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MarcBulger
04-11-2006, 09:11 PM
US economy's latest output: better jobs
Newest job numbers show that businesses are expanding opportunities in high-wage
fields.
By Mark Trumbull
The US economy isn't just producing jobs these days, it's also producing good jobs.
Alongside the ads for jobs handling a cash register or a spatula are these new
opportunities:
* In St. Louis, AFB International is enlisting both technicians, paid $30,000 to
$40,000, and PhD scientists, offered $80,000 to $100,000, in its quest for the
perfect pet food.

* In Delaware, Honeywell plans to hire people at $40,000 to $100,000 to work in a
data-storage center.
* In southern California, some of the latest openings involve working on the
railroad, for $35,000 to $70,000 a year. Union Pacific plans to add 2,000 employees
altogether.
These reports in the past month symbolize a welcome trend during an economic
expansion that at first offered only tepid job gains, both in quantity and quality.
This good news about the breadth of job creation comes against a backdrop of
labor-market anxiety that has persisted despite the economy's solid overall footing.
Competition from imported goods, the threat of outsourcing services abroad, and a
controversial influx of illegal laborers are just some of the forces that make many
workers worried about their future.
Creating good jobs - the kinds that can keep American living standards rising -
appears likely to remain a challenge. But the current employment picture at least
indicates movement in a positive direction.
"We're creating lots of all kinds of jobs, across many industries, occupations, and
pay scales," says Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody's Economy.com. But he adds:
"If your skill sets are rusty, or at the low end of the skill range, you're going to
have a tougher time."
The economy added 211,000 jobs in March, according to a Labor Department report
Friday - a solid showing about on par with expectations. The unemployment rate fell
a notch, to 4.7 percent.
The new jobs still include plenty at the low end: An analysis by Merrill Lynch finds
that some 40 percent of the net gain in March came in two areas known for low pay:
retail services and leisure/hospitality, which includes restaurants.
But this is just part of a broader tapestry. Management and professional occupations
are employing 1.2 million more people this month than a year ago - or about 1 in 3
new jobs in America. This is the highest-paying of five broad categories tracked by
the Labor Department. Not all of them are CEOs or engineers, but the median paycheck
for full-time workers in this category is $937 a week, far above the US median of
$651.
The construction industry continues to hammer out more than its share of new jobs.
It accounts for about 6.4 percent of US jobs, but has provided 14.4 percent of the
past year's job growth. The quality of construction jobs is mixed - often offering
higher hourly pay than the US median but with lower benefits.
Even the manufacturing sector, which has long offered blue-collar workers a measure
of middle-class prosperity, appears to be stabilizing after a period of heavy job
losses. Despite downsizing in the automotive industry, 175,000 more people are
employed in production occupations today than a year ago.
"As this recovery gets under way, professional services have begun adding jobs
fairly broadly," says Jared Bernstein, an economist at the liberal Economic Policy
Institute (EPI) in Washington.
EPI tracks the weighting of higher- versus lower-paying jobs that are being added to
the economy. For much of the current expansion, which began at the end of 2001, that
indicator has been negative.
In the past year, however, it has turned positive, meaning that the new jobs in the
economy are the kind that tend to pull average wages up, not down.
Beyond professional services, one example may be construction. The housing market is
cooling, but commercial building is heating up.
"More of the work will be in nonresidential construction," predicts Michael
Carliner, an economist at the National Association of Home Builders. That could mean
demand for higher skills, such as equipment operation, that boost pay.
The question, however, is how much of today's strengthening labor market represents
cyclical trends, rather than long-term gains.
At this point, perhaps midway into an expansion phase, it's not unusual to see the
job mix improve and pay to rise in new and existing jobs alike. "I would expect
wages and compensation to increase faster," says Rae Hederman of the conservative
Heritage Foundation in Washington.
How long that pattern lasts will depend in some measure on the Federal Reserve,
which is now trying to decide whether to raise interest rates further. Setting rates
too high, some experts warn, could slow the economy and dampen job growth.
The labor market's gains are beginning to take on the shape of a barbell, with
growth weighted heavily at the two ends of the pay scale. During the current
expansion, the bulk of new jobs have come in either the highest-paid of five broad
occupational categories - management and professional - or the lowest-paid,
services. Together the two sectors now account for more than half of all jobs. (The
other three major categories are sales and office work, construction and natural
resources, and production/transportation.)
The economy's overall share of jobs with strong pay and benefits has failed to grow
during the past quarter century, even though workers today have higher skills and
more technology to make them productive, says John Schmitt, an economist at the
Center for Economic and Policy Research, a liberal research institute in Washington.
That's a break with the past, he says, when "wages typically tracked closely with
productivity

