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Matt Helm
01-17-2006, 03:37 PM
The elderly parking lot attendant wasn't in a good mood. Neither was Sam Bierstock. It was around 1 a.m., and Bierstock, a Delray Beach, Fla. , eye doctor, business consultant, corporate speaker and musician, was bone tired after appearing at an event.

He pulled up in his car, and the parking attendant began to speak. "I took two bullets for this country and look what I'm doing," he said bitterly.

At first, Bierstock didn't know what to say to the World War II veteran. But he rolled down his window and told the man, "Really, from the bottom of my heart, I want to thank you." Then the old soldier began to cry.

"That really got to me," Bierstock says.

Cut to today. Bierstock, 58, and John Melnick, 54, of Pompano Beach - a member of Bierstock's band, Dr. Sam and the Managed Care Band - have written a song inspired by that old soldier in the airport parking lot. The mournful "Before You Go" does more than salute those who fought in WWII. It encourages people to go out of their way to thank the aging warriors before they die.
"If we had lost that particular war, our whole way of life would have been shot," says Bierstock, who plays harmonica. "Every ethnic minority would be dead. And the soldiers are now dying at the rate of about 2,000 every day. I thought we needed to thank them."

The song is striking a chord. Within four days of Bierstock placing it on the Web www.beforeyougo.us (http://www.beforeyougo.us/) the song and accompanying photo essay have bounced around nine countries, producing tears and heartfelt thanks from veterans, their sons and daughters and grandchildren.

"It made me cry," wrote one veteran's son. Another sent an e-mail saying that only after his father consumed several glasses of wine would he discuss "the unspeakable horrors" he and other soldiers had witnessed in places such as Anzio, Iwo Jima, Bataan and Omaha Beach. "I can never thank them enough," the son wrote. "Thank you for thinking about them."

Bierstock and Melnick thought about shipping it off to a professional singer, maybe a Lee Greenwood type, but because time was running out for so many veterans, they decided it was best to release it quickly, for free, on the Web. They've sent the song to Sen. John McCain and others in Washington. Already they have been invited to perform it in Houston for a Veterans Day tribute - this after just a few days on the Web. They hope every veteran in America gets a chance to hear it.


www.beforeyougo.us (http://www.beforeyougo.us/)

Saulbadguy
01-17-2006, 03:41 PM
:rolleyes:

htismaqe
01-17-2006, 03:53 PM
Why don't you elaborate Saul?

Is there something wrong with the content of the thread?

Or are you reponding to the poster?

ChiTown
01-17-2006, 04:04 PM
Cool.

We can't thank our WWII vets enough.

Jenson71
01-17-2006, 04:07 PM
That's a horrible song. I guess it's the thought that counts though. Of course, they'd love to have you buy the CD.

Rain Man
01-17-2006, 04:13 PM
That's a horrible song. I guess it's the thought that counts though.

Nazi. You're not allowed to criticize stuff like this. These guys fought to protect our Freedom of Speech, and now you say stuff like that?

Valiant
01-17-2006, 06:20 PM
Man **** you pricks who would criticize a song about thanking veterans.. I do not care if you do not agree with wars or politics, Do not say shit about veterans who sacrificed life and limb for they fellow soldiers and country... Ignorant pricks...

And smart ass remark on the buying the cd, you can get if for free online you dipshit...

Bob Dole
01-17-2006, 06:27 PM
Man **** you pricks who would criticize a song about thanking veterans..

Agreed. The Greatest Generation earned all the respect we can give them.

(Even though many of "us" aren't bright enough to recognize their contribution.)

jspchief
01-17-2006, 06:31 PM
Did KCJohnny write it?

Amnorix
01-17-2006, 06:39 PM
First worthwhile thing Matt Helm has ever posted.

Rain Man
01-17-2006, 06:40 PM
Man **** you pricks who would criticize a song about thanking veterans.. I do not care if you do not agree with wars or politics, Do not say shit about veterans who sacrificed life and limb for they fellow soldiers and country... Ignorant pricks...



Other than a few lines that are painfully bad, I actually think it's a pretty reasonable song.

However, Valiant's point does raise the question of whether a song or other tribute can be bad enough that it's worthy of scorn regardless of the content or the intent. It seems to me that such a thing is not only possible, but probable.

Jenson71
01-17-2006, 09:51 PM
Man **** you pricks who would criticize a song about thanking veterans.. I do not care if you do not agree with wars or politics, Do not say shit about veterans who sacrificed life and limb for they fellow soldiers and country... Ignorant pricks...

