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Saulbadguy
04-13-2006, 12:37 PM
http://stanislavpetrovtribute.ytmnd.com/

rageeumr
04-13-2006, 12:39 PM
http://stanislavpetrovtribute.ytmnd.com/

I saw that on the most viewed list yesterday. I can't believe that I had never heard of that.

MOhillbilly
04-13-2006, 12:39 PM
thanka commie?

We owned those bitches w/ SDI.

RaiderH8r
04-13-2006, 12:45 PM
Nice system douchebags.

Donger
04-13-2006, 12:46 PM
Nice system douchebags.

We had at least two similar incidents, FYI.

Saulbadguy
04-13-2006, 12:47 PM
We had at least two similar incidents, FYI.
I remember that. Matthew Broderick saved the day.

Donger
04-13-2006, 12:49 PM
I remember that. Matthew Broderick saved the day.

Heh. WOPR!! WOPR!!

No, I'm being serious. IIRC, one happened in the late 1970s and another in late 1980s. Both were hardware failures at Cheyenne Mountain.

Ally Sheedy always caused an increase in blood flow to specific parts of my body back then. Not sure why.

Donger
04-13-2006, 12:51 PM
The training tape incident Shortly before 9 a.m. on November 9, 1979, the computers at North American Aerospace Defense Command's Cheyenne Mountain site, the Pentagon's National Military Command Center, and the Alternate National Military Command Center in Fort Ritchie, Maryland, all showed what the United States feared most -- a massive Soviet nuclear strike aimed at destroying the U.S. command system and nuclear forces. A threat assessment conference, involving senior officers at all three command posts, was convened immediately. Launch control centers for Minuteman missiles, buried deep below the prairie grass in the American West, received preliminary warning that the United States was under a massive nuclear attack.

The alert did not stop with the U.S. ICBM force. The entire continental air defense interceptor force was put on alert, and at least 10 fighters took off. Furthermore, the National Emergency Airborne Command Post, the president's "doomsday plane," was also launched, but without the president on board. It was later determined that a realistic training tape had been inadvertently inserted into the computer running the nation's early-warning programs.


Early warning In the "training tape" incident, Defense Support Program early-warning satellites saved the day. Above, a $256 million DSP satellite goes aloft in August 2001.
However, within minutes of the original alert, the officers had reviewed the raw data from the DSP satellites and checked with the early-warning radars ringing the country. The radars were capable of spotting missiles launched from submarines close to the U.S. shores and ICBM warheads that had traveled far enough along their trajectories to rise above the curvature of the Earth. The DSP satellites were capable of detecting the launches of Soviet missiles almost anywhere on the Earth's surface. Neither system showed any signs that the country was under attack, so the alert was canceled.


The computer chip incident On June 3, 1980, less than a year after the incident involving the training tape, U.S. command posts received another warning that the Soviet Union had launched a nuclear strike. As in the earlier episode, launch crews for Minuteman missiles were given preliminary launch warnings, and bomber crews manned their aircraft. This time, however, the displays did not present a recognizable or even a consistent attack pattern as they had during the training tape episode. Instead, the displays showed a seemingly random number of attacking missiles. The displays would show that two missiles had been launched, then zero missiles, and then 200 missiles. Furthermore, the numbers of attacking missiles displayed in the different command posts did not always agree.

Although many officers did not take this event as seriously as the incident of the previous November, the threat assessment conference still convened to evaluate the possibility that the attack was real. Again the committee reviewed the raw data from the early-warning systems and found that no missiles had been launched. Later investigations showed that a single computer chip failure had caused random numbers of attacking missiles to be displayed.

Dave Lane
04-13-2006, 12:52 PM
Damn War games

Dave