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View Full Version : If God showed himself to you, would you live differently?


Mr. Kotter
04-26-2006, 04:10 PM
(a spin-off of Dave's thread. I think this warranted a follow-up thread....)

So, God shows himself to you in an unmistakable and clear way, and proves his existence to you....how do you react? :shrug:

For purposes of the discussion, let's assume one of the major religion's "type of God" which shows himself.....you can pick from among them....

Would you live your life any differently than you do? :hmmm:

mlyonsd
04-26-2006, 04:12 PM
Depends on how he answered my first question which would be, in my lifetime will the Chiefs ever win another SB?

patteeu
04-26-2006, 04:17 PM
Which God? If he tells me to spend way too much time arguing politics on a Chiefs message board or I'll go to hell, I probably wouldn't change my life much. If he tells me his name is HomoGod, I'm in for some difficult decisions.

Mr. Kotter
04-26-2006, 04:23 PM
Depends on how he answered my first question which would be, in my lifetime will the Chiefs ever win another SB?

A man with his priorities straight! ROFL

:thumb:

Mr. Kotter
04-26-2006, 04:25 PM
Which God? If he tells me to spend way too much time arguing politics on a Chiefs message board or I'll go to hell, I probably wouldn't change my life much. If he tells me his name is HomoGod, I'm in for some difficult decisions.

Good point. :hmmm:

ROFL

Seriously though, simply knowing God exists....you pick the God (within reason, of course)....would it change the way you live?

Baby Lee
04-26-2006, 04:31 PM
http://www.jerriblank.com/colbert-report_david-cross.jpg
"Actually, I spoke with God the other day, and boy is she pissed!! eh, aheh, ummm"

'Hamas' Jenkins
04-26-2006, 04:32 PM
I'd tell him that if man is truly created in his image, that he is douchebag.

Cochise
04-26-2006, 04:45 PM
I would think that a theophany might make me a few degrees more dedicated.

patteeu
04-26-2006, 04:47 PM
Good point. :hmmm:

ROFL

Seriously though, simply knowing God exists....you pick the God (within reason, of course)....would it change the way you live?

Definitely. I'd quit daydreaming and undressing the hot chicks in my mind during church. Seriously.

Duck Dog
04-26-2006, 04:57 PM
Which God? If he tells me to spend way too much time arguing politics on a Chiefs message board or I'll go to hell, I probably wouldn't change my life much. If he tells me his name is HomoGod, I'm in for some difficult decisions.

LOL. Excellent point!

Sully
04-26-2006, 05:01 PM
God revealed God's self to me in the past few years. Every day God is revealed more to me, in several ways, not the least of which is my fiance (Sorry if I gush about her).
Fact of the matter is that it did change me. it made my worship much more meaningful and joyful. It made me want to worship God, not feel coerced into doing it through fear or "just in case." It made me care far more for others. It made me look for more ways to make the world better, rather than making my world better. it made me care more about solving problems through my intellect and heart, rather than through my machismo.
I understand those who do not believe, and I hope that within whatever they do believe in, they find something that warms them as much as my faith warms me.

Sully
04-26-2006, 05:01 PM
Definitely. I'd quit daydreaming and undressing the hot chicks in my mind during church. Seriously.

I'm lucky. My minister is a hot chick..
nanny-nanny boo boo

patteeu
04-26-2006, 05:03 PM
I'm lucky. My minister is a hot chick..
nanny-nanny boo boo

Maybe I should go to your church and undress your minister with my mind. :p

Sully
04-26-2006, 05:07 PM
Maybe I should go to your church and undress your minister with my mind. :p

If you did it quietly and with a minimum of drool, I'd never know.

Nightwish
04-26-2006, 05:22 PM
(a spin-off of Dave's thread. I think this warranted a follow-up thread....)

So, God show's himself to you in an unmistakable and clear way, and proves his existence to you....how do you react? :shrug:

For purposes of the discussion, let's assume one of the major religion's "type of God" which shows himself.....you can pick from among them....

Would you live your life any differently than you do? :hmmm:
By "type of God," should we assume that you mean the major religion's beliefs and teachings regarding that God are correct in all respects? If that's the case, then it would really depend on which religion's god showed him/her/itself to be the real thing. If it turned out to be a pagan-type or Deist god, then it wouldn't really change anything for me. If it was a Christian, Jewish or Muslim god, it would probably change things. If it was a Hindu god, I don't know, as I don't know that much about them.

