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chagrin
01-18-2006, 02:12 PM
Forget the religious crap,

Who's been there for skiin or mountain climbing, hiking, camping or anything else? I was in Salt Lake City something like 15 years ago and I remember it being pretty clean place with alot of outdoors type things to do. My wife and I are going to go there (unless I can talk her into going to KC, so far I have been unsucessful) for a 3 day trip and go camping and stuff. Just curious if anyone here had some experience there?

Chiefs Pantalones
01-18-2006, 02:13 PM
Mormon chicks are so freakin' horny.

joesomebody
01-18-2006, 02:19 PM
Yeah I'm stationed about 20 minutes from SLC.

kepp
01-18-2006, 02:35 PM
Yeah, been there a few times. If you're looking for hiking go to Zion National Park (http://www.utah.com/zion/) . I went on two incredible hikes there - "Angel's Landing (http://www.americansouthwest.net/utah/zion/angels_landing.html)" and "The Narrows (http://www.americansouthwest.net/slot_canyons/zion_national_park/zion_narrows.html)".

Angel's landing is an all-day affair and not for the weak-of-heart. You end up at an elevation of around 6,000 feet overlooking the canyons from narrow ridge...very cool.

The Narrows is also very cool...and a lot tamer. You hike down a shallow portion of the Virgin River with vertical cliffs on either side.

We stayed in a campground there. I don't remember the name of it, but there are plenty there. If you like the outdoors and mountains and such, you'll love it there.

joesomebody
01-18-2006, 02:38 PM
Agreed, there is a ton of great outdoors stuff to do here. If you based around Salt lake for the trip, I'd check out Idaho too... they have some amazing stuff too.

I prefer Idaho for my camping, but thats mostly because of the more relaxed culture when it comes to drinking and what not.

chagrin
01-18-2006, 02:40 PM
Yeah, been there a few times. If you're looking for hiking go to Zion National Park (http://www.utah.com/zion/) . I went on two incredible hikes there - "Angel's Landing (http://www.americansouthwest.net/utah/zion/angels_landing.html)" and "The Narrows (http://www.americansouthwest.net/slot_canyons/zion_national_park/zion_narrows.html)".

Angel's landing is an all-day affair and not for the weak-of-heart. You end up at an elevation of around 6,000 feet overlooking the canyons from narrow ridge...very cool.

The Narrows is also very cool...and a lot tamer. You hike down a shallow portion of the Virgin River with vertical cliffs on either side.

We stayed in a campground there. I don't remember the name of it, but there are plenty there. If you like the outdoors and mountains and such, you'll love it there.

Rippin, thanks dude.

chagrin
01-18-2006, 02:42 PM
Agreed, there is a ton of great outdoors stuff to do here. If you based around Salt lake for the trip, I'd check out Idaho too... they have some amazing stuff too.

I prefer Idaho for my camping, but thats mostly because of the more relaxed culture when it comes to drinking and what not.

Where in Idaho?

I passed through Boise once and stayed overnight in a campground that same trip, but again, 15 years ago. I don't remember much about it. Is it pretty out there?

Frazod
01-18-2006, 02:42 PM
We took a day trip there last May while visiting my cousin in Grand Junction, CO. Went to Moab and Arches National Park. Beautiful, and interesting, country.

Iowanian
01-18-2006, 02:47 PM
Lake Powell is one of my favorite places on earth.

At least until became known.

joesomebody
01-18-2006, 02:47 PM
Where in Idaho?

I passed through Boise once and stayed overnight in a campground that same trip, but again, 15 years ago. I don't remember much about it. Is it pretty out there?I'll do some searching from you... I basically drive through Idaho on my way to Yellowstone, because I love Yellowstone... but Idaho is beautiful country.

Skip Towne
01-18-2006, 02:49 PM
Idaho? We call that Iowa around here.

chagrin
01-18-2006, 02:52 PM
Lake Powell is one of my favorite places on earth.

At least until became known.


