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big nasty kcnut
03-11-2006, 10:37 PM
I'm reading The New American Revolution by tammy bruce. She is a great thinker and funny.

ChiefsFanatic
03-11-2006, 10:43 PM
Undaunted Courage by Stephen Ambrose.

58-4ever
03-11-2006, 10:44 PM
The Elegant Universe by Brian Greene.

Mike in SW-MO
03-11-2006, 10:46 PM
Cally's War - John Ringo

High brow? no.

High foreheard? Got that.

Count Alex's Losses
03-11-2006, 10:51 PM
America's Game - Michael McCambridge

Soon as I polish that off I'm going to start on one of my two new books by Scott Adams - "Way of the Weasel" and "The Joy of Work."

luv
03-11-2006, 10:53 PM
Cider House Rules by John Irving

|Zach|
03-11-2006, 10:58 PM
http://homerdixon.com/ingenuitygap/

The Ingenuity Gap

By Thomas Homer-Dixon's

Can we solve the problems of the future? Thomas Homer-Dixon tackles this question in a groundbreaking study of a world becoming too complex and too fast-paced to manage.

The challenges we face converge, intertwine, and often remain largely beyond our understanding. Most of us suspect that the "experts" don't really know what's going on and that as a species we've released forces that are neither managed nor manageable. This is the ingenuity gap, the critical gap between our need for ideas to solve complex problems and our actual supply of those ideas.

Poor countries are particularly vulnerable to ingenuity gaps, but our own rich countries are no longer immune, and we're all caught dangerously between a soaring requirement for ingenuity and an increasingly uncertain supply. As the gap widens, the result can be political disintegration and violent upheaval.

With riveting anecdotes and lucid argument, Thomas Homer-Dixon uses his ingenuity theory to suggest how we might approach these problems -- in our own lives, our thinking, our businesses, and our societies.

T-post Tom
03-11-2006, 11:00 PM
Undaunted Courage by Stephen Ambrose.

Try "Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge," by Ambrose Bierce when you're done. If you haven't already. Classic American short story.

jspchief
03-11-2006, 11:03 PM
Just finished the Archer's Tale trilogy by Bernard Cornwell.

I'll probably start something else written by him, because his style appeals to me.

Frazod
03-11-2006, 11:06 PM
Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow. Before that, His Excellency (biography of Washington) by Joseph Ellis.

I've been reading quite a bit on the Revolutionary War era over the past couple of years. I read Jeff Shaara's historical fiction works Rise to Rebellion and The Glorious Cause, and also David McCullough's John Adams. Fascinating period. I'll probably read American Sphinx (about Jefferson) next.

arrowheadnation
03-11-2006, 11:24 PM
How to Ruin an NFL Franchise in 10 Days - by Carl Peterson










On the real though....I'm reading "Michael Jordan: Driven from Within"

TrickyNicky
03-11-2006, 11:26 PM
I'm currently reading The Winter King by Bernard Cromwell which is a spin of the Arthurian legend. Cromwell writes very well.

jspchief
03-11-2006, 11:36 PM
I'm currently reading The Winter King by Bernard Cromwell which is a spin of the Arthurian legend. Cromwell writes very well.It's Cornwell, not Cromwell.

And if you haven't read The Archer's Tale, by Cornwell, I recommend it.

Winter King is likely my next book.

Phobia
03-11-2006, 11:39 PM
I'm reading Love and Respect - it's a marriage manual where my balls get chopped off and put in my wife's purse.

WoodDraw
03-11-2006, 11:55 PM
Right now I'm reading "Roosevelt: The Lion and the Fox" by James MacGregor Burns. It's part one of his two part biography of FDR. This one runs from his birth to before WWII.

1punkyQB
03-12-2006, 12:24 AM
Witness by Whitaker Chambers and I was reading Bobby Knight's unauthorized biography before I accidentally left it in a pile of clothing bound for goodwill.

SNR
03-12-2006, 01:16 AM
Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow. Before that, His Excellency (biography of Washington) by Joseph Ellis.

I've been reading quite a bit on the Revolutionary War era over the past couple of years. I read Jeff Shaara's historical fiction works Rise to Rebellion and The Glorious Cause, and also David McCullough's John Adams. Fascinating period. I'll probably read American Sphinx (about Jefferson) next.What did you think of the McCullough? I loved it.

I'm actually re-reading 1984 right now.

luv
03-12-2006, 01:43 AM
If I ever get done with Cider House Rules, then I must choose between False Memory by Dean Koontz or 1984 by what's-his-face.

tk13
03-12-2006, 01:45 AM
Funny you mention it today. I finally, after all these years, got "Moneyball" by Michael Lewis. Always wanted to read it, never gotten around to doing so. I guess I should turn in my baseball geek card.

tyton75
03-12-2006, 06:02 AM
The Theory of Everything- Stephen Hawking

Braincase
03-12-2006, 07:10 AM
Zen Guitar by Philip Toshio Sudo

alanm
03-12-2006, 07:14 AM
I'm reading the Last Stand of the Tin Can Soldiers by James D. Hornfischer. It's about Task group Taffy 3, a contingent of Destroyers facing Adm. Toyada and his pacific fleet in the Sumar strait in the battle of Luzon in WWII.
Good book so far. :thumb:

Lzen
03-12-2006, 08:02 AM
Does Popular Mechanics count? :) I have a subscription.

Also, I'm reading Oliver North's The Assasins. It's the 3rd novel in a trilogy about terrorist, gov't corruption, and some marines. Aw crap, I'm not very good at describing these things. I'll just say that I think it's a great book and a great trilogy. If you want to see better descriptions, go here:

Book 1: Mission Compromised (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0805425500/ref=pd_bxgy_img_b/104-2572426-7779159?%5Fencoding=UTF8)
Book 2: The Jerico Sanction (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0805425519/ref=pd_bxgy_img_b/104-2572426-7779159?%5Fencoding=UTF8)
Book 3: The Assasins (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0805425527/sr=8-1/qid=1142171961/ref=pd_bbs_1/104-2572426-7779159?%5Fencoding=UTF8)

TrickyNicky
03-12-2006, 08:36 AM
It's Cornwell, not Cromwell.

And if you haven't read The Archer's Tale, by Cornwell, I recommend it.

Winter King is likely my next book.
Always get James Cromwell and Bernard Cornwell mixed up for some reason. I've already read the Holy Grail series and I enjoyed it immensely.

Baby Lee
03-12-2006, 09:18 AM
Finally got around to reading 'In Cold Blood.' Deserves the accolades.

Sully
03-12-2006, 09:42 AM
I don't have a lot of time to read books (that aren't assigned, I won't even go into those). But, I just finished a coffee-table style book on the history of KC, which was interesting. Now I have started a book about Nixon, titled appropriately, "President Nixon" by Richard Reeves.

Adept Havelock
03-12-2006, 10:14 AM
I've been rereading "The Last Lion". It's a fantastic bio. of Sir Winston.

Also reading "The Long and the Short of it" by Borski, which is an analysis of some of Gene Wolfe's fiction.

Adept Havelock
03-12-2006, 10:16 AM
I'm reading the Last Stand of the Tin Can Soldiers by James D. Hornfischer. It's about Task group Taffy 3, a contingent of Destroyers facing Adm. Toyada and his pacific fleet in the Sumar strait in the battle of Luzon in WWII.
Good book so far. :thumb:

Heck of a good read. Michner did a really nice homage to that in his fictional work "Space".

If you are a WW2 buff, I also suggest any of the three histories written by Cornelious Ryan (Last Battle, A Bridge too Far, and The Longest Day).

alanm
03-12-2006, 02:45 PM
Heck of a good read. Michner did a really nice homage to that in his fictional work "Space".

If you are a WW2 buff, I also suggest any of the three histories written by Cornelious Ryan (Last Battle, A Bridge too Far, and The Longest Day).
HUGE WWII buff. I've read all of Ryan's stuff years ago. I have quite a extensive library of WWII books and books from all the US wars in general. My Dad served in the Navy during WW2 from 1942 till 46. He started with a couple of LST's that got shot out from under him but spent the bulk of his tour aboard the USS O'Brien which was a destroyer that served mostly in the Pacific but did some Atlantic work as well including the D Day invasion. The O'Brien finally ended it's engagements when it was hit the 1st day of the Okinawa invasion by a kamakazi losing 55 KIA(My dad was wounded) and managed to limp back to Truk. At the time of this story he was returning from the D Day invasion since it was June 44 and the O'Brien was in California getting ready for the Iwo Jima and Okinawa invasions and he was home on leave. Previously just before D Day he was in on the Tinian and Saipan invasions. They kept those "Tin Cans" pretty busy back then,

Ari Chi3fs
03-12-2006, 02:50 PM
Candide - Voltaire

Jenny Gump
03-12-2006, 02:53 PM
I'm reading Mo Dowd's "Are Men Necessary?" and "The Known World".

Simplex3
03-12-2006, 02:57 PM
I'm reading Mo Dowd's "Are Men Necessary?" and "The Known World".
Please tell me this is a joke. How can anyone read that man-hating lesbian's drivel?

Simplex3
03-12-2006, 02:58 PM
As evidenced by my last post, I'm reading:

"The Compass of Zen" by Seung Sahn.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1570623295/002-2611890-9857639?n=283155

seclark
03-12-2006, 04:19 PM
asassin, by ted bell
sec

TrickyNicky
03-12-2006, 04:22 PM
Oh yeah, just in case I forget. Let me recommend A Song of Ice and Fire series by George R. R. Martin. Best fantasy series I've ever read.

Jenson71
03-12-2006, 04:34 PM
To those who are reading history books: Why are you doing so?

JBucc
03-12-2006, 04:35 PM
To those who are reading history books: Why are you doing so?Yeah guys, there's a history channel now.

jspchief
03-12-2006, 05:01 PM
Oh yeah, just in case I forget. Let me recommend A Song of Ice and Fire series by George R. R. Martin. Best fantasy series I've ever read.Rep.

I'm always looking for tips on good fantasy series. Thanks.

Rain Man
03-12-2006, 05:23 PM
To those who are reading history books: Why are you doing so?

I've been thinking about invading Russia, and someone told me that if I didn't understand history, I was doomed to repeat it.

Rain Man
03-12-2006, 05:26 PM
I'm just about to finish "A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius". I like David Eggers' writing a lot.

luv
03-12-2006, 05:28 PM
To those who are reading history books: Why are you doing so?
My guess would be they like history.

Rain Man
03-12-2006, 05:32 PM
My guess would be they like history.

It's also possible that they're reincarnated, and they're reading about their hometowns and old friends.

alanm
03-12-2006, 05:32 PM
Yeah guys, there's a history channel now.
It's not the same. :shake:

Frazod
03-12-2006, 06:09 PM
It's not the same. :shake:

Especially lately. Seems like everytime I turn it on, one of those friggin "Modern Marvels" shows is on. I really don't give a shit about the history of the dump truck.

