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View Full Version : Which would be more expensive to obtain


Frankie
04-14-2006, 03:59 PM
A ton of pennies or a ton of Monopoly money? :hmmm:

Rain Man
04-14-2006, 04:00 PM
A ton of saffron.

Frankie
04-14-2006, 04:01 PM
A ton of saffron.
Duh!

JBucc
04-14-2006, 04:01 PM
To get a ton of monopy money you'd probably have to buy a shitload of Monopoly sets which are expensive. Each penny ways about .26 ounces so you'd only need about 213569 pennies. Actually I made those numbers up because I have no idea.

SLAG
04-14-2006, 04:07 PM
To get a ton of monopy money you'd probably have to buy a shitload of Monopoly sets which are expensive. Each penny ways about .26 ounces so you'd only need about 213569 pennies. Actually I made those numbers up because I have no idea.


Marijuana is sold by the .25 Ounce..

A penny weighs less then 5g

JBucc
04-14-2006, 04:08 PM
Marijuana is sold by the .25 Ounce..

I'm sure you would know

ENDelt260
04-14-2006, 04:27 PM
Marijuana is sold by the .25 Ounce..

That's like saying soda is sold by the liter.

Kclee
04-14-2006, 04:31 PM
That's like saying soda is sold by the liter.

Liter is French for give me some ****in' cola before I break both ****in' lips!

jspchief
04-14-2006, 04:34 PM
I don't think would even be close.

How many pennies would it take to equal the weight of one game's worth of Monopoly money? Certainly not enough to actually pay for the game.

Pennies win in a landslide.

sd4chiefs
04-14-2006, 07:07 PM
(Robert of Clifton, TX. 2000-11-11) US Pennies by the pound.
How many pennies are in a pound?
[How many pennies per avoirdupois pound? US pennies in 1 lb.]
Assuming you're talking about US coins, there's a big problem: In November 1982, the US penny became about 0.6 gram lighter. The older coin was 95% copper and 5% zinc, while the new one is essentially copper-plated zinc (97.6% zinc and only 2.4% copper). The nominal mass of a penny before 1982 was 48 grains (about 3.11 g). The size of a penny changed very little (-0.84%) in 1982 but, because zinc is lighter than copper, the new coin's nominal mass is 2.5 g.

The price of copper had risen to $1.33 per pound in 1980, so pennies could not be minted for less than their monetary value. Copper-plated coins postponed the crisis (in 2000, it cost 0.81 to mint a penny).
Before 1982, there was about 146 pennies in a pound... If all the pre-1982 pennies were out of circulation, there would be about 181 pennies to the pound.

Right now, a pound of pennies from the street will contain anywhere between 146 and 181 pennies, depending on the percentage of pre-1982 pennies in it. According to the US Mint, the approximate life span of a coin is about 25 years. If we take this number at face value, there remains in circulation today (November 2000; 18 years later) approximately exp(-18/25), or about 48.7% of the pennies that were in circulation in November 1982.

Assuming that the total number of pennies in circulation is the same today as it was in 1982 (which is probably not quite true), this would mean that a penny's mass in grams averages about 3.11(0.487)+2.5(1-0.487) which is very close to 2.8 g, so that there would be just about 162 pennies in a pound as of November 2000. If there's already more than 160 pennies in a pound, the average penny is already slightly less than 1/10 of an avoirdupois ounce!

The above theoretical approach tells how the number of pennies in a pound varies with time, if we assume that the total number of pennies in circulation is held roughly constant... However, it's all based on the "approximate life span" of 25 years quoted by the US Mint, which could be an overestimate for pennies. If we are to believe some fundraisers, an average pound of pennies was already worth $1.64 (164 pennies to the pound) as early as September 1995, only 13 years after the introduction of the new penny. 164 pennies in a pound (of 453.59237 g) corresponds to a proportion (x) of pre-1982 pennies which is such that: 164 = 453.59237 / (3.11034768 x + 2.5 (1-x)) This would mean that x was already as low as 43.55% after only 13 years or so, implying that the average number of years (T) that a penny lives is such that exp(-13/T) = 0.4355. T would thus be about 15.64 years, about 2/3 of what the US Mint states for its other coins.

Pound of pennies = 160 x 2000 = $3,200.00

SLAG
04-14-2006, 07:19 PM
Hey I was right..

Less than 5g

ChiefFripp
04-14-2006, 07:23 PM
I moved to Orlando which outside of the tourist area, can be compared to Mediterranean Ave.