If by "type of God," you simply meant a general paradigm (monotheistic god, polytheistic gods, male-only deity, female-only deity, dualistic deity, etc.), then it would change nothing for me.

Mr. Kotter
04-26-2006, 05:26 PM
I'd tell him that if man is truly created in his image, that he is douchebag.

Good. Your ticket to Hell is pretty secure, then. ;)

Logical
04-26-2006, 06:23 PM
I hope he shows up as the founder of the Deist religion, either that or of Islam just to spite all of the Christians condemening everyone to be denied heaven because they did not convert to Christianity. Now that would be sweet irony. Allah Akbar be praised.

Logical
04-26-2006, 06:26 PM
ROFLI'd tell him that if man is truly created in his image, that he is douchebag.

You have to think this one through but it is actually pretty funny and perceptive. Man is clearly the douchebag so if we are made in Gods image then ergo God must be a douchebag.:clap::clap::clap:

KC Jones
04-26-2006, 06:27 PM
It all depends what God reveals to me. I already believe and think I'm living the good life, but if God shows up and says, "drop and give me 20 beotch!", I gots some droppin to do.

WilliamTheIrish
04-26-2006, 06:43 PM
What if the priest revealed himself to you?

And I imagine it would be rather unmistakeable.

Mr. Kotter
04-26-2006, 06:50 PM
ROFL

You have to think this one through but it is actually pretty funny and perceptive. Man is clearly the douchebag so if we are made in Gods image then ergo God must be a douchebag.:clap::clap::clap:

Man has douchebag-like qualities, but it's a pretty cynical view to call mankind a douchebag. Besides, our likeness with God was greatly diminished....during and after the "fall."

Mr. Kotter
04-26-2006, 06:51 PM
It all depends what God reveals to me. I already believe and think I'm living the good life, but if God shows up and says, "drop and give me 20 beotch!", I gots some droppin to do.
Reasonable answer; probably me too. Just curious about the others; especially those that seem to take delight in their arrogance and humanistic perspectives--to the point of denigrating anyone who believes otherwise....

irishjayhawk
04-26-2006, 07:31 PM
If there was enough evidence, I'd have to admit I was wrong.

I wouldn't change anything but that. An all-knowing, all powerful all loving god doesn't need my worship....

Count Alex's Losses
04-26-2006, 07:52 PM
Nope. I'd tell him to go away and stop being such a damn attention whore.

tiptap
04-26-2006, 08:15 PM
Just how would I distinguish between God and the second most powerful thing that came along? I mean if Satan, as a shining light, that was his original name, showed up how would I know the difference? How would I recognize Jesus? I am willing to admit there are greater beings and powers than myself. I can't judge if they are the prime mover god or force or some emanation.

tiptap
04-26-2006, 08:17 PM
It is your choice to offer worship to that which is beyond you. To expect a favor for that seems a bit too much to be likely.

KC Jones
04-26-2006, 08:33 PM
Reasonable answer; probably me too. Just curious about the others; especially those that seem to take delight in their arrogance and humanistic perspectives--to the point of denigrating anyone who believes otherwise....

You're totally wrong. Clearly you lack a true humanistic moral compass. I hereby denigrate you!

NewChief
04-26-2006, 08:54 PM
God revealed God's self to me in the past few years. Every day God is revealed more to me, in several ways, not the least of which is my fiance (Sorry if I gush about her).
Fact of the matter is that it did change me. it made my worship much more meaningful and joyful. It made me want to worship God, not feel coerced into doing it through fear or "just in case." It made me care far more for others. It made me look for more ways to make the world better, rather than making my world better. it made me care more about solving problems through my intellect and heart, rather than through my machismo.
I understand those who do not believe, and I hope that within whatever they do believe in, they find something that warms them as much as my faith warms me.

Wow. I was about to make pretty much this post, minus the part about your fiance (though I'm sure she's hot and all).

Seriously, God reveals himself to me daily. Of course, there are moments of grace where I feel God's presence more fully and tangibly than others, and in those moments I know how to behave, I know what to believe, and I know the truth. The problem is not what you believe when God reveals himself to you, the problem is what you believe when God then removes himself from you (or you remove yourself from him). Those are the tough times.