Logical
04-11-2006, 09:26 PM
Those are decent wages, not great wages. Still in general it is some good news. Unfortunately it is not likely to offset the 45,000 people GM is going to be laying off.

Dave Lane
04-11-2006, 10:29 PM
Didn't Rectum say they were laying off everyone? No wait that was me...

Dave

Mr. Kotter
04-11-2006, 10:57 PM
I know this won't sit well with some of my conservative bretheren.....

but Marc, pointing out the good right now, is not gonna reverse the momentum. This administration had a shot at making a comeback....but hasn't shown the resiliency that was needed. Give it up....

It's like if it were an NFL game....at halftime, Bush was lucky to be clinging to a lead (that he didn't deserve.) He got the breaks, and even though he was constantly playing defense....a couple of turnovers and penalties, and a fortunate bounce here and there sent him to the locker room in front--barely. Now, during the second half....despite an inept opponent, the breaks have stopped. Turnovers, penalties, and lucky bounces are evening out....and the opponent is in front. Yet Bush is sticking with the same game plan that got him into this mess.....think Martyball. Think Jimmy Raye's offense.

It's now gonna take a turnover, an on sides kick, a 'Hail Mary" and three scores in the last 5 minutes of the game to pull this out. It's possible, but even the lower level endzone die-hards are headed to the parking lot. And you have Elvis Grbac at QB, Donnel Bennett at RB, and Kevin Lockett at WR. Good luck! :banghead: :banghead: :banghead:

I hope I'm wrong; I really do. My nature is to defer to the sitting President, unless he's a criminal. We aren't there yet. But the fat lady is smiling; and she's about to begin warming up. Grbac and Bennett better have something up their sleeve...and NOW.....

Chiefs Express
04-11-2006, 11:00 PM
Those are decent wages, not great wages. Still in general it is some good news. Unfortunately it is not likely to offset the 45,000 people GM is going to be laying off.

I feel sorry for the 45,000 people, but not for GM. They have had opportunities to compete with the manufacturers that are putting them out of business and failed to do so.

The technology for hybrids has existed for a few years, they could have gotten in on that way back and declined.

They could have gone full scale into the development of the hydrogen cell and blew it off as well.

I have a hybrid that gets 50 mpg in town and 42-44 on the highway. People are waiting to buy them and GM had the opportunity, as has Ford and Chrysler but they all backed off until it was too late.

The GM workers will find other jobs, maybe not at the $25-$35 per hour they are now getting, but there are jobs out there.

What they need to hope for is that someone will buy the plants an retool them for another make of automobiles.

I did see that the UAW lowered their expectations for new employees by lowering wages in Louisiana from $26 an hour to $15 an hour for new hires. The surprising thing was that the $15 per hour was higher than most of the other jobs in the area other than at that particular assembly plant.

Dave Lane
04-11-2006, 11:11 PM
I worked my way through college by working at GM so I don't hate them but CE you hit it on the head they had their chances really since the early 70s and have constantly hosed them up.

Also good job on the hybrid. You surprise me!

Dave

Chiefs Express
04-11-2006, 11:38 PM
I worked my way through college by working at GM so I don't hate them but CE you hit it on the head they had their chances really since the early 70s and have constantly hosed them up.