Adept Havelock
03-12-2006, 06:17 PM
Rep.

I'm always looking for tips on good fantasy series. Thanks.

Try Gene Wolfe's "Book of the New Sun". One of my all time favorites-
Shadow & Claw
Sword & Citadel
Urth of the New Sun.

The Long Sun and Short Sun series that follow are also fantastic.

Be aware it's some of the most subtle and cryptic fiction I've read since Joyce. A real challenge, but well worth it IMO.

Misplaced_Chiefs_Fan
03-12-2006, 06:20 PM
Fiction:

The Dragon in Lyonaisse - Gordon Dickson (SF/F)
Medalon - Jennifer Fallon (SF/F)
Billibub Baddings - Tee Morris (Fantasy/Noir)

Non-Fiction:
Military Methods of the Art of War - Sun Pin
Under the Black Flag - David Cordingly

(that is, when I'm not reading my class books, which I should be . . . )

Adept Havelock
03-12-2006, 06:21 PM
I've been thinking about invading Russia, and someone told me that if I didn't understand history, I was doomed to repeat it.


ROFL :clap:


Napoleon went waltzing into Russia saying "this is easy...Gee...it's a bit cold.."

Hitler said "I've got a better idea...oh hell, it's the same idea".

Hitler never played Risk as a kid, did he? Asia worth 7 armies! Seven armies a turn, but you cant $@&%! hold it!

Mr. Laz
03-12-2006, 06:22 PM
The Elegant Universe by Brian Greene

alanm
03-12-2006, 06:22 PM
Especially lately. Seems like everytime I turn it on, one of those friggin "Modern Marvels" shows is on. I really don't give a shit about the history of the dump truck.
Modern Marvels isn't that bad but I hate it when they show blocks of them all day. It would seem better if they showed them late night/early morning. I may have to upgrade my package and get the Military channel. :thumb:

duncan_idaho
03-12-2006, 06:28 PM
I'm about halfway through "player piano" by Vonnegut right now... really enjoying it so far.

Also just finished the Holy Grail series by Bernard Cornwell. Next on the list is Settling Accounts: Return Engagement by Harry Turtledove (it's an alternate history book... good stuff for history/polisci buffs)

Stuckinbama
03-12-2006, 07:47 PM
Just finished the Rise and Fall of the Great Powers by Paul Kennedy and am now wading through The Life and Times of Pancho Villa by Fredrich Katz (all 900 pages of it).

Jim Jones
03-12-2006, 08:15 PM
A Scanner Darkly by Philip K. Dick

Amnorix
03-12-2006, 09:06 PM
Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow. Before that, His Excellency (biography of Washington) by Joseph Ellis.

I've been reading quite a bit on the Revolutionary War era over the past couple of years. I read Jeff Shaara's historical fiction works Rise to Rebellion and The Glorious Cause, and also David McCullough's John Adams. Fascinating period. I'll probably read American Sphinx (about Jefferson) next.

Chernow is superb, in my opinion. If you like his style, I'm sure you'll also like Titan (about John Rockefeller) and House of Morgan, about JP Morgan and his banking firm from inception to current.

For Revolutionary War era, 1776 by McCullough is also very good and a quick read.

Amnorix
03-12-2006, 09:07 PM
What did you think of the McCullough? I loved it.

McCullough is always good and very readable. Path Between the Seas, abou the building of the Panama Canal, is my current read, and also a McCullough book.

NewChief
03-12-2006, 09:08 PM
Finished The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay by Michael Chabon recently. Excellent.

Amnorix
03-12-2006, 09:09 PM
Especially lately. Seems like everytime I turn it on, one of those friggin "Modern Marvels" shows is on. I really don't give a shit about the history of the dump truck.

ROFLROFLROFLROFL

Teh Rep

NewChief
03-12-2006, 09:10 PM
I'm just about to finish "A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius". I like David Eggers' writing a lot.

You should check out McSweeney's, his faux lit crit bizarro website. It's probably right up your alley.
http://www.mcsweeneys.net/

Dave Lane
03-12-2006, 09:24 PM
Jesus Never Existed.

Outstanding book...

Available at jesusneverexisted.com

Dave

Frazod
03-12-2006, 11:19 PM
Chernow is superb, in my opinion. If you like his style, I'm sure you'll also like Titan (about John Rockefeller) and House of Morgan, about JP Morgan and his banking firm from inception to current.

For Revolutionary War era, 1776 by McCullough is also very good and a quick read.

I already read 1776. It was excellent (I just forget to mention it).

Jenny Gump
03-13-2006, 09:10 AM
Please tell me this is a joke. How can anyone read that man-hating lesbian's drivel?

Obviously, you are ignorant about the content of the book. It's actually more "woman-hating" than "man-hating" as you so stereotypically label her drivel.

It's obvious by the first few pages, that the title is to incense people who won't even bother to open the cover to see what the content is actually about. I think my track record of opinion here makes it obvious I am far from condoning man-hating.

I in fact, think men get a bad rap most of the time as compared to women.

Skip Towne
03-13-2006, 09:42 AM
Obviously, you are ignorant about the content of the book. It's actually more "woman-hating" than "man-hating" as you so stereotypically label her drivel.

It's obvious by the first few pages, that the title is to incense people who won't even bother to open the cover to see what the content is actually about. I think my track record of opinion here makes it obvious I am far from condoning man-hating.

I in fact, think men get a bad rap most of the time as compared to women.
I agree. The worst thing to be is a WASP man. Nobody cares about us. No NAAWP, no National Oganization for Men, no nothing.

Iowanian
03-13-2006, 09:58 AM
I'm doing some really heavy reading right now.

I've got the latest Pederson's Bowhunting and a special edition on Alternative renewable fuels(wind, biomass/switchgrass, biodiesel and ethynol).

Top quality throne reading material.

Bowser
03-13-2006, 10:20 AM
Just opened up Dan Brown's Angels and Demons.

Up next - Stephen King's Cell. Looks interesting, even if it turns out to be a ripoff of The Stand.

Chief Henry
03-13-2006, 11:27 AM
The Bernie Saggau Story of the Iowa Boy.
Written by Chuck Offenberger, former Des Moines
Register writer.

Bernie Saggau was the executive director of the Iowa High School Boys Athletic Assn for about 40 years. I've heard him speak several times and he's
a terrific person and leader.

Rain Man
03-13-2006, 11:34 AM
You should check out McSweeney's, his faux lit crit bizarro website. It's probably right up your alley.
http://www.mcsweeneys.net/


Cool. I'll check it out. Thanks.

NewChief
03-13-2006, 11:47 AM
Cool. I'll check it out. Thanks.

They also publish a quarterly journal and do all sorts of weird things with it. Here's a synopsis of Issue 17:
http://kwc.org/blog/archives/2006/2006-01-31.book_mcsweeneys_17.html

McSweeney's 17 comes disguised as junk mail. I'm pretty sure this takes the crown for most ridiculous media packaging that I have ever purchased. Screw the comb that came in my McSweeney's 16, the material in this issue is packed inside of envelopes and even comes with a rubberband!

The ridiculous packaging is an odd, yet appropriate, choice for the mixed assortment within. There's Envelope, which is a big brown envelope containing reproductions of various contemporary art, mostly paintings. There's humorous inserts, my favorite being the plural clothing brochure. There's Yeti Researcher, a parody of a scientific research journal filled, too filled, with yeti research articles. I was more frightened than entertained by the amount of effort that went into reproducing that much straight-faced yeti research articles. And, of course, there are a couple short stories, though most shorter than the usual McSweeney's fare.

There's a lot of variety in McSweeney's 17, but not enough for the hefty price tag. It's a lot of variety, little depth, with the exception of a frightening number of yeti articles. Issue 17 was supposed to come with the Wolphin dvd, which instead arrived with McSweeney's 18. If it had, this little mixed media packaging experiment might have been worth the price of admission.

Then again, I haven't watched my copy of Wolphin yet, so who's to say?


I've looked over the Yeti Researcher journal, and it's hilarious. Written to look completely like a scholarly journal on Yeti Research. Here's the amazon synopsis and reviews, which shows a pretty good pictures of the "packaging."
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/customer-reviews/1932416315/104-1231629-4975948

Jenson71
03-13-2006, 01:15 PM
I'm reading The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich by Shirer

MOhillbilly
03-13-2006, 02:28 PM
johnny got his gun-dalton trumbo


i read it about ten years ago,but killed so many brain cells inbetween, i figured id read it again.

AirForceChief
03-13-2006, 03:00 PM
Gates of Fire - An Epic Novel of the Battle of Thermopylae

Three hundred Spartans hold of an army of nearly two million Persians at a narrow mountain pass. Lots of historical accuracy (accounts from Herodotus). Spartans gave the Greeks enough time to hold off Persaians and preserve Athens and early Western democracy...

Oddly enough, it's by Steven Pressfield, who wrote The Legend of Bagger Vance.

Frazod
03-13-2006, 03:07 PM
Gates of Fire - An Epic Novel of the Battle of Thermopylae

Three hundred Spartans hold of an army of nearly two million Persians at a narrow mountain pass. Lots of historical accuracy (accounts from Herodotus). Spartans gave the Greeks enough time to hold off Persaians and preserve Athens and early Western democracy...

Oddly enough, it's by Steven Pressfield, who wrote The Legend of Bagger Vance.

That sounds like a winner. I'll have to make a note of it.

Taco John
03-13-2006, 03:10 PM
Just purchased it off Amazon yesterday... Really looking forward to the read.

http://images.amazon.com/images/P/0671747584.01._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-dp-500-arrow,TopRight,45,-64_AA240_SH20_SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg

Taco John
03-13-2006, 03:15 PM
To those who are reading history books: Why are you doing so?



For context.

I'm reading a few history books on the development of Radio as a broadcast medium and the impact that it had on community and economy. I think this information will help give me context as I navigate the current waters in my "career boad." Broadcast communications technology becomes more and more readily available, and I think in many ways, history is about to repeat itself.

Taco John
03-13-2006, 03:25 PM
Jesus Never Existed.

Outstanding book...

Available at jesusneverexisted.com

Dave



If you like reading the word "perhaps" over and over and over, then yeah, it's fantastic.

banyon
03-13-2006, 03:29 PM
Collapse- Jared Diamond

A People's History of the United States- Howard Zinn

When Presidents Lie- Eric Alterman

keg in kc
03-13-2006, 03:35 PM
His Dark Materials Trilogy by Philip Pullman
Ringworld Throne by Larry Niven
The Urth of the New Sun by Gene Wolfe

Frosty
03-13-2006, 04:12 PM
The Dragon in Lyonaisse - Gordon Dickson (SF/F)

I have most of the series (garage sale find) but got stuck about half-way through the second book (Dragon Knight).