Hey dude, I understand that yuou are a pretty active outdoor sportsman right? We won't be doing much hunting or fishing, mostly hiking and canoeing if possible, can you do that at Lake Powell?

joesomebody
01-18-2006, 02:54 PM
http://www.visitidaho.org/ check out the south central and south eastern corners of the state for stuff to do.

Salt Lake City is closer to Idaho than it is to south Utah. Again, it depends on where you are staying in Utah.

I live up near Salt Lake, so its more city like than the rest of Utah.

Warrior5
01-18-2006, 02:59 PM
If you're taking kids along, I'd highly recommend Moab...tons of family stuff to do there.

AndChiefs
01-18-2006, 03:03 PM
If you have any specific questions of camping in southern Idaho or places to see, let me know an area and I can help you out some, i lived in South Central Idaho for ten years.

UTChief
01-18-2006, 03:10 PM
I live in northern Utah. We just got pounded with snow today, and more is coming.

Fox River
01-18-2006, 03:12 PM
If you are going to go to Idaho go to the Northern part in their panhandle. Check out Washinton State and the Spokane area.

Be careful of calling people from Idaho names. That should go for anyone who is from another place and does not have a sense of humor. I worked with a girl from their and I used to try to joke with her about being a Canadan. She would become so defensive and start talking about how much better she and the place she was from was. She would start calling everyone redneck and such. She would talk about how backwards we are. It is funny what a few people moving from Cali can do to people. Five to Ten years ago Idaho was a Backwoods State. The Iowa of the Nortwest. She did not like that one either. She may have calmed down now. She found a nice girl of her own to settle down with.

Bob Dole
01-18-2006, 03:14 PM
When Bob Dole lived in Vegas, he used to drive up to Brian Head (http://www.brianhead.com/) regularly for skiing.

Bob Dole doesn't have much to compare it to, but it was affordable, enjoyable and the crowds weren't usually too bad (and a whole lot better on all accounts than Mt. Charleston).

chagrin
01-18-2006, 03:29 PM
http://www.visitidaho.org/ check out the south central and south eastern corners of the state for stuff to do.

Salt Lake City is closer to Idaho than it is to south Utah. Again, it depends on where you are staying in Utah.

I live up near Salt Lake, so its more city like than the rest of Utah.


Thanks dude, we would like to be able to have a few drinks maybe at the campsite with us, but we probably won't go out to a bar or anything. Is this not possible in Utah?

I guess I should clarify what we are looking for:

Basically we would like to be in a place not totally away from civilization but far enough. We will camp in our tent and can build a fire if need be. We would like amenities like a shower and food close by if we run our or have a hankerin for something we didn't bring. We also plan on bringing some beer and a small bottle of liquor.

Originally we looked at the Salt Lake City KOA, but there is a nice one in Moab too.

If not a KOA, just a campground where other people are camping nearby would be cool.

Can I get that up near Idaho?

unlurking
01-18-2006, 03:30 PM
If you're taking kids along, I'd highly recommend Moab...tons of family stuff to do there.
Yep, went last year. Planning on headin' out to Moab around the beginning of May this year to do some river rafting and hiking. Thinking about renting some ATVs or something as well.

kepp
01-18-2006, 03:44 PM
When Bob Dole lived in Vegas, he used to drive up to Brian Head (http://www.brianhead.com/) regularly for skiing.

Bob Dole doesn't have much to compare it to, but it was affordable, enjoyable and the crowds weren't usually too bad (and a whole lot better on all accounts than Mt. Charleston).
I've been to Brian Head too. Nice place.

blueballs
07-03-2008, 10:51 PM
Utah is going to a 4-day workweek
In an effort to save energy, state employees will get Friday off

updated 1:26 p.m. CT, Thurs., July. 3, 2008
SALT LAKE CITY - Starting next month, it will be "TGIT" for Utah state employees. As in: "Thank God It's Thursday."

In a yearlong experiment aimed at reducing the state's energy costs and commuters' gasoline expenses, Utah is about to become the first state to switch to a four-day workweek for thousands of government employees.

