PDA

View Full Version : Get ready for $2.50 gasoline this summer


Donger
03-16-2006, 11:59 AM
I was just reading the EIA's latest Short Term Energy Outlook (http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html): "During the early summer months of 2006, the average retail regular motor gasoline price is expected to rise above $2.50 per gallon."

That's what the expected average retail price of gasoline could be. This doesn't take into account any hurricanes and other "disturbances."

Just a heads-up. I'd imagine that you will see $2.60+ in the midwest and close to $2.80 out west. The national average has been in the $2.28 to $2.36 range for the last few months.

Skip Towne
03-16-2006, 12:00 PM
It's $2.40 in Tulsa right now.

Dunit35
03-16-2006, 12:01 PM
$2.48 here...

Mr. Laz
03-16-2006, 12:01 PM
It's $2.40 in Tulsa right now.

oklahoma city is at $2.40 also

Skip Towne
03-16-2006, 12:05 PM
And all the while the oil companies post record profits. I'm sure Bush will look into this soon.

Gonzo
03-16-2006, 12:05 PM
:spank:

Thanks GW!

Donger
03-16-2006, 12:06 PM
And all the while the oil companies post record profits. I'm sure Bush will look into this soon.

ROFL

Let's not do this again.

Hydrae
03-16-2006, 12:07 PM
I filled up 2 weeks ago at $2.07 (they were changing the signs as I filled up, just made it under the wire). Last night I filled up at $2.34 which was $.05 cheaper than anywhere else. Today the same station is at $2.39 along with everyone else.

Any ideas why prices have jumped 15% in the last 2 weeks?

Also, it seems odd that EVERY station in the Austin are is at the same price. I have to wonder if there is any relationship between this price jump and the congressional hearings into gas pricing going on. (ok, so that just smacks of conspiracy theory but it is an interesting coincidence).

Mr. Laz
03-16-2006, 12:09 PM
Any ideas why prices have jumped 15% in the last 2 weeks?
typhoon off the coast of japan ... threatening the oil supply.


the professor is said to be working on a weather control device made out of coconuts shells to solve the problem.

Baconeater
03-16-2006, 12:10 PM
Any ideas why prices have jumped 15% in the last 2 weeks?


They're just getting us lubed up for the ass-raping we're going to get this summer.

Gonzo
03-16-2006, 12:12 PM
Drink the Kool aid! There is no conspiracy.
:BLVD:

Donger
03-16-2006, 12:15 PM
I filled up 2 weeks ago at $2.07 (they were changing the signs as I filled up, just made it under the wire). Last night I filled up at $2.34 which was $.05 cheaper than anywhere else. Today the same station is at $2.39 along with everyone else.

Any ideas why prices have jumped 15% in the last 2 weeks?

Also, it seems odd that EVERY station in the Austin are is at the same price. I have to wonder if there is any relationship between this price jump and the congressional hearings into gas pricing going on. (ok, so that just smacks of conspiracy theory but it is an interesting coincidence).

Because the $2.07 was far too low, in comparison ot the national average. I'm amazed that the retailers didn't adjust sooner.

CoMoChief
03-16-2006, 12:16 PM
$2.40 in Columbia right now. :shake:

Gonzo
03-16-2006, 12:17 PM
$2.40 in Columbia right now. :shake:
$2.43 in Omaha for freakin Ethanol.
I refuse to put corn in my gas tank.

Hydrae
03-16-2006, 12:19 PM
Because the $2.07 was far too low, in comparison ot the national average. I'm amazed that the retailers didn't adjust sooner.

One of the odd parts of this from my perspective is that while it was $2.07 in my little town, Austin was at around $2.15. I figured this was probably due to local gas taxes. However, all stations are at the same price now. :shrug:

Also, I would expect (but it doesn't seem to be the case most of the time in reading these kinds of threads on here) prices to be lower here in Texas where a lot of the refining happens not to mention the amount that is pulled out of the ground here. If nothing else, transportation costs should be less here than other areas but is seems to not be reflected in prices.

patteeu
03-16-2006, 12:21 PM
I predict that there will be wild-eyed, anti-capitalists running around screaming about price gouging this summer too.

Donger
03-16-2006, 12:26 PM
One of the odd parts of this from my perspective is that while it was $2.07 in my little town, Austin was at around $2.15. I figured this was probably due to local gas taxes. However, all stations are at the same price now. :shrug:

Also, I would expect (but it doesn't seem to be the case most of the time in reading these kinds of threads on here) prices to be lower here in Texas where a lot of the refining happens not to mention the amount that is pulled out of the ground here. If nothing else, transportation costs should be less here than other areas but is seems to not be reflected in prices.

Yes, prices are typically lower in Texas due to being closer to the refineries. They ARE still lower there now than the national average.

As to the retailers all having the same price, that is up to them. One of them will need some additional sales and will lower their price by a few cents. The others will either follow or keep their exisiting pricing.

BigMeatballDave
03-16-2006, 12:35 PM
Eh, I just filled up yesterday for 2.49. If it goes up to 3+ I'll still pay. My fat ass ain't ****ing walking no place...

Hydrae
03-16-2006, 12:37 PM
Yes, prices are typically lower in Texas due to being closer to the refineries. They ARE still lower there now than the national average.

As to the retailers all having the same price, that is up to them. One of them will need some additional sales and will lower their price by a few cents. The others will either follow or keep their exisiting pricing.

Interesting note from a couple weeks ago. I mentioned that they were changing the prices on the signs when I filled up. I joked about it with the guy behind the counter and he said that they base their prices (this is a Diamond Shamrock, Valero) on what the price is in the next town at the Exxon. That really bothered me in some ways. Yes, price to what the market will bear is capitalism at it's finest but there is no doubt in my mind that Exxon and Valero do not have the same overhead costs but Valero is basing it's pricing on what Exxon is doing? No wonder the prices just continue to head for a non-existant ceiling.

Donger
03-16-2006, 12:39 PM
Interesting note from a couple weeks ago. I mentioned that they were changing the prices on the signs when I filled up. I joked about it with the guy behind the counter and he said that they base their prices (this is a Diamond Shamrock, Valero) on what the price is in the next town at the Exxon. That really bothered me in some ways. Yes, price to what the market will bear is capitalism at it's finest but there is no doubt in my mind that Exxon and Valero do not have the same overhead costs but Valero is basing it's pricing on what Exxon is doing? No wonder the prices just continue to head for a non-existant ceiling.

It's a retail environment, and they are going to maximize their profits, just like any other retailer.

BigMeatballDave
03-16-2006, 12:40 PM
Drink the Kool aid! There is no conspiracy.
:BLVD:Both parties suck ass! You know what you call a 1000 politicians at the bottom of the Ocean?

Cochise
03-16-2006, 12:41 PM
There's a good way to get back at the oil companies - If it costs too much, don't buy as much. Trade in your 15 MPG vehicle perhaps?

I don't understand how people think they can gorge and gorge on a non-renewable resource as the number of users in the world continues to expand geometrically and still get it for $1.50 a gallon.

Gonzo
03-16-2006, 12:43 PM
Both parties suck ass! You know what you call a 1000 politicians at the bottom of the Ocean?

A good start?

Donger
03-16-2006, 12:44 PM
There's a good way to get back at the oil companies - If it costs too much, don't buy as much. Trade in your 15 MPG vehicle perhaps?

I don't understand how people think they can gorge and gorge on a non-renewable resource as the number of users in the world continues to expand geometrically and still get it for $1.50 a gallon.

Stop it. Logic has no place in the discussion of gasoline pricing!

plbrdude
03-16-2006, 12:47 PM
i had heard on npr about a week ago gas would go up 30 to 40 cents by summer. also to expect record prices should crude prices rise a little.

Mr. Laz
03-16-2006, 12:48 PM
There's a good way to get back at the oil companies - If it costs too much, don't buy as much. Trade in your 15 MPG vehicle perhaps?.

price controls (like other utilities)
investing in alternative energies in a serious manner
getting the white house out of their pockets
stop letting the right protect them



:shrug:

Baconeater
03-16-2006, 12:49 PM
It's a retail environment, and they are going to maximize their profits, just like any other retailer.

That's kind of funny because during the post-Katrina price spike last fall drive-offs were becoming a problem for retailers. They had a station owner on the news saying most of them only made $.01/gal profit and he'd have to sell 5,000 gallons to make up for a $50 drive-off. He was full of shit, wasn't he?

Baconeater
03-16-2006, 12:51 PM
There's a good way to get back at the oil companies - If it costs too much, don't buy as much. Trade in your 15 MPG vehicle perhaps?

I don't understand how people think they can gorge and gorge on a non-renewable resource as the number of users in the world continues to expand geometrically and still get it for $1.50 a gallon.

That's the sad truth to it all, high prices are the only thing that will convince most of us to conserve.

Gonzo
03-16-2006, 12:51 PM
There's a good way to get back at the oil companies - If it costs too much, don't buy as much. Trade in your 15 MPG vehicle perhaps?

I don't understand how people think they can gorge and gorge on a non-renewable resource as the number of users in the world continues to expand geometrically and still get it for $1.50 a gallon.

Non-renewable??? I am currently working at a fuel production facility. I can attest that if the government invested the same resources in fuel substitutes we would be paying less than .99 cents a gallon. There is a factory in Missouri that takes all of the waste from the Butterball turkey processing plant and in less than 10 minutes turns it into usable fossil fuels. The process is inexpensive and if the citizens of this country took the time to research these types of processes they would start to be far less dependant on Apu and Mohammed's oil.

(Not to mention all the oil in Alaska and Texas that we don't use.)

Donger
03-16-2006, 12:52 PM
That's kind of funny because during the post-Katrina price spike last fall drive-offs were becoming a problem for retailers. They had a station owner on the news saying most of them only made $.01/gal profit and he'd have to sell 5,000 gallons to make up for a $50 drive-off. He was full of shit, wasn't he?

No, he wasn't. Perhaps a bit dramatic, however. IIRC, the retailers make only a few cents profit on a single gallon of gas. And, the oil companies only make about $0.08 profit on each gallon they refine and sell.

dtrain
03-16-2006, 12:53 PM
It's $2.49 here in good ol Corcoran, CA.

Demonpenz
03-16-2006, 12:56 PM
i wish bush would step in. I can barely put food on the table. (Hmm maybe if i didn't drop 40 bucks a week on whiskey, vending machines, and pop)

Donger
03-16-2006, 01:00 PM
There is a factory in Missouri that takes all of the waste from the Butterball turkey processing plant and in less than 10 minutes turns it into usable fossil fuels. The process is inexpensive and if the citizens of this country took the time to research these types of processes they would start to be far less dependant on Apu and Mohammed's oil.

"Usable fossil fuel?" What do you mean?

(Not to mention all the oil in Alaska and Texas that we don't use.)

I agree. It's insane that we aren't (and won't) drill ANWR.

Gonzo
03-16-2006, 01:04 PM
"Usable fossil fuel?" What do you mean?



I agree. It's insane that we aren't (and won't) drill ANWR.

(Useable), sorry. Some fossil fuels cannot be burned by a standard engine. The flash point is far to high or low. These fuels can be refined into different gasses such as hydrogen or luiquid oxygen just by the transference of certain molecules.

patteeu
03-16-2006, 01:08 PM
No, he wasn't. Perhaps a bit dramatic, however. IIRC, the retailers make only a few cents profit on a single gallon of gas. And, the oil companies only make about $0.08 profit on each gallon they refine and sell.

How much do the federal and state governments make?

Someone is PRICE GOUGING!!! ;)

Donger
03-16-2006, 01:15 PM
(Useable), sorry. Some fossil fuels cannot be burned by a standard engine. The flash point is far to high or low. These fuels can be refined into different gasses such as hydrogen or luiquid oxygen just by the transference of certain molecules.

Are you referring to the plant in Carthage, MO? If so, I remember reading that they produce something like 400 barrels per day at ~$90 per barrel.

We could do better than that (much better) with shale.

Donger
03-16-2006, 01:15 PM
How much do the federal and state governments make?

Someone is PRICE GOUGING!!! ;)

About 25% of what you pay for a gallon of gas is local, state and federal taxes.

Cochise
03-16-2006, 01:16 PM
price controls (like other utilities)

Didn't we try that in the Carter administration?

bkkcoh
03-16-2006, 01:17 PM
We are already there... I put gas in today for $2.46

Bob Dole
03-16-2006, 01:17 PM
i had heard on npr about a week ago gas would go up 30 to 40 cents by summer. also to expect record prices should crude prices rise a little.

It's already risen more that 40 cents here in the past month.

bkkcoh
03-16-2006, 01:18 PM
About 25% of what you pay for a gallon of gas is local, state and federal taxes.

Here in Ohio, there is about $.43 per gallon of taxes

Cochise
03-16-2006, 01:19 PM
I can attest that if the government invested the same resources in fuel substitutes we would be paying less than .99 cents a gallon.

Well I keep reading that biofuels like ethanol are net-losers after government subsidies are considered so I'm skeptical that my car will ever run on turkeymeat.

But it's worth mentioning that, what, 1/3 of the cost of gas is taxes?

How about we pass a law that says there is no fuel tax between May and September?

Logical
03-16-2006, 01:20 PM
You mean my gas prices are going to go down? PBJ

bkkcoh
03-16-2006, 01:22 PM
But it's worth mentioning that, what, 1/3 of the cost of gas is taxes?

How about we pass a law that says there is no fuel tax between May and September?

The only problem with that is, the congress would have to raise income taxes in order to make up the shortfall from lack of fuel taxes... :banghead:

They can't seem to wean themselves off of the public teat......

Baconeater
03-16-2006, 01:26 PM
How much do the federal and state governments make?

Someone is PRICE GOUGING!!! ;)

The amount of taxes/gal stays constant. What I'll never understand is the significant price fluctuations. *Puts on tin-foil hat* It almost seems as if the oil industry is feeling us out to see exactly how much they can charge us without creating an outrage.

Donger
03-16-2006, 01:28 PM
The amount of taxes/gal stays constant. What I'll never understand is the significant price fluctuations. *Puts on tin-foil hat* It almost seems as if the oil industry is feeling us out to see exactly how much they can charge us without creating an outrage.

Here's a good read on the subject:

http://www.eia.doe.gov/pub/oil_gas/petroleum/analysis_publications/primer_on_gasoline_prices/html/petbro.html

WHY DO GASOLINE PRICES FLUCTUATE?

Even when crude oil prices are stable, gasoline prices normally fluctuate due to factors such as seasonality and local retail station competition. Additionally, gasoline prices can change rapidly due to crude oil supply disruptions stemming from world events, or domestic problems such as refinery or pipeline outages.

Seasonality in the demand for gasoline - When crude oil prices are stable, retail gasoline prices tend to gradually rise before and during the summer, when people drive more, and fall in the winter. Good weather and vacations cause U.S. summer gasoline demand to average about 5% higher than during the rest of the year. If crude oil prices remain unchanged, gasoline prices would typically increase by 10-20 cents from January to the summer.

Changes in the cost of crude oil - Events in crude oil markets were a major factor in all but one of the fi ve run-ups in gasoline prices between 1992 and 1997, according to the National Petroleum Councilís study, U.S. Petroleum Supply - Inventory Dynamics.

About 47 barrels of gasoline are produced from every 100 barrels of crude oil processed at U. S. refineries, with other refi ned products making up the remainder.

Crude oil prices are determined by worldwide supply and demand, with signifi cant infl uence by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). Since it was organized in 1960, OPEC has tried to keep world oil prices at its target level by setting an upper production limit on its members. OPEC has the potential to infl uence oil prices worldwide because its members possess such a great portion of the worldís oil supply, accounting for about 40% of the worldís production of crude oil and holding more than two-thirds of the worldís estimated crude oil reserves. Additionally, increased demand for gasoline and other refi ned products in the U.S. and the rest of the world is also exerting upward pressure on crude oil prices.

Rapid gasoline price increases have occurred in response to crude oil shortages caused by, for example, the Arab oil embargo in 1973, the Iranian revolution in 1978, the Iran/Iraq war in 1980, and the Persian Gulf confl ict in 1990. Gasoline price increases in recent years have been due in part to OPEC crude oil production cuts, turmoil in key oil producing countries, and problems with petroleum infrastructure (e.g., refi neries and pipelines) within the United States. Additionally, increased demand for gasoline and other petroleum products in the U. S. and the rest of the world is also exerting upward pressure on prices.

Product supply/demand imbalances - If demand rises quickly or supply declines unexpectedly due to refi nery production problems or lagging imports, gasoline inventories (stocks) may decline rapidly. When stocks are low and falling, some wholesalers become concerned that supplies may not be adequate over the short term and bid higher for available product. Such imbalances have occurred when a region has changed from one fuel type to another (e.g., to cleaner-burning gasoline) as refi ners and marketers adjust to the new product.

Gasoline may be less expensive in one summer when supplies are plentiful vs another summer when they are not. These are normal price fluctuations, experienced in all commodity markets.

However, prices of basic energy (gasoline, electricity, natural gas, heating oil) are generally more volatile than prices of other commodities. One reason is that consumers are limited in their ability to substitute between fuels when the price for gasoline, for example, fl uctuates. So, while consumers can substitute readily have that option in fueling their vehicles.

munkey
03-16-2006, 01:33 PM
2.15 (at costco) in Boise, Idaho.

2.34 everywhere else.

Cochise
03-16-2006, 01:35 PM
The only problem with that is, the congress would have to raise income taxes in order to make up the shortfall from lack of fuel taxes... :banghead:

They can't seem to wean themselves off of the public teat......

Bullsh#t.

They can do without paying for sculptures of elephant dung and politicians' travel for a few months. Shut the place down for all I care.

Blackened
03-16-2006, 01:35 PM
$2.60 in the Bay Area...Will be over $3.00 this summer...

Donger
03-16-2006, 01:37 PM
You mean my gas prices are going to go down? PBJ

ROFL

No. Not bloody likely in CA. More like $3.00 minimum.

Postal_clone
03-29-2006, 06:19 AM
Gas 2.49 In Dead Moines today

Mile High Mania
03-29-2006, 06:27 AM
It's been $2.50 in Dallas for at least 2 weeks... floats up or down by a dime every day or so.

dirk digler
03-29-2006, 07:42 AM
It figures that Donger would start a thread about gas prices going up....****er.

DaKCMan AP
03-29-2006, 07:43 AM
cheapest here is $2.53

chief52
03-29-2006, 07:47 AM
Already $2.87 in Northern Calif. I will be thrilled if it only tops out at $3.00 this summer. Probably more in the $3.25 and up range!

Hightest damn prices in the nation are here I believe.

HemiEd
03-29-2006, 07:51 AM
I paid $2.69 yesterday.

tiptap
03-29-2006, 08:56 AM
I predict that there will be wild-eyed, anti-capitalists running around screaming about price gouging this summer too.

I often wonder why MONEY and PROFIT get to ALWAYS be the commodity and the discriminator in a discussion. Why doesn't FAIRNESS and MODERATION or MORALITY or other ideas that shouldn't have a price a discriminator based upon purchase. It amounts to NON FREEDOM of VALUES. The choice is the all mighty dollar and its pursuit. I have already conceded the argument if the house makes up the rules. In a true democracy EVERYTHING is up for evaluation and change.

Skip Towne
03-29-2006, 09:04 AM
As much as I hate the gubment being involved, this industry needs to be regulated. Gasoline is every bit as necessary as electricity in this day and age.

Donger
03-29-2006, 09:06 AM
It figures that Donger would start a thread about gas prices going up....****er.

Why?

Cochise
03-29-2006, 09:07 AM
I often wonder why MONEY and PROFIT get to ALWAYS be the commodity and the discriminator in a discussion. Why doesn't FAIRNESS and MODERATION or MORALITY or other ideas that shouldn't have a price a discriminator based upon purchase.

So you want to legislate morality, eh?

Donger
03-29-2006, 09:07 AM
As much as I hate the gubment being involved, this industry needs to be regulated. Gasoline is every bit as necessary as electricity in this day and age.

So are food and shelter, even more so. Should they be regulated/price fixed?

Skip Towne
03-29-2006, 09:09 AM
So are food and shelter, even more so. Should they be regulated/price fixed?
The free marke system is working in those instances. It is not in the petroleum industry.

Donger
03-29-2006, 09:11 AM
The free marke system is working in those instances. It is not in the petroleum industry.

On the contrary, I'd say it's working as designed. Supplies are tight and demand is still high.

Globally-speaking, gasoline is still a veritable bargain in the United States.

Cochise
03-29-2006, 09:15 AM
The free marke system is working in those instances. It is not in the petroleum industry.

We are not at the price breaking point where people absolutely cannot afford it. Prices spiralled upward last year, but people kept driving.

There aren't that many less SUVs on the road anymore. There aren't that many more Honda Insights. Some people cut back on consumption marginally, but most just kept driving like they always did. There was only an increase in complaining.

If gas really cost something that people really could not afford, then you would see changes. But I don't think people have been sufficiently motivated to significantly change their consumption habits. How often recently have we seen a new thread here about someone buying a Tahoe or a Mustang GT? How often have we seen one about a basic import 4-banger?