Please tell me they get better.

Jenson71
03-13-2006, 10:41 PM
Collapse- Jared Diamond


How does this compare to Guns, Germs, Steel? I liked the interesting twist on history he gave in the first one.

Miles
03-13-2006, 10:49 PM
I just finished up Red Mars by Kim Stanley Robinson about a week ago and really enjoyd it.

About to start on either A Game of Thones by George RR Martin or Arrowsmith by Sinclair Lewis.

Mr. Laz
03-13-2006, 11:17 PM
Oh yeah, just in case I forget. Let me recommend A Song of Ice and Fire series by George R. R. Martin. Best fantasy series I've ever read.
i love the kind of book ... how many in the series?

Miles
03-13-2006, 11:22 PM
i love the kind of book ... how many in the series?

There are four in the series with A Game of Thrones being the first one. Im not really into the genre but its supposed to be a hell of a great page turner.

You can pick up A Game of Thrones at a bookstore for only $3.99 too.

banyon
03-13-2006, 11:36 PM
How does this compare to Guns, Germs, Steel? I liked the interesting twist on history he gave in the first one.

I've onlt browsed G,G, & S (which he won the pulitzer for).

It's just more about the environmental choices that different civilizations made in history and its role in those respective societies' respective "collapses".

It's not as doom and gloom as I'm making it sound though. He's optimitstic that we are better informed than our predecessors to confront these choices.

TrickyNicky
03-14-2006, 01:38 PM
There are four in the series with A Game of Thrones being the first one. Im not really into the genre but its supposed to be a hell of a great page turner.

You can pick up A Game of Thrones at a bookstore for only $3.99 too.
It definitely is a great page-turner. I'd put it right up there with the other fantasy series by a guy named R. R.

Dave Lane
03-14-2006, 03:24 PM
If you like reading the word "perhaps" over and over and over, then yeah, it's fantastic.

Did you read it?

Great historical book that is off the charts good.

Dave

Amnorix
03-14-2006, 03:30 PM
It definitely is a great page-turner. I'd put it right up there with the other fantasy series by a guy named R. R.

errr.... JRR, perhaps??

Amnorix
03-14-2006, 03:31 PM
I'm reading The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich by Shirer


Damn good book. Takes a little while to get through it though, that's for sure.

jspchief
03-14-2006, 05:46 PM
I'm currently reading The Winter King by Bernard Cromwell which is a spin of the Arthurian legend. Cromwell writes very well.Well, I just started The Winter King last night, and so far it's not grabbing me. Granted, I only read for about thirty minutes, but I don't care for the first person narrative style. Hopefully it picks up.

Adept Havelock
03-14-2006, 06:01 PM
Well, I just started The Winter King last night, and so far it's not grabbing me. Granted, I only read for about thirty minutes, but I don't care for the first person narrative style. Hopefully it picks up.

If you don't care for first person, I withdraw my suggestion of Wolfe's New Sun books. Wolfe writes almost exclusively in the first person.

You might enjoy Harry Turtledove's "Darkness" cycle. It's basically WW2 reintepreted into a fantasy-style war in a different world. It's a fun, but kind of long romp.

jspchief
03-14-2006, 06:08 PM
If you don't care for first person, I withdraw my suggestion of Wolfe's New Sun books. Wolfe writes almost exclusively in the first person.

You might enjoy Harry Turtledove's "Darkness" cycle. It's basically WW2 reintepreted into a fantasy-style war in a different world. It's a fun, but kind of long romp.Actually, I'm not sure if I like the first person style or not. I can't remember the last book I read that was written in it, if ever (maybe Bio of a Space Tyrant by Piers Anthony?).

I'll have to see how I feel about it after I finish this book. 100 pages are hardly enough to form an opinion.

Either way, I appreciate the recommendations.

CosmicPal
03-14-2006, 06:08 PM
I just started reading a new book. It's a memoir and it is literally fantastic. This is no joke, the title of the book is called: Another Bullshit Night in Suck City. It's by Nick Flynn.

It was named one of the Top 25 books of 2004 by the NY Public Library and won the Pen/Martha Albrand Award for memoir.

It's about Nick and his father- whom he never met until he was working as a caseworker in a homeless shelter in Boston. It's a great book about a son discovering the father he never had in the worst possible of places. Heartbreaking and honest.

keg in kc
03-14-2006, 06:19 PM
If you don't care for first person, I withdraw my suggestion of Wolfe's New Sun books. Wolfe writes almost exclusively in the first person.They're not easy reads either. Deep books.

SCTrojan
03-14-2006, 06:50 PM
Just started Son of the Morning Star: Custer and the Little Bighorn by Evan Connell.

Frazod
03-14-2006, 07:02 PM
Just started Son of the Morning Star: Custer and the Little Bighorn by Evan Connell.

Good read, but a bit annoying. You will quickly learn that the author has no concept of linear time.

SCTrojan
03-14-2006, 07:25 PM
Good read, but a bit annoying. You will quickly learn that the author has no concept of linear time.

I've noticed that. It seems sort of stream-of-consciousness right now.

WoodDraw
03-14-2006, 07:59 PM
Just purchased it off Amazon yesterday... Really looking forward to the read.

http://images.amazon.com/images/P/0671747584.01._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-dp-500-arrow,TopRight,45,-64_AA240_SH20_SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg

I have that one around here somewhere. I've heard good things and have been meaning to add it on to my to read stack. Let me know how you like it.

Rain Man
03-14-2006, 08:03 PM
If you don't care for first person, I withdraw my suggestion of Wolfe's New Sun books. Wolfe writes almost exclusively in the first person.

You might enjoy Harry Turtledove's "Darkness" cycle. It's basically WW2 reintepreted into a fantasy-style war in a different world. It's a fun, but kind of long romp.

"Guns of the South" was pretty good, but I must say that I really dislike Turtledove's writing. I read a couple of books of his about the aliens invading Earth during WWII, and while I liked the concept, I found myself often getting jolted from the story by the recurring thought of "No one would really say something like that."

Adept Havelock
03-14-2006, 08:30 PM
They're not easy reads either. Deep books.

No kidding. Wolfe writes for the re-reader. I've been through them a few times and am still puzzling out the "real" story. I got a pretty good grip on it the first time, but it's like archeology.

I've read most of his works. He seems to love to tell you 2/3 or so of a story, and leaves the rest of the story as an exercise for the student.

Ever read his 5th Head of Cerberus? It's basically a murder mystery, where he takes us through the whole investigation with the "detective". He gives the conclusion, but leaves it to you to figure out how the clues lead to that conclusion.

Try the sequel the Book of the Long Sun. His main character Patera Silk is even more intriguing than old Severian. The follow-on the Book of the Short Sun is possibly the most cryptic thing he ever wrote, but again, well worth the effort and a fantastic capstone to the series.

Next up, I'm going to try his "Latro" novels. I'm told they are about a Greek Soldier (400-500 BC or so) who has a peculiar amnesia. Every morning, he reads the scroll he added to the day before to learn who he is and what his life is about.

Wolfe has a serious fetish about memory.

Adept Havelock
03-14-2006, 08:34 PM
"Guns of the South" was pretty good, but I must say that I really dislike Turtledove's writing. I read a couple of books of his about the aliens invading Earth during WWII, and while I liked the concept, I found myself often getting jolted from the story by the recurring thought of "No one would really say something like that."

I like some of his work, others not so much. I'll agree that his prose can be clunky, to say the least. I read him more as a literary candy-bar.

In the Darkness cycle, the "fantasy" motif disguises his shortcomings pretty well, and shows a pretty wicked sense of humor (for starters, it's the Blond-Haired Blue Eyed folk being sacrificed to fuel some pretty horrific sorcery).

Guns of the South was very enjoyable. Probably my favorite of his. He wrote it because he was talking to another author (Judith Tarr) who was complaining the cover art for the new novel she wrote was "as anachronistic as Robert E. Lee holding an Uzi". One thought led to another.... ROFL

redbrian
03-14-2006, 08:44 PM
Just finishing up Effendi : the second arabesk by, Jon Courtenay Grimwood it’s the second book in an offbeat trilogy.

It’s a noir cyberpunk set in an alternate universe where the Ottoman Empire still exists, the first book was called after Pashazade.

In the truck I’m listening to Roving Mars by Steve Squyres. Squyres was the principal scientist on the Mars rover mission. Really interesting to see all of the politics and ups and downs that collimated in the two rovers getting to Mars.

Next on my shelf is Flush by Carl Hiaasen, it’s a juvenile book but my son brought it home and I try and read everything written by this guy.

NewChief
03-14-2006, 09:26 PM
Next on my shelf is Flush by Carl Hiaasen, it’s a juvenile book but my son brought it home and I try and read everything written by this guy.

One of my favorite "beach read" authors as well. I finally convinced my wife to read him, and I took a lot of enjoyment out of listening to her giggle and laugh as she read it next to me at night in bed (and yes, perverts, the book was the source of her humor).

Now she has about a year's worth of reading material, since he's written so many freaking books. I think I may have a couple of his that I haven't read, but I'm pretty close to exhausting the supply. I even read all of his Miami Herald articles that are collected in an anthology.

BigOlChiefsfan
03-14-2006, 10:16 PM
No kidding. Wolfe writes for the re-reader.

Next up, I'm going to try his "Latro" novels. I'm told they are about a Greek Soldier (400-500 BC or so) who has a peculiar amnesia. Every morning, he reads the scroll he added to the day before to learn who he is and what his life is about.

Wolfe has a serious fetish about memory.


True dat, on the re-read. I'm re-reading His Wizard Knight novels as we speak, and if you're interested in 'fantasy' these are mo' bettah than the various Urth books. Duty, courage, fidelity are hidden in amongst the knighthood adventures. Wolfe is probably the most 'moral' writer we have these days in any genre. You just don't notice it as you read it, only later when you're thinking, "I wonder if he meant..." yes, he probably did.
I just re-read the Latro books again last month for the umpteenth time, there's a 3rd volume for those due out in October of this year. It'll be called Soldier of Sidon. One tip for you while you read the Latro stories...keep a copy of Herodotus 'the Histories' near by for reference. It won't hurt to have Bullfinch's mythology handy as well. Worth all the effort, they're my alltime favorites of all his books.

Thoughts on memory and how understanding affects it, as well as the 'unreliable narrator' are Wolfe's claim to fame. I saw a recent photo of him, he's no spring chicken. Let's enjoy him while we've got him. A national treasure, even if he can't be everyone's cup of tea.

nychief
03-14-2006, 10:20 PM
didn't realize tha reading was high brow, but currently reading Moby Dick, The Big White Lie and the christopher shinn collection of plays.