And smart ass remark on the buying the cd, you can get if for free online you dipshit...
ROFL

Nobody said anything about veterans, wars or politics. I'm just commenting on a song that seems like it came from a 3rd grade contest.

Where can you get the CD for free? Seems like it costs $11.95, plus s&h. Oh and check out the patriot's other CDs while you're at it.

Am I jumping to conclusions about his intentions? Sure, but his song writing sure needs some work.

For Homes and Jobs and Baseball Games....Thank you thank you thank you, now die in peace....

Chiefnj
01-17-2006, 10:19 PM
ROFL

For Homes and Jobs and Baseball Games....Thank you thank you thank you, now die in peace....


I'm going to laugh when you die of stomach cancer.

Cochise
01-17-2006, 10:20 PM
Oh no... what do I do... I want to say I agree with this.. but that would be feeding the Tom... I think my head's gonna explode...

listopencil
01-18-2006, 01:05 AM
Go ahead and call me a sap, but I still get chills when I hear taps and I'm liable not to be able to choke back a few tears when I hear the National Anthem. The song and the pictures got to me...and I will always be thankful for what those guys did for us. I talked to a guy recently who was in on some ****ed up island hopping. After we talked a bit he shared a little of what they went through. Trust me, it was ****ed up and we owe a huge debt of gratitude to them for what they went through because I know that there's no way I'll ever hear all of the stories and I probably don't want to. So I'll raise a glass in salute to the ones who didn't make it, and I'll raise another to the ones who did. Then I'll try to pass on to my children the tradition of giving respect to those who have earned it a thousand times.

Miles
01-18-2006, 01:43 AM
I tend to side with Jenson about the song. Thought the content is in the right place. I have a deep respect for WWII veterans.

huskerdooz
01-18-2006, 02:36 AM
Go ahead and call me a sap, but I still get chills when I hear taps and I'm liable not to be able to choke back a few tears when I hear the National Anthem. The song and the pictures got to me...and I will always be thankful for what those guys did for us. I talked to a guy recently who was in on some ****ed up island hopping. After we talked a bit he shared a little of what they went through. Trust me, it was ****ed up and we owe a huge debt of gratitude to them for what they went through because I know that there's no way I'll ever hear all of the stories and I probably don't want to. So I'll raise a glass in salute to the ones who didn't make it, and I'll raise another to the ones who did. Then I'll try to pass on to my children the tradition of giving respect to those who have earned it a thousand times.

I couldn't have said it better.

IMO the 1st 30 minutes of "Saving Private Ryan" should be required watching for everyone, (age appropriate of course). As graphic as that first 30 minutes of the movie, I'm sure it was only a fraction of what it was like to be there that day at Omaha Beach in real life.

From the stories I've read and heard, the war with Japan was every bit as horrific. The US Marines met with similiar resistance and fortifications on nearly every island they took during their island hopping course acrossed the Pacific.

I remember when I was just a kid hanging around downtown in my old hometown. When an older couple from out of state (California plates) drove up to the hotel, as they were carrying their bags inside, the older gentleman remarked that Missouri was one of his favorite states of the Union. When I asked how someone from California could be so fond of what I thought at the time was such a miserable state (especially compared to CAL). He replied that Missouri was the state that produced Harry S. Truman and that to this day he was his favorite president. He went on to say that he thanked the Lord everyday of his existance for old "Give em Hell Harry". He was absolutely sure that Truman's decision to drop the bomb on Japan saved his life. He was in the Marines in WWII and at the time we dropped the bomb, he was training to be part of the invasion of Japan. He was absolutely sure that even though he had survived upto that point during the Pacific War, that he wouldn't be so lucky when the time came to invade Japan. He was convinced that as horrific an act as dropping the bomb was, that Truman had saved thousands of American Soldiers and Marines lives by choosing to do so.

But I digress.

I listened to the song, read the words, and looked at the pictures and I couldn't help but think how I missed my dad and hadn't gotten to really thank him for what he and his generation did. I know that he was there everyday when I was growing up and I saw him probably atleast every other weekend after I grew up and went my own way. You just never know when it's going to be too late to say thanks and as it turned out I let all that time slip by and in the end it was regrettably, too late. Regardless of whether you think that the song is up to your personal standards, the thought and message is pure. The "Greatest Generation" does deserve our thanks before it's too late.