As much complaining as there was, and I was part of it, I don't think people really can't afford it. Sure there are some, but it's a great minority, or we would see an incredible amount of shift in the market.

Skip Towne
03-29-2006, 09:16 AM
On the contrary, I'd say it's working as designed. Supplies are tight and demand is still high.

Globally-speaking, gasoline is still a veritable bargain in the United States.
I don't see home builders and grocers posting record profits every quarter like the oil oligopoly does. Oil stayed at $10 per barrel for 50 years and I haven't seen anything happen to cause it to go up 6X except greed.

Cochise
03-29-2006, 09:17 AM
Globally-speaking, gasoline is still a veritable bargain in the United States.

At or above $5.00 a gallon around Europe, isn't it?

Those people drive less and drive smaller cars, but I would contend that this is a primary reason for those two things.

Donger
03-29-2006, 09:19 AM
I don't see home builders and grocers posting record profits every quarter like the oil oligopoly does. Oil stayed at $10 per barrel for 50 year and I haven't seen anything happen to cause it to go up 6X except greed.

But you would if their primary material went up in price dramatically and yet their production costs remained the same, while maintaining continued high demand from consumers.

Oil was cheap for so long because they were pumping it like crazy with less demand = lower price. That has changed. Output has not increased all that much while demand has VASTLY increased.

Donger
03-29-2006, 09:21 AM
At or above $5.00 a gallon around Europe, isn't it?

Those people drive less and drive smaller cars, but I would contend that this is a primary reason for those two things.

Right around there, yes. However, most of that difference is in taxes. It's some ungodly percentage, like 60%

Donger
03-29-2006, 09:23 AM
We are not at the price breaking point where people absolutely cannot afford it. Prices spiralled upward last year, but people kept driving.

There aren't that many less SUVs on the road anymore. There aren't that many more Honda Insights. Some people cut back on consumption marginally, but most just kept driving like they always did. There was only an increase in complaining.

If gas really cost something that people really could not afford, then you would see changes. But I don't think people have been sufficiently motivated to significantly change their consumption habits. How often recently have we seen a new thread here about someone buying a Tahoe or a Mustang GT? How often have we seen one about a basic import 4-banger?

As much complaining as there was, and I was part of it, I don't think people really can't afford it. Sure there are some, but it's a great minority, or we would see an incredible amount of shift in the market.

Yep. The only short term thing that will have an immediate effect on gasoline prices is a significant and sustained demand reduction. If prices go as high as projected, we may see that.

Cochise
03-29-2006, 09:23 AM
Right around there, yes. However, most of that difference is in taxes. It's some ungodly percentage, like 60%

I guess another factor in consumption would be that our government doesn't actively discourage use of the fuel, at least not as much as other countries do.

It's taxed heavily for revenue but not (yet) as a social engineering project.

Skip Towne
03-29-2006, 09:26 AM
But you would if their primary material went up in price dramatically and yet their production costs remained the same, while maintaining continued high demand from consumers.

Oil was cheap for so long because they were pumping it like crazy with less demand = lower price. That has changed. Output has not increased all that much while demand has VASTLY increased.
Output has not increased because the oil industry does not want it to increase. They want to artificially regulate the price by controlling the availability. The gov. has put a stop to that in other necessary industries like electric companies. They are called public utilities. Oil should be declared a public utility since it affects the price of everything you buy.

DJJasonp
03-29-2006, 09:29 AM
I WISH for days of $2.50 per gallon.....

I payed $2.80 last week here in San Diego....

We get the ultimate reaming every time they decide to jack the prices....they do the big jacking so that when it does go back down to $2.25....everyone's happy like we're getting a freakin' bargain or something.

Cochise
03-29-2006, 09:32 AM
Yep. The only short term thing that will have an immediate effect on gasoline prices is a significant and sustained demand reduction. If prices go as high as projected, we may see that.

I think it will take some time for the effects to show though. If the typical price for a car was $500 instead of $20k-40k, everyone would have switched to something else - or at least kept an economical car around for the bulk of their mileage. But people don't buy what they need in a car, they buy the absolute most they can afford. And as soon as one is paid off, they trade it in and start paying on a new one, sometimes before.

Since cars are such a large percentage of our expenditures it will take a whole car-buying cycle for change to even begin, I think. People don't feel they can just dump the Yukon they bought last year for $35,000 even if it does continue to suck down gas at 14 MPG. Other people have been driving a car that's paid off for years, and don't want to get into a payment again because they've adjusted their budget around not having one.

It will take time for peoples' attitudes to adjust, and in the meantime, there is friction.

jspchief
03-29-2006, 09:34 AM
So are food and shelter, even more so. Should they be regulated/price fixed?Well, the governement doesn't fix the price of food per se, but there is a lot of legislation that insures that every american can get food, through farm subsidies, food stamps, etc.. So I'd say food isn't a good example.

There are a lot of neccessities that the government ensures will be available/affordable for us. But almost all of those things are products that this country can provide on it's own. We can't do that with oil. We can't force other countries to sell it to us for cheaper, and we can't force refineries to make gas without profit. If anything, price controls would force subsidies for the refineries, which would just raise our taxes and probably cost us more in the long run.

Cochise
03-29-2006, 09:34 AM
Oil should be declared a public utility since it affects the price of everything you buy.

I wasn't around in the 1970s the last time price fixing was tried, but I would rather have gas that is expensive but readily available than gas that is cheaper that I have to wait in line for an hour for, or that I can't find at all.

Donger
03-29-2006, 09:36 AM
Output has not increased because the oil industry does not want it to increase. They want to artificially regulate the price by controlling the availability. The gov. has put a stop to that in other necessary industries like electric companies. They are called public utilities. Oil should be declared a public utility since it affects the price of everything you buy.

Okay, Vladimir.

Bowser
03-29-2006, 09:38 AM
Does anyone know what the nation's minimum wage is right now? I might be wrong, but I don't think that number has changed for some time. The last I remember, it was 5.15/hour.

I find it interesting that gas explodes up from the 1.50 range to 3 bucks a gallon, yet the minimum wage is still the same.

We have the family member who was caught in the downsizing of a company, and is drawing unemployment at the moment from Kansas. He says he makes more on unemployment than he would if he had a job that paid minimum or a bit more. That really confuses me.

I'm not sure how much of this is related to Donger's thread, it just seemed to be an interesting parallel.

jspchief
03-29-2006, 09:38 AM
Output has not increased because the oil industry does not want it to increase. They want to artificially regulate the price by controlling the availability. The gov. has put a stop to that in other necessary industries like electric companies. They are called public utilities. Oil should be declared a public utility since it affects the price of everything you buy.The US government can't force foreign companies to do anything. It can't be made a public utility, because unlike water and electrcity, it's not something that the United States is self sufficient with.

Donger
03-29-2006, 09:38 AM
I think it will take some time for the effects to show though. If the typical price for a car was $500 instead of $20k-40k, everyone would have switched to something else - or at least kept an economical car around for the bulk of their mileage. But people don't buy what they need in a car, they buy the absolute most they can afford. And as soon as one is paid off, they trade it in and start paying on a new one, sometimes before.

Since cars are such a large percentage of our expenditures it will take a whole car-buying cycle for change to even begin, I think. People don't feel they can just dump the Yukon they bought last year for $35,000 even if it does continue to suck down gas at 14 MPG. Other people have been driving a car that's paid off for years, and don't want to get into a payment again because they've adjusted their budget around not having one.

It will take time for peoples' attitudes to adjust, and in the meantime, there is friction.

Indeed. I understand the economic concerns.

Has anyone else noted that virtually all new car ads highlight the fuel economy of the vehicle? I've never seen that before now.

HemiEd
03-29-2006, 09:39 AM
Bowser, $6.50 in Illinois.

Donger
03-29-2006, 09:39 AM
Well, the governement doesn't fix the price of food per se, but there is a lot of legislation that insures that every american can get food, through farm subsidies, food stamps, etc.. So I'd say food isn't a good example.

There are a lot of neccessities that the government ensures will be available/affordable for us. But almost all of those things are products that this country can provide on it's own. We can't do that with oil. We can't force other countries to sell it to us for cheaper, and we can't force refineries to make gas without profit. If anything, price controls would force subsidies for the refineries, which would just raise our taxes and probably cost us more in the long run.

I really don't expect our government to do anything intelligent when they still won't approve drilling for new oil on our own, f*cking land.

Cochise
03-29-2006, 09:42 AM
Has anyone else noted that virtually all new car ads highlight the fuel economy of the vehicle? I've never seen that before now.

I have noticed that.

For an SUV it will say "best fuel economy in its class", in the 2WD, base configuration with the smaller engine that half or most people won't actually buy.

And the "best in class" gas mileage they are pimping is still s***.

jspchief
03-29-2006, 09:43 AM
I really don't expect our government to do anything intelligent when they still won't approve drilling for new oil on our own, f*cking land.I agree. Step one should be a push to reduce or eliminate our reliance on foreign oil. And on the heels of that should come a hard push for technology that gets us away from oil consumption for automobiles.

The problem with alternatives is, for the average American, the alternative won't catch on if it's only "as good" as gas powered cars. People are reluctant to get away from what they know. Imagine if the microwave oven would have required the same cooking times as the conventional oven... it would have never caught on. People don't want to make lateral moves out of their comfort zone.

Bowser
03-29-2006, 09:48 AM
I agree. Step one should be a push to reduce or eliminate our reliance on foreign oil. And on the heels of that should come a hard push for technology that gets us away from oil consumption for automobiles.

The problem with alternatives is, for the average American, the alternative won't catch on if it's only "as good" as gas powered cars. People are reluctant to get away from what they know. Imagine if the microwave oven would have required the same cooking times as the conventional oven... it would have never caught on. People don't want to make lateral moves out of their comfort zone.

That might change if the ass raping at the pumps starts to hurt so bad that we can't sit down.

oldandslow
03-29-2006, 09:58 AM
JS...

Alternatives will have to eventually catch on...price of gas is key.

I don't know what that price will be - 3.00, 4.00, 5.00 or whatever, but we are about to experience a shift in paradigms when it comes to energy and transportation.

Donger - while you and I tend to agree concerning most things oil related, I do not understand your love affair with ANWR. While we should, and soon will, drill there, it will make very little difference in overall oil supply.

By the way, we will NEVER reduce reliance on foreign oil w/o doing something about demand. The US hit peak oil in the mid 70's - there just isn't enough under US soil to make much difference. Do the research. The govt's own sites admit as much. Conservation and new tech are the only answers...

unfortunately, I believe we are sorely lacking in both.

Donger
03-29-2006, 10:02 AM
JS...

Alternatives will have to eventually catch on...price of gas is key.

I don't know what that price will be - 3.00, 4.00, 5.00 or whatever, but we are about to experience a shift in paradigms when it comes to energy and transportation.

Donger - while you and I tend to agree concerning most things oil related, I do not understand your love affair with ANWR. While we should, and soon will, drill there, it will make very little difference in overall oil supply.

By the way, we will NEVER reduce reliance on foreign oil w/o doing something about demand. The US hit peak oil in the mid 70's - there just isn't enough under US soil to make much difference. Do the research. The govt's own sites admit as much. Conservation and new tech are the only answers...

unfortunately, I believe we are sorely lacking in both.

It's more of a symbolic issue for me. I realize that at maximum, it could only replace about 10% of our needs.

I wouldn't be surprised if we get back into shale oil. I'm all for that, with a corresponding drive towards reduction of demand through greater efficiency and also alternative energy research.

Bowser
03-29-2006, 10:02 AM
Personally, I am one of the tinfoil hat wearers, and believe there is price gouging somewhere along the line.

And I completely agree with oldandslow about alternative energy. Hydrogen powered vehicles should be a priority not only in the US, but the world.

And I'm mildly pissed that we are in the 21st century, and I don't have my anti-matter powered Jetsons fold up flying car yet. WTF?

sd4chiefs
03-29-2006, 10:04 AM
I bought more energy stocks a few weeks ago. :thumb:


http://www.marketwatch.com/News/Story/Story.aspx?guid=%7BD5BACD3D%2D63DF%2D4124%2DA1D4%2DF5DE91AD3E2A%7D&source=blq%2Fyhoo&dist=yhoo&siteid=yhoo


THE GURU'S CORNER
Buy the dip
Commentary: Considerable upside left in energy service stocks
E-mail | Print | | Disable live quotes By Ron Rowland, All Star Fund Trader
Last Update: 1:18 PM ET Feb 6, 2006


AUSTIN, Texas (ASFT) -- At the end of last week, energy service stocks were off some 5 percent from the Jan.30 peak, as measured by the Philadelphia Oil Service Sector Index.
We view this and any further weakness as a buying opportunity. Given Monday's action, we may not be alone in our thinking.
Short term sentiment is decidedly bearish, as most pundits seem to think last years gains cannot be repeated. One cannot find a newspaper or magazine without an article detailing the recent strength in the energy sector. These are signs of the proverbial wall of worry. Savvy investors know that going against the grain can yield substantial rates of return.
What nobody is talking about
The market capitalization of the energy sector as a percent of the entire Standard & Poor's 500 Index (SPX : S&P 500 Index
News , chart, profile, more
Last: 1,296.01+2.78+0.21%

SPX1,296.01, +2.78, +0.2%) today is 10.3%. Why is this an important figure? First, let's review some history. In 1992, technology represented only 6% of the S&P 500 and grew to 19% in 1998 and 30% in 1999.
In contrast, energy's S&P weight climbed from 7% in 1972 to 22% in 1979 to 28% at year-end 1980. No, that is not a typo; the energy component was a whopping 28% at the end of 1980. We are nowhere near that level today. In fact, the energy complex could be eerily similar to the mid 1990's when technology began its initial ramp and ultimately crested over 30% in the early 2000's.
Could energy be on a similar path? Yes. Did many investors consider shares of Netscape, Iomega, 3Com, US Robotics, AOL, and Presstek over-valued even during the first wave of the build-up, in say, 1996? Of course. Do you find, when discussing energy stocks today, that many times you get the cold shoulder, with comments such as those stocks have returned 50% in the past 12 months and they can't possibly go any higher? Yes.
What does this mean? Undoubtedly, you have the variant perception, you view the market differently than most others, and excess return can be had if you stick to your disciplined strategy. With the energy complex, it means you stay long and strong, in the face of the doubting Thomas'.


Overlooked: China and Saudi Arabia

Two weeks ago, Chinese and Saudi Arabian officials reached a landmark accord on oil, natural gas, and other minerals. Chinese President Hu Jintao said, "China is willing to improve the dialogue and the method of cooperation on energy with Saudi Arabia to raise the level of energy cooperation."
Neither side provided any details of the agreement, but Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal underlined Hu's remarks on hydrocarbons as a main theme of the summit, saying, "China is one of the most important markets for oil and Saudi oil is one of the most important sources of energy for China."
Why is this important? I found little, if any coverage of this summit in the mainstream press. That in itself has important investment ramifications. What it also means is this: the cyclicality in energy continues to diminish, and it's going to be a bull market in energy through the end of this decade. A major deal between China, with an insatiable and growing thirst for oil, and Saudi Arabia, the most relevant of all oil producing nations in the world, but one with a declining infrastructure and questionable reserves, means energy prices are likely to remain high.
This is in contrast to most observers who continue to proclaim the price of oil will decline below the $50 level. In fact, could it mean we are more likely on pace for what Goldman Sachs calls the super spike phase and $100 per barrel oil? We think so!
Bottom line, if we are even half right about the energy bull market having some upside left, that move can be substantial. And if the herd ultimately comes into the sector, much like the tech stampede in the late 90's, significant returns can be achieved.
We'd be an aggressive buyer of Oil Service Holdrs (OIH : Oil Service HOLDRS
OIH147.36, +1.00, +0.7%) , Rydex Energy Services (RYVIX : Rydex:Energy Svcs;Inv
News , chart, profile, more
Last: 44.45+0.91+2.09%

RYVIX44.45, +0.91, +2.1%) , Fidelity Select Energy Service (FSESX : Fidelity Sel Enrgy Ser
News , chart, profile, more
Last: 73.18+1.77+2.48%

FSESX73.18, +1.77, +2.5%) , and PowerShares Dynamic Energy Exploration & Production (PXE : powershares etf trust dyn en ex prod
News , chart, profile, more
Last: 18.22+0.22+1.22%

10:36am 03/29/2006
Add to portfolio
Analyst
Create alertInsider
Discuss
Financials
Sponsored by:PXE18.22, +0.22, +1.2%) at current prices. On Friday, there was strong support at the 200 level for the Oil Service Index (OSX : phlx euro style oil svc index osx
News , chart, profile, more
Last: 207.64+0.98+0.47%

OSX207.64, +0.98, +0.5%) , which is approximately 5.8% less than current prices, so buy any continued weakness aggressively.

Cochise
03-29-2006, 10:06 AM
One thought that I just had, is that I know the government may already be doing this, but instead of fixing prices maybe they should adopt a much more aggressive timetable for adopting minimum gas milage standards for cars sold in the United States?

If what we want is to force a decrease in consumption rather than wait for the market forces to shake everything out naturally, it seems that would be the most logical solution.

Since we want to lower the price, and we can't affect supply, it seems our only option is to work on the demand side.

Donger
03-29-2006, 10:23 AM
One thought that I just had, is that I know the government may already be doing this, but instead of fixing prices maybe they should adopt a much more aggressive timetable for adopting minimum gas milage standards for cars sold in the United States?

If what we want is to force a decrease in consumption rather than wait for the market forces to shake everything out naturally, it seems that would be the most logical solution.

Since we want to lower the price, and we can't affect supply, it seems our only option is to work on the demand side.

I'm all for that.

However, we Americans do have a desire for freedom: freedom to choose to drive a gus-guzzling SUV while simultaneously having the freedom to bitch about high gasoline prices, while simultaneously not acknowledging that there might just be a correlation between the two.

patteeu
03-29-2006, 11:00 AM
One thought that I just had, is that I know the government may already be doing this, but instead of fixing prices maybe they should adopt a much more aggressive timetable for adopting minimum gas milage standards for cars sold in the United States?

If what we want is to force a decrease in consumption rather than wait for the market forces to shake everything out naturally, it seems that would be the most logical solution.

Since we want to lower the price, and we can't affect supply, it seems our only option is to work on the demand side.

It seems to me that that would be self-defeating. Any reasonable reduction in US demand will eventually be swamped by demand growth in China and India and other parts of the developing world. All we would be doing is sacrificing in order to delay the inevitable and in order to keep oil cheap for China.

Besides, as long as the price of gasoline is kept low, whether through reduced demand or through ill-advised government regulation, the transition to alternative energy sources will be that much harder. When supply/demand considerations push the price of sweet crude oil-based-gasoline high enough, the price of alternatives from shale oil to biofuels to whatever else will become relatively attractive. There might be a role for government in stimulating research to investigate the alternatives, but in the end, the alternative has to be able to stand on it's own feet, economically speaking, in order to be a success.

dirk digler
03-29-2006, 11:09 AM
Why?

Because you are shill for the oil industry... :)

oldandslow
03-29-2006, 11:13 AM
Patteeu:

To a degree you are correct. However, government should get involved at the research level, and, imo, also at the policy level.

Here is a prime example. Brazil is about to become completely energy independent. They are not importing ANY oil even though they have fewer oil reserves than say, Venezuala. How they did it is remarkable - Sugar cane.

The government mandated that Brazilian farmers would grow it and the only "new" cars bought and sold in the country would run on sugar cane ethanol.

It worked.

Sugar cane is one of best methods of producing ethanol (much better than our corn method) - unfortunately, for us, our climate would not let us grow enough of it and our SUV's won't run on it.

But, as you can see, governments, if they have the will, can make a difference.

Calcountry
03-29-2006, 11:41 AM
I was just reading the EIA's latest Short Term Energy Outlook (http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html): "During the early summer months of 2006, the average retail regular motor gasoline price is expected to rise above $2.50 per gallon."

That's what the expected average retail price of gasoline could be. This doesn't take into account any hurricanes and other "disturbances."

Just a heads-up. I'd imagine that you will see $2.60+ in the midwest and close to $2.80 out west. The national average has been in the $2.28 to $2.36 range for the last few months.We are at 2.6/gal right now? It will be well over 3 dollars a gallon when the first 'cane blows Galvestons skirt up.

bogie
03-29-2006, 11:44 AM
I just paid $3.05 at the pump for premium. Cost me $54.00 to fill up, WOW! Fortunately I live 2 miles away from my work, so this should last close to a month.

Donger
03-29-2006, 11:44 AM
We are at 2.6/gal right now? It will be well over 3 dollars a gallon when the first 'cane blows Galvestons skirt up.

The national average as of last week is $2.49.

Donger
03-29-2006, 11:46 AM
I just paid $3.05 at the pump for premium. Cost me $54.00 to fill up, WOW! Fortunately I live 2 miles away from my work, so this should last close to a month.

Are you sure that your engine requires premium fuel? If not, check your manual to make sure. If it doesn't, you are throwing money down the tank.

bogie
03-29-2006, 11:51 AM
Are you sure that your engine requires premium fuel? If not, check your manual to make sure. If it doesn't, you are throwing money down the tank.