Misplaced_Chiefs_Fan
03-14-2006, 11:36 PM
I have most of the series (garage sale find) but got stuck about half-way through the second book (Dragon Knight).

Please tell me they get better.

I've enjoyed the series. However tastes may vary wildly with authors, so I can't swear <b>you'll</b> enjoy the remaining books. I did really enjoy the Dragon on the Border and the Dragon at War. Didn't especially enjoy The Dragon and the Djinn. It had a lot of good parts, but was a little slow in the middle.

Dickson is an acquired taste from what I've seen. I really, REALLY liked his "The Way of the Pilgrim", but even that had some slow spots in it.

Although, for just sheer insanity, "Earthman's Burden" and "Hoka", which he co-wrote with Poul Anderson, are worth the efforts to track down at a used-book store.

Adept Havelock
03-15-2006, 06:53 AM
True dat, on the re-read. I'm re-reading His Wizard Knight novels as we speak, and if you're interested in 'fantasy' these are mo' bettah than the various Urth books. Duty, courage, fidelity are hidden in amongst the knighthood adventures. Wolfe is probably the most 'moral' writer we have these days in any genre. You just don't notice it as you read it, only later when you're thinking, "I wonder if he meant..." yes, he probably did.
I just re-read the Latro books again last month for the umpteenth time, there's a 3rd volume for those due out in October of this year. It'll be called Soldier of Sidon. One tip for you while you read the Latro stories...keep a copy of Herodotus 'the Histories' near by for reference. It won't hurt to have Bullfinch's mythology handy as well. Worth all the effort, they're my alltime favorites of all his books.

Thoughts on memory and how understanding affects it, as well as the 'unreliable narrator' are Wolfe's claim to fame. I saw a recent photo of him, he's no spring chicken. Let's enjoy him while we've got him. A national treasure, even if he can't be everyone's cup of tea.

Thanks for the tip on Latro. You also might like:

Robert Borski's Solar Laybrinth, and his newer work The Long and Short of It. While I don't agree with all of his conclusions, he has some fascinating idea. He makes a fantastic case the main character of the New Sun isn't really Severian...but Father Inire. :hmmm:

"Attending Daedalus" is also a nice analysis of the Urth cycle, though the author eludes me at this time.

No spring chicken indeed. He's absolutely an acquired taste, but I believe him to be one of the finest authors writing today. Those looking for a quick "kill the bad guy, grab the treasure, and take over the kingdom" book will be disappointed. Thankfully.

Good point about his morality. To borrow a pharse from another author, Wolfe went a long way towards convincing me over the years that Religious Conservatism did not directly equal mean spiritedness. For that, I have a lot of gratitude.

Frosty
03-15-2006, 07:26 AM
Dickson is an acquired taste from what I've seen.

That may be the issue. His Wolf and Iron was in with the books I bought and I only made it half way through before giving up because it was soooo boring. I felt like I was reading a textbook on wolf behavior.

I'll get back to the Dragon series and see how it goes. Thanks.

Fairplay
03-15-2006, 07:40 AM
Im reading a book called Gulag by Anne Applebaum.

kregger
03-15-2006, 10:19 AM
The Camel Club by David Baldacci

MahiMike
03-15-2006, 11:00 AM
The World is Flat.

Excellent book about America, India, Globalizalition and outsourcing.

Gaz
03-15-2006, 11:09 AM
Persuader is a “Reacher” novel by Lee Child.

It is in the “disenchanted ÜberKool ex-military protagonist kicks butt” genre.

xoxo~
Gaz
Not stretching those brain muscles today.

redbrian
03-15-2006, 12:43 PM
One of my favorite "beach read" authors as well. I finally convinced my wife to read him, and I took a lot of enjoyment out of listening to her giggle and laugh as she read it next to me at night in bed (and yes, perverts, the book was the source of her humor).

Now she has about a year's worth of reading material, since he's written so many freaking books. I think I may have a couple of his that I haven't read, but I'm pretty close to exhausting the supply. I even read all of his Miami Herald articles that are collected in an anthology.

His books do make you laugh out loud, which makes you wonder how could Hollywood take a very funny book called Strip-Tease and just take all the humour out of it.

NewChief
03-15-2006, 12:47 PM
His books do make you laugh out loud, which makes you wonder how could Hollywood take a very funny book called Strip-Tease and just take all the humour out of it.

No kidding. I had never even made the connection that the movie was based on his book until I'd read a few of his books and saw some blurb that listed him as the author of the book upon which the movie was based.

Strip Tease is one of the few books of his I still haven't read. I think the reason I've put it off is because the movie wasn't very funny. I'm sure the book is great, though. I'll have to check it out from the library, now. I'm needing something new to read.

Inspector
03-15-2006, 01:49 PM
State of Fear

Michael Crighton(sp)

luv
03-15-2006, 01:56 PM
http://us.news1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/uc/20060315/sft060315.gif

David.
03-15-2006, 03:00 PM
I just finished The Things they Carried" by Tim O'Brien.


great read

Adept Havelock
03-15-2006, 06:35 PM
Im reading a book called Gulag by Anne Applebaum.

Good work, and solidly researched. I also suggest Solzhenitsyn's The Gulag Archipleago.

Mark M
03-16-2006, 12:14 AM
Island by Aldous Huxley.

Old, but interesting enough.

MM
~~:shrug:

Fish
03-16-2006, 12:22 AM
Aztec.... by Gary Jennings

Excellent historical read if you're interested in the Aztec society at all. Very good read....

Halfcan
03-16-2006, 12:31 AM
Ghost Rider-by Neil Peart

2nd time I have read it-great book!

greg63
03-16-2006, 12:36 AM
http://us.news1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/uc/20060315/sft060315.gif


ROFLROFL

keg in kc
03-16-2006, 12:37 AM
Old, but interesting enough.Kind of like you. Except for the "interesting" part.

luv
03-16-2006, 12:38 AM
There's a Christian author, Roger Elwood, who wrote a book called Angelwalk. EXCELLENT book. There's a trilogy based on it as well that includes Angelwalk, Fallen Angel, and Stedfast Gaurdian Angel.

Guru
03-16-2006, 12:39 AM
Violets are Blue - James Patterson An Alex Cross novel

greg63
03-16-2006, 12:39 AM
There's a Christian author, Roger Elwood, who wrote a book called Angelwalk. EXCELLENT book. There's a trilogy based on it as well that includes Angelwalk, Fallen Angel, and Stedfast Gaurdian Angel.


I'll look for them on Amazon. :thumb:

luv
03-16-2006, 12:40 AM
I'll look for them on Amazon. :thumb:
You MUST read Angelwalk in order to fully understand the other two.

greg63
03-16-2006, 12:44 AM
You MUST read Angelwalk in order to fully understand the other two.

I see; kinda like the "Left Behind" series.


Thanks for the tip.

Guru
03-16-2006, 12:45 AM
I see; kinda like the "Left Behind" series.


Thanks for the tip.

That was a great series.

greg63
03-16-2006, 12:48 AM
That is a great series. :thumb:


Fixed your post. :D

luv
03-16-2006, 12:49 AM
I see; kinda like the "Left Behind" series.


Thanks for the tip.
Kind of, but not really. You don't have to read Fallen Angel to understand Stedfast Guardian Angel or vice versa. They are both based on Angelwalk, only from different characters prespectives.

Guru
03-16-2006, 12:50 AM
:thumb:


Fixed your post. :D


Potato, potahto

Smartazz. ROFL

greg63
03-16-2006, 12:53 AM
Potato, potahto

Smartazz. ROFL


ROFLROFLROFL


Why yes, yes he is thank you.

greg63
03-16-2006, 01:03 AM
Kind of, but not really. You don't have to read Fallen Angel to understand Stedfast Guardian Angel or vice versa. They are both based on Angelwalk, only from different characters prespectives.


Sounds good. That is a neat way begin a series.

NewChief
03-16-2006, 06:04 AM
Just picked up Summerland by Michael Chabon

Frazod
06-14-2006, 11:25 PM
It took me about a month and a half to get through Alexander Hamilton (I basically only read on the train on the way home from work, and the book is 800 pages long). I know I was pimping this on another thread a couple of days ago, but I wanted resurrect this one.

Since then, I've read Devil in the White City, a book which weaves together the stories of Chicago's 1893 Columbian Exposition and a serial killer who operated in Chicago at the same time. An interesting, although somewhat disjointed, read.

And a couple of minutes ago, I finished Biggest Brother, a biography of Major Dick Winters from Band of Brothers. Excellent companion to BoB and goes much more in depth. I highly recommend it. What an amazing guy.

Must find new book tomorrow.

Misplaced_Chiefs_Fan
06-14-2006, 11:31 PM
Reading "Podcasting for Dummies" by Tee Morris and Evo Terra.

Oh yeah, and some Star Trek e-book called <i>S.C.E. #63, "Echoes of Coventry"</i> by some hack named Richard C. White. Just came out a few weeks ago. He obviously has pictures of the editor or something.

Frazod
06-15-2006, 12:14 AM
Forgot to mention Angels & Demons (I knew I was missing something for that long a time period).

Much, much better than Da Vinci Code. I wish they'd made A&D into a movie. Of course, nobody trying to make a movie from one of Dan Brown's books will ever even sniff the inside of the Vatican now. :D

patteeu
06-15-2006, 12:35 AM
Just started The Zenith Angle by Bruce Sterling. So far it's pretty good although it's a small departure from his cyberpunk roots. It's a novel about a computer security guy who leaves a high paying job in private industry after 9/11 to help fight the information security aspect of the GWoT.

Fish
06-15-2006, 12:38 AM
Want a really trippy read along the lines of Neil Gaiman?

In Silent Graves (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0843953292/103-8077816-9675069?v=glance&n=283155) by Gary A. Braunbeck.

It's a horror thriller that I happened upon and was completely unable to put down. The visual imagery is very unique and the writer's imagination is spellbinding. Really grabs you.

Read some of the reviews in the link to get a better idea..... they are obviously better at reviewing a book than I am.

Anyway, check it out.... It's a one of a kind book....

BigOlChiefsfan
06-15-2006, 06:54 AM
I really liked Cormac McCarthy's "No Country For Old Men". If you haven't read any of his stuff before, this is a good one to start with.

BucEyedPea
06-15-2006, 06:57 AM
History of Dead Languages
written in Sanskrit and Latin


Military Blunders of the British Empire

4th and Long
06-15-2006, 07:16 AM
http://www.nhccnm.org/Resources/curious-george.gif

BucEyedPea
06-15-2006, 07:17 AM
What are you tellin' us 4th....that you can't read so only do videos?
The thread is about reading.
That's a video.

