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View Full Version : A tale of two ... tales. Dead Alabama guy.


Rain Man
04-13-2006, 02:54 PM
Here's story #1, posted last week. Read the bolded part, and then skip down to Story #2. I wonder if he accidentally shot himself in the back, too.

http://msn.foxsports.com/cfb/story/5493782

Controversial booster killed in his home

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - An Alabama booster convicted of bribing a high school coach to get a top recruit for the Crimson Tide was killed in his home after a fierce, bloody struggle, police said Tuesday.

Alabama booster Logan Young was found dead Tuesday in his Memphis home. (The Commercial Appeal, A.J. Wolfe / Associated Press)
Police and his defense attorney confirmed the death of Logan Young, 65, but did not say how he was killed.

Investigators found "a lot of blood," police Sgt. Vince Higgins said. "The nature of the attack was brutal. The entire house is a crime scene."

Higgins said there were signs of a struggle in the house, a two-story stone Tudor home in one of Memphis' most exclusive country club neighborhoods.
Investigators don't know a motive or if the attack was related to Young's federal conviction, Higgins said. Police haven't determined how his home was entered or how many attackers there might have been.

While police waited for fingerprints and dental records to identify the body, Nashville defense attorney Jim Neal confirmed the victim was Young.

"I've had two or three calls about it, all to the same end, found killed in his home. ... I heard that there was blood everywhere," Neal said.

Higgins said Young's housekeeper found the body after she arrived for work Tuesday morning, and the pool boy told police he saw Young as he was leaving the house late Monday.

"All we can tell is (the killing) happened sometime overnight - late night or early morning," Higgins said.

Memphis police said there had not been any recent police calls to Young's address before his body was found.

Young was free pending appeal of his 2005 conviction on money laundering and racketeering conspiracy charges in a federal case involving the recruiting of defensive lineman Albert Means.

Young was sentenced last June to six months in prison, plus six months' home confinement, then two years' supervised release.

His attorneys had argued against any jail time because Young needed a kidney transplant and could not get proper medical care in prison. Final briefs in his appeal were to be filed July 14, according to court records.

Young was the son of a wealthy businessman in Osceola, Ark., and was never a student at Alabama, but he was widely known as the Crimson Tide's most influential booster in Memphis.

He claimed to be a friend of Alabama coach Paul "Bear" Bryant and was the original owner of the Memphis Showboats of the USFL in the early '80s.

But last year he became one of the first college football boosters ever to be sentenced to federal prison for recruiting violations.

Former high school coach Lynn Lang, who avoided jail time after pleading guilty to taking part in a racketeering conspiracy, testified against Young, saying the booster paid $150,000 to get Means to sign with Alabama in 2000.

The NCAA has said it believed Means was unaware his football talents were being brokered. The player later transferred to Memphis, where he finished his college career.

Lang testified at Young's trial that other universities, including Georgia, Kentucky, Arkansas, Memphis, Mississippi, Michigan State and Tennessee, offered him money or jobs to get Means.

No charges were filed against anyone with those schools.

Means' recruitment became part of an NCAA investigation that led to sanctions against Alabama in 2002, costing the Crimson Tide scholarships and bowl appearances.

Attorney Tommy Gallion, who represented former Alabama assistants Ivy Williams and Ronnie Cottrell in a defamation suit against the NCAA and others, called the news tragic.

Memphis attorney Phillip Shanks was assisting Gallion on the lawsuit in May 2004 when he was attacked in his office and left unconscious. Key case documents were stolen, he said. No one was ever charged in the case.

"I have no idea who could be behind this. I was shocked that Phillip Shanks was beaten, and this was more shocking," Gallion said in a statement read by his secretary.

Cottrell said he was horrified when he heard Young had been killed.

"I couldn't believe it. Logan was a friend, and he has been through so much already. Certainly for his life to end this way was a tragedy. My prayers are just with his family right now," Cottrell said.

Defense attorney Robert Hutton said he last talked with Young last week and called his death a total shock and a real loss.