Actually no, I'm not sure. I drive a 1994 Explorer so I always figured since it was an older vehicle premium would be better for it. I'm not sure I still have my manual, I'll look.

Donger
03-29-2006, 11:57 AM
Actually no, I'm not sure. I drive a 1994 Explorer so I always figured since it was an older vehicle premium would be better for it. I'm not sure I still have my manual, I'll look.

Ugh. Chances are that it requires regular grade only, which is the lowest octane. Only cars with higher compression engines require premium/high octane fuel. I seriously doubt your Explorer has one.

If you can't find your manual, check inside the fuel door; it might be there.

MOhillbilly
03-29-2006, 11:58 AM
Just when i get a chance to bump up in economic class THEY DRAG ME BACK DOWN!

i feel like Charlie Brown.:(

bogie
03-29-2006, 12:09 PM
Ugh. Chances are that it requires regular grade only, which is the lowest octane. Only cars with higher compression engines require premium/high octane fuel. I seriously doubt your Explorer has one.

If you can't find your manual, check inside the fuel door; it might be there.

I will check. I've used lower octane fuel in the past and if memory serves the vehicle starts knocking. Is that possible, or just my imagination?

bogie
03-29-2006, 12:13 PM
Just when i get a chance to bump up in economic class THEY DRAG ME BACK DOWN!

i feel like Charlie Brown.:(

I feel your pain.

Donger
03-29-2006, 12:13 PM
I will check. I've used lower octane fuel in the past and if memory serves the vehicle starts knocking. Is that possible, or just my imagination?

Possible, yes. However, if you check and the engine does not require premium fuel, you have some other issue, probably timing-related. Of course, you could keep using the premium to correct it and it might be less than a repair.

Perhaps some of the resident motorheads will chime in.

bogie
03-29-2006, 12:26 PM
Possible, yes. However, if you check and the engine does not require premium fuel, you have some other issue, probably timing-related. Of course, you could keep using the premium to correct it and it might be less than a repair.

Perhaps some of the resident motorheads will chime in.

I've owned the vehicle for 11 years and have pretty much always burned high octane, so the knocking could be mostly my imagination. Imagine how much money I've potentially wasted using the expensive gas :banghead:. Obviously, I am not at all mechanically inclined.

Donger
03-29-2006, 12:27 PM
I've owned the vehicle for 11 years and have pretty much always burned high octane, so the knocking could be mostly my imagination. Imagine how much money I've potentially wasted using the expensive gas :banghead:. Obviously, I am not at all mechanically inclined.

I'll do the math for you if you want.

:p

How many miles on it?

Cochise
03-29-2006, 12:38 PM
Besides, as long as the price of gasoline is kept low, whether through reduced demand or through ill-advised government regulation, the transition to alternative energy sources will be that much harder.

That's true. Necessity is the mother of invention. I guess that in the longrun we want fossil fuels to be even more untennable if it forced alternatives along that much more quickly.

Either way equals suffering in the short term I guess.

bogie
03-29-2006, 12:44 PM
I'll do the math for you if you want.

:p

How many miles on it?

About 72k

oldandslow
03-29-2006, 12:46 PM
If we extrapolate from the settle price in late March to where it's peaked about six months down the road over the last two year cycle, then oil could safely hit $80 a barrel this year.

Which should mean prices well above 3.00.

All columns are light, sweet crude...but set at four different contract points at NYMEX.