They will put in 10-hour days, Monday through Thursday, and have Fridays off, freeing them to golf, shop, spend time with the kids or do anything else that strikes their fancy. They will get paid the same as before.


"One of the jokes is that one of the biggest benefits will be for golf courses," said Ryan Walker, 49, an information technology director. He said he is looking forward to tackling items on his long-neglected "honey-do" list (As in: "Honey, do this" and "Honey, do that"); camping; and traveling more around the state.

The order issued by Republican Gov. Jon Huntsman will affect about 17,000 out of 24,000 executive-branch employees. It will not cover state police officers, prison guards or employees of the courts or Utah's public universities. Also, state-run liquor stores will stay open on Fridays.

The compressed workweek in Utah whose motto is "Industry" and whose official symbol is the beehive, representing thrift and perseverance could prove inconvenient to those who need to use state services and find certain offices closed on Fridays.

Also, some parents may have to rearrange their child care to accommodate their longer hours, and bus and commuter train schedules might have to be adjusted.

But many are excited about the idea.

"I'm thrilled," said Rose Kenworthy, 58, an executive secretary at the Utah Department of Environmental Quality. "Now I can do anything I want. I can have lunch with my friends, spend time with my grandchildren or just chill out."

Sheldon Wood, 48, who writes property tax software, plans on using his three-day weekends to go into the mountains to hike and bike with his wife, also a state employee.

Turning off the lights, the heat and the air conditioning on Fridays in 1,000 of 3,000 government buildings will save about $3 million a year out of a state budget of $11 billion, according to the governor's spokeswoman, Lisa Roskelley. The state will also save on gasoline used by official vehicles, but authorities have not figured out how much.

The Department of Environmental Quality estimated employees in six buildings alone will save themselves more than $300,000 spent on gas to commute to work.

The four-day workweek could also be good for the environment.

"We feel like we can reduce the CO2 or the ozone by around over 3,000 metric tons, as well as have an impact on our air pollution," said Kim Hood, executive director of the Department of Administrative Services.

In addition, the governor said the new schedule could help recruit younger workers who prefer a three-day weekend.

State officials will evaluate the program after a year and decide whether to extend it.

Because of the downturn in the economy and $4-a-gallon gasoline, many states are looking at cost-saving measures, including expanded telecommuting, compressed workweeks and more flexible schedules.


"Everyone's going to keep a close eye on it and see what happens in Utah and whether they can demonstrate employee effectiveness and the energy savings, too," said Leslie Scott, executive director of the National Association of State Personnel Executives, based in Lexington, Ky.

Many Utah state offices will extend their hours and stay open from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. so people can use government services before or after work. And residents are being encouraged to use the Internet for hundreds of ordinary services, such as automobile registration renewals.

As for such things as hazardous spills and calls from Medicaid recipients who need approval for medical procedures, "certainly there are people who are on call 24-7 now, and those people will continue to be on call 24-7," the governor's spokeswoman said.

Natalie Smith, 38, who works on a state arthritis program, supports the governor's push to make government more environmentally friendly, but said the change will mean juggling schedules with her husband to take care of their two young children.

"We're not exactly sure how we're going to do it," she said. But she added that it will be nice to have Fridays to visit the library or the zoo or run errands.

Debra McBride, a Medicaid specialist who has been working four 10-hour shifts a week for about 20 years, said it is harder to make doctor's appointments and do other errands Monday through Thursday, and working longer hours can be rough.

"After working 10 hours in a day," she said, "I don't do anything after I get home."

Copyright 2008 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Guru
07-03-2008, 10:59 PM
Zion and Bryce Canyon are AMAZING!!!!

Adept Havelock
07-03-2008, 11:09 PM
The compressed workweek in Utah — whose motto is "Industry" and whose official symbol is the beehive, representing thrift and perseverance — could prove inconvenient to those who need to use state services and find certain offices closed on Fridays.


You learn something new everyday. I always figured it was chosen because they had a desire to become a mostly sexless monarchy with a rigid caste system. :p