4th and Long
06-15-2006, 07:23 AM
What are you tellin' us 4th....that you can't read so only do videos?
The thread is about reading.
That's a video.
Damnit! No wonder I can't get the pages to turn! :cuss:

Inspector
06-15-2006, 07:24 AM
Not very high brow, but I'm currently reading "Velocity" by Koontz.

I've have finished every Grisham I can find...

Raiderhader
06-15-2006, 09:15 AM
Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow.

Rain Man
06-15-2006, 09:24 AM
http://www.nhccnm.org/Resources/curious-george.gif


Are you at the part yet where the French accuse him of doping?

Rain Man
06-15-2006, 09:28 AM
I've got an unusual situation of having two books going now, which breaks a longstanding Rain Man rule.

At the gym, when I'm on the exercise machines, I'm reading "The Know-It-All", a light non-fiction book about a guy who is trying to read the Encyclopedia Brittanica.

At home, I'm reading "Lost in Tibet", a non-fiction book about a U.S. transport plane crew that got off course and crashed in Tibet during WWII. The book includes stories of the crew, but also discusses the political implications of their arrival in Tibet on Sino-Anglo-Tibetan relations.

Frazod
06-15-2006, 09:47 AM
Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow.

Cool. You'll love it.

4th and Long
06-15-2006, 09:52 AM
Are you at the part yet where the French accuse him of doping?
Yeah I got past that part and I'm now to the part where the French Drug Testing Agency was actually altering the test results.

Sam Hall
06-15-2006, 09:55 AM
"The Secret Man" by Bob Woodward

I'm curious about that stuff since I'm a journalism major. I just finished "All the President's Men". I've learned a lot about what it takes to be a good reporter than those books. The scope of Watergate was huge, and Woodward and Bernstein had to be persistent.

Frazod
06-15-2006, 10:09 AM
I think I'll go looking for Gates of Fire at lunch.

PunkinDrublic
06-15-2006, 10:13 AM
I'm re-reading "The Game, penetrating the secret society of pickup artists" by Neil Strauss. Without a doubt the most fascinating book I've ever read.

"The Rantings of a Single Male, Losing patience with feminism, political correctness and basically everything" by Thomas Ellis. Hilarious anti-feminism book.

bkkcoh
06-15-2006, 10:32 AM
I am about half way through with Ted Bell's Assasin

Raiderhader
06-15-2006, 10:38 AM
Cool. You'll love it.


My dad picked it up probably a year ago and gave me first shot at reading it, then shortly after decided he was ready for it and confiscated the damned thing. I just started to get back into it a couple of days ago. I decided that I not only needed to finish reading it, but to get back into reading again. I used to read all the time, now, very rarely.

ChiefFripp
06-15-2006, 10:50 AM
World War-Upton Sinclair

Baby Lee
06-15-2006, 11:01 AM
Wold War-Upton Sinclair
Do the Wolds win or lose? ;)

Frazod
06-15-2006, 11:01 AM
My dad picked it up probably a year ago and gave me first shot at reading it, then shortly after decided he was ready for it and confiscated the damned thing. I just started to get back into it a couple of days ago. I decided that I not only needed to finish reading it, but to get back into reading again. I used to read all the time, now, very rarely.

I'm reading more as well. It used to be that I'd only read two or three books a year. So far this year I've already read five or six, and the next one is hold at Borders, so I'll start it tonight.

Raiderhader
06-15-2006, 11:16 AM
I'm reading more as well. It used to be that I'd only read two or three books a year. So far this year I've already read five or six, and the next one is hold at Borders, so I'll start it tonight.


What is really sad is that I will start books, and then never finish them. I probably have 7-8 books partially read dating back 4-5 years. I don't know what has gotten into me, I use to tear through a Clancy novel in about a week, and that was in my early teens, very early teens. I guess the older you get the more distractions life has for you....

Frazod
06-15-2006, 08:46 PM
Gates of Fire - An Epic Novel of the Battle of Thermopylae

Three hundred Spartans hold of an army of nearly two million Persians at a narrow mountain pass. Lots of historical accuracy (accounts from Herodotus). Spartans gave the Greeks enough time to hold off Persaians and preserve Athens and early Western democracy...

Oddly enough, it's by Steven Pressfield, who wrote The Legend of Bagger Vance.

I'm about 60 pages into this and it is excellent. Thanks for the recommendation. :thumb:

I also picked up American Sphinx, which I'll read next. I guess I'll take Banyon's advice and give that weasel Jefferson a chance. :D

NewChief
06-15-2006, 08:52 PM
Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion. It's cool so far.

Finally finished the Little Friend by Donna Tartt, which was a huge dissapointment to me after the Secret History, which I loved. The Little Friend seemed to be way too much east coast intellectual trying to explore and 'honor' Southern tradition. She's no Flannery O'Connor, that's for sure.

Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson was before that, and it was excellent. Also very interesting in light of the recent "wire tapping" brouhaha. It will give you a unique insight into data mining and the way pattern analysis works.

Picked up Portnoy's Complaint by Philip Roth, due to his ubiquitousness in that best American novels of the last 25 years. I'm underimpressed. Maybe I'm just not east coast Jewish enough, but the novel was just... irritating. I've got 3 Roth novels checked out, so I'm hoping one of the others hooks me a little better. That's about it for me on the literary front.

DJay23
06-15-2006, 08:56 PM
The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova.

Great mix of personal memoirs, historical facts, and fiction. It's actually 2 stories at the same time, about the search for a still living Dracula. Not hokie at all.

Mark M
06-15-2006, 08:57 PM
Just finished The Te of Piglet by Benjamin Hoff.

Okay ... not exactly "high-brow" (it's basically Taoism for Dummies) but it was interesting and a good, light read.

And after reading about 300 books in college (I have a Literature Degree) I'm all "high browed" out ... even now, ten years later.

MM
~~:shake:

NewChief
06-15-2006, 09:00 PM
Just finished The Te of Piglet by Benjamin Hoff.

Okay ... not exactly "high-brow" (it's basically Taoism for Dummies) but it was interesting and a good, light read.

And after reading about 300 books in college (I have a Literature Degree) I'm all "high browed" out ... even now, ten years later.

MM
~~:shake:

Te of Piglet was excellent. I dug it more than the Tao of Poo.

DJay23
06-15-2006, 09:01 PM
It took me about a month and a half to get through Alexander Hamilton (I basically only read on the train on the way home from work, and the book is 800 pages long). I know I was pimping this on another thread a couple of days ago, but I wanted resurrect this one.

Since then, I've read Devil in the White City, a book which weaves together the stories of Chicago's 1893 Columbian Exposition and a serial killer who operated in Chicago at the same time. An interesting, although somewhat disjointed, read.

And a couple of minutes ago, I finished Biggest Brother, a biography of Major Dick Winters from Band of Brothers. Excellent companion to BoB and goes much more in depth. I highly recommend it. What an amazing guy.

Must find new book tomorrow.
Dick Winters doesn't live far from me in Hershey, PA. I was telling my dad the other day that if I ever ran into him somewhere, I'd be more starstruck than if i met ANY actor, musician, or athlete. He's larger than life through both the book and mini series.

I'll have to check that book out. Is this his autobiography? I saw that advertised on history Channel when they were playing Band of Brothers a couple weeks ago.

DJay23
06-15-2006, 09:03 PM
Forgot to mention Angels & Demons (I knew I was missing something for that long a time period).

Much, much better than Da Vinci Code. I wish they'd made A&D into a movie. Of course, nobody trying to make a movie from one of Dan Brown's books will ever even sniff the inside of the Vatican now. :D
From what I've read, it's in the works.

DJay23
06-15-2006, 09:04 PM
The World is Flat.

Excellent book about America, India, Globalizalition and outsourcing.
I think that guy was on the Daily Show not too long ago. Really seemed to know his shit.

Mark M
06-15-2006, 09:05 PM
Te of Piglet was excellent. I dug it more than the Tao of Poo.

Without a doubt, although he does get a lot more political in it. There was even one point where the writing seemed kinda pissed. He wasn't necessarily wrong, of course ... :)

I wish I would've read them in college—I've had them since then and just never got around to it.

MM
~~:shrug:

Mark M
06-15-2006, 09:07 PM
I think that guy was on the Daily Show not too long ago. Really seemed to know his shit.

I believe it's Thomas Friedman ...

and yes and no -- his theories seem to make since, but he's been spectacularly wrong a few times (but who hasn't?).

MM
~~:)

Bob Dole
06-15-2006, 09:09 PM
A Dirty Job by Christopher Moore.

That guy cracks Bob Dole up.

Frazod
06-15-2006, 09:09 PM
Dick Winters doesn't live far from me in Hershey, PA. I was telling my dad the other day that if I ever ran into him somewhere, I'd be more starstruck than if i met ANY actor, musician, or athlete. He's larger than life through both the book and mini series.

I'll have to check that book out. Is this his autobiography? I saw that advertised on history Channel when they were playing Band of Brothers a couple weeks ago.

Agreed. Winters is amazing I dusted off the Band of Brothers DVDs and I'm going to start rewatching them tonight.

And the book isn't an autobiography. The author is Larry Alexander. He did work closely with Winters, though.

DJay23
06-15-2006, 09:11 PM
Agreed. Winters is amazing I dusted off the Band of Brothers DVDs and I'm going to start rewatching them tonight.

And the book isn't an autobiography. The author is Larry Alexander. He did work closely with Winters, though.
It's now on my summer reading list.

Adept Havelock
06-15-2006, 10:07 PM
A Dirty Job by Christopher Moore.

That guy cracks Bob Dole up.

Christopher Moore is fantastic. I still feel indebted to a friend who gave me a copy of Practical Demonkeeping. Lamb, The Stupidest Angel, and Fluke were also fantastic.

If you like him, you might like one I just finished. Came out a while back, but they finally released it in Hardback. It's called "Good Omens" by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman. One of the funniest things I've read in years.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0060853964/sr=8-1/qid=1150427165/ref=pd_bbs_1/102-3803437-7830510?%5Fencoding=UTF8

Dirty Job just got on the to-read list. I didn't know he had a new one. Thanks!

nychief
06-15-2006, 10:08 PM
first off, I love that reading is considered "high brow."

But I am reading "Hetty: the genius and madness of america's first female tycoon." and re-reading "moby dick."

Bob Dole
06-15-2006, 10:14 PM
If you like him, you might like one I just finished. Came out a while back, but they finally released it in Hardback. It's called "Good Omens" by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman. One of the funniest things I've read in years.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0060853964/sr=8-1/qid=1150427165/ref=pd_bbs_1/102-3803437-7830510?%5Fencoding=UTF8


Bob Dole will check it out. Thanks!

Adept Havelock
06-15-2006, 10:35 PM
first off, I love that reading is considered "high brow."

But I am reading "Hetty: the genius and madness of america's first female tycoon." and re-reading "moby dick."

