 PM
Am I the only one who could never understand half the words? I agree its a good song, and better now that I know what he's saying.

CosmicPal
11-01-2005, 07:13 PM
Uhhhh, I've never heard of this song and I swear on my Blue Oyster Cult drumstick I've heard just about every damn song evah.

Speaking of which, I heard an ELO song on the satellite radio the other day and man oh man, I just can't get it out of my head.

4th and Long
11-01-2005, 07:26 PM
Uhhhh, I've never heard of this song and I swear on my Blue Oyster Cult drumstick I've heard just about every damn song evah.
Like ... wow.

Here, Cosmic. http://media.putfile.com/The-Wreck-OfTheEdmund-Fitzgerald

stevieray
11-01-2005, 07:27 PM
she ran calling wiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiildfire....


:deevee:

Rain Man
11-01-2005, 07:29 PM
Am I the only one who could never understand half the words? I agree its a good song, and better now that I know what he's saying.

Most songs are like that for me.

Edmund Fitzgerald may be tougher than average because I keep wanting to sing along with it, which means I never sit back and listen to the words.

CosmicPal
11-01-2005, 07:32 PM
Like ... wow.

Here, Cosmic. http://media.putfile.com/The-Wreck-OfTheEdmund-Fitzgerald

Wow....I love that music!

I think I have heard of it now, but damn, now that I REALLY listened to it for the first time- I love it already.

Thanks...

Rain Man
11-01-2005, 07:34 PM
Wow....I love that music!

I think I have heard of it now, but damn, now that I REALLY listened to it for the first time- I love it already.

Thanks...

Holy cripes. I thought you were joking. So where in Afghanistan are you from?

4th and Long
11-01-2005, 07:36 PM
Wow....I love that music!

I think I have heard of it now, but damn, now that I REALLY listened to it for the first time- I love it already.

Thanks...
You're welcome, bro. :thumb:

4th and Long
11-01-2005, 07:39 PM
http://www.knowyourships.com/pictures/edfitzbig.jpg

http://www.knowyourships.com/pictures/fitzbig.jpg

http://www.lakesuperior.com/online/225/225fitzport.jpg

http://www.jclary.com/fitz/02b-fitzwreck(7).jpg

shaneo69
11-01-2005, 07:53 PM
Didn't Costanza get screwed out of a great apartment by an Edmund Fitzgerald survivor?

Rain Man
11-01-2005, 07:56 PM
Didn't Costanza get screwed out of a great apartment by an Edmund Fitzgerald survivor?

I think that was the Andrea Doria.

chefsos
11-01-2005, 08:17 PM
she ran calling wiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiildfire....


:deevee:

Another great song.

She comes down from Yellow Mountain
On a dark, flat land she rides
On a pony she named Wildfire
With a whirlwind by her side
On a cold Nebraska night

Oh, they say she died one winter
When there came a killing frost
And the pony she named Wildfire
Busted down its stall
In a blizzard he was lost

She ran calling Wildfire [x3]
By the dark of the moon I planted
But there came an early snow
There's been a hoot-owl howling by my window now
For six nights in a row
She's coming for me, I know
And on Wildfire we're both gonna go

We'll be riding Wildfire [x3]

On Wildfire we're gonna ride
Gonna leave sodbustin' behind
Get these hard times right on out of our minds
Riding Wildfire

Rain Man
11-01-2005, 08:17 PM
Like ... wow.

Here, Cosmic. http://media.putfile.com/The-Wreck-OfTheEdmund-Fitzgerald

Awesome. How can I save the file to my hard drive?

shaneo69
11-01-2005, 08:17 PM
I think that was the Andrea Doria.

Ahh yes.

jspchief
11-01-2005, 08:22 PM
Great song.

My favorite verse:

When supper time came the old cook came on deck
Saying fellows it's too rough to feed ya
At 7PM a main hatchway caved in
He said fellas it's been good to know ya.

Gordon Lightfoot has some good stuff. Sundown is another excellent tune.

4th and Long
11-01-2005, 08:32 PM
Awesome. How can I save the file to my hard drive?
Check your PMs

patteeu
11-01-2005, 08:44 PM
Am I the only one who could never understand half the words? I agree its a good song, and better now that I know what he's saying.

Of course you couldn't, the guy is speaking Canadian.

patteeu
11-01-2005, 08:52 PM
Awesome song.

Amnorix
11-01-2005, 09:19 PM
Like ... wow.

Here, Cosmic. http://media.putfile.com/The-Wreck-OfTheEdmund-Fitzgerald

Hey thanks. Never heard the song in my life. LIke it quite a bit. I'll download it tomorrow.

I saw a great documentary ont he Edmund Fitzgerald -- one of those where they use computer graphics to show various things that could have happened. Very cool. I'd never heard the story of the Edmund Fitzgerald prior to seeing htis documentary (maybe a year or two ago). Fascinating stuff.

Halfcan
11-01-2005, 09:30 PM
Rain man was in time
with that special ryme

chefsos
11-01-2005, 10:01 PM
Hey thanks. Never heard the song in my life. LIke it quite a bit. I'll download it tomorrow.