If you have a relative or a friend or even a relative of a friend, if you know someone that is a member of that generation or even fought in WWII, take the time to thank them for all that they did to help make our nation what it is today. Thank them, before it's too late.

BigRedChief
01-18-2006, 05:33 AM
They were farmers, salesman, factory workers etc. Regular Joe's with 8 weeks of training and the passion for freedom inside. It was that passion that won the war. The sacrifices made at home during that time. Just imagine a world with Hitler in charge. If it wasn't for them it would have been a reality.

They were the greatest generation since the greneration that founded this country.

Oxford
01-18-2006, 05:35 AM
I couldn't have said it better.


I listened to the song, read the words, and looked at the pictures and I couldn't help but think how I missed my dad and hadn't gotten to really thank him for what he and his generation did. I know that he was there everyday when I was growing up and I saw him probably atleast every other weekend after I grew up and went my own way. You just never know when it's going to be too late to say thanks and as it turned out I let all that time slip by and in the end it was regrettably, too late. Regardless of whether you think that the song is up to your personal standards, the thought and message is pure. The "Greatest Generation" does deserve our thanks before it's too late.

If you have a relative or a friend or even a relative of a friend, if you know someone that is a member of that generation or even fought in WWII, take the time to thank them for all that they did to help make our nation what it is today. Thank them, before it's too late.

Well said, my father never talked about WWII, nor will my brother talk about Vietnam, and no one remembers Korea. I heard the cries of baby killer when my brother came home... incenses me to this day. I rolled the dice and won (enlisted & served in SE Asia), but I always make it a point to thank the servicemen that I know when they rotate back from Iraq, Afghanistan, the Balkans etc. Evil people abound in the world and ones who stand against them go unremembered......

bkkcoh
01-18-2006, 05:57 AM
They were farmers, salesman, factory workers etc. Regular Joe's with 8 weeks of training and the passion for freedom inside. It was that passion that won the war. The sacrifices made at home during that time. Just imagine a world with Hitler in charge. If it wasn't for them it would have been a reality.

They were the greatest generation since the greneration that founded this country.



:clap: :toast: Well said

Matt Helm
01-18-2006, 06:09 AM
They were farmers, salesman, factory workers etc. Regular Joe's with 8 weeks of training and the passion for freedom inside. It was that passion that won the war. The sacrifices made at home during that time. Just imagine a world with Hitler in charge. If it wasn't for them it would have been a reality.

They were the greatest generation since the greneration that founded this country.

Something that is missed is that the guys today that are protecting our freedoms are coming from much the same background, just in lesser numbers. You are right though, the guys that got called in a moments notice went without hesitation and many of them died for us.

bkkcoh
01-18-2006, 06:16 AM
Something that is missed is that the guys today that are protecting our freedoms are coming from much the same background, just in lesser numbers. You are right though, the guys that got called in a moments notice went without hesitation and many of them died for us.

It is a true shame that that isn't really realized by more people. The threat from the extreme Islamists is just as much of a threat as Hitler was and is more difficult to fight since they aren't wearing a single country's uniform. Extreme Islamics have stated that they aren't going to stop until they have taken over the world. How is that different than Hitler?? Hitler had an actual army to assist in his efforts. The Islamic extremists don't have an army like Hilter, but their goal is the same. :banghead:

Matt Helm
01-18-2006, 09:07 AM
It is a true shame that that isn't really realized by more people. The threat from the extreme Islamists is just as much of a threat as Hitler was and is more difficult to fight since they aren't wearing a single country's uniform. Extreme Islamics have stated that they aren't going to stop until they have taken over the world. How is that different than Hitler?? Hitler had an actual army to assist in his efforts. The Islamic extremists don't have an army like Hilter, but their goal is the same. :banghead:

I totally agree, but I don't want to divert fromt he intent of the original post. We need to be there for our WWII vets whenever possible. My dad was one and has passed, just another one of the sources of information about a time that none of us ever witnessed first hand.

htismaqe
01-18-2006, 09:37 AM
My grandfather died a little over a decade ago, he did 3 years in the Pacific theater.

Having lived in Germany and visited the death camps, I don't think alot of younger Americans appreciate what we were spared from by this generation of heroes.

I do know this, having celebrated in the streets of Berlin on May 8th, 1995 - the 50th anniversary of the end of Hitler's regime.

Despite our political position in today's Europe, they DO appreciate the men and women that helped spare them from Fascism in 1945.