Also good job on the hybrid. You surprise me!

Dave

I can't take full credit for the hybrid. My wife started talking about them so we started looking. We have always driven cars that are fuel efficient, other than the "70 Chevelle we inherited from her family and a '77 Nova I bought in '77.

I like the looks of some of the SUV's but I'd rather walk than pay the price for a full tank of gas in one of them.

My old car gets 30+ mpg and that is the worst, other than the '70, it doesn't get out on the road too often, just enough to keep it running. We are about to list it on Ebay, I'm sure there is someone out there with more money than brains!

patteeu
04-12-2006, 06:43 AM
I know this won't sit well with some of my conservative bretheren.....

but Marc, pointing out the good right now, is not gonna reverse the momentum. This administration had a shot at making a comeback....but hasn't shown the resiliency that was needed. Give it up....

It's like if it were an NFL game....at halftime, Bush was lucky to be clinging to a lead (that he didn't deserve.) He got the breaks, and even though he was constantly playing defense....a couple of turnovers and penalties, and a fortunate bounce here and there sent him to the locker room in front--barely. Now, during the second half....despite an inept opponent, the breaks have stopped. Turnovers, penalties, and lucky bounces are evening out....and the opponent is in front. Yet Bush is sticking with the same game plan that got him into this mess.....think Martyball. Think Jimmy Raye's offense.

It's now gonna take a turnover, an on sides kick, a 'Hail Mary" and three scores in the last 5 minutes of the game to pull this out. It's possible, but even the lower level endzone die-hards are headed to the parking lot. And you have Elvis Grbac at QB, Donnel Bennett at RB, and Kevin Lockett at WR. Good luck! :banghead: :banghead: :banghead:

I hope I'm wrong; I really do. My nature is to defer to the sitting President, unless he's a criminal. We aren't there yet. But the fat lady is smiling; and she's about to begin warming up. Grbac and Bennett better have something up their sleeve...and NOW.....


Uh,... we're barely halfway through the 3rd quarter. Anybody heading for the parking lot now should have their season tickets revoked.

Adept Havelock
04-12-2006, 06:57 AM
I know this won't sit well with some of my conservative bretheren.....

but Marc, pointing out the good right now, is not gonna reverse the momentum. This administration had a shot at making a comeback....but hasn't shown the resiliency that was needed. Give it up....

It's like if it were an NFL game....at halftime, Bush was lucky to be clinging to a lead (that he didn't deserve.) He got the breaks, and even though he was constantly playing defense....a couple of turnovers and penalties, and a fortunate bounce here and there sent him to the locker room in front--barely. Now, during the second half....despite an inept opponent, the breaks have stopped. Turnovers, penalties, and lucky bounces are evening out....and the opponent is in front. Yet Bush is sticking with the same game plan that got him into this mess.....think Martyball. Think Jimmy Raye's offense.

It's now gonna take a turnover, an on sides kick, a 'Hail Mary" and three scores in the last 5 minutes of the game to pull this out. It's possible, but even the lower level endzone die-hards are headed to the parking lot. And you have Elvis Grbac at QB, Donnel Bennett at RB, and Kevin Lockett at WR. Good luck! :banghead: :banghead: :banghead:

I hope I'm wrong; I really do. My nature is to defer to the sitting President, unless he's a criminal. We aren't there yet. But the fat lady is smiling; and she's about to begin warming up. Grbac and Bennett better have something up their sleeve...and NOW.....


Exellent analogy, except I'm pretty sure that they've got Jeff Hostetler under center, with a banged up N. Kaufman at RB, and James Jett (playing with a bad hammy) at WR. (Tim Brown's clearly out w/an injury).
:p

CE and Dav, good points about hybrids, and GM's stupid decision making in the 70's. A 70' chevelle? Those things were great, but big as a boat. Don't you have to scrape the occasional little Toyota compact or two out from under the fender after you take it for a drive?