I saw a great documentary ont he Edmund Fitzgerald -- one of those where they use computer graphics to show various things that could have happened. Very cool. I'd never heard the story of the Edmund Fitzgerald prior to seeing htis documentary (maybe a year or two ago). Fascinating stuff.

I saw a documentary on it, too. Don't know if it was the same one. But this was long after I knew the song, so I kinda knew how it was going to turn out. They would present a fact, and I would think to myself, yeah, I heard that in the song.

It would be interesting to see it the other way like you have now, facts first, tune later.

C-Mac
11-01-2005, 10:06 PM
When I hear this great old song I also it reminds of an old Manford Man song "Blinded By The Light".
I wonder if they were released close to the same time?

Nzoner
11-01-2005, 10:19 PM
it reminds of an old Manford Man song "Blinded By The Light".

Not to be a dick just thought you might like to know it's actually a Bruce Springsteen song,covered by Manfred Mann who took the song to #1

C-Mac
11-01-2005, 10:24 PM
Not to be a dick just thought you might like to know it's actually a Bruce Springsteen song,covered by Manfred Mann who took the song to #1

I knew that, but perhaps some others didnt know that bit of trivia.
:thumb:
I know my 70's

SNR
11-01-2005, 10:46 PM
I like it. I can't wait to hear SNR chime in though.*Ding*

Archie F. Swin
11-02-2005, 07:49 AM
When your name is Gordon Lightfoot you could sing a song about scraping overly toasted bread with a butterknife and it would be cool!

Iowanian
11-02-2005, 08:18 AM
*Ding*

[/Iowanian busts over cubicle from stage left, tackling a female coworker, knocking over a box of cupcakes to check that southwest fare to vegas...but the Burger King King beats him to the cubicle,while standing in the "gotta little captain in ya, pose]


*signs of annoyingly affective marketing campaigns.

Rain Man
11-02-2005, 08:19 AM
When your name is Gordon Lightfoot you could sing a song about scraping overly toasted bread with a butterknife and it would be cool!

The legend lives on from the cupboards on down
Of the toaster they call Kitschy Gumee
The slot, it is said, never gives up her dead
When the clouds of black smoke turn you gloomy.

With a load of sourdough - 26 slices more
Than the loaf would have weighed while empty
That good bread to view was a crust to be chewed
When the coils of the toaster glowed early

Archie F. Swin
11-02-2005, 08:47 AM
The legend lives on from the cupboards on down
Of the toaster they call Kitschy Gumee
The slot, it is said, never gives up her dead
When the clouds of black smoke turn you gloomy.

With a load of sourdough - 26 slices more
Than the loaf would have weighed while empty
That good bread to view was a crust to be chewed
When the coils of the toaster glowed early

and a legend is born

Mr. Rat Fink
11-02-2005, 08:50 AM
Thats a great song. But my GL favorites are still "Sundown" and "Carefree Highway."

Archie F. Swin
11-02-2005, 08:51 AM
Now that I think about it, Gordon Lightfoot could be the stage name of someone whom is teh ghey :hmmm:

Seek
11-02-2005, 08:55 AM
Uhhhh, I've never heard of this song and I swear on my Blue Oyster Cult drumstick I've heard just about every damn song evah.

Speaking of which, I heard an ELO song on the satellite radio the other day and man oh man, I just can't get it out of my head.

I have never heard of it either. So it must be a country song.

Area 51
11-02-2005, 09:01 AM
The legend lives on from the cupboards on down
Of the toaster they call Kitschy Gumee
The slot, it is said, never gives up her dead
When the clouds of black smoke turn you gloomy.

With a load of sourdough - 26 slices more
Than the loaf would have weighed while empty
That good bread to view was a crust to be chewed
When the coils of the toaster glowed early

Gordon, where ya been dude?

(It's not nice pimping your old songs here!!)

gblowfish
11-02-2005, 09:06 AM
I have a old band mate that does a thrash metal version of this song.
"All that remains are the faces and the names of the wives and the sons and the daughters.....AAAAAAAAAHHHH!!!!! (turned up to 11... Played ten times fast...)

bkkcoh
11-02-2005, 09:11 AM
Thats a great song. But my GL favorites are still "Sundown" and "Carefree Highway."



http://www.radioblogclub.com/search/0/edmund_

sorry for the round about way to get there, but ....


It was/is a great song.

DeepPurple
11-02-2005, 09:28 AM
When the decade of 1970 came about I turned 20, so 70's music is my generation of life. Those of you that remember television before cable, it was basically three channels and no remote, the same could be said about radio before FM. In those days, most AM radio stations played some form of top 40, some more pop than others, and there were a few so-called underground rock stations but for the most part it wasn't until FM took over in the mid to late 70's that the stations began to splinter into more defined styles. I can remember it was about 1974 at a friend's house in Tampa and he flipped on his amp and listening to a rock station on FM and was blown away.