"He was very generous man. He was generous with people around him. A pastor of a Catholic Church, he asked for money for some program, for the roof or something, and he gave him the money. Logan wasn't even Catholic," Hutton said.


Here's Story #2, just released.

http://msn.foxsports.com/cfb/story/5500210

Police: Booster's death an accident, not slaying

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) - A University of Alabama football booster died when he hit his head in an accidental fall at home, rather than being slain as first thought, the police director said Thursday.

Alabama booster Logan Young was found dead Tuesday in his Memphis home. (The Commercial Appeal, A.J. Wolfe / Associated Press)
Police initially described the death of 65-year-old Logan Young as a bloody slaying after a fierce struggle but quit calling it a homicide a day later.

"He fell in his house, hit his head on a metal stair railing and died from that injury," Memphis Police Director Larry Godwin said at a news conference.

Young, who was convicted last year of bribing a high school football coach to steer a top recruit to Alabama, was found dead at his Memphis home Tuesday. No arrests had been made and no suspects had been identified although family members and friends had been questioned.

Crime scene crews spent most of two days in Young's house, where police said blood or traces of blood were found in several rooms.

Lt. Joe Scott said Thursday that investigators determined that after Young fell, he lay on the floor awhile before getting up and walking into several rooms and then upstairs to his bedroom.

Young's body was found on the floor beside his bed Tuesday morning by his housekeeper. Scott said police still aren't sure when Young died but he was seen Monday evening by his pool boy.

Young, who was divorced, lived alone much of the time in his stone Tudor home. His son, Logan Young III, an only child, apparently had been staying with him off and on recently, police said.

Logan Young III was not at the residence when his father's body was found by a housekeeper. He was located several hours later and taken to police headquarters for questioning. There, he voluntarily gave DNA samples to investigators, including fingernail scrapings, his lawyer, Steve Farese, said.

The elder Young's conviction for money laundering and racketeering conspiracy capped a scandal that put Alabama on NCAA probation and cost Young his favored standing among the university's big-money boosters.

cdcox
04-13-2006, 03:09 PM
Even before this latest twist, I thought there was more to this case than meets the eye. Here's a story from SI reported a few days ago. I highlited another interesting, likely related, tidbit.


http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2006/football/ncaa/wires/04/11/2060.ap.fbc.recruiting.scandal.booster.dead.3rd.ld.writethru.0699/index.html

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - An Alabama booster convicted of bribing a high school football coach to get a top recruit for the Crimson Tide was found dead Tuesday in his Memphis home, and police were investigating it as a homicide.

Police hadn't yet confirmed the body was that of Logan Young, but his defense attorney said it was the Alabama booster.

"We're treating it as a mystery homicide,'' Sgt. Vince Higgins said in a telephone interview.

He said officials assume the victim was Young but needed to use fingerprints and dental records to confirm the identity. A medical examiner was at Young's upscale home near a Memphis country club trying to determine the cause of death.

"Suffice it to say, there was quite a physical struggle in this and this individual was injured severely,'' he said.

Nashville defense attorney Jim Neal said he had been told the body was found by a housekeeper.

"I've had two or three calls about it, all to the same end, found killed in his home. ... I heard that there was blood everywhere. That is all I know,'' Neal said.

Higgins said Young's housekeeper found the body after she arrived for work this morning. The body had not been removed from the house and no family members immediately arrived at the house.

The 65-year-old Young was convicted under federal law of money laundering and racketeering conspiracy in the case involving the peddling of defensive lineman Albert Means.

Young was sentenced last June to six months in prison and six months home confinement then two years supervised release. But he had been allowed to remain free pending his appeal. Final briefs in Young's appeal were to be filed by July 14, according to court records.

His attorneys had argued Young needed a kidney transplant and could not get proper medical care in prison.

Former high school coach Lynn Lang, who avoided jail time after pleading guilty to taking part in a racketeering conspiracy, testified against Young, saying the booster paid $150,000 to get Means to sign with Alabama in 2000.

The NCAA has said it believed Means was unaware his football talents were being brokered. The player later transferred to Memphis, where he finished his college career.