Mr. Kotter
04-12-2006, 07:55 AM
Uh,... we're barely halfway through the 3rd quarter. Anybody heading for the parking lot now should have their season tickets revoked.

Down by 3 scores, playing Martyball is NOT a good place to be.

Does anyone really pay attention to the final year of a second term? Ask Reagan; ask Clinton. I mean, seriously.....:shrug:

I notice you didn't disagree with the content of the analogy though....you just think there's more time left to "comeback" I guess? :hmmm:

FWIW, a reasonable step toward clear resolution in Iraq would be the equivalent to....after scoring a TD, recovering a fumbled KO return or on-sides and scoring another TD a few seconds later. It happens once in a while. Grbac, Bennett, and Lockett need one helluva of a fourth quarter. :shake:

Mr. Kotter
04-12-2006, 08:05 AM
Exellent analogy, except I'm pretty sure that they've got Jeff Hostetler under center, with a banged up N. Kaufman at RB, and James Jett (playing with a bad hammy) at WR. (Tim Brown's clearly out w/an injury).
:p

Oh, God....please tell me you are NOT a Fader fan? :spock:

stevieray
04-12-2006, 08:06 AM
good luck with that, kotter.

Mr. Kotter
04-12-2006, 08:21 AM
good luck with that, kotter.

Could you be a little more specific? :hmmm:

banyon
04-12-2006, 10:19 AM
Wow. These idiosyncratic examples MarcBulger cites are great evidence that wages for middle America are going up. :shake:

median income has declined by $1,535 since Bush took office , or 3.4 percent. And while the decline leveled off last year and may even be climbing again in 2004, most households are clearly worse off economically now than they were when the President was sworn in.

http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/p60-226.pdf
http://www.factcheck.org/article249.html

patteeu
04-12-2006, 11:32 AM
Down by 3 scores, playing Martyball is NOT a good place to be.

Does anyone really pay attention to the final year of a second term? Ask Reagan; ask Clinton. I mean, seriously.....:shrug:

I notice you didn't disagree with the content of the analogy though....you just think there's more time left to "comeback" I guess? :hmmm:

FWIW, a reasonable step toward clear resolution in Iraq would be the equivalent to....after scoring a TD, recovering a fumbled KO return or on-sides and scoring another TD a few seconds later. It happens once in a while. Grbac, Bennett, and Lockett need one helluva of a fourth quarter. :shake:

I don't think the good guys are down by 3 scores and playing martyball so I guess I don't really agree with the analogy much at all. I think Bush and the Republicans are struggling and need to come back a little bit to avoid letting the dems get back into the game (control of the House). I think the Republicans would have to accelerate their self destruction and the dems would have to kick some real ass to get control of the Senate. But there is still a lot of time before the mid-term elections and even more time before the final gun (2008 elections).

Mr. Kotter
04-12-2006, 11:46 AM
I don't think the good guys are down by 3 scores and playing martyball so I guess I don't really agree with the analogy much at all. I think Bush and the Republicans are struggling and need to come back a little bit to avoid letting the dems get back into the game (control of the House). I think the Republicans would have to accelerate their self destruction and the dems would have to kick some real ass to get control of the Senate. But there is still a lot of time before the mid-term elections and even more time before the final gun (2008 elections).

Ah-ha. There's our problem....

I was talking, specifically, about Bush. I agree the Republicans are still, for the moment, in a decent position. And the Dems incompetence may allow that position to last. That could change, if Bush drags them down with him though.

picasso
04-12-2006, 11:54 AM
In talk about GM letting people go you should also keep in mind the 20 some thousand that Ford released about six months ago.
That said I am sick of people saying that the job market is great and that unemployment is down. Does anyone remember the unemployment reform that the Bush administration put into place in the beginning of his first term? He cut government jobs, job programs and put harsh unemployment restrictions on people that qualify according to where state unemployment levels are at shortening the time period a person is eligible.
The reason unemployment rates falls it is based on how many people are currently eligible for it. A state may have a huge layoff at a major company and the unemployment rate drastically increases, three months later it drops a little bit due to those same people finding other employment or relocating to another state, 6 months later due to those subtle drops in unemployment it reaches the mandated cutoff and benefits to eligible people are cut thus giving a huge false decrease in the rate of unemployed americans. Are companies hirinr? Yes but very slowly and the larger companies that feel the effects of higher gas prices and a damaged economy are letting people go in record numbers as mentioned.

patteeu
04-12-2006, 12:16 PM
Ah-ha. There's our problem....