So to answer your question, nothing would change. I face this scenario constantly. God "shows" himself to me daily, and I still act like a total shit on a daily basis because it's way too easy to get caught up in the moment instead of keeping your eyes on the big picture.

Earthling
04-26-2006, 10:06 PM
Wow... With zero doubt about Gods existence my life would change tremendously. Not to say that I'm a bad person, but certainly not religious. I'd be one religious SOB.

Mr. Kotter
04-26-2006, 10:08 PM
Wow... With zero doubt about Gods existence my life would change tremendously. Not to say that I'm a bad person, but certainly not religious. I'd be one religious SOB.

Rep. ROFL

I suspect you offer the brutal honesty that some are lacking....:clap:

WoodDraw
04-26-2006, 10:23 PM
Reasonable answer; probably me too. Just curious about the others; especially those that seem to take delight in their arrogance and humanistic perspectives--to the point of denigrating anyone who believes otherwise....

There is a great chapter in one of my favorite books - The Brothers Karamazov - called "The Grand Inquisitor". Jesus comes back during the Inquisition and after the people begin to follow him, he is arrested and told that the church no longer needs him. The Inquisitor says that humans are incapable of handling the freedom given by Jesus and thereby have been condemed to suffer. So the few humans capable of accepting his freedom take on the burden for everyone and give the ignorant majority a controlling God to worship - the church. It is better that they live in ignorance and not the chaos that would come again from Jesus' freedom.

That was a pretty shitty summary, but your question made me think of it. The chapters a bit long but can be read outside the novel if anyone wants to dig around on the internet for it. The book is great (but long) and I highly recommended it. The philosophy of the author (and the books protagonist) is very much different than the character's view I summarized so don't be scared off by that.

Adept Havelock
04-26-2006, 10:25 PM
To say it would throw me for a loop is a huge understatement . Would I become a "worshipper"? Intellectualy, I doubt it for a couple of reasons. If it were the traditional Abrahamic God that revealed itself, I'd be too P.O.'d over what I consider to be:

1) Poor parenting techniques, bordering on (and occasionally including) sadism and abuse, IMO. I.E., even with "free will" I believe a decent parent should intervene directly in extreme cases (the Stalin terror, Pol Pot's or Mao's Genocide, The Crusades, Hitler's Holocaust, etc.). Letting the "kids" have their head while inflicting that kind of pain and misery on your other kids? I just can't see it as decent parenting.

2) Extreme Vanity. It would astound me that the all-powerful creator of the multiverse would be petulant enough to condemn it's "children" to eternal suffering for being insufficent in their flattery.

That's Intellectually. Emotionally, to be honest, I'd have to admit I don't know. I've faced fear enough times in my life to know that it can be one hell of a powerful force and motivator.

Would my anger and outrage from the above examples be enough to continue to refuse to worship God at the price of eternal suffering? I don't know is the most honest answer I could give. I've always prided myself on an almost ruthless intellectual honesty. Given that proof, I would have to acknowledge the reality of God. However, I'm uncertain if I would find God worthy of worship, for reasons outlined above and in my other posts.

Nice threads. Kudos to Dave Lane and you for starting them. :thumb:

Mr. Kotter
04-26-2006, 10:27 PM
There is a great chapter in one of my favorite books - The Brothers Karamazov - called "The Grand Inquisitor". Jesus comes back during the Inquisition and after the people begin to follow him, he is arrested and told that the church no longer needs him. The Inquisitor says that humans are incapable of handling the freedom given by Jesus and thereby have been condemed to suffer. So the few humans capable of accepting his freedom take on the burden for everyone and give the ignorant majority a controlling God to worship - the church. It is better that they live in ignorance and not the chaos that would come again from Jesus' freedom.

That was a pretty shitty summary, but your question made me think of it. The chapters a bit long but can be read outside the novel if anyone wants to dig around on the internet for it. The book is great (but long) and I highly recommended it. The philosophy of the author (and the books protagonist) is very much different than the character's view I summarized so don't be scared off by that.

Sounds fascinating. I'll consider adding it to my "To Read" list.....seriously. It sounds like it's right down my alley. :hmmm:

Thanks.

Adept Havelock
04-26-2006, 10:30 PM
Sounds fascinating. I'll consider adding it to my "To Read" list.....seriously. It sounds like it's right down my alley. :hmmm:

Thanks.