1/5/2000 24.91 24.27 23.61 22.99
1/6/2000 24.78 24.20 23.54 22.92
1/7/2000 24.22 23.76 23.25 22.75
1/10/2000 24.67 24.13 23.62 23.13
1/11/2000 25.77 25.11 24.44 23.84
1/12/2000 26.28 25.66 24.93 24.28
1/13/2000 26.69 25.92 25.16 24.50
1/14/2000 28.02 27.14 26.33 25.58
1/18/2000 28.85 27.80 26.95 26.15
1/19/2000 29.54 27.88 26.92 26.10
1/20/2000 29.66 27.97 26.98 26.14
1/21/2000 28.20 27.19 26.25 25.43
1/24/2000 27.83 26.91 26.09 25.35
1/25/2000 28.28 27.31 26.44 25.66
1/26/2000 27.84 26.86 26.02 25.28
1/27/2000 27.32 26.35 25.58 24.90
1/28/2000 27.22 26.30 25.55 24.91
1/31/2000 27.64 26.72 25.97 25.32
2/1/2000 28.22 27.26 26.49 25.82
2/2/2000 27.55 26.67 25.96 25.33
2/3/2000 28.03 27.13 26.39 25.75
2/4/2000 28.82 27.82 27.04 26.37
2/7/2000 28.45 27.48 26.68 25.98
2/8/2000 28.02 27.08 26.32 25.66
2/9/2000 28.77 27.75 26.87 26.16
2/10/2000 29.43 28.27 27.29 26.54
2/11/2000 29.44 28.40 27.38 26.59
2/14/2000 30.25 29.26 28.11 27.24
2/15/2000 30.06 29.19 28.05 27.14
2/16/2000 30.05 29.33 28.32 27.45
2/17/2000 29.46 28.55 27.64 26.84
2/18/2000 29.51 28.45 27.48 26.67
2/22/2000 29.62 28.92 27.83 26.95
2/23/2000 29.39 28.02 27.04 26.25
2/24/2000 29.97 28.26 27.14 26.28
2/25/2000 30.35 28.61 27.45 26.56
2/28/2000 30.13 28.45 27.31 26.40
2/29/2000 30.43 28.85 27.68 26.74
3/1/2000 31.77 30.01 28.69 27.66
3/2/2000 31.69 30.08 28.71 27.68
3/3/2000 31.51 30.02 28.68 27.68
3/6/2000 32.18 30.56 29.16 28.12
3/7/2000 34.13 32.39 30.66 29.46
3/8/2000 31.26 29.47 28.09 27.07
3/9/2000 31.69 29.96 28.65 27.68
3/10/2000 31.76 29.84 28.39 27.38
3/13/2000 32.02 30.00 28.45 27.39
3/14/2000 31.69 29.72 28.32 27.32
3/15/2000 30.72 29.03 27.78 26.88
3/16/2000 31.09 29.28 28.00 27.10
3/17/2000 30.91 29.08 27.83 27.00
3/20/2000 29.43 27.55 26.70 26.13
3/21/2000 28.00 27.81 27.06 26.47
3/22/2000 27.46 26.76 26.17 25.69
3/23/2000 27.31 26.70 26.19 25.72
3/24/2000 28.02 27.28 26.71 26.21
3/27/2000 27.79 27.00 26.45 25.97
3/28/2000 27.09 26.35 25.88 25.48
3/29/2000 26.45 25.87 25.58 25.31
3/30/2000 26.70 26.07 25.74 25.47
3/31/2000 26.90 26.38 26.04 25.76
4/3/2000 26.43 25.94 25.62 25.34
4/4/2000 25.45 25.13 24.93 24.72
4/5/2000 25.83 25.31 25.11 24.92
4/6/2000 25.69 25.12 24.89 24.70
4/7/2000 25.04 24.47 24.27 24.09
4/10/2000 23.85 23.23 23.05 22.92
4/11/2000 24.14 23.39 23.27 23.17
4/12/2000 25.41 24.74 24.57 24.43
4/13/2000 25.38 24.62 24.41 24.21
4/14/2000 25.57 24.33 24.12 23.92
4/17/2000 25.89 24.57 24.28 24.07
4/18/2000 26.11 24.83 24.40 24.15
4/19/2000 27.35 25.80 25.25 24.91
4/20/2000 25.88 25.34 24.98 24.69
4/24/2000 26.04 25.55 25.18 24.88
4/25/2000 25.33 25.02 24.70 24.42
4/26/2000 24.65 24.53 24.34 24.15
4/27/2000 25.42 25.21 24.94 24.70
4/28/2000 25.74 25.48 25.15 24.86
5/1/2000 25.87 25.60 25.25 24.95
5/2/2000 26.89 26.46 26.00 25.60
5/3/2000 26.75 26.41 25.91 25.46
5/4/2000 26.98 26.56 26.02 25.52
5/5/2000 27.29 26.92 26.31 25.78
5/8/2000 28.09 27.75 27.01 26.42
5/9/2000 28.65 28.40 27.67 27.00
5/10/2000 28.10 28.05 27.45 26.86
5/11/2000 29.11 28.94 28.27 27.66
5/12/2000 29.62 29.39 28.71 28.06
5/15/2000 29.92 29.73 29.07 28.41
5/16/2000 29.73 29.65 29.08 28.41
5/17/2000 29.32 29.44 28.96 28.38
5/18/2000 30.33 30.22 29.66 29.01
5/19/2000 29.89 29.85 29.41 28.84
5/22/2000 28.61 28.73 28.32 27.83
5/23/2000 28.78 28.28 27.81 27.35
5/24/2000 29.93 29.18 28.60 28.09
5/25/2000 30.51 29.63 28.98 28.43
5/26/2000 30.00 29.07 28.40 27.85
5/30/2000 30.35 29.41 28.77 28.24
5/31/2000 29.01 28.42 27.89 27.40
6/1/2000 30.14 29.31 28.71 28.20
6/2/2000 30.35 29.44 28.74 28.18
6/5/2000 29.70 28.92 28.25 27.72
6/6/2000 29.75 28.97 28.30 27.76
6/7/2000 29.95 29.28 28.66 28.13
6/8/2000 29.78 29.08 28.39 27.83
6/9/2000 30.20 29.26 28.46 27.89
6/12/2000 31.74 30.43 29.53 28.85
6/13/2000 32.56 31.20 30.16 29.41
6/14/2000 32.85 31.17 30.09 29.33
6/15/2000 32.95 30.95 29.87 29.11
6/16/2000 32.33 30.02 29.02 28.31
6/19/2000 31.69 29.64 28.67 28.02
6/20/2000 33.05 30.65 29.49 28.74
6/21/2000 31.37 29.90 29.05 28.45
6/22/2000 32.19 30.67 29.75 29.11
6/23/2000 32.25 30.85 29.92 29.28
6/26/2000 31.63 30.41 29.52 28.90
6/27/2000 32.06 30.88 30.01 29.38
6/28/2000 31.90 30.65 29.78 29.14
6/29/2000 32.72 31.25 30.33 29.65
6/30/2000 32.50 31.13 30.20 29.51
7/5/2000 30.67 29.60 28.90 28.35
7/6/2000 29.99 29.04 28.48 27.98
7/7/2000 30.28 29.18 28.62 28.12
7/10/2000 29.69 28.83 28.29 27.82
7/11/2000 29.70 29.06 28.56 28.13
7/12/2000 30.32 29.64 29.04 28.60
7/13/2000 31.47 30.41 29.69 29.21
7/14/2000 31.40 30.43 29.71 29.21
7/17/2000 30.83 29.76 29.12 28.68
7/18/2000 31.94 30.64 29.93 29.41
7/19/2000 31.42 30.35 29.76 29.32
7/20/2000 30.93 29.77 29.31 28.91
7/21/2000 28.56 28.36 28.08 27.78
7/24/2000 28.02 27.80 27.57 27.31
7/25/2000 27.95 27.73 27.50 27.24
7/26/2000 27.81 27.63 27.44 27.20
7/27/2000 28.02 27.80 27.65 27.43
7/28/2000 28.18 27.91 27.76 27.54
7/31/2000 27.43 27.31 27.19 27.00
8/1/2000 27.79 27.58 27.44 27.25
8/2/2000 28.26 27.97 27.72 27.46
8/3/2000 28.66 28.32 27.98 27.66
8/4/2000 29.96 29.36 28.94 28.53
8/7/2000 28.91 28.65 28.30 27.94
8/8/2000 29.12 28.87 28.51 28.15
8/9/2000 30.35 29.95 29.43 28.98
8/10/2000 31.34 30.87 30.25 29.70
8/11/2000 31.02 30.58 29.98 29.42
8/14/2000 31.94 31.08 30.41 29.83
8/15/2000 31.67 30.96 30.32 29.74
8/16/2000 31.80 30.98 30.36 29.79
8/17/2000 31.94 31.33 30.68 30.08
8/18/2000 31.99 31.56 31.03 30.46
8/21/2000 32.47 31.98 31.36 30.70
8/22/2000 31.22 31.22 30.83 30.31
8/23/2000 32.02 31.56 30.97 30.37
8/24/2000 31.63 31.09 30.53 29.99
8/25/2000 32.03 31.23 30.66 30.11
8/28/2000 32.87 31.94 31.32 30.75
8/29/2000 32.74 31.83 31.21 30.63
8/30/2000 33.32 32.42 31.82 31.25
8/31/2000 33.12 32.21 31.58 30.99
9/1/2000 33.38 32.42 31.79 31.20
9/5/2000 33.83 32.98 32.31 31.69
9/6/2000 34.90 33.98 33.22 32.52
9/7/2000 35.39 34.54 33.76 33.03
9/8/2000 33.63 32.77 32.14 31.53
9/11/2000 35.14 34.22 33.54 32.87
9/12/2000 34.28 33.42 32.88 32.29
9/13/2000 33.82 32.68 32.20 31.72
9/14/2000 34.07 33.05 32.56 32.08
9/15/2000 35.92 34.72 34.06 33.43
9/18/2000 36.88 35.55 34.78 34.07
9/19/2000 36.51 35.01 34.22 33.53
9/20/2000 37.20 35.24 34.35 33.60
9/21/2000 34.00 33.41 32.83 32.25
9/22/2000 32.68 32.27 31.85 31.43
9/25/2000 31.57 31.43 31.21 30.93
9/26/2000 31.50 31.37 31.16 30.89
9/27/2000 31.46 31.39 31.18 30.91
9/28/2000 30.34 30.34 30.23 30.03
9/29/2000 30.84 30.71 30.54 30.34
10/2/2000 32.18 31.86 31.57 31.31
10/3/2000 32.07 31.85 31.58 31.32
10/4/2000 31.43 31.24 31.06 30.86
10/5/2000 30.53 30.54 30.49 30.42
10/6/2000 30.86 30.91 30.75 30.62
10/9/2000 31.86 31.85 31.56 31.37
10/10/2000 33.18 33.07 32.70 32.38
10/11/2000 33.25 33.24 32.94 32.64
10/12/2000 36.06 35.72 35.14 34.56
10/13/2000 34.99 34.13 33.55 33.02
10/16/2000 32.92 32.39 31.96 31.53
10/17/2000 32.99 32.42 31.98 31.58
10/18/2000 33.48 32.47 31.91 31.48
10/19/2000 32.91 31.90 31.36 30.91
10/20/2000 33.75 32.95 32.28 31.76
10/23/2000 33.76 32.99 32.39 31.88
10/24/2000 33.37 32.50 31.89 31.37
10/25/2000 32.96 32.19 31.60 31.10
10/26/2000 33.71 32.77 32.14 31.59
10/27/2000 32.74 31.68 31.03 30.48
10/30/2000 32.81 31.63 30.91 30.32
10/31/2000 32.70 31.55 30.85 30.27
11/1/2000 33.25 31.98 31.17 30.53
11/2/2000 32.54 31.28 30.48 29.87
11/3/2000 32.71 31.55 30.73 30.11
11/6/2000 32.86 31.69 30.84 30.21
11/7/2000 33.40 32.29 31.34 30.66
11/8/2000 33.24 32.28 31.38 30.68
11/9/2000 33.92 32.98 32.07 31.32
11/10/2000 34.02 33.06 32.16 31.36
11/13/2000 34.47 33.56 32.58 31.68
11/14/2000 34.87 33.96 32.95 31.92
11/15/2000 35.58 34.99 33.92 32.79
11/16/2000 35.12 34.46 33.53 32.45
11/17/2000 35.45 35.03 34.12 33.05
11/20/2000 35.22 34.16 32.99 31.91
11/21/2000 35.16 34.19 33.13 32.07
11/22/2000 35.40 34.40 33.32 32.24
11/27/2000 35.38 34.29 33.25 32.21
11/28/2000 34.22 33.21 32.28 31.36
11/29/2000 34.63 33.49 32.50 31.57
11/30/2000 33.82 32.88 31.90 31.00
12/1/2000 32.02 31.17 30.36 29.61
12/4/2000 31.22 30.47 29.75 29.12
12/5/2000 29.53 29.03 28.48 28.00
12/6/2000 29.85 29.31 28.81 28.34
12/7/2000 29.35 29.01 28.52 28.06
12/8/2000 28.44 28.09 27.75 27.44
12/11/2000 29.50 29.04 28.57 28.16
12/12/2000 29.68 29.10 28.57 28.14
12/13/2000 28.74 28.12 27.62 27.21
12/14/2000 27.99 27.17 26.78 26.48
12/15/2000 28.87 27.86 27.40 27.05
12/18/2000 29.76 28.59 28.03 27.63
12/19/2000 29.33 27.96 27.37 26.97
12/20/2000 25.77 25.49 25.18 24.89
12/21/2000 25.98 25.64 25.44 25.24
12/22/2000 26.18 25.79 25.49 25.24
12/26/2000 26.64 26.05 25.71 25.46
12/27/2000 26.47 25.86 25.50 25.25
12/28/2000 25.85 25.30 24.96 24.72
12/29/2000 26.80 25.98 25.59 25.34
1/2/2001 27.21 26.52 26.04 25.74
1/3/2001 28.00 27.27 26.73 26.35
1/4/2001 28.14 27.54 27.04 26.65
1/5/2001 27.95 27.16 26.68 26.28
1/8/2001 27.32 26.51 25.98 25.58
1/9/2001 27.64 26.70 26.18 25.81
1/10/2001 29.48 28.21 27.44 26.97
1/11/2001 29.41 28.22 27.44 26.96
1/12/2001 30.05 28.76 27.94 27.41
1/16/2001 30.29 28.50 27.66 27.11
1/17/2001 29.60 27.80 27.03 26.54
1/18/2001 30.45 28.67 27.78 27.17
1/19/2001 32.19 30.19 29.29 28.56
1/22/2001 32.19 29.80 28.90 28.14
1/23/2001 29.57 28.79 28.14 27.57
1/24/2001 29.05 28.31 27.72 27.19
1/25/2001 29.36 28.43 27.82 27.33
1/26/2001 29.77 28.77 28.12 27.60
1/29/2001 29.06 28.25 27.65 27.16
1/30/2001 29.06 28.25 27.67 27.22
1/31/2001 28.66 27.96 27.41 26.99
2/1/2001 29.82 29.06 28.42 27.92
2/2/2001 31.19 30.39 29.61 29.03
2/5/2001 30.55 29.87 29.13 28.56
2/6/2001 30.35 29.75 29.06 28.49
2/7/2001 31.27 30.98 30.26 29.62
2/8/2001 31.59 31.31 30.65 29.97
2/9/2001 31.03 30.74 30.23 29.63
2/12/2001 30.51 30.21 29.73 29.19
2/13/2001 30.36 30.23 29.86 29.41
2/14/2001 29.71 29.59 29.23 28.77
2/15/2001 28.80 28.71 28.45 28.10
2/16/2001 29.16 29.00 28.67 28.29
2/20/2001 28.58 28.81 28.48 28.15
2/21/2001 28.53 28.13 27.76 27.39
2/22/2001 28.82 28.47 28.07 27.67
2/23/2001 29.04 28.77 28.37 27.95
2/26/2001 28.42 28.25 27.95 27.58
2/27/2001 28.13 28.13 27.91 27.62
2/28/2001 27.39 27.50 27.36 27.11
3/1/2001 27.62 27.68 27.55 27.30
3/2/2001 27.84 27.91 27.74 27.47
3/5/2001 28.60 28.59 28.34 28.02
3/6/2001 28.32 28.37 28.22 27.93
3/7/2001 29.00 29.16 29.03 28.76
3/8/2001 28.39 28.62 28.54 28.30
3/9/2001 28.01 28.28 28.30 28.11
3/12/2001 28.00 28.26 28.29 28.17
3/13/2001 27.59 27.83 27.88 27.79
3/14/2001 26.41 26.62 26.77 26.75
3/15/2001 26.55 26.82 26.97 27.01
3/16/2001 26.74 26.92 26.99 26.98
3/19/2001 26.15 26.46 26.60 26.65
3/20/2001 25.96 26.12 26.24 26.27
3/21/2001 26.80 26.86 26.83 26.72
3/22/2001 26.54 26.71 26.64 26.50
3/23/2001 27.30 27.38 27.25 27.08
3/26/2001 27.48 27.53 27.36 27.16
3/27/2001 27.75 27.84 27.66 27.40
3/28/2001 26.31 26.49 26.42 26.21
3/29/2001 26.32 26.48 26.48 26.34
3/30/2001 26.29 26.57 26.60 26.49
4/2/2001 25.59 25.87 25.92 25.83
4/3/2001 26.19 26.39 26.40 26.27
4/4/2001 27.12 27.27 27.26 27.01
4/5/2001 27.26 27.49 27.52 27.22
4/6/2001 27.06 27.38 27.45 27.20
4/9/2001 27.28 27.59 27.69 27.50
4/10/2001 28.48 28.68 28.77 28.56
4/11/2001 28.18 28.49 28.64 28.49
4/12/2001 28.25 28.59 28.73 28.59
4/16/2001 28.79 29.19 29.35 29.22
4/17/2001 28.24 28.82 29.01 28.93
4/18/2001 27.95 28.55 28.79 28.80
4/19/2001 27.82 28.20 28.45 28.50
4/20/2001 27.28 27.58 27.84 27.88
4/23/2001 27.61 27.88 27.98 27.92
4/24/2001 26.86 27.34 27.56 27.56
4/25/2001 27.29 27.79 27.97 27.94
4/26/2001 28.44 28.69 28.69 28.54
4/27/2001 28.27 28.68 28.71 28.54
4/30/2001 28.46 28.86 28.89 28.65
5/1/2001 28.94 29.33 29.36 29.07
5/2/2001 27.80 28.39 28.55 28.36
5/3/2001 28.45 28.99 29.12 28.91
5/4/2001 28.36 28.96 29.15 28.96
5/7/2001 27.77 28.54 28.74 28.63
5/8/2001 27.39 28.37 28.62 28.29
5/9/2001 28.23 28.94 29.06 28.98
5/10/2001 28.52 29.10 29.13 28.90
5/11/2001 28.55 29.08 29.10 28.82
5/14/2001 28.71 29.13 29.20 28.88
5/15/2001 28.98 29.35 29.36 28.99
5/16/2001 28.86 29.16 29.15 28.78
5/17/2001 28.91 29.21 29.24 28.88
5/18/2001 29.91 30.34 30.34 29.92
5/21/2001 29.98 30.26 30.30 29.95
5/22/2001 29.74 30.00 30.06 29.73
5/23/2001 29.58 29.70 29.49 29.06
5/24/2001 28.41 28.60 28.54 28.23
5/25/2001 28.38 28.57 28.52 28.25
5/29/2001 28.66 28.82 28.70 28.42
5/30/2001 28.55 28.69 28.61 28.37
5/31/2001 28.37 28.52 28.43 28.23
6/1/2001 27.93 28.17 28.17 28.03
6/4/2001 28.13 28.41 28.44 28.29
6/5/2001 28.24 28.58 28.67 28.54
6/6/2001 27.72 28.09 28.24 28.21
6/7/2001 27.75 28.14 28.21 28.12
6/8/2001 28.33 28.63 28.63 28.50
6/11/2001 29.04 29.19 29.09 28.84
6/12/2001 29.18 29.39 29.27 28.99
6/13/2001 28.84 29.16 29.02 28.75
6/14/2001 29.04 29.20 29.06 28.75
6/15/2001 28.51 28.62 28.56 28.39
6/18/2001 27.55 27.67 27.69 27.63
6/19/2001 27.48 27.64 27.66 27.58
6/20/2001 26.50 26.48 26.58 26.55
6/21/2001 26.56 26.56 26.51 26.45
6/22/2001 26.83 26.80 26.68 26.59
6/25/2001 27.25 27.18 27.00 26.91
6/26/2001 26.98 26.96 26.80 26.69
6/27/2001 25.61 25.72 25.72 25.72
6/28/2001 25.56 25.61 25.65 25.68
6/29/2001 26.25 26.09 26.07 26.06
7/2/2001 25.95 25.83 25.81 25.80
7/3/2001 26.24 26.07 26.02 26.00
7/5/2001 27.02 26.65 26.44 26.33
7/6/2001 28.21 27.69 27.35 27.17
7/9/2001 27.59 27.19 26.87 26.69
7/10/2001 27.49 27.08 26.78 26.62
7/11/2001 27.11 26.69 26.39 26.25
7/12/2001 26.80 26.45 26.30 26.26
7/13/2001 26.59 26.14 26.03 26.00
7/16/2001 26.06 25.91 25.91 25.91
7/17/2001 25.57 25.59 25.59 25.59
7/18/2001 24.89 24.93 24.97 25.00
7/19/2001 24.70 24.78 24.71 24.73
7/20/2001 25.59 25.94 25.70 25.66
7/23/2001 26.12 25.83 25.76 25.69
7/24/2001 26.31 25.90 25.79 25.69
7/25/2001 26.84 26.42 26.26 26.09
7/26/2001 26.73 26.33 26.19 26.02
7/27/2001 27.02 26.41 26.23 26.06
7/30/2001 26.63 26.06 25.93 25.80
7/31/2001 26.35 25.77 25.69 25.59
8/1/2001 26.77 26.13 26.05 25.97
8/2/2001 27.71 27.04 26.91 26.74
8/3/2001 27.62 27.00 26.90 26.73
8/6/2001 27.74 27.13 27.04 26.87
8/7/2001 27.94 27.35 27.24 27.03
8/8/2001 27.54 26.96 26.91 26.73
8/9/2001 27.64 27.04 27.01 26.84
8/10/2001 28.05 27.32 27.22 26.98
8/13/2001 27.82 27.21 27.12 26.90
8/14/2001 28.01 27.27 27.20 26.99
8/15/2001 27.56 26.74 26.71 26.58
8/16/2001 27.40 26.49 26.48 26.38
8/17/2001 26.68 25.61 25.62 25.55
8/20/2001 27.18 26.19 26.11 26.02
8/21/2001 27.91 26.72 26.58 26.42
8/22/2001 26.37 26.35 26.19 25.97
8/23/2001 26.63 26.60 26.48 26.26
8/24/2001 26.90 26.91 26.79 26.53
8/27/2001 26.67 26.78 26.74 26.48
8/28/2001 27.17 27.21 27.19 26.89
8/29/2001 27.05 27.14 27.10 26.79
8/30/2001 26.55 26.73 26.73 26.45
8/31/2001 27.20 27.35 27.34 27.04
9/4/2001 26.93 27.07 27.07 26.80
9/5/2001 26.95 27.13 27.10 26.83
9/6/2001 27.58 27.67 27.62 27.32
9/7/2001 28.03 28.19 28.19 27.83
9/10/2001 27.63 27.85 27.89 27.56
9/17/2001 28.81 29.17 29.13 28.73
9/18/2001 27.70 28.09 28.15 27.90
9/19/2001 26.72 27.11 27.28 27.13
9/20/2001 26.59 26.73 26.97 26.82
9/21/2001 25.97 26.26 26.20 26.01
9/24/2001 22.01 22.44 23.20 23.01
9/25/2001 21.81 22.21 22.33 22.41
9/26/2001 22.38 22.73 22.81 22.88
9/27/2001 22.74 23.05 23.14 23.23
9/28/2001 23.43 23.68 23.76 23.84
10/1/2001 23.28 23.56 23.69 23.81
10/2/2001 22.79 23.11 23.25 23.38
10/3/2001 22.08 22.44 22.61 22.77
10/4/2001 22.63 22.97 23.10 23.23
10/5/2001 22.39 22.81 22.95 23.09
10/8/2001 22.45 22.86 23.01 23.16
10/9/2001 22.48 22.89 23.04 23.19
10/10/2001 22.53 22.96 23.10 23.22
10/11/2001 23.34 23.69 23.78 23.82
10/12/2001 22.50 22.82 22.93 22.98
10/15/2001 22.29 22.58 22.71 22.78
10/16/2001 22.00 22.26 22.39 22.46
10/17/2001 21.81 22.10 22.25 22.33
10/18/2001 21.31 21.55 21.77 21.89
10/19/2001 21.83 22.26 22.41 22.48
10/22/2001 21.76 22.26 22.44 22.51
10/23/2001 21.85 22.06 22.15 22.19
10/24/2001 22.33 22.50 22.58 22.60
10/25/2001 22.01 22.19 22.29 22.31
10/26/2001 22.03 22.20 22.31 22.32
10/29/2001 22.15 22.29 22.38 22.39
10/30/2001 21.87 21.99 22.07 22.09
10/31/2001 21.18 21.32 21.46 21.53
11/1/2001 20.39 20.58 20.75 20.85
11/2/2001 20.18 20.40 20.59 20.75
11/5/2001 20.02 20.24 20.40 20.54
11/6/2001 19.92 20.11 20.25 20.37
11/7/2001 20.09 20.28 20.40 20.49
11/8/2001 21.17 21.37 21.43 21.45
11/9/2001 22.22 22.46 22.51 22.48
11/12/2001 21.23 21.53 21.64 21.66
11/13/2001 21.67 21.90 21.97 21.97
11/14/2001 19.74 20.01 20.15 20.22
11/15/2001 17.45 17.84 18.06 18.27
11/16/2001 18.03 18.37 18.59 18.79
11/19/2001 17.72 18.43 18.66 18.88
11/20/2001 19.15 19.37 19.51 19.65
11/21/2001 18.96 19.19 19.33 19.46
11/26/2001 18.69 18.88 19.03 19.17
11/27/2001 19.48 19.64 19.74 19.84
11/28/2001 19.22 19.50 19.64 19.76
11/29/2001 18.62 18.94 19.16 19.35
11/30/2001 19.44 19.64 19.84 19.99
12/3/2001 20.09 20.39 20.53 20.63
12/4/2001 19.65 20.01 20.19 20.31
12/5/2001 19.49 19.84 20.04 20.17
12/6/2001 18.54 18.93 19.17 19.38
12/7/2001 19.04 19.45 19.73 19.96
12/10/2001 18.37 18.79 19.08 19.32
12/11/2001 18.08 18.46 18.76 18.99
12/12/2001 18.36 18.74 18.98 19.18
12/13/2001 18.12 18.53 18.77 18.98
12/14/2001 19.23 19.49 19.68 19.84
12/17/2001 19.22 19.52 19.70 19.85
12/18/2001 19.36 19.60 19.79 19.92
12/19/2001 19.80 20.05 20.16 20.26
12/20/2001 19.28 19.57 19.71 19.83
12/21/2001 19.62 19.82 19.99 20.13
12/26/2001 21.27 21.45 21.55 21.65
12/27/2001 20.90 21.14 21.24 21.34
12/28/2001 20.41 20.66 20.80 20.93
12/31/2001 19.84 20.11 20.27 20.41
1/2/2002 21.01 21.23 21.34 21.42
1/3/2002 20.37 20.64 20.77 20.85
1/4/2002 21.62 21.91 22.02 22.02
1/7/2002 21.48 21.78 21.94 21.90
1/8/2002 21.25 21.57 21.73 21.69
1/9/2002 20.18 20.65 20.88 20.93
1/10/2002 20.38 20.90 21.16 21.25
1/11/2002 19.68 20.32 20.61 20.73
1/14/2002 18.89 19.41 19.74 19.91
1/15/2002 18.90 19.44 19.74 19.91
1/16/2002 18.86 19.48 19.84 20.05
1/17/2002 17.97 18.63 19.03 19.27
1/18/2002 18.00 18.66 19.06 19.30
1/21/2002
1/22/2002 18.34 18.98 19.34 19.59
1/23/2002 19.50 19.75 19.91 20.01
1/24/2002 19.70 19.93 20.05 20.14
1/25/2002 19.99 20.23 20.36 20.46
1/28/2002 20.05 20.34 20.48 20.56
1/29/2002 19.58 19.91 20.08 20.19
1/30/2002 19.08 19.44 19.69 19.86
1/31/2002 19.48 19.81 20.07 20.23
2/1/2002 20.38 20.63 20.84 20.96
2/4/2002 20.07 20.36 20.56 20.67
2/5/2002 20.07 20.37 20.53 20.63
2/6/2002 19.78 20.14 20.29 20.38
2/7/2002 19.64 20.02 20.20 20.31
2/8/2002 20.26 20.62 20.79 20.85
2/11/2002 21.41 21.81 21.94 21.95