The book on Hetty is something else. I've not read it through, but skimmed it a couple of times. She was indeed a miser, but for a woman to pull off what she did in that time was an accomplishment. Kind of a shame it's overshadowed by the fact she let her son die because she was cheap.

Bob Dole will check it out. Thanks!

Happy to be of service, Bob. Drop me a PM and let me know what you think. I can't wait for Dirty Job to get here...already ordered it from Amazon. :D

Bob Dole
06-15-2006, 10:44 PM
Happy to be of service, Bob. Drop me a PM and let me know what you think. I can't wait for Dirty Job to get here...already ordered it from Amazon. :D

It's got his typically funny narative style.

While you wait, you might visit his website and check out his "Beta Male Manifesto" posted in the forums. It pertains to the book.

Nzoner
06-15-2006, 10:58 PM
I just finished my first Jeffery Deaver book The Coffin Dancer it definitely won't be my last.

"Fair warning to newcomers: Author Deaver is just as cunning and deceptive as his killer; don't assume he's run out of tricks until you've run out of pages." – Kirkus Reviews

Fish
06-15-2006, 11:25 PM
Te of Piglet was excellent. I dug it more than the Tao of Poo.

Did you catch the episode of Rescue Me where they were making fun of Tao of Poo?

Classic.....

Frazod
06-15-2006, 11:29 PM
It's now on my summer reading list.
One thing I learned from the the Winters biography - Albert Blithe, the guy who was the main character of Episode 3 (he was the one who suffered from hysterical blindness) did, in fact, recover from his wounds, stayed in the Army, went on to serve in Korea, and eventually died in 1968. At the end of Episode 3, which I am currently watching, we are told that he never recovered from his wounds and died in 1948. Band of Brothers was amazingly accurate, but that was one of a handful of glaring mistakes that were apparently included for dramatic effect.

Frazod
06-22-2006, 05:48 PM
I'm about 3/4 of the way through Gates of Fire.

This is the best book I've read in 25 years; it's been that long since I read Dune. It reminds me of Dune in the way it completely immerses the reader into the lives of the Spartans through the eyes of an outsider (the refugee Xeo) as Dune completely immersed the reader in the lives of the Fremen through the eyes of outsiders (Paul and Jessica).

I can't recommend this book highly enough. Wow.

SBK
06-22-2006, 05:54 PM
Okay, here's mine...

Just got done with:
Cherie Carter-Scott "If Life is a Game These are the Rules."

It's Awesome, a great read.

Reading now:
John Maxwell, "Failing Forward."
Fred Gratzon, "The Lazy Way to Success."
Lazy Way is incredible, he's 10-15 years ahead of his time, and about that long from now all business books will be like his. I haven't read much past the first chapter of Failing Forward, so I can't tell you much about it at this point.

Gaz
06-23-2006, 10:41 AM
I also enjoyed Gates of Fire. FYI, Frank Miller did a graphic novel about Thermopyle called 300. A completely different approach from Gates of Fire, but still an interesting read.

Right now, I am reading Dragon by Steven Brust. It is part of the Vlad Taltos series. Very reminiscent of Zelazny. Light reading.

xoxo~
Gaz
Resting his brain cells for a while.

Jenson71
06-23-2006, 10:55 AM
I'm reading The Killer Angels for an American Civ class.

I bought Things Fall Apart cheap today, I've read about half of it and for some reason, never finished it.

DanT
06-23-2006, 11:36 AM
I just finished The Leopard (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0679731210/ref=cm_bg_f_1/104-8808369-9652710?v=glance&n=283155), one of the best books I've ever read.

jspchief
06-23-2006, 11:38 AM
Well, I just started The Winter King last night, and so far it's not grabbing me. Granted, I only read for about thirty minutes, but I don't care for the first person narrative style. Hopefully it picks up.I'm now on the third and final book in this series. It was a slow start, but really grabbed me once I got going. A great variation on the classic tale of King Arthur, from a unique perspective.

The Winter King, Enemy of God, and Excalibur, by Bernard Cornwell.

Great light reading.

Jenson71
06-23-2006, 11:43 AM
I just finished The Leopard (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0679731210/ref=cm_bg_f_1/104-8808369-9652710?v=glance&n=283155), one of the best books I've ever read.

Very cool. I have the Criterion film, with Burt Lancaster. Sort of an Italian Gone With the Wind, I really love the movie.

DanT
06-23-2006, 11:59 AM
Very cool. I have the Criterion film, with Burt Lancaster. Sort of an Italian Gone With the Wind, I really love the movie.

I'm looking forward to seeing the movie. I'm hoping that one of the libraries around here has it. One of the list makers on amazon.com has "The Leopard" on the top of his lists for best book/DVD combinations.

Over-Head
06-23-2006, 12:35 PM
Given that I have a 45min wait getting on the boat in the morning,
a 20 min crossing,
then half hr or so wait at night,plus the 20 min crossing time, I find myself with LOTS of reading time.:)
Done everything by Cussler, Marcinko, Coonts, Evanovich and 90%of Jack Higgins.
Just finished " Storm Warning" and started another book in the same crossing.
I can have any number of books on the go at one time.
Current books I have on the go atm:
-in the wife’s car is "Immediate Action" by Andy McNab (Think Rouge Warrior only not funny) having a hard time finishing this one
-my car "Angel of Death" by Jack Higgins
-beside my easy chair ""Rip Tide" by Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child
-in my lunch box "She’s having a Baby-(and I’m having a breakdown") by James Douglas Barron (Funny is not the word)

And no matter how bad the book is, I ALWAYS finish reading it.

TrickyNicky
06-23-2006, 01:22 PM
I finished Day by Day Armageddon by J.L. Bourne the other day. It's about a navy pilot surviving the Zombocalypse (Zombie Apocalypse) through the use of journal entries. It is bare bones with no prose or other literary devices and is a quick read. I would recommend it if you are interested in Zombies and the destruction/survival of.

WilliamTheIrish
07-17-2006, 10:09 PM
I am currently reading the book Flags Of Our Fathers by James Bradley.

The book is an account of the six men who raised the flag on Iwo Jima. I'm drawn to this part of WWII because my Dad fought on the two islands that led to the battle of Iwo Jima- Saipan and Tinian.

I read this novel and think of the baby faces - like my dad - who endured jungle fighting, rooting Japanese out of caves and the like, and how it shaped his life after the war.

The book goes into great detail about these men in that same way. Especially their early years.

Only most of them didn't come home form the battle.

A ver compelling and (for me) a very emotional book.

WilliamTheIrish
07-17-2006, 10:17 PM
Also just recently read george Friedman's: America's Secret War

It's a great read on today's stategies in fighting the WoT. It's documants our successes and and our failures. He blisters the Bush Administration for their blunders.

It also documents the history of the bin Laden terror movement and the West's responses to them.

All in all a very good, readable book.

Jenson71
07-17-2006, 10:21 PM
I am currently reading the book Flags Of Our Fathers by James Bradley.

The book is an account of the six men who raised the flag on Iwo Jima. I'm drawn to this part of WWII because my Dad fought on the two islands that led to the battle of Iwo Jima- Saipan and Tinian.

I read this novel and think of the baby faces - like my dad - who endured jungle fighting, rooting Japanese out of caves and the like, and how it shaped his life after the war.

The book goes into great detail about these men in that same way. Especially their early years.

Only most of them didn't come home form the battle.

A ver compelling and (for me) a very emotional book.

Did you know Mr. Clint Eastwood is directing the film adaption of this, with the same title? Comes to theaters in October I believe.

WilliamTheIrish
07-17-2006, 10:26 PM
Did you know Mr. Clint Eastwood is directing the film adaption of this, with the same title? Comes to theaters in October I believe.


I thought I read that on the cover of my book. But as I look at it right now, it doesn't say that.

I think the concept is safe in the Clint Eastwood's hands.

Big Dick Jones
07-17-2006, 11:10 PM
I thought I read that on the cover of my book. But as I look at it right now, it doesn't say that.

I think the concept is safe in the Clint Eastwood's hands.
Hey, William, I didn't know you liked books? Hell, I didn't know you could read what with that KSU education. I have a couple of books you might like. You only need the small crayola pack and the lines are wide enough even you can stay between them. PM me and I will send you these books. Please post your creations on the Planet. Your pal, Big Dick Jones

WilliamTheIrish
07-18-2006, 10:27 AM
Hey, William, I didn't know you liked books? Hell, I didn't know you could read what with that KSU education. I have a couple of books you might like. You only need the small crayola pack and the lines are wide enough even you can stay between them. PM me and I will send you these books. Please post your creations on the Planet. Your pal, Big Dick Jones

No Dick or Stones (yes skip, we all know it's you)

you still haven't told everybody why you bailed out on your old screen name. All that hubris about how many "100 post threads" you've started finally wear thin on you? Or did WPI finally "kill for a poster like you?" Personally, I think the you got spanked by everybody over the n00b thing, and you ran away. Like a Kotter. Embarrassing.

You friggin' putz.

Speaking of education, that KU psychology degree must come in pretty handy when you're setting up the azimuth on dish?

In the future try to keep with the theme of the thread. I realize that reading the DTV installation manual probably maximizes your synaptic potential, but I promise not to laugh.

Really. I won't.

ChiefFripp
07-18-2006, 10:30 AM
Reading the classic 'The Brothers Karamazov'by Dostoevsky. It's pretty thick book,especially considering I had been sticking to short ones like 'The Great Gatsby' lately.

Frazod
07-18-2006, 10:34 AM
I'm about 2/3rds of the way through American Sphinx, a Thomas Jefferson biography.

And I still think he's a friggin weasel.

NLU Tailgater
07-18-2006, 10:36 AM
Almost finished with "A Confederacy of Dunces" by John Kennedy Toole. I find myself quoting Ignatius daily....great book.
Plus Ignatius' character has given me plenty of motivation to stay in shape and keep the ol' valve functioning.

Frazod
07-26-2006, 08:36 PM
I'm about 2/3rds of the way through American Sphinx, a Thomas Jefferson biography.

And I still think he's a friggin weasel.

I finished this a few days ago (felt like a homework assignment towards the end). It wasn't a terribly good book, and Jefferson was most definitely a friggin weasel. This quote from Hamilton sums him up perfectly: "I admit that his politics are tinctured with fanaticism, that he is too much in earnest in his democracy, that he has been a mischievous enemy to the principal measures of the past [Washington's] administration, that he is crafty and persevering in his objects, that he is not scrupulous about the means of success, nor very mindful of the truth, and that he is a contemptible hypocrite." Definitely not the pillar of virtue we have all been led to believe. Not even remotely close.

But enough with that bastard. Just started another Steven Pressfield novel - Tides of War. Excellent so far.