Lang testified at Young's trial that other universities, including Georgia, Kentucky, Arkansas, Memphis, Mississippi, Michigan State and Tennessee, offered him money or jobs to get Means.

No charges were filed against anyone with those schools. Three former coaches, Rip Scherer of Memphis, Jim Donnan of Georgia and Alabama assistant Ivy Williams, testified Lang was lying.

Means' recruitment became part of an NCAA investigation that led to sanctions against Alabama in 2002, costing the Crimson Tide scholarships and bowl appearances.

Attorney Tommy Gallion, who represented Williams and former Alabama assistant Ronnie Cottrell in a defamation suit against the NCAA and others, called the news tragic.

"I have no idea who could be behind this. I was shocked that Phillip Shanks was beaten and this was more shocking,'' Gallion said in a statement read by his secretary.

Shanks was assisting Gallion on the lawsuit in May 2004 when he was attacked in his office and left unconscious. Key case documents were stolen, he said. No one was ever charged in the case.

Defense attorney Robert Hutton said he last talked with Young last week and called his death a total shock and a real loss.

"He was very generous man. He was generous with people around him. A pastor of a Catholic Church, he asked for money for some program, for the roof or something, and he gave him the money. Logan wasn't even Catholic,'' Hutton said.

"He was a wonderful character. I really enjoyed him as a person. It's just a horrible tragedy.''

Five players who are having excellent seasons, but don't quite deserve my MVP vote.

Last season's surprise 11-1 team looks like a bona fide '06 national title contender.

Ultra Peanut
04-13-2006, 03:17 PM
I, for one, find it perfectly plausible that he managed to accidentally batter himself to the point where he was unrecognizable without dental records.

StcChief
04-13-2006, 03:22 PM
These reporters need to watch less crime dramas on TV.

cdcox
04-13-2006, 03:26 PM
These reporters need to watch less crime dramas on TV.

I think it is a matter of these cops needing to spend less time watching SEC football.

Rain Man
04-13-2006, 03:37 PM
Does anyone know where Auburn University was that night?

banyon
04-13-2006, 03:51 PM
2 possibilities:

1) the cops are mentally retarded schizophrenics.

(being from Memphis originally, this possibility seems strong)

2) Someone very powerful is behind this and got the police to cover up the original report.

Im looking at...

http://www.pbase.com/image/50232560/original.jpg

Ultra Peanut
04-13-2006, 05:13 PM
Does anyone know where Auburn University was that night?You're looking at the wrong rival school... It's UTK you should be pointing the finger at.

Just for the record, Phat Phil actually WAS in M-Town that night. Coincidence? You tell me... :hmmm:

In all seriousness, I honestly would not be shocked at all if this were being covered up due to some link with organized crime. The change in story is stunningly disparate that even retarded cops wouldn't have made such an erroneous initial report.

Sure... he fell down the stairs, battering his face beyond recognition, then waltzed around his house, took a shower, and went to bed, only to fall out of it and die. Either he's an old, rich Gumby, or... something.

cdcox
04-13-2006, 06:47 PM
You're looking at the wrong rival school... It's UTK you should be pointing the finger at.

Just for the record, Phat Phil actually WAS in M-Town that night. Coincidence? You tell me... :hmmm:

In all seriousness, I honestly would not be shocked at all if this were being covered up due to some link with organized crime. The change in story is stunningly disparate that even retarded cops wouldn't have made such an erroneous initial report.

Sure... he fell down the stairs, battering his face beyond recognition, then waltzed around his house, took a shower, and went to bed, only to fall out of it and die. Either he's an old, rich Gumby, or... something.

The only problem with your UTK theory is that the guy was bumped off in West Tennessee. We only control the police in East Tennessee.

Ultra Peanut
04-13-2006, 07:23 PM
The only problem with your UTK theory is that the guy was bumped off in West Tennessee. We only control the police in East Tennessee.Logan had his finger in many pots... if he really didn't fall down the freaking stairs, just about anyone could have done it.