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Mr. Laz
03-09-2006, 01:45 PM
i know it's been posted about many times... but i haven't heard or seen about any content other than the cap number and the % shared etc.


how about the rookie salary cap that both sides apparently wanted?

specific draft slotting?


anyone hear some specifics about changes other than the dollar amounts?

Amnorix
03-09-2006, 01:51 PM
Minimum salaries are going up (no surprise there):

NEW CBA PUSHES UP MINIMUM SALARIES

To no surprise, the new CBA has nudged higher the minimum player salaries.

Per a league source, the new minimum for a first-year player is $275,000. For a second-year player, it's $350,000. For a third-year player, it's $425,000. For a fourth-year player, it's $500,000. For a player in years five through seven, it's $585,000. In years eight through ten, it's $710,000. In years eleven and beyond, it's $810,000.

Across the board, the increases are $40,000 above the 2006 minimum levels.

This also means that the one-year veteran minimum deals for players with four or more years of service will cost $500,000 against the cap in 2006, assuming that the new CBA retains the device that calls for a separate fund to pay the player the difference between the four-year minimum and the minimum for six years and beyond.

http://www.profootballtalk.com/rumormill.htm

Mr. Laz
03-09-2006, 01:54 PM
thanks... i thought the NFLPA wanted to push down rookie salary etc to make more room for the veteran players?

Amnorix
03-09-2006, 01:58 PM
I believe that cash over cap is in there, but haven't heard a specific percentage.

The top 15 teams will contribute some number of dollars into a pool that goes to the bottom 15 teams. Apparently, the amount of money contributed will be hit hte top 5 hardest, then 6-10 somewhat hard, and be relatively light for 11-15. No idea what the formula is, but I heard $150M per year for the top 15 total being given to the bottom teams. No ide if the "bottom teams" means the bottom 10, or bottom 17 or what?

I heard that language would be standardized for players needing to return signing bonus dollars to the teams if they commit bad/stupid acts. In other words, instead of each team negotiating separately with each player about when/where/whether signing bonus dollars would need to be given back to the club, that's going to be in the CBA itself, so it will be standard across the entire league.

The deal is for 6 years. So I take it that means we have labor peace through the 2011 season.

Rumor was that second and third round picks would have a maximum contract length of 5 years, and thereafter it would be a max of 4 years. Some clubs were trying to tie up guys for alot longer, I guess. Not sure if 1st rounders are uncapped in terms of length of contract or what.

I also heard that the system for LBTE and NLBTE bonuses is changed, but that might be me mis-remembering. That might have been a "what happens if there is no new CBA" thing.

Amnorix
03-09-2006, 01:59 PM
thanks... i thought the NFLPA wanted to push down rookie salary etc to make more room for the veteran players?


I think the agents might have muscled the PA on that one, but I haven't heard any specifics either way on it. Since I haven't heard anything, I'd be shocked if it was in there. SOMEONE would have noted that "Leinart/Bush/Young Get Screwed by New CBA" by now, if it was in there.

Amnorix
03-09-2006, 02:03 PM
Here's the relevant highlights from John Clayton.


Terms sheets weren't readily available for general managers, agents and players Wednesday night. This much was known: The cap in 2006 will be $102 million, an increase of $7.5 million over the projected $94.5 million cap for 2006. That's a $16.5 million increase from the $85.5 million cap of 2005. The 2007 cap will be $109 million.

Tagliabue was asked about the proration of signing bonuses, but he joked that he couldn't remember if his granddaughter was six years old or if the proration for signing bonuses was four. Proration will be five years in 2006 instead of the current four. The proration will be six years in 2007 and five in 2008. What that means is it will be easier for teams to structure bigger deals for top five draft choices and the highest paid free agents.

Also confusing is the bottom line figure on the revenue sharing. Tagliabue said $500 million of local team revenue will be put in a pool for the lower-revenue teams in the first four years of the six-year agreement. The incremental revenue-sharing plan, as it is called, will cost high-revenue teams between $850 million and $900 million over the six years. The top five revenue teams will pay the most; teams between six through 10 in revenue will pay the second most and 11 through 15 will pay the lowest third of that revenue-sharing pool.

http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/columns/story?columnist=clayton_john&id=2360296

Amnorix
03-09-2006, 02:05 PM
More stuff (thanks for inspiring me to hunt around);

Here are a few other provisions of the deal:

Teams will be able to use their franchise tag on a player more than once, but if they franchise a player for a third time, they will have to do it at a salary equivalent to that of a top-five quarterback, the highest-paid position in football.

Contracts for players selected in rounds two through seven of the draft will be limited to four years in length. More and more teams have been trying to lock second-day draft choices into five-year contracts that prevent the player from hitting restricted free agency after year three and unrestricted free agency after year four.

Bonuses in contracts will be prorated over five years this year and over six years in 2007, but in 2008 the proration reverts to five years.

(no link -- off a post on KFFL)

Amnorix
03-09-2006, 02:05 PM
Also off KFFL:


Per Mort the top 15 will give money to a pool that will go to the bottom 17.

The top 5 will give 3 mil, the next 5 2 mil, the next 5 1 mil.

I just heard it on ESPN news.

ct
03-09-2006, 02:07 PM
I've heard nothing regarding rookie salary structures, just what Amnorix posted about the contract length. Basically protecting the later round draftees' rights to get into RFA.

ct
03-09-2006, 02:09 PM
Also off KFFL:


Per Mort the top 15 will give money to a pool that will go to the bottom 17.

The top 5 will give 3 mil, the next 5 2 mil, the next 5 1 mil.

I just heard it on ESPN news.

That's only $30M. Not much additional revenue sharing, IMO. I suspected as much, when the only 2 'NO' votes came from small market teams(other than Mr. Wilson, who's just an idiot).

Amnorix
03-09-2006, 02:16 PM
I note that the Mort numbers posted on ESPN don't come remotely close to what Clayton reported on the website:

"Also confusing is the bottom line figure on the revenue sharing. Tagliabue said $500 million of local team revenue will be put in a pool for the lower-revenue teams in the first four years of the six-year agreement. The incremental revenue-sharing plan, as it is called, will cost high-revenue teams between $850 million and $900 million over the six years. The top five revenue teams will pay the most; teams between six through 10 in revenue will pay the second most and 11 through 15 will pay the lowest third of that revenue-sharing pool."

Amnorix
03-09-2006, 04:45 PM
More elements of the new CBA posted here:

http://www.profootballtalk.com/rumormill.htm