2/12/2002 20.73 21.12 21.26 21.27
2/13/2002 21.18 21.52 21.62 21.62
2/14/2002 21.23 21.52 21.63 21.62
2/15/2002 21.50 21.74 21.82 21.80
2/18/2002
2/19/2002 20.88 21.12 21.27 21.29
2/20/2002 20.29 20.43 20.62 20.70
2/21/2002 20.95 21.11 21.19 21.16
2/22/2002 21.07 21.20 21.26 21.22
2/25/2002 20.48 20.69 20.76 20.74
2/26/2002 21.41 21.59 21.62 21.57
2/27/2002 21.29 21.51 21.59 21.54
2/28/2002 21.74 21.96 22.04 21.99
3/1/2002 22.40 22.64 22.71 22.64
3/4/2002 22.45 22.69 22.75 22.68
3/5/2002 23.17 23.45 23.49 23.39
3/6/2002 23.15 23.45 23.51 23.43
3/7/2002 23.71 24.00 24.04 23.95
3/8/2002 23.84 24.14 24.22 24.16
3/11/2002 24.31 24.64 24.73 24.69
3/12/2002 24.20 24.55 24.63 24.62
3/13/2002 24.16 24.54 24.62 24.60
3/14/2002 24.56 24.90 24.93 24.82
3/15/2002 24.51 24.85 24.92 24.81
3/18/2002 25.11 25.44 25.51 25.38
3/19/2002 24.88 25.28 25.40 25.30
3/20/2002 24.90 24.95 25.10 25.05
3/21/2002 25.61 25.67 25.63 24.48
3/22/2002 25.35 25.49 25.46 25.31
3/25/2002 24.99 25.17 25.20 25.11
3/26/2002 25.36 25.49 25.51 25.41
3/27/2002 25.87 25.97 25.95 25.80
3/28/2002 26.31 26.37 26.32 26.13
3/29/2002
4/1/2002 26.88 27.01 26.91 26.64
4/2/2002 27.71 27.84 27.72 27.37
4/3/2002 27.56 27.66 27.56 27.22
4/4/2002 26.58 26.81 26.74 26.46
4/5/2002 26.21 26.41 26.30 26.03
4/8/2002 26.54 26.75 26.55 26.21
4/9/2002 25.82 26.03 25.87 25.56
4/10/2002 26.13 26.30 26.07 25.73
4/11/2002 24.99 25.19 25.01 24.75
4/12/2002 23.47 23.69 23.58 23.40
4/15/2002 24.57 24.80 24.66 24.45
4/16/2002 24.75 25.01 24.88 24.66
4/17/2002 25.94 26.05 25.79 25.47
4/18/2002 26.18 26.28 25.94 25.54
4/19/2002 26.38 26.44 26.16 25.76
4/22/2002 26.27 26.40 26.19 25.84
4/23/2002 26.62 26.37 26.01 25.74
4/24/2002 26.38 26.14 25.83 25.57
4/25/2002 26.73 26.42 26.11 25.83
4/26/2002 27.11 26.78 26.43 26.14
4/29/2002 27.57 27.12 26.77 26.46
4/30/2002 27.29 26.93 26.65 26.38
5/1/2002 26.75 26.43 26.18 25.94
5/2/2002 26.24 25.91 25.66 25.45
5/3/2002 26.62 26.27 26.01 25.77
5/6/2002 26.12 25.75 25.55 25.35
5/7/2002 26.63 26.16 25.91 25.70
5/8/2002 27.85 27.01 26.65 26.38
5/9/2002 27.68 26.92 26.64 26.40
5/10/2002 27.99 27.23 26.91 26.65
5/13/2002 28.38 27.62 27.29 27.02
5/14/2002 29.36 28.40 28.02 27.69
5/15/2002 28.15 27.21 26.93 26.60
5/16/2002 27.95 27.08 26.93 26.66
5/17/2002 28.18 27.15 27.00 26.73
5/20/2002 28.33 27.23 27.10 26.85
5/21/2002 27.33 26.43 26.41 26.26
5/22/2002 26.37 26.37 26.23 26.04
5/23/2002 26.15 26.23 26.13 25.94
5/24/2002 25.88 25.98 25.95 25.79
5/27/2002
5/28/2002 25.27 25.43 25.38 25.22
5/29/2002 25.76 25.87 25.78 25.61
5/30/2002 24.67 24.85 24.79 24.65
5/31/2002 25.31 25.39 25.24 25.07
6/3/2002 25.08 25.26 25.11 24.93
6/4/2002 25.33 25.45 25.34 25.16
6/5/2002 24.89 25.08 25.05 24.95
6/6/2002 24.79 24.98 25.03 25.03
6/7/2002 24.75 25.02 25.06 25.05
6/10/2002 24.29 24.56 24.62 24.64
6/11/2002 24.12 24.43 24.50 24.52
6/12/2002 24.64 24.87 24.90 24.88
6/13/2002 25.64 25.87 25.85 25.73
6/14/2002 25.94 26.14 26.10 25.97
6/17/2002 26.09 26.34 26.14 25.99
6/18/2002 25.43 25.65 25.56 25.45
6/19/2002 25.31 25.58 25.51 25.42
6/20/2002 25.53 25.95 25.90 25.81
6/21/2002 25.82 25.72 25.62 25.52
6/24/2002 26.47 26.27 26.14 26.02
6/25/2002 26.32 26.08 25.90 25.75
6/26/2002 26.76 26.36 26.16 26.01
6/27/2002 26.86 26.59 26.34 26.14
6/28/2002 26.86 26.71 26.45 26.23
7/1/2002 26.81 26.74 26.48 26.25
7/2/2002 26.77 26.69 26.42 26.19
7/3/2002 26.80 26.68 26.42 26.20
7/4/2002
7/5/2002
7/8/2002 26.07 26.08 25.87 25.69
7/9/2002 26.09 26.10 25.87 25.68
7/10/2002 26.77 26.76 26.47 26.25
7/11/2002 26.83 26.84 26.52 26.29
7/12/2002 27.48 27.43 27.07 26.78
7/15/2002 27.07 27.04 26.70 26.44
7/16/2002 27.75 27.76 27.39 27.11
7/17/2002 27.88 28.01 27.54 27.22
7/18/2002 27.57 27.66 27.26 27.00
7/19/2002 27.83 27.84 27.44 27.18
7/22/2002 26.60 26.70 26.39 26.21
7/23/2002 26.31 25.98 25.85 25.66
7/24/2002 26.87 26.36 26.18 25.99
7/25/2002 26.77 26.36 26.20 26.02
7/26/2002 26.54 26.11 25.96 25.79
7/29/2002 26.55 26.09 25.94 25.79
7/30/2002 27.36 26.82 26.59 26.40
7/31/2002 27.02 26.47 26.23 26.03
8/1/2002 26.47 26.06 25.84 25.66
8/2/2002 26.84 26.34 26.12 25.96
8/5/2002 26.58 26.03 25.81 25.67
8/6/2002 27.17 26.61 26.34 26.17
8/7/2002 26.50 26.06 25.82 25.67
8/8/2002 26.67 26.22 25.96 25.82
8/9/2002 26.86 26.37 26.07 25.91
8/12/2002 27.86 27.15 26.79 26.60
8/13/2002 27.90 27.19 26.79 26.55
8/14/2002 28.15 27.51 27.06 26.78
8/15/2002 29.06 28.38 27.86 27.49
8/16/2002 29.33 28.51 27.97 27.55
8/19/2002 29.84 28.80 28.22 27.78
8/20/2002 30.11 28.77 28.20 27.80
8/21/2002 29.24 28.50 28.08 27.64
8/22/2002 28.84 28.31 27.94 27.54
8/23/2002 28.63 28.21 27.91 27.55
8/26/2002 29.28 28.91 28.54 28.11
8/27/2002 28.83 28.60 28.37 27.96
8/28/2002 28.34 28.23 28.12 27.84
8/29/2002 28.92 28.75 28.56 28.26
8/30/2002 28.98 28.80 28.58 28.27
9/2/2002
9/3/2002 27.79 27.79 27.65 27.38
9/4/2002 28.27 28.27 28.12 27.82
9/5/2002 28.98 29.01 28.83 28.46
9/6/2002 29.61 29.59 29.36 28.92
9/9/2002 29.73 29.81 29.56 29.09
9/10/2002 29.73 29.89 29.66 29.20
9/11/2002 29.77 29.90 29.70 29.27
9/12/2002 28.85 29.03 28.87 28.50
9/13/2002 29.81 29.99 29.76 29.30
9/16/2002 29.67 29.90 29.76 29.33
9/17/2002 29.08 29.32 29.18 28.80
9/18/2002 29.48 29.67 29.49 29.04
9/19/2002 29.50 29.74 29.63 29.27
9/20/2002 29.61 29.84 29.68 29.30
9/23/2002 30.71 30.45 29.97 29.22
9/24/2002 30.77 30.45 29.92 29.18
9/25/2002 30.64 30.29 29.79 29.08
9/26/2002 30.41 30.21 29.76 29.13
9/27/2002 30.54 30.28 29.78 29.13
9/30/2002 30.45 30.21 29.75 29.16
10/1/2002 30.83 30.48 29.97 29.34
10/2/2002 30.49 30.28 29.80 29.19
10/3/2002 29.76 29.64 29.28 28.79
10/4/2002 29.62 29.52 29.21 28.78
10/7/2002 29.64 29.64 29.30 28.86
10/8/2002 29.48 29.51 29.15 28.72
10/9/2002 29.35 29.45 29.10 28.67
10/10/2002 28.97 29.07 28.71 28.30
10/11/2002 29.37 29.43 28.98 28.51
10/14/2002 30.03 29.97 29.44 28.90
10/15/2002 29.72 29.76 29.28 28.74
10/16/2002 29.47 29.49 29.10 28.58
10/17/2002 29.62 29.64 29.24 28.72
10/18/2002 29.60 29.60 29.18 28.66
10/21/2002 28.37 28.34 27.96 27.55
10/22/2002 27.92 28.07 27.70 27.35
10/23/2002 28.18 27.78 27.42 27.07
10/24/2002 28.20 27.79 27.39 27.03
10/25/2002 27.05 26.65 26.30 25.97
10/28/2002 27.29 26.85 26.49 26.19
10/29/2002 26.86 26.53 26.17 25.86
10/30/2002 26.81 26.56 26.25 25.95
10/31/2002 27.22 26.88 26.53 26.21
11/1/2002 27.13 26.71 26.35 26.02
11/4/2002 26.95 26.44 26.07 25.75
11/5/2002 26.14 25.65 25.33 25.11
11/6/2002 25.77 25.28 25.00 24.82
11/7/2002 25.38 24.93 24.63 24.46
11/8/2002 25.78 25.12 24.77 24.56
11/11/2002 25.94 25.34 24.96 24.72
11/12/2002 25.90 25.30 24.94 24.70
11/13/2002 25.19 24.48 24.21 24.05
11/14/2002 25.29 24.49 24.26 24.13
11/15/2002 25.51 24.71 24.50 24.37
11/18/2002 26.71 25.80 25.56 25.36
11/19/2002 26.42 25.50 25.34 25.12
11/20/2002 26.98 26.09 25.89 25.64
11/21/2002 26.35 26.20 25.92 25.62
11/22/2002 26.76 26.65 26.33 25.97
11/25/2002 26.11 26.05 25.84 25.52
11/26/2002 26.40 26.27 26.07 25.82
11/27/2002 26.89 26.71 26.44 26.13
11/28/2002
11/29/2002
12/2/2002 26.71 26.59 26.28 25.95
12/3/2002 27.29 27.17 26.80 26.47
12/4/2002 27.24 27.04 26.71 26.36
12/5/2002 27.30 27.17 26.82 26.47
12/6/2002 26.93 26.89 26.60 26.29
12/9/2002 27.20 27.18 26.86 26.52
12/10/2002 27.74 27.77 27.40 27.03
12/11/2002 27.40 27.42 27.04 26.65
12/12/2002 28.01 27.99 27.56 27.13
12/13/2002 28.44 28.45 27.93 27.41
12/16/2002 30.10 30.04 29.42 28.80
12/17/2002 30.10 29.94 29.24 28.59
12/18/2002 30.44 30.43 29.63 28.93
12/19/2002 30.56 30.19 29.60 28.87
12/20/2002 30.30 29.63 28.86 28.13
12/23/2002 31.75 30.85 29.87 28.99
12/24/2002 31.97 31.03 29.95 29.01
12/25/2002
12/26/2002 32.49 31.53 30.37 29.39
12/27/2002 32.72 31.80 30.49 29.44
12/30/2002 31.37 30.70 29.46 28.45
12/31/2002 31.20 30.59 29.46 28.50
1/1/2003
1/2/2003 31.85 31.10 29.91 28.84
1/3/2003 33.08 32.22 30.84 29.62
1/6/2003 32.10 31.44 30.17 28.99
1/7/2003 31.08 30.55 29.63 28.73
1/8/2003 30.56 30.06 29.29 28.52
1/9/2003 31.99 31.28 30.32 29.38
1/10/2003 31.68 30.96 30.00 29.04
1/13/2003 32.26 31.59 30.64 29.64
1/14/2003 32.37 31.78 30.96 29.97
1/15/2003 33.21 32.45 31.52 30.48
1/16/2003 33.66 32.81 31.83 30.82
1/17/2003 33.91 32.96 31.96 30.95
1/20/2003
1/21/2003 34.61 33.19 32.01 30.96
1/22/2003 32.85 31.79 30.77 29.78
1/23/2003 32.25 31.39 30.46 29.55
1/24/2003 33.28 32.16 31.12 30.13
1/27/2003 32.29 31.39 30.49 29.60
1/28/2003 32.67 31.82 30.94 30.07
1/29/2003 33.63 32.71 31.72 30.75
1/30/2003 33.85 32.96 31.95 30.96
1/31/2003 33.51 32.74 31.80 30.86
2/3/2003 32.76 32.16 31.34 30.52
2/4/2003 33.58 32.91 32.04 31.15
2/5/2003 33.93 33.27 32.37 31.45
2/6/2003 34.16 33.33 32.40 31.45
2/7/2003 35.12 34.25 33.13 32.03
2/10/2003 34.48 33.70 32.60 31.54
2/11/2003 35.44 34.47 33.27 32.07
2/12/2003 35.77 34.54 33.35 32.15
2/13/2003 36.36 35.18 33.92 32.64
2/14/2003 36.80 35.36 34.04 32.72
2/17/2003
2/18/2003 36.96 35.51 34.12 32.74
2/19/2003 37.16 35.66 34.21 32.76
2/20/2003 36.79 34.74 33.46 32.11
2/21/2003 35.58 34.33 32.92 31.75
2/24/2003 36.48 35.04 33.54 32.28
2/25/2003 36.06 34.42 32.97 31.72
2/26/2003 37.70 35.34 33.56 32.26
2/27/2003 37.20 35.19 33.51 32.19
2/28/2003 36.60 34.83 33.28 31.98
3/3/2003 35.88 34.24 32.85 31.68
3/4/2003 36.89 34.91 33.29 32.01
3/5/2003 36.69 34.96 33.36 32.11
3/6/2003 37.00 35.54 33.76 32.46
3/7/2003 37.78 36.35 34.43 33.08
3/10/2003 37.27 36.28 34.32 32.96
3/11/2003 36.72 35.74 34.06 32.81
3/12/2003 37.83 36.35 34.67 33.37
3/13/2003 36.01 34.67 33.17 32.07
3/14/2003 35.38 33.36 31.96 31.09
3/17/2003 34.93 32.54 31.09 30.29
3/18/2003 31.67 30.05 28.97 28.44
3/19/2003 29.88 29.36 28.54 28.05
3/20/2003 28.61 28.12 27.27 26.87
3/21/2003 26.91 26.18 25.91 25.66
3/24/2003 28.66 27.54 27.06 26.68
3/25/2003 27.97 26.46 26.06 25.73
3/26/2003 28.63 26.83 26.23 25.91
3/27/2003 30.37 28.45 27.49 26.98
3/28/2003 30.16 28.36 27.44 26.93
3/31/2003 31.04 29.19 28.22 27.64
4/1/2003 29.78 28.23 27.42 26.98
4/2/2003 28.56 27.21 26.64 26.30
4/3/2003 28.97 27.26 26.62 26.26
4/4/2003 28.62 26.86 26.26 25.99
4/7/2003 27.96 26.51 25.91 25.66
4/8/2003 28.00 26.73 26.11 25.85
4/9/2003 28.85 27.73 27.07 26.72
4/10/2003 27.46 26.74 26.34 26.10
4/11/2003 28.14 27.11 26.73 26.51
4/14/2003 28.63 27.06 26.61 26.29
4/15/2003 29.29 27.53 27.00 26.62
4/16/2003 29.18 27.53 27.08 26.69
4/17/2003 30.55 28.54 27.99 27.50
4/18/2003
4/21/2003 30.87 28.83 28.17 27.63
4/22/2003 29.91 27.99 27.48 27.01
4/23/2003 26.65 26.33 26.01 25.72
4/24/2003 26.64 26.35 26.09 25.84
4/25/2003 26.26 26.10 25.90 25.66
4/28/2003 25.49 25.40 25.29 25.10
4/29/2003 25.24 25.11 25.01 24.87
4/30/2003 25.80 25.46 25.29 25.14
5/1/2003 26.03 25.84 25.65 25.47
5/2/2003 25.67 25.47 25.31 25.15
5/5/2003 26.49 26.30 26.09 25.88
5/6/2003 25.72 25.62 25.47 23.32
5/7/2003 26.23 26.12 25.91 25.72
5/8/2003 26.98 26.75 26.39 26.11
5/9/2003 27.72 27.33 26.85 26.49
5/12/2003 27.35 27.09 26.64 26.28
5/13/2003 28.50 28.08 27.52 27.04
5/14/2003 29.17 28.78 28.18 27.59
5/15/2003 28.74 28.41 27.86 27.31
5/16/2003 29.14 28.75 28.10 27.49
5/19/2003 28.83 28.29 27.64 27.07
5/20/2003 29.28 28.41 27.66 27.08
5/21/2003 29.03 28.15 27.51 27.03
5/22/2003 28.85 27.98 27.35 26.88
5/23/2003 29.16 28.25 27.56 27.07
5/26/2003
5/27/2003 29.35 28.39 27.70 27.21
5/28/2003 28.58 27.65 27.04 26.63
5/29/2003 29.10 28.09 27.38 26.93
5/30/2003 29.56 28.49 27.75 27.28
6/2/2003 30.71 29.59 28.67 28.07
6/3/2003 30.67 29.50 28.65 28.05
6/4/2003 30.05 28.95 28.14 27.54
6/5/2003 30.74 29.68 28.83 28.18
6/6/2003 31.28 30.26 29.45 28.79
6/9/2003 31.45 30.48 29.66 28.96
6/10/2003 31.73 30.62 29.84 29.12
6/11/2003 32.36 31.05 30.18 29.41
6/12/2003 31.51 30.30 29.55 28.87
6/13/2003 30.65 29.33 28.68 28.08
6/16/2003 31.18 29.57 28.98 28.38
6/17/2003 31.07 29.48 28.85 28.32
6/18/2003 30.36 28.77 28.26 27.79
6/19/2003 29.96 28.51 28.09 27.64
6/20/2003 30.82 29.48 28.98 28.44
6/23/2003 29.17 28.78 28.33 27.90
6/24/2003 28.78 28.36 27.97 27.59
6/25/2003 29.95 29.34 28.87 28.42
6/26/2003 29.01 28.55 28.15 27.76
6/27/2003 29.27 28.90 28.52 28.13
6/30/2003 30.19 29.77 29.27 28.83
7/1/2003 30.40 30.05 29.45 28.98
7/2/2003 30.15 29.81 29.21 28.76
7/3/2003 30.42 30.02 29.40 28.94
7/4/2003
7/7/2003 30.13 29.72 29.20 28.81
7/8/2003 30.22 29.92 29.41 29.01
7/9/2003 30.88 30.63 30.09 29.65
7/10/2003 31.06 30.77 30.18 29.69
7/11/2003 31.28 31.05 30.45 29.92
7/14/2003 31.27 31.05 30.45 29.91
7/15/2003 31.62 31.11 30.50 29.97
7/16/2003 31.05 30.41 29.85 29.39
7/17/2003 31.41 30.72 30.16 29.65
7/18/2003 31.96 31.03 30.49 29.94
7/21/2003 31.78 30.83 30.40 29.93
7/22/2003 30.19 29.49 29.13 28.73
7/23/2003 29.67 29.32 28.95 28.56
7/24/2003 30.22 29.82 29.40 28.98
7/25/2003 30.17 29.83 29.38 28.94
7/28/2003 30.11 29.73 29.30 28.88
7/29/2003 30.24 29.83 29.39 28.96
7/30/2003 30.68 30.31 29.82 29.35
7/31/2003 30.54 30.25 29.78 29.32
8/1/2003 32.31 31.95 31.36 30.79
8/4/2003 31.84 31.53 30.99 30.42
8/5/2003 32.22 31.91 31.36 30.76
8/6/2003 31.70 31.46 30.97 30.39
8/7/2003 32.39 32.23 31.68 31.04
8/8/2003 32.18 32.07 31.55 30.94
8/11/2003 32.01 31.90 31.42 30.83
8/12/2003 31.92 31.82 31.35 30.76
8/13/2003 30.78 30.80 30.45 29.95
8/14/2003 31.09 31.03 30.63 30.08
8/15/2003 31.05 30.99 30.64 30.09
8/18/2003 30.89 30.88 30.54 29.99
8/19/2003 30.70 30.70 30.43 29.90
8/20/2003 30.95 31.04 30.75 30.18
8/21/2003 31.88 31.61 31.01 30.41
8/22/2003 31.84 31.60 31.05 30.45
8/25/2003 31.56 31.36 30.90 30.31
8/26/2003 31.95 31.54 31.04 30.46
8/27/2003 31.21 30.93 30.46 29.95
8/28/2003 31.50 31.25 30.77 30.26
8/29/2003 31.57 31.31 30.83 30.28
9/1/2003
9/2/2003 29.41 29.35 29.00 28.63
9/3/2003 29.49 29.46 29.13 28.78
9/4/2003 28.98 28.97 28.67 28.33
9/5/2003 28.88 28.86 28.58 28.25
9/8/2003 28.85 28.92 28.64 28.29
9/9/2003 29.18 29.23 28.94 28.56
9/10/2003 29.35 29.43 29.13 28.73
9/11/2003 28.82 28.95 28.69 28.34
9/12/2003 28.27 28.40 28.16 27.86
9/15/2003 28.14 28.25 28.02 27.75
9/16/2003 27.56 27.68 27.47 27.26
9/17/2003 27.03 27.16 26.97 26.79
9/18/2003 27.17 27.24 26.98 26.81
9/19/2003 27.03 27.07 26.82 26.67
9/22/2003 26.96 27.19 27.00 26.82
9/23/2003 27.13 26.89 26.65 26.48
9/24/2003 28.24 27.96 27.60 27.32
9/25/2003 28.29 28.08 27.72 27.41
9/26/2003 28.16 27.92 27.56 27.25
9/29/2003 28.40 28.17 27.79 27.46
9/30/2003 29.20 28.92 28.48 28.08
10/1/2003 29.39 29.17 28.73 28.32
10/2/2003 29.84 29.57 29.10 28.65
10/3/2003 30.40 30.10 29.63 29.16
10/6/2003 30.47 30.31 29.84 29.34
10/7/2003 30.41 30.38 29.99 29.51
10/8/2003 29.81 29.90 29.59 29.19
10/9/2003 31.01 31.09 30.72 30.25
10/10/2003 31.97 31.99 31.55 30.98
10/13/2003 31.95 32.06 31.60 31.04
10/14/2003 31.82 31.93 31.46 30.92
10/15/2003 31.77 31.86 31.48 30.98
10/16/2003 31.54 31.66 31.31 30.83
10/17/2003 30.68 30.70 30.42 30.02
10/20/2003 30.35 30.43 30.09 29.69
10/21/2003 30.18 30.32 29.95 29.55
10/22/2003 29.92 29.62 29.24 28.86
10/23/2003 30.30 29.97 29.57 29.17
10/24/2003 30.16 29.87 29.51 29.11
10/27/2003 29.92 29.70 29.37 28.98
10/28/2003 29.56 29.37 29.07 28.71
10/29/2003 28.91 28.72 28.48 28.19
10/30/2003 28.47 28.27 28.02 27.77
10/31/2003 29.11 28.85 28.57 28.29
11/3/2003 28.90 28.74 28.47 28.19
11/4/2003 28.75 28.63 28.34 28.05
11/5/2003 30.30 30.13 29.76 29.40
11/6/2003 30.26 29.97 29.53 29.19
11/7/2003 30.85 30.56 30.13 29.68
11/10/2003 30.88 30.62 30.19 29.74
11/11/2003 31.15 30.90 30.51 30.05
11/12/2003 31.33 30.89 30.50 30.05
11/13/2003 31.90 31.43 31.00 30.51
11/14/2003 32.37 31.78 31.33 30.77
11/17/2003 31.73 31.27 30.91 30.42
11/18/2003 33.28 32.70 32.27 31.71
11/19/2003 32.92 32.07 31.64 31.06
11/20/2003 32.86 31.86 31.42 30.84
11/21/2003 31.61 31.21 30.67 30.14
11/24/2003 29.74 29.49 29.08 28.69
11/25/2003 29.77 29.56 29.18 28.81
11/26/2003 30.41 30.22 29.84 29.45
11/27/2003
11/28/2003
12/1/2003 29.95 29.80 29.47 29.11
12/2/2003 30.78 30.62 30.22 29.81
12/3/2003 31.10 30.93 30.49 30.05
12/4/2003 31.26 31.13 30.70 30.26
12/5/2003 30.73 30.64 30.25 29.87
12/8/2003 32.10 32.00 31.56 31.10
12/9/2003 31.76 31.60 31.12 30.64
12/10/2003 31.88 31.76 31.32 30.84
12/11/2003 31.85 31.75 31.29 30.81
12/12/2003 33.04 32.95 32.36 31.78
12/15/2003 33.18 33.24 32.62 32.00
12/16/2003 32.89 32.95 32.36 31.75
12/17/2003 33.35 33.39 32.85 32.22
12/18/2003 33.71 33.75 33.24 32.61
12/19/2003 33.02 33.02 32.55 31.96
12/22/2003 31.87 31.52 31.01 30.50
12/23/2003 31.95 31.57 31.07 30.58
12/24/2003 32.86 32.42 31.88 31.33
12/25/2003
12/26/2003
12/29/2003 32.40 32.02 31.53 31.00
12/30/2003 32.79 32.40 31.89 31.35
12/31/2003 32.52 32.28 31.83 31.30
1/1/2004
1/2/2004
1/5/2004 33.78 33.51 33.01 32.41
1/6/2004 33.70 33.48 33.04 32.45
1/7/2004 33.62 33.40 32.97 32.42
1/8/2004 33.98 33.73 33.28 32.73
1/9/2004 34.31 34.03 33.55 32.98
1/12/2004 34.72 34.40 33.89 33.29
1/13/2004 34.43 34.01 33.52 32.94
1/14/2004 34.50 33.79 33.31 32.77
1/15/2004 33.44 32.53 32.11 31.66
1/16/2004 35.07 34.00 33.51 33.00
1/19/2004
1/20/2004 36.20 34.87 34.31 33.75
1/21/2004 34.58 34.00 33.42 32.83
1/22/2004 34.93 34.30 33.68 33.07
1/23/2004 34.94 34.03 33.37 32.75
1/26/2004 34.47 33.64 32.99 32.41
1/27/2004 34.12 33.26 32.61 32.03
1/28/2004 33.62 32.81 32.16 31.58
1/29/2004 32.81 32.12 31.52 31.01
1/30/2004 33.05 32.10 31.49 30.98
2/2/2004 34.98 33.48 32.75 32.18
2/3/2004 34.10 32.82 32.04 31.47
2/4/2004 33.10 31.99 31.32 30.84
2/5/2004 33.08 32.17 31.60 31.14
2/6/2004 32.48 31.74 31.21 30.76
2/9/2004 32.83 32.03 31.49 31.02
2/10/2004 33.87 33.01 32.41 31.89
2/11/2004 34.00 33.21 32.64 32.10
2/12/2004 33.98 33.38 32.89 32.38
2/13/2004 34.56 34.10 33.53 32.96
2/16/2004
2/17/2004 35.19 34.86 34.34 33.76
2/18/2004 35.45 34.48 33.93 33.33
2/19/2004 36.00 34.64 34.06 33.45
2/20/2004 35.60 34.26 33.60 33.04
2/23/2004 34.35 33.47 32.88 32.35
2/24/2004 34.58 33.45 32.85 32.35
2/25/2004 35.68 34.33 33.59 33.01
2/26/2004 35.51 34.55 33.78 33.21
2/27/2004 36.16 35.24 34.42 33.80
3/1/2004 36.86 36.18 35.35 34.69
3/2/2004 36.66 35.99 35.23 34.57
3/3/2004 35.80 35.05 34.32 33.73
3/4/2004 36.64 35.81 34.98 34.35
3/5/2004 37.26 36.44 35.52 34.82