I was talking, specifically, about Bush. I agree the Republicans are still, for the moment, in a decent position. And the Dems incompetence may allow that position to last. That could change, if Bush drags them down with him though.

OK. I don't really understand what game Bush is in by himself. As far as his legacy is concerned, I don't think that will be determined for a decade or more. He's probably done spearheading big legislative agendas, but that might be a good thing considering what he's accomplished so far (NCLB, Prescription Drugs). About the only thing of significance that I can see him possibly losing would be tax cut permanency, but that remains to be seen.

picasso
04-12-2006, 12:18 PM
Good luck on your Bush coming back theory with the latest news in the Post about the Bio Chemical trailers and of course the White Houses response that Bush just told the people what he was told.
That excuse is getting absolutely redundant, extremely careless and quite frankly a bit juvenile. I have never seen an administration take less responsibility for their actions as I have this one.
Don't you republican guys get pissed off when Sammy Parker runs a 10 yard route for a first down on 3rd and 8 and drops the ball and all he does is smile about it? Show's no anger at himself for dropping it or expresses any kind of emotion.
Can you guys relate this question to this president or his administration? I mean hey if Clinton was doing this same thing I'd be the first one against him democrat or not. I mean what Clinton did was get a blower from a cheerleader in the dressing room and lie to the fans about it out of embarassment. Bush is actually permenantly injuring fellow players, lying to them and their families, and saying to the public that he doesn't expect to go to the superbowl in the time he has to play. But even more importantly NOT catching the ball when it's thrown to him.

patteeu
04-12-2006, 12:19 PM
Does anyone remember the unemployment reform that the Bush administration put into place in the beginning of his first term? He cut government jobs, job programs and put harsh unemployment restrictions on people that qualify according to where state unemployment levels are at shortening the time period a person is eligible.

Link? I recall unemployment benefits being temporarily extended, not shortened. Maybe I'm wrong.

picasso
04-12-2006, 12:38 PM
Link? I recall unemployment benefits being temporarily extended, not shortened. Maybe I'm wrong.

I don't have a link I have an experience of being unemployed 6 months after Bush took office and was told that by my advisor at the Washington Unemployment office that once the state unemployment rate falls to a federally mandated statewide percentage and you're still currently unemployed you will be sent a notice that your under review, your benefits then cut and you will be redirected to a training program that doesn't council but rather looks in the Unemployment data base and assists you in finding temporary employment.
Unemployment benefits were extended only after 9/11 when companies ridiculously cut back jobs and increased the unemployment rate. It still didn't change the unemployment process as reviewing cases prior to the extension and also that extension had an expiration. It no longer exists. And the unemployment rate doesn't account for all of those dropped out of the system where you have to not draw for 1 year or make at least 20,000 in a 9 month period to be eligible again even though you have moneys to be drawn.

Mr. Kotter
04-12-2006, 12:41 PM
OK. I don't really understand what game Bush is in by himself. As far as his legacy is concerned, I don't think that will be determined for a decade or more. He's probably done spearheading big legislative agendas, but that might be a good thing considering what he's accomplished so far (NCLB, Prescription Drugs). About the only thing of significance that I can see him possibly losing would be tax cut permanency, but that remains to be seen.

He's not in it by himself, but this is the age of the Imperial Presidency--for better or worse. I think you know I've tried to be supportive of Bush, deferring to him as much as possible. However, if you think you are gonna be able to hang your hat on NCLB and the Prescription Drug program....I think you are dreaming.