If I remember right, Gordon Lightfoot became known in the late 60's early 70's during the days of AM radio, you could easily hear a top 40 station play a mix of say Black Sabbath, followed by Gordon Lightfoot followed by Billy Paul "Me and Mrs. Jones". "If you could read my Mind" and "Sundown" were both earlier hits of his that received a lot of airplay during that period, so when the "Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald" came along in the mid-70's, Rock and Top 40 FM radio added the song since he known. Plus during that time folk-rock was pretty standard fare on rock and top 40, Crosby Stills & Nash, Seals & Crofts, Arlo Guthrie, Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, James Taylor, even most of the Woodstock line-up was folk rock with a couple of exceptions.

siberian khatru
11-02-2005, 09:55 AM
The legend lives on from the cupboards on down
Of the toaster they call Kitschy Gumee
The slot, it is said, never gives up her dead
When the clouds of black smoke turn you gloomy.

With a load of sourdough - 26 slices more
Than the loaf would have weighed while empty
That good bread to view was a crust to be chewed
When the coils of the toaster glowed early

You missed your calling as the next Ben Folds.

Andoverer
11-02-2005, 10:24 AM
I loved that song. Last summer we went to Duluth Minnesota and there was a maritime museum on Lake Superier which contained a lot of information about the Edmund Fitzgerald. The song immediately pops into your mind while you're viewing this place.
It was a haunting tune.

bkkcoh
11-02-2005, 10:27 AM
I loved that song. Last summer we went to Duluth Minnesota and there was a maritime museum on Lake Superier which contained a lot of information about the Edmund Fitzgerald. The song immediately pops into your mind while you're viewing this place.
It was a haunting tune.

I got the same feeling when we were in Sault Ste Marie, Michigan. They definitely have pride in the mari-time history and the city is very pretty. Atleast for the 2 or 3 days of summer. We were there around the 4th of July and it was in the upper 40's... brrrr...

chagrin
11-02-2005, 10:35 AM
It's the mystery behind it. They still don't know what happened.

Plus, the fact that it happened on a lake -- albeit a really big lake -- made it more unusual; you expect ships to be swamped by oceans.

Finally, it's by a Canadian folk singer, and folk songs often seem to be inspired by smaller events. I think they appear more accessible. The sinking of the Titanic is too vast to get a good folk song around; you need Celine Dion to tackle it.


TLC did a thing on it, and the most likely scenario was that it was in an awkward position when a large wave hit it and simply snapped in half. The way it was presented (yeah believe it or not, I know) was very convincing, and the engineers they had working on it bought into it as well.


awesome tune btw

siberian khatru
11-02-2005, 10:40 AM
TLC did a thing on it, and the most likely scenario was that it was in an awkward position when a large wave hit it and simply snapped in half. The way it was presented (yeah believe it or not, I know) was very convincing, and the engineers they had working on it bought into it as well.


awesome tune btw

I'm pretty sure that was the documentary I saw. They illustrated several possible theories, then settled on that one.

Here's a good website offering (without endorsement) the most popular theories:

http://www.ssefo.com/

1. Bottoming out/grounding. This could have very well happened near Six Fathom Shoal.
2. Faulty hatch covers
3. Another theory, which is very disliked by many Fitz enthusiasts, is that the supposedly men did not fasten the series of clamps that were used to hold down all of the heavy taconite pellets, and therefore the cargo shifted.
4. Previous structural damage may have caused the sinking.
5. Huge waves swamped the ship and it sank. Many people call these huge waves (so big they are detected by radar) the Three Sisters.
6. Lack of proper repair from previous damage may have played a role
7. A huge wave rode up between two swells and the ship snapped in half.
8. Human error
9. A wave engulfed the ship, pushing the front of the ship underwater. The ship then hit ground, and broke in two...this may be why the two portions of the ship are so close.
10. Waves lifted both ends of the ship (bow and stern), but the center of the ship containing the cargo was not held by a wave, so the overload forced the center downward, sinking and/or breaking the ship in two.

chagrin
11-02-2005, 10:55 AM
I'm pretty sure that was the documentary I saw. They illustrated several possible theories, then settled on that one.

Here's a good website offering (without endorsement) the most popular theories:

http://www.ssefo.com/

1. Bottoming out/grounding. This could have very well happened near Six Fathom Shoal.
2. Faulty hatch covers
3. Another theory, which is very disliked by many Fitz enthusiasts, is that the supposedly men did not fasten the series of clamps that were used to hold down all of the heavy taconite pellets, and therefore the cargo shifted.
4. Previous structural damage may have caused the sinking.
5. Huge waves swamped the ship and it sank. Many people call these huge waves (so big they are detected by radar) the Three Sisters.
6. Lack of proper repair from previous damage may have played a role
7. A huge wave rode up between two swells and the ship snapped in half.
8. Human error
9. A wave engulfed the ship, pushing the front of the ship underwater. The ship then hit ground, and broke in two...this may be why the two portions of the ship are so close.
10. Waves lifted both ends of the ship (bow and stern), but the center of the ship containing the cargo was not held by a wave, so the overload forced the center downward, sinking and/or breaking the ship in two.


Far out dude, thanks - very cool!