3/8/2004 36.57 35.82 34.94 34.27
3/9/2004 36.28 35.45 34.60 33.95
3/10/2004 36.10 35.36 34.53 33.90
3/11/2004 36.78 36.14 35.28 34.60
3/12/2004 36.19 35.57 34.79 34.15
3/15/2004 37.44 36.70 35.84 35.14
3/16/2004 37.48 36.68 35.80 35.09
3/17/2004 38.18 37.62 36.72 35.95
3/18/2004 37.93 37.39 36.54 35.80
3/19/2004 38.08 37.62 36.73 35.97
3/22/2004 37.11 37.05 36.27 35.59
3/23/2004 37.45 36.65 35.95 35.34
3/24/2004 37.01 36.29 35.64 35.05
3/25/2004 35.51 34.80 34.26 33.77
3/26/2004 35.73 34.87 34.31 33.82
3/29/2004 35.45 34.65 34.10 33.63
3/30/2004 36.25 35.50 34.91 34.40
3/31/2004 35.76 35.08 34.55 34.07
4/1/2004 34.27 33.75 33.29 32.85
4/2/2004 34.39 33.87 33.44 33.02
4/5/2004 34.38 33.86 33.44 33.03
4/6/2004 34.97 34.38 33.91 33.48
4/7/2004 36.15 35.60 35.07 34.57
4/8/2004 37.14 36.59 36.05 35.46
4/9/2004
4/12/2004 37.84 37.24 36.72 36.09
4/13/2004 37.21 36.68 36.26 35.70
4/14/2004 36.72 36.42 36.09 35.62
4/15/2004 37.57 37.10 36.74 36.24
4/16/2004 37.74 36.99 36.63 36.14
4/19/2004 37.42 36.75 36.40 35.92
4/20/2004 37.60 36.50 36.06 35.60
4/21/2004 35.73 35.34 34.95 34.54
4/22/2004 36.71 36.28 35.86 35.42
4/23/2004 36.46 36.01 35.65 35.24
4/26/2004 36.97 36.60 36.20 35.76
4/27/2004 37.53 37.23 36.82 36.35
4/28/2004 37.46 37.17 36.72 36.22
4/29/2004 37.31 37.05 36.66 36.20
4/30/2004 37.38 37.08 36.71 36.24
5/3/2004 38.21 37.99 37.58 37.07
5/4/2004 38.98 38.75 38.24 37.63
5/5/2004 39.57 39.36 38.79 38.13
5/6/2004 39.37 39.17 38.62 37.96
5/7/2004 39.93 39.71 39.13 38.44
5/10/2004 38.93 38.75 38.20 37.57
5/11/2004 40.06 39.97 39.38 38.68
5/12/2004 40.77 40.66 40.04 39.33
5/13/2004 41.08 41.00 40.42 39.72
5/14/2004 41.38 41.30 40.76 40.08
5/17/2004 41.55 41.48 40.97 40.29
5/18/2004 40.54 40.42 39.92 39.31
5/19/2004 41.50 41.52 41.00 40.34
5/20/2004 40.92 40.80 40.40 39.79
5/21/2004 39.93 39.56 39.01 38.46
5/24/2004 41.72 41.24 40.64 40.02
5/25/2004 41.14 40.68 40.12 39.53
5/26/2004 40.70 40.38 39.89 39.33
5/27/2004 39.44 39.28 38.91 38.40
5/28/2004 39.88 39.71 39.35 38.85
5/31/2004
6/1/2004 42.33 42.19 41.77 41.20
6/2/2004 39.96 39.93 39.64 39.17
6/3/2004 39.28 39.23 39.02 38.61
6/4/2004 38.49 38.53 38.38 38.03
6/7/2004 38.66 38.75 38.59 38.27
6/8/2004 37.28 37.43 37.32 37.05
6/9/2004 37.54 37.74 37.65 37.45
6/10/2004 38.45 38.65 38.55 38.28
6/11/2004
6/14/2004 37.59 37.88 37.83 37.58
6/15/2004 37.19 37.42 37.44 37.24
6/16/2004 37.32 37.65 37.63 37.41
6/17/2004 38.46 38.81 38.82 38.54
6/18/2004 38.75 39.00 39.01 38.72
6/21/2004 37.63 37.77 37.80 37.57
6/22/2004 38.11 38.25 38.25 38.00
6/23/2004 37.57 37.64 37.41 37.16
6/24/2004 37.93 38.02 37.79 37.53
6/25/2004 37.55 37.60 37.39 37.16
6/28/2004 36.24 36.31 36.20 36.06
6/29/2004 35.66 35.75 35.65 35.53
6/30/2004 37.05 37.14 36.99 36.84
7/1/2004 38.74 38.83 38.60 38.34
7/2/2004 38.39 38.46 38.24 37.98
7/5/2004
7/6/2004 39.65 39.72 39.46 39.18
7/7/2004 39.08 39.20 38.89 38.59
7/8/2004 40.33 40.53 40.07 39.67
7/9/2004 39.96 40.14 39.61 39.20
7/12/2004 39.50 39.64 39.20 38.81
7/13/2004 39.44 39.54 39.10 38.71
7/14/2004 40.97 41.15 40.57 40.09
7/15/2004 40.77 40.93 40.41 39.93
7/16/2004 41.25 41.30 40.82 40.34
7/19/2004 41.64 41.44 40.88 40.38
7/20/2004 40.86 40.44 39.88 39.45
7/21/2004 40.58 40.09 39.68 39.26
7/22/2004 41.36 40.88 40.46 40.03
7/23/2004 41.71 41.27 40.87 40.45
7/26/2004 41.44 40.97 40.58 40.17
7/27/2004 41.84 41.26 40.84 40.41
7/28/2004 42.90 42.28 41.81 41.34
7/29/2004 42.75 42.13 41.64 41.17
7/30/2004 43.80 43.05 42.49 41.99
8/2/2004 43.82 43.16 42.63 42.14
8/3/2004 44.15 43.66 43.14 42.65
8/4/2004 42.83 42.30 41.84 41.37
8/5/2004 44.41 43.80 43.22 42.65
8/6/2004 43.95 43.52 43.00 42.45
8/9/2004 44.84 44.44 43.96 43.38
8/10/2004 44.52 44.06 43.60 43.02
8/11/2004 44.80 44.35 43.89 43.31
8/12/2004 45.50 44.93 44.50 43.92
8/13/2004 46.58 46.03 45.61 45.04
8/16/2004 46.05 45.69 45.29 44.76
8/17/2004 46.75 46.26 45.81 45.25
8/18/2004 47.27 46.35 45.93 45.37
8/19/2004 48.70 47.64 47.23 46.65
8/20/2004 47.86 46.72 46.34 45.81
8/23/2004 46.05 45.71 45.22 44.67
8/24/2004 45.21 44.86 44.46 43.96
8/25/2004 43.47 43.15 42.78 42.32
8/26/2004 43.10 42.75 42.38 41.93
8/27/2004 43.18 42.98 42.68 42.25
8/30/2004 42.28 42.11 41.82 41.40
8/31/2004 42.12 42.04 41.75 41.37
9/1/2004 44.00 43.96 43.65 43.23
9/2/2004 44.06 44.01 43.68 43.28
9/3/2004 43.99 43.96 43.63 43.23
9/6/2004
9/7/2004 43.31 43.31 43.01 42.64
9/8/2004 42.77 42.84 42.52 42.15
9/9/2004 44.61 44.63 44.20 43.73
9/10/2004 42.81 42.84 42.44 42.00
9/13/2004 43.87 43.83 43.36 42.86
9/14/2004 44.39 44.34 43.87 43.34
9/15/2004 43.58 43.51 43.10 42.60
9/16/2004 43.88 43.92 43.52 43.03
9/17/2004 45.59 45.59 45.02 44.42
9/20/2004 46.35 46.19 45.59 44.97
9/21/2004 47.10 46.76 46.16 45.52
9/22/2004 48.35 47.58 46.89 46.25
9/23/2004 48.46 47.73 47.07 46.43
9/24/2004 48.88 48.08 47.42 46.80
9/27/2004 49.64 48.93 48.26 47.62
9/28/2004 49.90 49.19 48.49 47.84
9/29/2004 49.51 48.91 48.27 47.68
9/30/2004 49.64 49.21 48.58 47.96
10/1/2004 50.12 49.69 49.06 48.44
10/4/2004 49.91 49.51 48.92 48.33
10/5/2004 51.09 50.64 50.03 49.40
10/6/2004 52.02 51.53 50.89 50.25
10/7/2004 52.67 52.24 51.61 50.96
10/8/2004 53.31 52.94 52.36 51.71
10/11/2004 53.64 53.34 52.79 52.14
10/12/2004 52.51 52.18 51.67 51.06
10/13/2004 53.64 53.14 52.62 51.99
10/14/2004 54.76 54.06 53.47 52.77
10/15/2004 54.93 53.97 53.40 52.72
10/18/2004 53.67 52.84 52.31 51.70
10/19/2004 53.29 52.64 52.14 51.56
10/20/2004 54.92 54.41 53.93 53.31
10/21/2004 54.47 54.05 53.45 52.74
10/22/2004 55.17 54.69 54.04 53.28
10/25/2004 54.54 54.17 53.60 52.88
10/26/2004 55.17 54.76 54.25 53.58
10/27/2004 52.46 52.17 51.81 51.29
10/28/2004 50.92 50.74 50.45 50.00
10/29/2004 51.76 51.60 51.31 50.86
11/1/2004 50.13 50.01 49.73 49.30
11/2/2004 49.62 49.59 49.32 48.89
11/3/2004 50.88 50.82 50.51 50.05
11/4/2004 48.82 48.84 48.67 48.28
11/5/2004 49.61 49.62 49.48 49.11
11/8/2004 49.09 49.17 49.07 48.73
11/9/2004 47.37 47.57 47.56 47.32
11/10/2004 48.86 48.92 48.84 48.56
11/11/2004 47.42 47.60 47.58 47.34
11/12/2004 47.32 47.41 47.43 47.23
11/15/2004 46.87 46.95 47.02 46.92
11/16/2004 46.11 46.20 46.29 46.20
11/17/2004 46.84 47.12 47.23 47.12
11/18/2004 46.22 46.38 46.47 46.35
11/19/2004 48.44 48.89 48.85 48.63
11/22/2004 48.64 48.81 48.60 48.17
11/23/2004 48.94 49.12 49.06 48.75
11/24/2004 49.44 49.45 49.37 49.04
11/25/2004
11/26/2004
11/29/2004 49.76 49.88 49.77 49.43
11/30/2004 49.13 49.26 49.18 48.91
12/1/2004 45.49 45.70 45.76 45.59
12/2/2004 43.25 43.48 43.58 43.46
12/3/2004 42.54 42.75 42.83 42.73
12/6/2004 42.98 43.24 43.29 43.17
12/7/2004 41.46 41.81 41.95 41.87
12/8/2004 41.94 42.31 42.47 42.38
12/9/2004 42.53 42.97 43.16 43.07
12/10/2004 40.71 41.36 41.64 41.64
12/13/2004 41.01 41.83 42.14 42.16
12/14/2004 41.82 42.45 42.68 42.63
12/15/2004 44.19 44.69 44.83 44.67
12/16/2004 44.18 44.51 44.68 44.48
12/17/2004 46.28 46.57 46.63 46.32
12/20/2004 45.64 45.78 45.81 45.51
12/21/2004 45.76 45.79 45.49 45.15
12/22/2004 44.24 44.33 44.10 43.80
12/23/2004 44.18 44.26 44.08 43.78
12/24/2004
12/27/2004 41.32 41.55 41.55 41.38
12/28/2004 41.77 42.01 42.01 41.83
12/29/2004 43.64 43.80 43.74 43.51
12/30/2004 43.45 43.63 43.57 43.32
12/31/2004
1/3/2005 42.12 42.34 42.37 42.19
1/4/2005 43.91 44.08 44.05 43.81
1/5/2005 43.39 43.61 43.55 43.29
1/6/2005 45.56 45.78 45.63 45.30
1/7/2005 45.43 45.65 45.47 45.11
1/10/2005 45.33 45.57 45.34 44.97
1/11/2005 45.68 45.91 45.64 45.27
1/12/2005 46.37 46.56 46.25 45.86
1/13/2005 48.04 48.19 47.82 47.39
1/14/2005 48.38 48.53 48.18 47.78
1/17/2005
1/18/2005 48.38 48.48 48.28 47.93
1/19/2005 47.55 47.86 47.71 47.40
1/20/2005 46.91 47.31 47.26 47.00
1/21/2005 48.53 48.60 48.37 48.02
1/24/2005 48.81 48.93 48.76 48.44
1/25/2005 49.64 49.80 49.70 49.42
1/26/2005 48.78 48.94 48.95 48.75
1/27/2005 48.84 49.02 49.06 48.85
1/28/2005 47.18 47.44 47.52 47.40
1/31/2005 48.20 48.45 48.50 48.35
2/1/2005 47.12 47.57 47.79 47.72
2/2/2005 46.69 47.15 47.34 47.27
2/3/2005 46.45 46.88 47.10 47.07
2/4/2005 46.48 46.95 47.15 47.12
2/7/2005 45.28 45.96 46.26 46.29
2/8/2005 45.40 46.06 46.36 46.42
2/9/2005 45.46 46.08 46.36 46.37
2/10/2005 47.10 47.69 47.92 47.83
2/11/2005 47.16 47.80 48.05 47.95
2/14/2005 47.44 48.02 48.25 48.17
2/15/2005 47.26 47.77 48.04 47.97
2/16/2005 48.33 48.86 49.11 49.02
2/17/2005 47.54 48.22 48.56 48.59
2/18/2005 48.35 49.01 49.39 49.43
2/21/2005
2/22/2005 51.15 51.42 51.72 51.66
2/23/2005 51.17 51.59 51.59 51.30
2/24/2005 51.39 51.85 51.91 51.69
2/25/2005 51.49 51.95 52.04 51.89
2/28/2005 51.75 52.33 52.50 52.38
3/1/2005 51.68 52.31 52.53 52.46
3/2/2005 53.05 53.62 53.74 53.59
3/3/2005 53.57 54.16 54.06 53.86
3/4/2005 53.78 54.28 54.18 53.96
3/7/2005 53.89 54.54 54.54 54.35
3/8/2005 54.59 55.23 55.30 55.10
3/9/2005 54.77 55.38 55.45 55.25
3/10/2005 53.54 54.26 54.49 54.44
3/11/2005 54.43 55.12 55.35 55.31
3/14/2005 54.95 55.65 55.95 55.93
3/15/2005 55.05 55.65 56.00 56.05
3/16/2005 56.46 57.04 57.42 57.53
3/17/2005 56.40 56.91 57.42 57.64
3/18/2005 56.72 57.24 57.83 58.17
3/21/2005 56.62 57.46 58.06 58.42
3/22/2005 56.03 56.72 57.20 57.46
3/23/2005 53.81 54.74 55.32 55.68
3/24/2005 54.84 55.65 56.11 56.35
3/25/2005
3/28/2005 54.05 54.78 55.15 55.31
3/29/2005 54.23 54.95 55.21 55.31
3/30/2005 53.99 54.79 55.26 55.44
3/31/2005 55.40 56.42 56.91 57.09
4/1/2005 57.27 58.29 58.87 59.09
4/4/2005 57.01 58.10 58.80 59.12
4/5/2005 56.04 57.10 57.79 58.12
4/6/2005 55.85 56.89 57.54 57.86
4/7/2005 54.11 55.33 55.99 56.30
4/8/2005 53.32 54.65 55.36 55.70
4/11/2005 53.71 55.10 55.82 56.16
4/12/2005 51.86 53.53 54.37 54.72
4/13/2005 50.22 52.13 53.12 53.52
4/14/2005 51.13 52.78 53.66 54.02
4/15/2005 50.49 52.06 53.00 53.38
4/18/2005 50.37 51.47 52.30 52.62
4/19/2005 52.29 53.57 54.46 54.77
4/20/2005 52.44 54.03 55.13 55.58
4/21/2005 54.20 55.55 56.13 56.36
4/22/2005 55.39 56.54 57.08 57.28
4/25/2005 54.57 55.91 56.52 56.74
4/26/2005 54.20 55.65 56.30 56.55
4/27/2005 51.61 53.19 54.02 54.40
4/28/2005 51.77 53.25 54.12 54.59
4/29/2005 49.72 51.45 52.40 52.93
5/2/2005 50.92 52.64 53.56 54.08
5/3/2005 49.50 51.23 52.14 52.67
5/4/2005 50.13 51.90 52.75 53.27
5/5/2005 50.83 52.49 53.17 53.61
5/6/2005 50.96 52.67 53.23 53.55
5/9/2005 52.03 53.38 53.73 53.86
5/10/2005 52.07 53.49 53.92 54.03
5/11/2005 50.45 51.95 52.58 52.75
5/12/2005 48.54 50.19 51.01 51.39
5/13/2005 48.67 50.28 51.07 51.50
5/16/2005 48.61 50.17 50.82 51.22
5/17/2005 48.97 50.67 51.21 51.55
5/18/2005 47.25 49.13 49.96 50.43
5/19/2005 46.92 48.74 49.65 50.21
5/20/2005 46.80 48.65 49.70 50.41
5/23/2005 49.16 50.05 50.72 51.20
5/24/2005 49.67 50.47 51.01 51.43
5/25/2005 50.98 51.66 52.06 52.38
5/26/2005 51.01 51.71 52.14 52.48
5/27/2005 51.85 52.36 52.66 52.91
5/31/2005 51.97 52.75 53.03 53.25
6/1/2005 54.60 55.42 55.79 56.01
6/2/2005 53.63 54.62 55.10 55.37
6/3/2005 55.03 55.98 56.54 56.85
6/6/2005 54.49 55.69 56.44 56.89
6/7/2005 53.76 54.94 55.78 56.32
6/8/2005 52.54 53.85 54.74 55.34
6/9/2005 54.28 55.57 56.37 56.90
6/10/2005 53.54 54.68 55.50 55.97
6/13/2005 55.62 56.82 57.66 58.16
6/14/2005 55.00 55.97 56.79 57.33
6/15/2005 55.57 56.41 57.08 57.53
6/16/2005 56.58 57.43 58.04 58.46
6/17/2005 58.47 59.18 59.73 60.04
6/20/2005 59.37 59.88 60.50 60.75
6/21/2005 58.90 59.04 59.63 59.90
6/22/2005 58.09 58.74 59.09 59.32
6/23/2005 59.42 60.05 60.42 60.64
6/24/2005 59.84 60.49 60.85 61.06
6/27/2005 60.54 61.33 61.76 61.97
6/28/2005 58.20 59.11 59.67 60.02
6/29/2005 57.26 58.23 58.89 59.31
6/30/2005 56.50 57.64 58.36 58.80
7/1/2005 58.75 59.81 60.43 60.75
7/4/2005
7/5/2005 59.59 60.74 61.50 61.95
7/6/2005 61.28 62.13 62.76 63.18
7/7/2005 60.73 61.68 62.33 62.74
7/8/2005 59.63 60.64 61.29 61.69
7/11/2005 58.92 60.08 60.86 61.33
7/12/2005 60.62 61.48 62.13 62.53
7/13/2005 60.01 60.85 61.49 61.87
7/14/2005 57.80 58.70 59.33 59.69
7/15/2005 58.09 59.13 59.77 60.11
7/18/2005 57.32 58.42 59.13 59.52
7/19/2005 57.46 58.69 59.34 59.78
7/20/2005 56.72 58.02 58.70 59.19
7/21/2005 57.13 57.86 58.45 58.84
7/22/2005 58.65 59.26 59.83 60.20
7/25/2005 59.00 59.75 60.30 60.67
7/26/2005 59.20 60.01 60.60 60.99
7/27/2005 59.11 60.12 60.79 61.24
7/28/2005 59.94 60.98 61.68 62.19
7/29/2005 60.57 61.65 62.35 62.86
8/1/2005 61.57 62.70 63.43 63.96
8/2/2005 61.89 62.87 63.63 64.16
8/3/2005 60.86 61.87 62.63 63.17
8/4/2005 61.38 62.31 63.04 63.56
8/5/2005 62.31 63.28 63.96 64.44
8/8/2005 63.94 64.90 65.50 65.87
8/9/2005 63.07 64.16 64.91 65.29
8/10/2005 64.90 66.06 66.77 67.12
8/11/2005 65.80 66.75 67.28 67.52
8/12/2005 66.86 67.37 67.55 67.64
8/15/2005 66.27 67.07 67.53 67.78
8/16/2005 66.08 66.70 67.23 67.56
8/17/2005 63.25 63.85 64.48 64.88
8/18/2005 63.27 63.77 64.39 64.79
8/19/2005 65.35 65.79 66.31 66.63
8/22/2005 65.45 65.65 66.28 66.61
8/23/2005 65.71 66.48 66.89 67.22
8/24/2005 67.32 68.01 68.51 68.89
8/25/2005 67.49 68.19 68.72 69.13
8/26/2005 66.13 66.89 67.42 67.83
8/29/2005 67.20 67.74 68.12 68.48
8/30/2005 69.81 69.87 69.91 70.00
8/31/2005 68.94 69.41 69.58 69.71
9/1/2005 69.47 69.98 70.23 70.41
9/2/2005 67.57 68.16 68.57 68.85
9/5/2005
9/6/2005 65.96 66.71 67.37 67.80
9/7/2005 64.37 65.03 65.72 66.23
9/8/2005 64.49 65.27 65.92 66.42
9/9/2005 64.08 64.90 65.41 65.88
9/12/2005 63.34 64.01 64.63 65.09
9/13/2005 63.11 63.78 64.38 64.83
9/14/2005 65.09 65.73 66.28 66.70
9/15/2005 64.75 65.25 65.78 66.23
9/16/2005 63.00 63.34 63.91 64.41
9/19/2005 67.39 67.51 67.71 67.98
9/20/2005 66.23 66.20 66.39 66.66
9/21/2005 66.80 66.79 67.00 67.22
9/22/2005 66.50 66.65 66.98 67.25
9/23/2005 64.19 64.52 65.02 65.39
9/26/2005 65.82 66.03 66.46 66.81
9/27/2005 65.07 65.35 65.83 66.21
9/28/2005 66.35 66.46 66.77 67.08
9/29/2005 66.79 66.29 66.43 66.63
9/30/2005 66.24 66.23 66.53 66.82
10/3/2005 65.47 65.29 65.69 65.97
10/4/2005 63.90 63.76 64.26 64.64
10/5/2005 62.79 62.69 63.21 63.64
10/6/2005 61.36 61.06 61.45 61.84
10/7/2005 61.84 61.62 62.04 62.46
10/10/2005 61.80 61.57 62.03 62.41
10/11/2005 63.53 63.05 63.47 63.81
10/12/2005 64.12 63.61 63.88 64.10
10/13/2005 63.08 62.61 62.93 63.16
10/14/2005 62.63 61.99 62.05 62.21
10/17/2005 64.36 63.61 63.42 63.39
10/18/2005 63.20 62.44 62.18 62.04
10/19/2005 62.41 61.51 61.33 61.23
10/20/2005 61.03 60.02 60.07 60.11
10/21/2005 60.63 60.82 61.02 61.16
10/24/2005 60.32 60.55 60.78 60.93
10/25/2005 62.44 62.82 63.10 63.28
10/26/2005 60.66 61.20 61.59 61.82
10/27/2005 61.09 61.52 61.85 62.06
10/28/2005 61.22 61.53 61.82 62.01
10/31/2005 59.76 60.39 60.77 61.00
11/1/2005 59.85 60.54 60.96 61.21
11/2/2005 59.75 60.49 60.92 61.20
11/3/2005 61.78 62.55 62.96 63.17
11/4/2005 60.58 61.50 61.91 62.10
11/7/2005 59.47 60.53 61.04 61.27
11/8/2005 59.71 60.73 61.28 61.50
11/9/2005 58.93 59.76 60.29 60.51
11/10/2005 57.80 58.74 59.29 59.55
11/11/2005 57.53 58.48 58.95 59.23
11/14/2005 57.69 58.51 58.94 59.20
11/15/2005 56.98 57.61 58.08 58.39
11/16/2005 57.88 58.45 58.93 59.22
11/17/2005 56.34 57.15 57.71 58.08
11/18/2005 56.14 57.21 57.88 58.35
11/21/2005 57.70 58.39 58.86 59.22
11/22/2005 58.84 59.41 59.78 60.07
11/23/2005 58.71 59.25 59.60 59.86
11/24/2005
11/25/2005
11/28/2005 57.36 57.99 58.40 58.70
11/29/2005 56.50 57.29 57.74 58.06
11/30/2005 57.32 58.23 58.68 59.01
12/1/2005 58.47 59.35 59.84 60.14
12/2/2005 59.32 60.21 60.76 61.07
12/5/2005 59.91 60.85 61.49 61.84
12/6/2005 59.94 60.85 61.44 61.79
12/7/2005 59.21 60.18 60.80 61.21
12/8/2005 60.66 61.61 62.29 62.72
12/9/2005 59.39 60.38 61.04 61.44
12/12/2005 61.30 62.26 62.86 63.20
12/13/2005 61.37 62.31 62.89 63.21
12/14/2005 60.85 61.87 62.52 62.90
12/15/2005 59.99 61.10 61.78 62.21
12/16/2005 58.06 59.05 59.76 60.22
12/19/2005 57.34 58.05 58.71 59.17
12/20/2005 57.98 58.09 58.69 59.14
12/21/2005 58.56 59.14 59.57 59.95
12/22/2005 58.28 58.86 59.30 59.66
12/23/2005 58.43 59.00 59.43 59.79
12/26/2005
12/27/2005 58.16 58.68 59.10 59.46
12/28/2005 59.82 60.36 60.78 61.12
12/29/2005 60.32 60.92 61.37 61.72
12/30/2005 61.04 61.90 62.35 62.70
1/2/2006
1/3/2006 63.14 63.99 64.48 64.84
1/4/2006 63.42 64.20 64.67 65.00
1/5/2006 62.79 63.59 64.09 64.41
1/6/2006 64.21 64.97 65.48 65.79
1/9/2006 63.50 64.35 64.91 65.26
1/10/2006 63.37 64.10 64.70 65.11
1/11/2006 63.94 64.45 64.95 65.33
1/12/2006 63.94 64.49 64.99 65.35
1/13/2006 63.92 64.58 65.14 65.53
1/16/2006
1/17/2006 66.31 66.94 67.43 67.77
1/18/2006 65.73 66.25 66.73 67.07
1/19/2006 66.83 67.19 67.69 68.04
1/20/2006 68.35 68.48 68.96 69.29
1/23/2006 68.10 68.67 69.06 69.33
1/24/2006 67.06 67.65 68.07 68.39
1/25/2006 65.85 66.48 66.93 67.28
1/26/2006 66.26 66.99 67.48 67.84
1/27/2006 67.76 68.52 69.02 69.38
1/30/2006 68.35 69.10 69.62 70.00
1/31/2006 67.92 68.74 69.28 69.70
2/1/2006 66.56 67.42 68.02 68.47
2/2/2006 64.68 65.49 66.17 66.70
2/3/2006 65.37 66.22 66.91 67.48
2/6/2006 65.11 66.08 66.77 67.36
2/7/2006 63.09 64.14 64.96 65.62
2/8/2006 62.55 63.53 64.33 64.94
2/9/2006 62.62 63.59 64.39 64.99
2/10/2006 61.84 62.86 63.75 64.41
2/13/2006 61.24 62.31 63.20 63.88
2/14/2006 59.57 61.03 61.93 62.64
2/15/2006 57.65 59.25 60.33 61.13
2/16/2006 58.46 60.13 61.20 62.00
2/17/2006 59.88 61.29 62.35 63.15
2/20/2006
2/21/2006 61.10 62.74 63.73 64.49
2/22/2006 61.01 62.25 63.11 63.79
2/23/2006 60.54 62.04 63.09 63.86
2/24/2006 62.91 64.14 65.03 65.73
2/27/2006 61.00 62.35 63.36 64.12
2/28/2006 61.41 63.01 64.06 64.83
3/1/2006 61.97 63.62 64.66 65.43
3/2/2006 63.36 65.07 66.05 66.80
3/3/2006 63.67 65.36 66.26 66.97
3/6/2006 62.41 64.05 64.92 65.59
3/7/2006 61.58 63.32 64.08 64.66
3/8/2006 60.02 61.79 62.69 63.34
3/9/2006 60.47 62.42 63.42 64.09
3/10/2006 59.96 61.84 62.81 63.49
3/13/2006 61.77 63.67 64.55 65.22
3/14/2006 63.10 65.09 65.99 66.62
3/15/2006 62.17 63.84 64.67 65.23
3/16/2006 63.58 65.10 65.96 66.51
3/17/2006 62.77 64.20 65.06 65.60
3/20/2006 60.42 61.96 63.06 63.74
3/21/2006 60.57 62.34 63.61 64.40
3/22/2006 61.77 63.00 63.78 64.27
3/23/2006 63.91 64.89 65.53 65.97
3/24/2006 64.26 65.2 65.79 66.17
3/27/2006 64.16 65.15 65.82 66.21
3/28/2006 66.07 66.92 67.49 67.84
3/29/2006
3/30/2006
3/31/2006