Bush's legacy will hinge on retrospective judgement of two things: 9/11 and its aftermath, and the War in Iraq. And, ostensibly, he may get some credit for truly "reinventing government," because of those tax cuts will force some difficult accounting and budgeting decisions down the road (not a bad thing, in my mind,) but I think you are right that tax cuts will be revisited in the not too distant future.

Pitt Gorilla
04-12-2006, 01:05 PM
Ah-ha. There's our problem....

I was talking, specifically, about Bush. I agree the Republicans are still, for the moment, in a decent position. And the Dems incompetence may allow that position to last. That could change, if Bush drags them down with him though.I think the Republicans are in a better than decent position. Politics have become so divisive that I'm not convinced that real issues matter much anymore. You chose a team and support them regardless of the crap they spew (I often hear "yeah, well, the deficit is the one thing I don't like about Bush. But, it's not that bad and everything else is great). It would take something major in one's life to cross that line (losing a job, etc). I hope I'm wrong, but I'm afraid I'm not.

Baby Lee
04-12-2006, 01:09 PM
I think the Republicans are in a better than decent position. Politics have become so divisive that I'm not convinced that real issues matter much anymore. You chose a team and support them regardless of the crap they spew (I often hear "yeah, well, the deficit is the one thing I don't like about Bush. But, it's not that bad and everything else is great). It would take something major in one's life to cross that line (losing a job, etc). I hope I'm wrong, but I'm afraid I'm not.
Would Biden v. McCain qualify as something major?

Pitt Gorilla
04-12-2006, 01:11 PM
Would Biden v. McCain qualify as something major?I don't know, but I love that possibility. Either way, someone much better than we have now wins. I'd lobby hard for McCain, but I'd take either.

Mr. Kotter
04-12-2006, 01:32 PM
I think the Republicans are in a better than decent position. Politics have become so divisive that I'm not convinced that real issues matter much anymore. You chose a team and support them regardless of the crap they spew (I often hear "yeah, well, the deficit is the one thing I don't like about Bush. But, it's not that bad and everything else is great). It would take something major in one's life to cross that line (losing a job, etc). I hope I'm wrong, but I'm afraid I'm not.

Every once in a while, with a post like this I suspect that you.....are one helluva poker player. :hmmm:




:)

patteeu
04-12-2006, 02:28 PM
He's not in it by himself, but this is the age of the Imperial Presidency--for better or worse. I think you know I've tried to be supportive of Bush, deferring to him as much as possible. However, if you think you are gonna be able to hang your hat on NCLB and the Prescription Drug program....I think you are dreaming.

Bush's legacy will hinge on retrospective judgement of two things: 9/11 and its aftermath, and the War in Iraq. And, ostensibly, he may get some credit for truly "reinventing government," because of those tax cuts will force some difficult accounting and budgeting decisions down the road (not a bad thing, in my mind,) but I think you are right that tax cuts will be revisited in the not too distant future.

I must have been unclear. Far from hanging my hat on NCLB and Prescription Drugs, I'm saying that with "accomplishments" like those, a little legislative ineffectiveness will be a welcome change. I agree that Bush's legacy will be based on the GWoT and the resulting foreign affairs impacts.

patteeu
04-12-2006, 02:33 PM
I don't have a link I have an experience of being unemployed 6 months after Bush took office and was told that by my advisor at the Washington Unemployment office that once the state unemployment rate falls to a federally mandated statewide percentage and you're still currently unemployed you will be sent a notice that your under review, your benefits then cut and you will be redirected to a training program that doesn't council but rather looks in the Unemployment data base and assists you in finding temporary employment.
Unemployment benefits were extended only after 9/11 when companies ridiculously cut back jobs and increased the unemployment rate. It still didn't change the unemployment process as reviewing cases prior to the extension and also that extension had an expiration. It no longer exists. And the unemployment rate doesn't account for all of those dropped out of the system where you have to not draw for 1 year or make at least 20,000 in a 9 month period to be eligible again even though you have moneys to be drawn.