WilliamTheIrish
07-26-2006, 09:09 PM
Finished Flags Of Our Fathers a while back. All I can say is.... there isn't anything I can say. It's a most incredible story. Hopefully, Clint Eastwood will be able to bring the book to life. At many points it left me in tears.

I've been facinated by the fact that so many men who fought in that war came home and never mentioned their duty. Ever. The characters in this book did it, and my Dad did it too.

Now, I understand why.

I'll be looking to for more books covering the Pacific theater, especially the battles that took place on Saipan where my Dad fought.

But I need a break from that stuff.

So I broke out Jack Nicklaus' Golf MY Way. An instructional book about all aspects of the game. The book won't make me cry. The way I play golf makes me want to sometimes.

Jenson71
07-26-2006, 09:22 PM
Finished Flags Of Our Fathers a while back. All I can say is.... there isn't anything I can say. It's a most incredible story. Hopefully, Clint Eastwood will be able to bring the book to life. At many points it left me in tears.

I've been facinated by the fact that so many men who fought in that war came home and never mentioned their duty. Ever. The characters in this book did it, and my Dad did it too.

Now, I understand why.

I'll be looking to for more books covering the Pacific theater, especially the battles that took place on Saipan where my Dad fought.

But I need a break from that stuff.

I hope so too. I think Eastwood is making another film after Flags of Our Fathers, a sort of companion piece, that shows the Japanese side of the war.

When you return to the Pacific campaign, I think you should check out "With the Old Breed" by E.B. Sledge. His memior of his Marine experiences on the islands of Peleliu and Okinawa. I just finished it for my class, and it's really good. John Keegan, the great British historian and writer, used "With the Old Breed" and some of it's stories for his own books on World War II.

Jenson71
08-02-2006, 05:47 PM
http://images.usatoday.com/life/_photos/2006/08/02/flags-large.jpg

The new poster to Flags of Our Fathers

http://www.usatoday.com/life/movies/news/2006-08-01-flags-firstlook_x.htm

Clint Eastwood's new film Flags of Our Fathers looks at the back story of one of the nation's most iconic images of unity in the face of war.

The two-time Oscar-winning director focuses on the raising of the American flag during World War II's battle of Iwo Jima. The moment was captured in photos and on film and later immortalized as a sculpture for the Marine Corps War Memorial in Arlington, Va.

Executive producer Robert Lorenz says Eastwood's film explores the men in photographer Joe Rosenthal's Pulitzer Prize-winning picture. Some did not survive the battle.

"You can't really recognize the faces of the people in it. It's all anonymous," Lorenz says. "And yet there's a desire to know more about them, and individualize them. This is the story behind the picture and the lives that came together because of it."

DJJasonp
08-02-2006, 05:54 PM
Is Juggs considered "high brow"????

:)

plbrdude
08-02-2006, 06:17 PM
getting ready to get into Why Revival Tarries by Leonard Ravenhill

Jenson71
08-09-2006, 03:55 PM
Right now I'm reading a book called "How to Read a Book". I've learned a lot so far today that can help me. A great tip for me: become an active reader by following the fingers.

When I was learning to read, it was a good thing if you could read without having your fingers do the guiding for you. But I like this strategy and will continue using it.

Who else uses follows their fingers while reading?

ck_IN
08-09-2006, 03:58 PM
At the moment I'm reading 'Beginning Perl' and 'Rman backup and recovery'

Gawd I'm such a geek! :banghead:

WilliamTheIrish
08-09-2006, 04:50 PM
I hope so too. I think Eastwood is making another film after Flags of Our Fathers, a sort of companion piece, that shows the Japanese side of the war.

When you return to the Pacific campaign, I think you should check out "With the Old Breed" by E.B. Sledge. His memior of his Marine experiences on the islands of Peleliu and Okinawa. I just finished it for my class, and it's really good. John Keegan, the great British historian and writer, used "With the Old Breed" and some of it's stories for his own books on World War II.

Thanks much, Jenson. I'll look into that book soon.

I'm reading a rather funny book titled The Flat Stick by Noah Liberman.

Funny as all hell.

BigOlChiefsfan
08-09-2006, 05:22 PM
Just finished 'The Dance of Time' by David Drake/Eric Flint. Final book in their Belisaurius alt. history series, not bad but Drake's done better. About to start Captain Alatriste, a spanish 'swashbuckler'. Knowing some of y'all like historical fiction, here's a link to Amazon's write up. On sale there, cheap.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000GFR9O4/sr=8-1/qid=1155162012/ref=sr_1_1/104-8556731-9040727?ie=UTF8

Adept Havelock
08-09-2006, 05:39 PM
Just finished S.M. Stirling's "The Domination". Disturbing piece of fiction, that.

It's a what-if, with a "point of departure" from our timeline around the time of the American Revolution. Rather fanciful, but a very good analysis of "can absolute evil exist".

One hell of a dystopia....Basically, in the Domination of the Draka (named for Sir Francis Drake) (a rival to the US) there are two classes. Citizens, and serfs (read slaves). They have one long term goal..to put the rest of humanity "Under the Yoke". It's the kind of place that embraced Nietzche and the ideals of "Will to Power".

Stirling may actually have invented a state worse than Orwell's, if considerably less plausible.

I preferred his "Emberverse" series that starts with "Dies the Fire", where on one day in March 1998, all High-density energy technologies (I.E. gas and steam engines, electricity, even gunpowder and explosives) suddenly stop working. Things get very very grim, very fast. That said, I found it a fun read.

BigOlChiefsfan
08-09-2006, 06:19 PM
Sterling's Draka novels aren't much 'fun', but he made his bones with 'em, opened the door for everything else that followed. Let me suggest his alt-history work w/David Drake. The General was the orignal name of the series, Baen just re-released it as a 2 book set (the Conqueror / the Warlord). Drake and Sterling put their hero on a distant planet settled by humans. The plot basically follows the real life exploits of Roman general Belisarius' with a sci-fi twist here and there. Considering that Count Belisarius rocked in real life, it's pretty good stuff, and a decent collaboration. Drake tends to rein in Steriling, who's a pretty good writer so long as someone keeps him pointed in the right direction.

Frazod
10-05-2006, 09:34 PM
Well, let's see. Since I last posted here, I've finished Tides of War and two other Pressfield novels, Last of the Amazons and The Afghan Campaign. All three are excellent, although none is as good as Gates of Fire. After that I read The Black Dahlia, since I heard the movie sucked balls but the book was great. It was.

I'm currently reading New Found Land, about Lewis and Clark. It's rather odd, in that its written in poetic prose from the viewpoint of multiple historic characters, including Lewis' dog (I didn't realize that when I picked it up on sale for $2.50). It's interesting, though. And it reads quick - I'll probably be done with it early next week.

Anybody got any more good recommendations out there?

NewChief
10-05-2006, 09:38 PM
Just finished Richard Wright's Early Works. Lots of cool short stories.

cdcox
10-05-2006, 09:39 PM
Well, let's see. Since I last posted here, I've finished Tides of War and two other Pressfield novels, Last of the Amazons and The Afghan Campaign. All three are excellent, although none is as good as Gates of Fire. After that I read The Black Dahlia, since I heard the movie sucked balls but the book was great. It was.

I'm currently reading New Found Land, about Lewis and Clark. It's rather odd, in that its written in poetic prose from the viewpoint of multiple historic characters, including Lewis' dog (I didn't realize that when I picked it up on sale for $2.50). It's interesting, though. And it reads quick - I'll probably be done with it early next week.

Anybody got any more good recommendations out there?


I just finished the Black Dahlia this evening. Second time trough. I'll probably watch the movie once it comes out on DVD. Ellroy is my absolute favorite author. Try LA Confidential if you haven't read it. Then American Tabloid and the Cold 6000.

I'm going to read Panic by James Abbott, starting in just a few minutes.

noa
10-05-2006, 09:40 PM
Well, let's see. Since I last posted here, I've finished Tides of War and two other Pressfield novels, Last of the Amazons and The Afghan Campaign. All three are excellent, although none is as good as Gates of Fire. After that I read The Black Dahlia, since I heard the movie sucked balls but the book was great. It was.

I'm currently reading New Found Land, about Lewis and Clark. It's rather odd, in that its written in poetic prose from the viewpoint of multiple historic characters, including Lewis' dog (I didn't realize that when I picked it up on sale for $2.50). It's interesting, though. And it reads quick - I'll probably be done with it early next week.

Anybody got any more good recommendations out there?


I just finished "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close," and I thought it was excellent. The story centers around a boy whose father died in 9/11. The book is not as depressing as it may sound. I generally don't like stories where the narrator is young, but it works perfectly for this book.
Here's the link on Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/Extremely-Loud-Incredibly-Close-Novel/dp/0618711651/sr=1-1/qid=1160102428/ref=sr_1_1/002-9216348-7036026?ie=UTF8&s=books

Frazod
10-05-2006, 09:41 PM
I just finished the Black Dahlia this evening. Second time trough. I'll probably watch the movie once it comes out on DVD. Ellroy is my absolute favorite author. Try LA Confidential if you haven't read it. Then American Tabloid and the Cold 6000.

I'm going to read Panic by James Abbott, starting in just a few minutes.

L.A. Confidential is in my all time top 5 favorite movies, but I've never read the book. I'm definitely going to read more of Ellroy's stuff.

Frazod
10-05-2006, 09:43 PM
I just finished "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close," and I thought it was excellent. The story centers around a boy whose father died in 9/11. The book is not as depressing as it may sound. I generally don't like stories where the narrator is young, but it works perfectly for this book.
Here's the link on Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/Extremely-Loud-Incredibly-Close-Novel/dp/0618711651/sr=1-1/qid=1160102428/ref=sr_1_1/002-9216348-7036026?ie=UTF8&s=books

Hmm. Sounds interesting.

the Talking Can
10-05-2006, 09:48 PM
Thomas Pynchon has a new book out in November.

makes life worth living....

cdcox
10-05-2006, 09:49 PM
L.A. Confidential is in my all time top 5 favorite movies, but I've never read the book. I'm definitely going to read more of Ellroy's stuff.

I love how the heroes in his books are extremely flawed to the point they are no longer heroes.

His writing style starts changing a bit in his latter books, to a terse, staccato type prose. The transition starts in LA Confidential and comes to full bloom in White Jazz, and the American Tabloid - Cold 6000 duo. The plots get a whole lot more complicated too.

Adept Havelock
10-05-2006, 09:56 PM
Sterling's Draka novels aren't much 'fun', but he made his bones with 'em, opened the door for everything else that followed. Let me suggest his alt-history work w/David Drake. The General was the orignal name of the series, Baen just re-released it as a 2 book set (the Conqueror / the Warlord). Drake and Sterling put their hero on a distant planet settled by humans. The plot basically follows the real life exploits of Roman general Belisarius' with a sci-fi twist here and there. Considering that Count Belisarius rocked in real life, it's pretty good stuff, and a decent collaboration. Drake tends to rein in Steriling, who's a pretty good writer so long as someone keeps him pointed in the right direction.