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Last Updated on 3/29/2006
By Joel Lou
Email: joel.lou@eia.doe.gov

patteeu
03-29-2006, 01:12 PM
Patteeu:

To a degree you are correct. However, government should get involved at the research level, and, imo, also at the policy level.

Here is a prime example. Brazil is about to become completely energy independent. They are not importing ANY oil even though they have fewer oil reserves than say, Venezuala. How they did it is remarkable - Sugar cane.

The government mandated that Brazilian farmers would grow it and the only "new" cars bought and sold in the country would run on sugar cane ethanol.

It worked.

Sugar cane is one of best methods of producing ethanol (much better than our corn method) - unfortunately, for us, our climate would not let us grow enough of it and our SUV's won't run on it.

But, as you can see, governments, if they have the will, can make a difference.

I don't think we are as far apart as it might seem. I know I'm normally a Laissez-faire capitalist, but I do think there might be a role for government here. I don't think they should pick a winner right now and force it's implementation though. I think the government should stimulate research across a wide variety of alternatives and only get involved in implementation most cautiously.

Carlota69
03-29-2006, 01:14 PM
I was just reading the EIA's latest Short Term Energy Outlook (http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html): "During the early summer months of 2006, the average retail regular motor gasoline price is expected to rise above $2.50 per gallon."

That's what the expected average retail price of gasoline could be. This doesn't take into account any hurricanes and other "disturbances."

Just a heads-up. I'd imagine that you will see $2.60+ in the midwest and close to $2.80 out west. The national average has been in the $2.28 to $2.36 range for the last few months.

It's averaging $2.56 in Vegas right now.

Donger
03-29-2006, 02:05 PM
Related news:

BALTIMORE (Reuters) - The Bush administration announced on Wednesday a modest rise in the average fuel economy standard for pick-up trucks and SUVs to 24.1 miles per gallon by 2011. The change is designed to save oil while not hurt struggling U.S. automakers.

The change is expected to add about $200 to the cost of an SUV or pick-up, but that cost should be recouped through fuel savings over the life of the vehicle, Transportation department officials said.

The current light truck fuel economy standard was last updated three years ago and required 22.5 miles per gallon for the current model year. Consumer groups had sought a much stricter increase to reduce oil consumption.

"We decided to ask more of manufacturers than we had proposed," Transportation Secretary Norman Mineta told reporters at a news conference overlooking two of Baltimore's busiest highways.

"Seven short months have taught us we can save more fuel," he added, referring to the administration's August proposal to tighten fuel economy standards for pick-up trucks and SUVs to an average of 24.0 mpg.

The federal government's final rule increased fuel savings by an estimated 10 percent, or 2 billion gallons, over its August proposal, reflecting sharply higher gasoline prices since Hurricane Katrina.

Mineta said the new standards mean that some light trucks will now have to meet a fuel economy target of 28.4 mpg, which is higher than today's standard for passenger cars.

Mineta and DOT officials said the new standard would not add to the pressures now facing General Motors Corp. and Ford Motor Co., the biggest producers of pick-ups and SUVs. Their financial condition was considered in calculating the new rule, along with other factors, officials said.

"We don't want them (automakers) to face a situation where they could have job losses," said Jackie Glassman, deputy director of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

The regulatory change will cost the auto industry an estimated $6.7 billion through 2011, officials said.

The auto industry said it welcomed the new standard.

"This is the most sweeping change over 30 years," said Eron Shosteck, a spokesman for the Alliance of American Automobile Manufacturers. "It is going to be a challenge for automakers to meet it, but automakers are committed to achieving these numbers as part of their commitment to energy security."

Transportation planners believe changes to the Corporate Average Fuel Economy, or CAFE, standards through 2011 will also address U.S. President George W. Bush's call for consumers to be more energy efficient. An estimated 10.7 billion gallons of gasoline will be saved by 2011, officials said.

Bush said in January that America was "addicted to oil" and needed to reduce its dependence on petroleum imports. Gasoline use is expected to account for about 44 percent of total U.S. petroleum demand in 2006, according to the Energy Department.

But consumer and environmental groups say the plan should demand more of U.S. automakers, noting that foreign manufacturers already outpace their U.S. rivals in producing vehicles that go further on a gallon of gas.

brent102fire
03-29-2006, 02:32 PM
$2.50 would be great...it's already $2.89 for 87 octane here in So Cal... :mad: :cuss: :banghead: :shake: :deevee:

MOhillbilly
03-29-2006, 02:35 PM
bunch of ****ing shylocks.

Radar Chief
03-29-2006, 02:58 PM
I've owned the vehicle for 11 years and have pretty much always burned high octane, so the knocking could be mostly my imagination. Imagine how much money I've potentially wasted using the expensive gas :banghead:. Obviously, I am not at all mechanically inclined.

Dongerís right, if your truck doesnít ping on regular 87 octane, thatís what you should be runín. You can actually do damage by runín a higher octane, since youíd be spitín unburned fuel out the exhaust where it will clog your Catalytic Converter.
Haveín said that, though, itís also possible that since your truck is over 10 years old and getín close to 100 K miles that itís built up carbon on the piston crowns and that has increased compression ratio beyond stock making it necessary to burn premium.
So, I guess the point is try a tank of regular. If it doesnít ping under load keep burnín it. If it does ping under load, throw in some octane boost until you can get at least half a tank of premium back in it.

Radar Chief
03-29-2006, 03:14 PM
I'm all for that.

However, we Americans do have a desire for freedom: freedom to choose to drive a gus-guzzling SUV while simultaneously having the freedom to bitch about high gasoline prices, while simultaneously not acknowledging that there might just be a correlation between the two.

I think it has more to do with power than ďwantingĒ gas guzzling SUVís.
When the EPA introduced emissions regulations back in the Ď70ís, and increased the requirements every year since, they pretty much relegated the big motors to the exempt trucks and SUVís.
Up Ďtill that point, most people didnít even know what SUVís were other than a niche group of autos.

Iíve been watchín the popularity of the Dodge Magnum, the station wagon with a Hemi motor, as kind of a way to gauge whether Iím right on this or not. So far the Magnumís been pretty popular, from what little Iíve seen of their sales that is.

Also, the popularity of the Diesel has jump tremendously since the manufactures figured out they donít have to be noisy gutless turds, that they could put a turbo on them and make huge gobs of torque (what most people perceive as ďpowerĒ). I think this may actually be more the direction of vehicles in the future since fuel can be made from soy or veggie oil.
But I guess weíll just have to wait and see.

bogie
03-29-2006, 04:43 PM
Dongerís right, if your truck doesnít ping on regular 87 octane, thatís what you should be runín. You can actually do damage by runín a higher octane, since youíd be spitín unburned fuel out the exhaust where it will clog your Catalytic Converter.
Haveín said that, though, itís also possible that since your truck is over 10 years old and getín close to 100 K miles that itís built up carbon on the piston crowns and that has increased compression ratio beyond stock making it necessary to burn premium.
So, I guess the point is try a tank of regular. If it doesnít ping under load keep burnín it. If it does ping under load, throw in some octane boost until you can get at least half a tank of premium back in it.

Next time I fill up, I'll test the low octane. I appreciate it!

Cochise
03-29-2006, 04:49 PM
Iíve been watchín the popularity of the Dodge Magnum, the station wagon with a Hemi motor, as kind of a way to gauge whether Iím right on this or not. So far the Magnumís been pretty popular, from what little Iíve seen of their sales that is.


I've seen a lot of those Magnums on the road too, but few of them seem to be the Hemi version.

listopencil
03-29-2006, 04:51 PM
You mean my gas prices are going to go down? PBJ



No shit. Welcome to NorCal.

Valiant
03-29-2006, 05:38 PM
Well, the governement doesn't fix the price of food per se, but there is a lot of legislation that insures that every american can get food, through farm subsidies, food stamps, etc.. So I'd say food isn't a good example.

There are a lot of neccessities that the government ensures will be available/affordable for us. But almost all of those things are products that this country can provide on it's own. We can't do that with oil. We can't force other countries to sell it to us for cheaper, and we can't force refineries to make gas without profit. If anything, price controls would force subsidies for the refineries, which would just raise our taxes and probably cost us more in the long run.


From my understanding the majority of the cost is not determined on the price of the barrels, That only makes up ten percent of the cost we pay... The thing we do control is the refining, and we cut that back to drive up costs, we have not opened a new refinery in what 20 years??? The oil companies are the ones that own the refinerys, and they are making the most money they ever have.. Are you telling me they are not making a profit???

The government and oil owners have this set up perfectly, they led the average consumer to believe that prices go up that much because of wars and natural disasters when in fact it is because they can restrict new refinerys from opening up or cut back on production...

Cntrygal
03-29-2006, 05:45 PM
It's been AT LEAST around the 2.50 range all winter here. Last summer we went up around $3 and we'll be beyond that this coming summer. That's what happens when there's a monopoly on the gas stations and you live in a summer tourist trap. I could make the drive to Wyoming for cheaper gas though....

4th and Long
03-29-2006, 05:47 PM
It's been AT LEAST around the 2.50 range all winter here. Last summer we went up around $3 and we'll be beyond that this coming summer. That's what happens when there's a monopoly on the gas stations and you live in a summer tourist trap. I could make the drive to Wyoming for cheaper gas though....
Is this why you don't come and visit? :p

BTW, how's Mom doin'?

Donger
03-29-2006, 05:50 PM
From my understanding the majority of the cost is not determined on the price of the barrels, That only makes up ten percent of the cost... The thing we do control is the refining, and we cut that back to drive up costs, we have not opened a new refinery in what 20 years??? The oil companies are the ones that own the refinerys, and they are making the most money they ever have.. Are you telling me they are not making a profit???

Actually, 47% of what you pay at the pump is just the cost of a barrel of crude. 23% are taxes. 18% are profits and refining costs. 12% goes to marketing and distribution.

IIRC, it's been 30 years since the last refinery was built. More importantly, many have CLOSED since then. Thankfully, the oil companies have learned to make the refining more efficient so that they can still (barely) meet our demand and turn a profit.

The government and oil owners have this set up perfectly, they led the average consumer to believe that prices go up that much because of wars and natural disasters when in fact it is because they can restrict new refinerys from opening up or cut back on production...

Sorry, but that's simply wrong. Oil is commodity traded on the global market.

Cntrygal
03-29-2006, 05:51 PM
Is this why you don't come and visit? :p

BTW, how's Mom doin'?


STFU


Mom is doing great! Better than she has in years! :)

4th and Long
03-29-2006, 05:56 PM
Mom is doing great! Better than she has in years! :)
Great to hear it, Kiddo. :)

Valiant
03-29-2006, 05:58 PM
Sorry, but that's simply wrong. Oil is commodity traded on the global market.


You are correct it is a global commodity.. But you have to be the most naive person in the country if you believe those numbers you just touted as true.. There is a reason why they are turning quarter after quarter of record and never before seen profits here in the states...

Donger
03-29-2006, 06:03 PM
You are correct it is a global commodity.. But you have to be the most naive person in the country if you believe those numbers you just touted as true.. There is a reason why they are turning quarter after quarter of record and never before seen profits here in the states...

Do you have some evidence that they are not true? Where did you come up with the 10% number?

The reason that they are presently turning huge profits is simple: their price of the priamry raw material has jumped significantly. But, the production/refining costs have remained the same. Hence, record profit.

BTW, you might want to go back and look at the profit/loss history of oil companies. You will be surprised at what you find. They have their ups and downs.

jAZ
03-29-2006, 06:16 PM
I predict that there will be wild-eyed, anti-capitalists running around screaming about price gouging this summer too.
You and I know that businesses (especially BIG, powerful businesses like energy companies) don't like "free" markets. They do everything they can to crush a competitive environment. It's good for profits to crush competition. Just ask the energy traders at Enron who shut down energy plants in CA during the rolling blackouts in order to reap record profits (actually causing the rolling blackouts).

Donger
03-29-2006, 06:31 PM
Just ask the energy traders at Enron who shut down energy plants in CA during the rolling blackouts in order to reap record profits (actually causing the rolling blackouts).

I agree that market manipulation probably took place in the deregulated market. However, you must take into account the significant lack of supply caused by California's stupid policies. That enabled the market sharks.

jAZ
03-29-2006, 06:38 PM
I agree that market manipulation probably took place in the deregulated market. However, you must take into account the significant lack of supply caused by California's stupid policies. That enabled the market sharks.
The only lack of supply that I'm aware of was that caused when Enron turned off available power plants for hours at a time during peak usage.

Donger
03-29-2006, 06:42 PM
The only lack of supply that I'm aware of was that caused when Enron turned off available power plants for hours at a time during peak usage.

That, and them not building capacity for years during explosive growth. They never should have abandoned their nuclear program. As I understand it (and I'm not that familiar with it), CA had such deficient indigenous supply that they had to buy from other states. That's just asking for trouble.

I wonder if other states presently have that problem? I honestly don't know.

jAZ
03-29-2006, 06:53 PM
That, and them not building capacity for years during explosive growth. They never should have abandoned their nuclear program. As I understand it (and I'm not that familiar with it), CA had such deficient indigenous supply that they had to buy from other states. That's just asking for trouble.

I wonder if other states presently have that problem? I honestly don't know.
Why would they need additional capacity if they were able to manage the power demands at all times but during the hours when Enron literally turned off power plants for phoney "maintenance".

The argument you are making is the same argument that Enron was making in the months surrounding their fraud upon California. It's not that our country (and California in particular) will not need expanded energy sources... it's that it's a whole 2nd round of fraud to suggest that California didn't have enough energy available to it during the heatwave and rolling blackouts.

In fact, it's fraud targeted at getting people support the expanding the very deregulation that leads to expanded monopolistic powers, reduced competition, higher prices and exanded profits.

You are repeating the very same talking point that Enron was touting as they were denying any role in the fraud.

chiefs4me
03-29-2006, 07:01 PM
Shouldn't affect me much, it's been 2.49 a gallon for diesel here for months..

Adept Havelock
03-29-2006, 07:06 PM
How much do the federal and state governments make?



Plenty, in the form of campaign contributions, and "lobbying". ;)

Adept Havelock
03-29-2006, 07:07 PM
So you want to legislate morality, eh?

No..that's the so-called "Christian Right". ;)

Donger
03-29-2006, 08:07 PM
Why would they need additional capacity if they were able to manage the power demands at all times but during the hours when Enron literally turned off power plants for phoney "maintenance".

The argument you are making is the same argument that Enron was making in the months surrounding their fraud upon California. It's not that our country (and California in particular) will not need expanded energy sources... it's that it's a whole 2nd round of fraud to suggest that California didn't have enough energy available to it during the heatwave and rolling blackouts.