That doesn't really sound too harsh to me, but I'm sure it seems different when it affects you personally.

Braincase
04-12-2006, 02:40 PM
I'd like to see number on what the average income did versus share of the national debt...

Cochise
04-12-2006, 02:50 PM
American automakers are not going under because Bush is de debbil.

They're going under because their overhead is enormous, and they sell an overpriced substandard product.

Radar Chief
04-12-2006, 02:53 PM
American automakers are not going under because Bush is de debbil.

They're going under because their overhead is enormous, and they sell an overpriced substandard product.

And sunk everything into an SUV market that they had to know was gonna crumble the moment gas prices spiked.

memyselfI
04-12-2006, 02:54 PM
I'd like to see number on what the average income did versus share of the national debt...

I'd like to see the source of this article...

Rush was reading from it on yesterday's show. :hmmm:

Baby Lee
04-12-2006, 03:18 PM
I'd like to see the source of this article...

Rush was reading from it on yesterday's show. :hmmm:
Christian Science Monitor (http://search.csmonitor.com/search_content/0411/p01s02-usec.html)

Logical
04-12-2006, 03:52 PM
Would Biden v. McCain qualify as something major?I know this I am coming around to Biden, I might vote for him over almost any Republican I think might actually get the nomination. If McCain actually manages it, it would make for a tough choice but a clearly better choice than we have had in many years.

Baby Lee
04-12-2006, 04:01 PM
I know this I am coming around to Biden, I might vote for him over almost any Republican I think might actually get the nomination. If McCain actually manages it, it would make for a tough choice but a clearly better choice than we have had in many years.
I'd vote for Guiliani [the man, the candidate I'm most excited about since William Weld] or Romney [hey! if he can exist, let alone thrive, as a Mormon Republican in Massachusetts] over any Dem.
Allen would have to earn my vote, because I don't know enough about him.
McCain would have to earn my vote, because I DO know enough about him. :p
Condaleeza is a dark horse.
Otherwise, I'm leaning Biden.

patteeu
04-12-2006, 05:19 PM
And sunk everything into an SUV market that they had to know was gonna crumble the moment gas prices spiked.

I heard one of the business reporters for one of the cable news networks reporting from some auto show today (sorry about the lack of specificity, but I was working on something else and didn't notice the name or network). Anyway, I was shocked to hear her say that at least some of the US automakers are counting on rebounding SUV sales in the relatively near term. With gas prices high and likely to go higher, I have to wonder WTF they are thinking.

Logical
04-12-2006, 05:33 PM
I'd vote for Guiliani [the man, the candidate I'm most excited about since William Weld] or Romney [hey! if he can exist, let alone thrive, as a Mormon Republican in Massachusetts] over any Dem.
Allen would have to earn my vote, because I don't know enough about him.
McCain would have to earn my vote, because I DO know enough about him. :p
Condaleeza is a dark horse.
Otherwise, I'm leaning Biden.

My preference is far and away Guiliani, but I just don't have much hope that he can capture the nomination due to the RRWNJ portion of the party.

Baby Lee
04-12-2006, 05:38 PM
My preference is far and away Guiliani, but I just don't have much hope that he can capture the nomination due to the RRWNJ portion of the party.
LWNJs to the rescue

http://www.nydailynews.com/front/story/408248p-345436c.html

Logical
04-12-2006, 06:50 PM
LWNJs to the rescue

http://www.nydailynews.com/front/story/408248p-345436c.html


That is interesting.

Adept Havelock
04-12-2006, 06:56 PM
Oh, God....please tell me you are NOT a Fader fan? :spock:

To put it bluntly, not only no, but HELL NO! :louder:

I just think the Raider's moniker fits the Bush administration much better than any of the members of my beloved Chiefs. (Even Grbac.) :p