I'd also recommend Solzhenitsyn's Gulag Archipelago, especially the third volume.

Aside from the historical interest, I think you would find his commentary on suffering and spirituality very interesting. It's also got some interesting notions from the "Orthodox" Christian point of view.

He certainly gave this old freethinker quite a bit to ponder.

Dave Lane
04-26-2006, 10:35 PM
Like Adept I think I'd have some pretty pointed questions for the almighty. I'd definately want to know why he needed or wanted my worship and if he had some reason that made sense I would probably do so. I would go to church if required and prehaps make a few more concessions.

I still think that my idea that god may well be Cartman from South Park is valid and would explain alot. I'd need to be somewhat conviced god wasn't.

Dave

WoodDraw
04-26-2006, 10:38 PM
Sounds fascinating. I'll consider adding it to my "To Read" list.....seriously. It sounds like it's right down my alley. :hmmm:

Thanks.

It's translated from Russian (it's by Dostoevsky) so that takes a bit of getting used to if you've never read any Russian literature. It's also over 800 pages, so it is by no means light reading. It is easily one of my favorite novels though (and arguably one of the greatest every written), and from your past posts I think you'd appreciate the philosophy.

Mr. Kotter
04-26-2006, 10:42 PM
To say it would throw me for a loop is a huge understatement . Would I become a "worshipper"? Intellectualy, I doubt it for a couple of reasons. If it were the traditional Abrahamic God that revealed itself, I'd be too P.O.'d over what I consider to be:

1) Poor parenting techniques, bordering on (and occasionally including) sadism and abuse, IMO. I.E., even with "free will" I believe a decent parent should intervene directly in extreme cases (the Stalin terror, Pol Pot's or Mao's Genocide, The Crusades, Hitler's Holocaust, etc.). Letting the "kids" have their head while inflicting that kind of pain and misery on your other kids? I just can't see it as decent parenting.

2) Extreme Vanity. It would astound me that the all-powerful creator of the multiverse would be petulant enough to condemn it's "children" to eternal suffering for being insufficent in their flattery.

That's Intellectually. Emotionally, to be honest, I'd have to admit I don't know. I've faced fear enough times in my life to know that it can be one hell of a powerful force and motivator.

Would my anger and outrage from the above examples be enough to continue to refuse to worship God at the price of eternal suffering? I don't know is the most honest answer I could give. I've always prided myself on an almost ruthless intellectual honesty. Given that proof, I would have to acknowledge the reality of God. However, I'm uncertain if I would find God worthy of worship, for reasons outlined above and in my other posts.

Nice threads. Kudos to Dave Lane and you for starting them. :thumb:
I swear, you and I seem to share a lot of similar thoughts--just from opposite sides of the fence, perhaps....:hmmm:

From my perspective, your first point is troubling....but, in my mind, is ameliorated by the very notion of "free will." By definition, it wouldn't be free...if God intervened. Sometimes parents have to let their kids learn from their mistakes; and while the costs are high, in worldly terms, maybe in divine and everlasting terms they are akin to a scrapped knee. Kids won't grow up, if you don't allowthem to live their own lives--as painful as it may be sometimes to watch.

Your second notion I agree with whole-heartedly. I simply have never, ever bought the notion that a God (especially one who has created us in his own image) needs to all the praise and adulation that so many seem intent on giving. It's just not a thought I articulate often in the fellowship of other Christians. I just kind of think, "you can think that if you want, but I'm gonna trust my own instincts on this one." That should not become an excuse for not fearing or respecting God....but I don't picture God as an attention whore or drama queen--what would the point be?

And my take on your second point, would render your third point moot. In my world God doesn't need us; we need him.

I'd also recommend Solzhenitsyn's Gulag Archipelago, especially the third volume.

Aside from the historical interest, I think you would find his commentary on suffering and spirituality very interesting. It's also got some interesting notions from the "Orthodox" Christian point of view.

He certainly gave this old freethinker quite a bit to ponder.

My reading is so consumed with parenting and family sorts of stuff right now, it will be a while....but I will add it to the list. Russian stuff though, I've always struggled to get going with---it's so deliberate and methodical, and detailed.