I'll give it a try. Thanks for the tip. I really enjoyed Stirlings collaborations with Jerry Pournelle (The Mercenary/Sparta books). They were recently issued in an omnibus called "The Prince". John Christian Falkenberg became one of my favorite fictional characters. These sound as interesting.


BTW- I recently read a few by John Ringo that were...interesting. The "Posleen" books. I actually enjoyed them. The author calls it "Carnography", but it seemed like "Starship Troopers on Crack" to me.

Thomas Pynchon has a new book out in November.

makes life worth living....


Motion seconded.

'Hamas' Jenkins
10-05-2006, 09:58 PM
Famous Women by Boccacio, The Legend of Good Women by Chaucer, An Accented Cinema by this dude named Naficy and various other texts :shake:

Brock
10-05-2006, 10:00 PM
I love how the heroes in his books are extremely flawed to the point they are no longer heroes.

His writing style starts changing a bit in his latter books, to a terse, staccato type prose. The transition starts in LA Confidential and comes to full bloom in White Jazz, and the American Tabloid - Cold 6000 duo. The plots get a whole lot more complicated too.

American Tabloid is the BOMB.

jiveturkey
10-05-2006, 10:03 PM
http://www.alphabetofmanliness.com/

By Maddox

Funniest book ever

Adept Havelock
10-05-2006, 10:05 PM
I love how the heroes in his books are extremely flawed to the point they are no longer heroes.

His writing style starts changing a bit in his latter books, to a terse, staccato type prose. The transition starts in LA Confidential and comes to full bloom in White Jazz, and the American Tabloid - Cold 6000 duo. The plots get a whole lot more complicated too.

Anti Heroes? Try Stephen Donaldson's mystery series "The Man Who...". The first one is "The Man who Killed his Brother". Mick Axbrewder and Ginny Fistoulari will get and keep your attention.

cdcox
10-05-2006, 10:07 PM
American Tabloid is the BOMB.

Agreed. I liked it a little better than The Cold 6000.

Ari Chi3fs
10-05-2006, 11:17 PM
http://ec3.images-amazon.com/images/P/0735203636.01._AA240_SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg

FAX
10-05-2006, 11:42 PM
http://ec3.images-amazon.com/images/P/0735203636.01._AA240_SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg

Are you really reading that, Mr. Ari Chi3fs?

FAX

BucEyedPea
10-06-2006, 12:06 AM
Jenna Jameson's "How To Make Love Like A Porn Star"

An autobiography with a victim narrative at first, some celebrity gossip...Howard Stern is really well endowed, but underneath it all Jenna is a girl just wanting to be a loving wife and mother. So it's really turns out to be a book about family values. :thumb:

NewChief
10-06-2006, 05:13 AM
Thomas Pynchon has a new book out in November.

makes life worth living....

Looks like it is going to be awesome, but I really hope it's more readable than Mason and Dixon.

Easy 6
10-06-2006, 08:02 AM
Son of the Morning Star, a Custer bio.

the Talking Can
10-06-2006, 08:34 AM
Looks like it is going to be awesome, but I really hope it's more readable than Mason and Dixon.

funny you mentioned that....I just started M&D...for the second time...it's the only book I haven't/can't get through...I know if I'd hang in there for 100 pages it would be worth it, but the writing is borderline awful in spots....unlike Gravity's Rainbow, which is perfect from the first sentence, "A screaming comes across the sky."

Otter
10-06-2006, 08:40 AM
Last three book:

Band of Brothers - 5/5 stars
Inside Delta Force - 3/5 stars
The Naked Soldier: A True Story Of The French Foreign Legion - work in progress

I'm on a military kick in the books department

Lzen
10-06-2006, 08:41 AM
- Fargo Rock City by Cuck Klosterman
- Citizen Soldiers by Stephen E. Ambrose

OnTheWarpath58
10-06-2006, 08:51 AM
Currently reading: The Human Predator by Katherine Ramsland.

Recently finished: Without Conscience by Robert Hare

What's The Matter With Kansas? by Thomas Frank

Flying Blind by Michael Smerconish

NewChief
10-06-2006, 08:52 AM
funny you mentioned that....I just started M&D...for the second time...it's the only book I haven't/can't get through...I know if I'd hang in there for 100 pages it would be worth it, but the writing is borderline awful in spots....unlike Gravity's Rainbow, which is perfect from the first sentence, "A screaming comes across the sky."

You're not alone in your struggles with M&D. I've read most of Pynchon's works twice (some of them 3 times), but I haven't gotten past page 25 or so of M&D. A friend of mine who is an equally huge Pynchon fan has had the same problem.

Brock
10-06-2006, 08:53 AM
L.A. Confidential is in my all time top 5 favorite movies, but I've never read the book. I'm definitely going to read more of Ellroy's stuff.

The movie was great, but it isn't really much like the book. The book is really better in a lot of ways.

tiptap
10-06-2006, 08:55 AM
You're not alone in your struggles with M&D. I've read most of Pynchon's works twice (some of them 3 times), but I haven't gotten past page 25 or so of M&D. A friend of mine who is an equally huge Pynchon fan has had the same problem.


Ditto

Jenson71
10-10-2006, 12:16 AM
Reading Crime and Punishment now for Humanities III. Surprisingly, not difficult and not boring like you might think of 19th century literature. It's got suspense, I'm really liking it.

Ecto-I
10-10-2006, 12:28 AM
David Copperfield by Charles Dickens...I'm about half way through this monster, but its starting to drag a bit :(

luv
10-10-2006, 01:03 AM
David Copperfield by Charles Dickens...I'm about half way through this monster, but its starting to drag a bit :(
The boys in The Cider House Rules really liked that story.

luv
10-10-2006, 01:05 AM
I am about to start chapter 2 in 1984 by George Orwell. Next in my lineup is Animal Farm.

joesomebody
10-10-2006, 11:55 AM
A Meeting at Corvallis by S. M. Sterling

I would read the first two in the series though before picking this one up. Someone on the board got me started on all of this alternate history stuff.

I beleive the board reco was An Island in the Sea of Time or something like that. These three of his are far better than his Nantucket series.

svuba
10-12-2006, 02:41 AM
Many Thanks to the people who have made suggestions on this Thread.

I have read quite of few books based on planet recommendations, here is a short list of the books that I have read this year that I highly recommend:

Snow Crash - Neal Stephenson - A masterpiece of Fiction with frighteningly accurate view of the future written in 1992, The Meteverse is here!

In Cold Blood - Truman Capote - "The best Documentary account of an American crime ever written" - I couldn't put it down.

The Smartest Guys in the room - The amazing rise & Scandalous Fall of Enron - This was a great read, The crap that they were pulling at ENRON was mind-numbingly ridiculous, the most amazing thing was how everybody went along with it because nobody wanted to rock the boat.

102 Minutes - The Untold story of the fight to survive inside the twin towers- Fascinating book, with details of how people survived, and how brave some people were, and what a ridiculous task the Firemen faced that day. Compiled from interviews with survivors, and transcripts of all the radio communication during the rescue effort.

Parallel Worlds - Michio Kaku - A tour of the cosmos & the Future of mans place in the universe - Excellent book, and an easier read than Brian Greene's The Elegant Universe. Both are eye opening.


The following are now in my Amazon Shopping cart thanks to the planet:

A Confederacy of Dunces
Band of Brothers
American Tabloid

Fairplay
11-10-2006, 03:57 PM
I just read 1776. I recommend it. It makes me wonder if i lived in America back then what kind of patriot i would be?

I was wondering if anyone else was going to get the new book by Jeff Shaara titled The Rising Tide.

I think he is a great author. Plus he provides actual historic facts as accurate as possible throughout his books he has written.

Books i like of his (all about the civil war)

The Killer Angels
Gods and Generals
Last Full Measure

Raiderhader
11-30-2006, 09:33 PM
Steel My Soldiers' Hearts

The Hopeless to Hardcore Transformation of U.S. Army, 4th Battalion, 39th Infantry, Vietnam
by Col. David Hackworth.

My Dad read it and thought it was great, "but that's coming from an old grunt, you might not find it as interesting." Well, I do. Hackworth was a true warrior with a great big pair of brass ones hanging 'tween his legs.

If you are at all interested in infantry actions in the Vietnam Delta, or just like a good war story, this is a great book. It reads fast, and shows that it was possible to beat Charlie, if you stopped trying to fight the war the way WWII was fought.

Frazod
11-30-2006, 09:41 PM
I'm currently reading When Hell Froze Over, a book about a joint U.S./British/French campaign INSIDE the Soviet Union during and after the closing days of World War I, where we fought alongside Russian dissidents against the Communists.

If you never heard about this, don't feel bad. Neither did I until I picked up the book.

I'm almost halfway through. Very interesting read. It isn't often that I read about an aspect of U.S. history that I knew absolutely nothing about.

Jenson71
11-30-2006, 10:02 PM
I'm currently reading When Hell Froze Over, a book about a joint U.S./British/French campaign INSIDE the Soviet Union during and after the closing days of World War I, where we fought alongside Russian dissidents against the Communists.

If you never heard about this, don't feel bad. Neither did I until I picked up the book.

I'm almost halfway through. Very interesting read. It isn't often that I read about an aspect of U.S. history that I knew absolutely nothing about.
When the Cold War truly started.

Reaper16
12-01-2006, 12:51 AM
I've been reading recent back issues ofThe Missouri Review (http://www.missourireview.com/) which is a top notch literary journal published by MU. It's one of the few national literary journals that I've found to include decent creative nonfiction.

Aside from that, assigned readings for classes. Read a novella called "The Pastoral Symphony" by Andre Gide. It was pretty nice, if obvious.

Fairplay
12-01-2006, 06:31 AM
I just read the latest book by Jeff Shaara titled The Rising Tide. WW2 book.

Good read. I need a new book to read. I will go through this thread to see i can see some that would interest me.

Frazod
12-01-2006, 09:16 AM
I just read the latest book by Jeff Shaara titled The Rising Tide. WW2 book.

Good read. I need a new book to read. I will go through this thread to see i can see some that would interest me.

I really enjoy his stuff. I'll be sure to pick that up.

Fairplay
12-01-2006, 10:38 AM
I really enjoy his stuff. I'll be sure to pick that up.



This should not be of any surprise to you Frazod but this is a part 1 of 3 books.

Thought thought you might want to know.

BIG_DADDY
12-01-2006, 10:42 AM
Case for a Creator

RedNeckRaider
12-01-2006, 10:49 AM
Forever Odd by Dean Koontz