In fact, it's fraud targeted at getting people support the expanding the very deregulation that leads to expanded monopolistic powers, reduced competition, higher prices and exanded profits.

You are repeating the very same talking point that Enron was touting as they were denying any role in the fraud.

California was operating under an energy deficit. They could not generate enough to supply their own state, so they had to buy from other producers to meet demand. That's what I'm talking about. In effect, they caused their own issue.

Nice rant, though. Good to see you haven't changed!

HMc
03-29-2006, 08:10 PM
Currently paying about $3.55 (USD) per gallon here for 98 octane. That's $1.30 (AUD) per litre.

Skip Towne
03-29-2006, 08:13 PM
Shouldn't affect me much, it's been 2.49 a gallon for diesel here for months..
That lead sled of yours is diesel?

chiefs4me
03-29-2006, 10:01 PM
That lead sled of yours is diesel?








yep, and she's always thirsty..ROFL

Guru
03-29-2006, 10:44 PM
typhoon off the coast of japan ... threatening the oil supply.


the professor is said to be working on a weather control device made out of coconuts shells to solve the problem.


Thank you Gilligan. ROFL

Jayhawkerman2001
03-29-2006, 11:48 PM
I don't understand why they keep raising the prices, its not costing them anymore to mine the oil, its just a price made up by a certain governing body isnt it?

Baconeater
03-30-2006, 12:05 AM
I don't understand why they keep raising the prices, its not costing them anymore to mine the oil, its just a price made up by a certain governing body isnt it?

Oh ya, it's costing a lot more to mine the oil these days. Oil miners have families to feed too.

luv
03-30-2006, 12:50 AM
Went from $2.29 this morning to $2.39 while I was just on my way home from work. :cuss:

greg63
03-30-2006, 12:54 AM
Went from $2.29 this morning to $2.39 while I was just on my way home from work. :cuss:

I hate it when that happens.

Guru
03-30-2006, 01:00 AM
I hate it when that happens.


Back in the day, a daily change was a penny. Now it is 10 to 15 cents. :cuss:

greg63
03-30-2006, 01:09 AM
Back in the day, a daily change was a penny. Now it is 10 to 15 cents. :cuss:

Yeah at least; it's the debil!

Guru
03-30-2006, 01:11 AM
Yeah at least; it's the debil!
:evil:

greg63
03-30-2006, 01:14 AM
:evil:

ROFL

...Speaking thereof.

Guru
03-30-2006, 01:15 AM
ROFL

...Speaking thereof.
:fire:

Sorry, chose the wrong one. ROFL

greg63
03-30-2006, 01:18 AM
:fire:

Sorry, chose the wrong one. ROFL

ROFL

...Better; bares a remarkable resemblance to Carl.

Guru
03-30-2006, 01:19 AM
ROFL

...Better; bares a remarkable resemblance to Carl.
:Elvis: Or this one.

:jester:

greg63
03-30-2006, 01:34 AM
:Elvis: Or this one.

:jester:


...Possibly, but I think you had it right the first time.

jAZ
03-30-2006, 01:48 AM
California was operating under an energy deficit. They could not generate enough to supply their own state, so they had to buy from other producers to meet demand. That's what I'm talking about. In effect, they caused their own issue.

Nice rant, though. Good to see you haven't changed!
Who says California needs to be self sustaining? They had the ability to pull power from the grid. It's designed for just that purpose.

None of this has anything to do with the price manipulation and resulting blackouts. That was entirely created by Enron to gouge the folks of California, scare people into supporting the very deregulation that allowed them to commit such profit-spiking fraud.

And you are still repeating their talking points. Way to spread the false, disinformation necessary to advance the cause of consolidation of power and profits.

Donger
03-30-2006, 08:50 AM
Who says California needs to be self sustaining? They had the ability to pull power from the grid. It's designed for just that purpose.

None of this has anything to do with the price manipulation and resulting blackouts. That was entirely created by Enron to gouge the folks of California, scare people into supporting the very deregulation that allowed them to commit such profit-spiking fraud.

And you are still repeating their talking points. Way to spread the false, disinformation necessary to advance the cause of consolidation of power and profits.

Wow. Did you suddenly become dense?

I've already acknowledged that they took plants offline which technically caused the rolling outs. My point is that California was, and is, not generating enough for their own use, so THEY HAD TO buy from out-of-state to meet their demands. That set them up to be manipulated.

It's equivalent to the United States not producing enough crude to support our needs, and therefore being subject to market manipulation = not under our control.

I'm sorry you didn't see that that was what I was trying to get across.

Radar Chief
03-30-2006, 09:08 AM
Currently paying about $3.55 (USD) per gallon here for 98 octane. That's $1.30 (AUD) per litre.

98 Octane?! :eek: What are ya driveín a freakín jet?

jAZ
03-30-2006, 11:39 AM
Wow. Did you suddenly become dense?

I've already acknowledged that they took plants offline which technically caused the rolling outs. My point is that California was, and is, not generating enough for their own use, so THEY HAD TO buy from out-of-state to meet their demands. That set them up to be manipulated.

It's equivalent to the United States not producing enough crude to support our needs, and therefore being subject to market manipulation = not under our control.

I'm sorry you didn't see that that was what I was trying to get across.
The manipulation was taking California plants offline. That by its nature has nothing to do with out of state energy. Not every state in the nation is going to be (or even should be) energy self sufficient as you are blaming CA for not being.

Skip Towne
03-30-2006, 11:43 AM
98 Octane?! :eek: What are ya driveín a freakín jet?
Jets burn kerosene.

Donger
03-30-2006, 11:53 AM
The manipulation was taking California plants offline. That by its nature has nothing to do with out of state energy. Not every state in the nation is going to be (or even should be) energy self sufficient as you are blaming CA for not being.

I may be wrong, but I'm pretty sure that the plants that were shut down were not in California. I think they were in Washington state and Vegas. That, by its nature, has everything to do with out of state energy.

I do blame California for not being self-sufficient in their generation. They CHOSE not to.

jAZ
03-30-2006, 12:03 PM
I may be wrong, but I'm pretty sure that the plants that were shut down were not in California. I think they were in Washington state and Vegas. That, by its nature, has everything to do with out of state energy.
I'll look into that, but that's not my understanding. If you are right, then it does have something to do with out of state energy.I do blame California for not being self-sufficient in their generation. They CHOSE not to.
That's like saying "I do blame Cindy for getting raped... she CHOSE to wear that short skirt."

Donger
03-30-2006, 12:07 PM
I'll look into that, but that's not my understanding. If you are right, then it does have something to do with out of state energy.
That's like saying "I do blame Cindy for getting raped... she CHOSE to wear that short skirt."

Let me know what you find out.

Peh. I think that's a stretch. California made a decision to roll the dice. If Cindy went to into a frat house saying, "Somebody f*ck me!" and then complains when someone does, I'd say that she was a little to blame for the outcome, just as California is.

sd4chiefs
03-30-2006, 12:21 PM
More bad news.

FUTURES MOVERS
Oil above $67 as Iran tension heats up
Iran rejects U.N. statement; natural gas taps 4-day high

SAN FRANCISCO (MarketWatch) -- Crude-oil futures climbed near $67 a barrel Thursday, trading close to their highest level in two months after Iran rejected a United Nations Security Council statement urging the Tehran government to cease uranium enrichment.

patteeu
03-30-2006, 12:36 PM
One of the things that California did as a part of it's energy "deregulation" was to force the electric utilities to shed their generation capabilities. As a result, the utilities didn't have any control over power generation and had to buy whatever they needed to service their customers. The bad part of this is that while the cost of generated power was allowed to rise (I'm not sure if it was completely deregulated or not) while the rate that the util's could charge their customers was still strictly regulated by the state. When the price of generated power went way up, some util's were forced to sell energy at a loss and it nearly drove a few of the smaller companies out of business. I don't know how this fits into the overall picture of the energy crisis and/or Enron's involvement, but it does speak to the lack of wisdom of the California legislature when they partially "deregulated" the industry while at the same time trying to "protect" consumers from price hikes.

Saulbadguy
03-30-2006, 12:43 PM
I'm seriously considering selling my fiancees car after we get married. I think we can get by on one car. That should save us a bundle.

Radar Chief
03-30-2006, 12:59 PM
Jets burn kerosene.

Which is an extremely high octane fuel.
Typical for pump gas here in the good ole US of A is 87-89. Premium is typically 91, with 93 beín available in a few places.
98 octane would be aviation fuel / race fuel range, which is why I asked. ;)

oldandslow
03-30-2006, 01:01 PM
This is really a simple equation. There are X number of barrels of light, sweet, crude available. With the advent of China and India and our own insatiable thirst for more, the price MUST rise. Indeed, my guess is that in 24 months or so the price of gasoline will be approaching 4.00.

There are barrels of heavy crude, oil in shale and tar sands etc available, but the cost of producing each of those rise pretty dramatically. Further, the infrastructure for producing oil from these methods is not anywhere near where it needs to be. It takes a lot of energy to produce oil from these sources.

Donger: only one quip with what you have typed so far - building Nuke plants in CA is probably not a great idea due to the threat of large earthquakes. Move them east 500 miles or so.

HMc
03-30-2006, 06:15 PM
Which is an extremely high octane fuel.
Typical for pump gas here in the good ole US of A is 87-89. Premium is typically 91, with 93 beín available in a few places.
98 octane would be aviation fuel / race fuel range, which is why I asked. ;)

Here, regular is 91, followed by premium at 95, and each vendor has a different name for their 98. Shell's is called "Optimax".

Shell is even now selling "Optimax Plus" which is 100 octane.

The reason is that we get a lot of cars from japan which won't run properly on anything less than 98.

Chiefs Express
03-30-2006, 08:22 PM
It's $2.45 in Tulsa, OK now.

Over-Head
03-30-2006, 08:23 PM
$2.50 a gallon?
If only it were that CHEAP!!!
$1.125 a liter today for midgrade.
Do the math
$1.12 x 3.8 Lís in a US gallon
= a nut gouging $4.256 per.

Donger
04-11-2006, 12:28 PM
Just checking in. Right around $2.60 in KC?

StcChief
04-11-2006, 12:31 PM
I'll take it.
Reformulated gas in STL regular 87 octane $2.60

Mile High Mania
04-11-2006, 12:33 PM
Depending on where you go in Dallas/Fort Worth... you "might" find it cheaper than $2.70... I think the average is near $2.80. And, this is just plain old regular gas... not the premium stuff.

Insanity...

morphius
04-11-2006, 12:33 PM
Just checking in. Right around $2.60 in KC?
I blame you.

Der FlŲprer
04-11-2006, 12:34 PM
$2.60 a gallon in beautiful charlotte nc

Donger
04-11-2006, 12:36 PM
Depending on where you go in Dallas/Fort Worth... you "might" find it cheaper than $2.70... I think the average is near $2.80. And, this is just plain old regular gas... not the premium stuff.

Insanity...

I was in Texas last week and was surprised at the cost there.

Donger
04-11-2006, 12:36 PM
I blame you.

ROFL

Mile High Mania
04-11-2006, 12:39 PM
I was in Texas last week and was surprised at the cost there.

Yeah, it sucks if you are someone (like I am) that annually puts on 25k miles.

bkkcoh
04-11-2006, 12:40 PM
$2.85 in Columbus.........

Postal_clone
04-11-2006, 02:50 PM
2.59 In Dead Moines

ENDelt260
04-11-2006, 03:33 PM
$2.50 a gallon?
If only it were that CHEAP!!!
$1.125 a liter today for midgrade.
Do the math
$1.12 x 3.8 Lís in a US gallon
= a nut gouging $4.256 per.
Yeah, but what's that come out to in real money?

chiefsfaninNC
04-11-2006, 04:19 PM
$2.60 a gallon in beautiful charlotte nc


$2.68 here in Greensboro.

TEX
04-11-2006, 04:52 PM
I bet it hits $4.00 a gallon this summer. :cuss:

SLAG
04-11-2006, 04:53 PM
Just Lowered to $2.54

greg63
04-11-2006, 06:28 PM
I bet it hits $4.00 a gallon this summer. :cuss:


That's what the evening news just said.

SLAG
04-11-2006, 06:29 PM
I bet it hits $4.00 a gallon this summer. :cuss:


My Suburban Wont Like that

Cprise89
04-11-2006, 07:48 PM
GAS WAR - an idea that WILL work
>
> This was originally sent by a retired Coca Cola
> executive It came from one of his engineer buddies who retired from
> Halliburton. It's worth your consideration.
>
> Join the resistance!!!! I hear we are going to
> hit close to $ 4.00 a gallon by next summer and it might go higher!!
> Want gasoline prices to come down? We need to take some
> intelligent, united action.
>
> Phillip Hollsworth offered this good idea. This makes MUCH MORE SENSE
> than the "don't buy gas on a certain day" campaign that was going
> around last April or May!
> The oil companies just laughed at that because they knew we wouldn't
> continue to "hurt" ourselves by refusing to buy gas. It was more of
> an inconvenience to us than it was a problem for them. BUT, whoever
> thought of this idea, has come up with a plan that can really work.
> Please read on and join with us!
>
> By now you're probably thinking gasoline priced at about $1.50 is
> super cheap. Me too! It is currently $2.79 for regular unleaded in my
> town. Now that the oil companies and the OPEC nations have
> conditioned us to think that the cost of a gallon of gas is CHEAP at
> $1.50 - $1.75, we need to take aggressive action to teach them that
> BUYERS control the marketplace..not sellers. With the price of
> gasoline going up more each day, we consumers need to take action.
> The only way we are going to see the price of gas come down is if we
> hit someone in the pocketbook by not purchasing their gas! And, we
> can do that WITHOUT hurting ourselves.
> How?
>
> Since we all rely on our cars, we can't just stop
> buying gas. But we CAN have an impact on gas prices if we all act
> together to force a price war.
>
> Here's the idea: For the rest of this year, DON'T purchase ANY
> gasoline from the two biggest companies (which now are one), EXXON
> and MOBIL. If they are not
> selling any gas, they will be inclined to reduce their prices. If
> they reduce their prices, the other
> companies will have to follow suit. But to have an impact, we need to
> reach literally millions of Exxon and Mobil gas buyers. It's really
> simple to do! Now, don't wimp out on me at this point...keep reading
> and I'll explain how simple it is to reach millions of people!!
>
> I am sending this note to 30 people. If each of us send it to at
> least ten more (30x10 = 300) ... and those 300 send it to at least
> ten more (300 x 10 = 3,000)...and so on, by the time the message
> reaches the sixth group of people, we will have reached over THREE
> MILLION consumers.
>
> If those three million get excited and pass this on to ten friends
> each, then 30 million people will have been contacted! If it goes
> one level further, you guessed it..... THREE HUNDRED MILLION
> PEOPLE!!!
>
> Again, all you have to do is send this to 10 people. That's all!
> (If you don't understand how we can reach 300 million and all you
> have to do is send this to 10 people.... Well, let's face it, you
> just aren't a mathematician. But I am . so trust me on this one.) :-)
>
> How long would all that take? If each of us sends this e-mail out to
> ten more people within one day of receipt, all 300 MILLION people
> could conceivably be contacted within the next 8 days!!! I'll bet you
> didn't think you and I had that much potential, did you! Acting
> together we can make a difference.
>
> If this makes sense to you, please pass this message on. I suggest
> that we not buy from EXXON/MOBIL UNTIL THEY LOWER THEIR PRICES TO
> THE $1.30 RANGE AND KEEP THEM DOWN. THIS CAN REALLY WORK.

Fat Elvis
04-11-2006, 07:58 PM
GAS WAR - an idea that WILL work
>
> This was originally sent by a retired Coca Cola
> executive It came from one of his engineer buddies who retired from
> Halliburton. It's worth your consideration.
>
> Join the resistance!!!! I hear we are going to
> hit close to $ 4.00 a gallon by next summer and it might go higher!!
> Want gasoline prices to come down? We need to take some
> intelligent, united action.
>
> Phillip Hollsworth offered this good idea. This makes MUCH MORE SENSE
> than the "don't buy gas on a certain day" campaign that was going
> around last April or May!
> The oil companies just laughed at that because they knew we wouldn't
> continue to "hurt" ourselves by refusing to buy gas. It was more of
> an inconvenience to us than it was a problem for them. BUT, whoever
> thought of this idea, has come up with a plan that can really work.
> Please read on and join with us!
>
> By now you're probably thinking gasoline priced at about $1.50 is
> super cheap. Me too! It is currently $2.79 for regular unleaded in my
> town. Now that the oil companies and the OPEC nations have
> conditioned us to think that the cost of a gallon of gas is CHEAP at
> $1.50 - $1.75, we need to take aggressive action to teach them that
> BUYERS control the marketplace..not sellers. With the price of
> gasoline going up more each day, we consumers need to take action.
> The only way we are going to see the price of gas come down is if we
> hit someone in the pocketbook by not purchasing their gas! And, we
> can do that WITHOUT hurting ourselves.
> How?
>
> Since we all rely on our cars, we can't just stop
> buying gas. But we CAN have an impact on gas prices if we all act
> together to force a price war.
>
> Here's the idea: For the rest of this year, DON'T purchase ANY
> gasoline from the two biggest companies (which now are one), EXXON
> and MOBIL. If they are not
> selling any gas, they will be inclined to reduce their prices. If
> they reduce their prices, the other
> companies will have to follow suit. But to have an impact, we need to
> reach literally millions of Exxon and Mobil gas buyers. It's really
> simple to do! Now, don't wimp out on me at this point...keep reading
> and I'll explain how simple it is to reach millions of people!!
>
> I am sending this note to 30 people. If each of us send it to at
> least ten more (30x10 = 300) ... and those 300 send it to at least
> ten more (300 x 10 = 3,000)...and so on, by the time the message
> reaches the sixth group of people, we will have reached over THREE
> MILLION consumers.
>
> If those three million get excited and pass this on to ten friends
> each, then 30 million people will have been contacted! If it goes
> one level further, you guessed it..... THREE HUNDRED MILLION
> PEOPLE!!!
>
> Again, all you have to do is send this to 10 people. That's all!
> (If you don't understand how we can reach 300 million and all you
> have to do is send this to 10 people.... Well, let's face it, you
> just aren't a mathematician. But I am . so trust me on this one.) :-)
>
> How long would all that take? If each of us sends this e-mail out to
> ten more people within one day of receipt, all 300 MILLION people
> could conceivably be contacted within the next 8 days!!! I'll bet you
> didn't think you and I had that much potential, did you! Acting
> together we can make a difference.
>
> If this makes sense to you, please pass this message on. I suggest
> that we not buy from EXXON/MOBIL UNTIL THEY LOWER THEIR PRICES TO
> THE $1.30 RANGE AND KEEP THEM DOWN. THIS CAN REALLY WORK.

Wow!

That's really retarded!

chief52
04-11-2006, 08:55 PM
$2.99 here in Eureka, Ca. $3/ gallon is here and climbing. They raised it 7 cents this morning.

gblowfish
04-11-2006, 09:02 PM
Gas here in Independence, MO just went from $2.47 to $2.63 unleaded. Bastards.

jlscorpio
04-11-2006, 09:08 PM
2.63 here in the great white north

gblowfish
04-11-2006, 09:11 PM
Don't Panic...everything is fine. Just fine. Gas is up a little bit. It'll come back down. I swear. Swear to God. Nobody's goughing anybody. Just a little rough time at the refinery...making the summer blends and all...don't panic...

Nice Job, Dumbya.

TEX
04-11-2006, 09:14 PM
Don't Panic...everything is fine. Just fine. Gas is up a little bit. It'll come back down. I swear. Swear to God. Nobody's goughing anybody. Just a little rough time at the refinery...making the summer blends and all...don't panic...

Nice Job, Dumbya.

And who says he hasn't accomplished anything...

tommykat
04-11-2006, 09:16 PM
Without reading all.......duh already at that price.

Misplaced_Chiefs_Fan
04-11-2006, 09:17 PM
$2.50 would be a nice price to have around here. It's anywhere from $2.75 - 2.85 for regular unleaded in Maryland, now. Can't wait to see what it's going to be like later this summer.

Sigh

Donger
04-11-2006, 09:35 PM
Let's not get this political, gentlemen.

Skip Towne
04-11-2006, 09:54 PM
Bush could stop this if he wanted to but it is his buddies making all the money.

Donger
04-11-2006, 09:56 PM
Bush could stop this if he wanted to but it is his buddies making all the money.

ROFL

TEX
04-11-2006, 10:31 PM
ROFL

:rolleyes:

Donger
04-11-2006, 11:12 PM
:rolleyes:

Being able to laugh in the face of either intentional or unintentional stupidity is one of my gifts.

TEX
04-12-2006, 12:14 AM
Being able to laugh in the face of either intentional or unintentional stupidity is one of my gifts.


That's good as long as said laughter doesn't blind one from the truth. If so, then the one laughing can look stupid.

Deberg_1990
06-11-2008, 03:20 PM
Bump!

CoMoChief
06-11-2008, 03:28 PM
**** the person who decided to bump this thread out of amusement.

StcChief
06-11-2008, 04:49 PM
Soon to be $2.50 / Liter