Adept Havelock
04-26-2006, 10:46 PM
It's translated from Russian (it's by Dostoevsky) so that takes a bit of getting used to if you've never read any Russian literature. It's also over 800 pages, so it is by no means light reading. It is easily one of my favorite novels though (and arguably one of the greatest every written), and from your past posts I think you'd appreciate the philosophy.


Dostoevsky is fascinating. I've developed a passion for a number of Russian authors over the years. I think the hardest thing to get used to in that in Western Novels, the character is the "focal point". In most of the works of Russian literature, the character only seems to exist in order to illustrate the ideal.

While admittedly a modern Russian novel, I believe Pasternak's poetry and novel are among the finest I've ever read. Ever had the pleasure, WoodDraw? If not, it's time well spent.

Mr. Kotter
04-26-2006, 10:47 PM
....I still think that my idea that god may well be Cartman from South Park is valid and would explain alot. I'd need to be somewhat conviced god wasn't.

Dave

Elaborate please? I don't get to see much TV....:hmmm:

WoodDraw
04-26-2006, 10:54 PM
Dostoevsky is fascinating. I've developed a passion for a number of Russian authors over the years. I think the hardest thing to get used to in that in Western Novels, the character is the "focal point". In most of the works of Russian literature, the character only seems to exist in order to illustrate the ideal.

They definetely have their own unique style. Even with the large focus on ideas, the best of the Russian authors have an ability to create multiple characters with a depth that builds through the ideas. It seems that many times the characters get lost in the ideas or the ideas end up being driven by whatever is convenient for the writer. Dostoevsky's ability to master both shouldn't be understated.

While admittedly a modern Russian novel, I believe Pasternak's poetry and novel are among the finest I've ever read. Ever had the pleasure, WoodDraw? If not, it's time well spent.

I haven't. The Brothers Karamazov was actually my entry into Russian literature. Since then I've been making my way through some short stories and building up to my next novel. I've become fascinated in the whole history though, so I'll definetly add Pasternak to my list. Thanks.

Adept Havelock
04-26-2006, 10:55 PM
I swear, you and I seem to share a lot of similar thoughts--just from opposite sides of the fence, perhaps....:hmmm:



I must say that I've had the same notion regarding the similarities. Heck, being divided by a fence isn't so bad. It worked well for Wilson and Tim the tool man. Especially as we do seem to switch off on those roles, IMO. :thumb:

I can see the "free will" concept as you express it. In the "big picture", given the Judeo-Chrisitian concept of the afterlife, it does make sense. Not sharing it personally, it's a bit harder for me to wrap my head around, I'll admit.

"God doesn't need us, we need god". That's one I'm going to have to remember. I know a couple of others who will appreciate it.

As far as the Russian authors, they aren't for everyone. In my case, they are an (occasionally painfully) acquired taste. I've always felt it must be something to do with their history of either getting the shaft from the East, West, or themselves (depending on the century), and those interminable winters.

Have a good night, Kotter. :toast:

Adept Havelock
04-26-2006, 10:59 PM
They definetely have their own unique style. Even with the large focus on ideas, the best of the Russian authors have an ability to create multiple characters with a depth that builds through the ideas. It seems that many times the characters get lost in the ideas or the ideas end up being driven by whatever is the convenient idea. Dostoevsky's ability to master both shouldn't be understated.

I haven't. The Brothers Karamazov was actually my entry into Russian literature. Since then I've been making my way through some short stories and building up to my next novel. I've become fascinated in the whole history though, so I'll definetly add Pasternak to my list. Thanks.

I think you'll enjoy it. His poetry is moving on a level I've seldom experienced, and I will freely admit that Dr. Zhivago (the novel, not the film, which I did still enjoy) is one of the few fictions I've read that actually moved me to tears.

When you read the "Lara" poems, I think you will understand.

'Hamas' Jenkins
04-26-2006, 11:33 PM
I've always loved Nabokov (although he was rather French for a Russian writer). Gogol is an entertaining read as well.

WoodDraw
04-26-2006, 11:38 PM
I've always loved Nabokov (although he was rather French for a Russian writer). Gogol is an entertaining read as well.

Well that, and his best works are in English. ;)

'Hamas' Jenkins
04-26-2006, 11:45 PM
Well that, and his best works are in English. ;)

Well, I assume you are referring to Lolita, but that actually was published in French and was only available in French for several years before it was available in the states.

WoodDraw
04-26-2006, 11:57 PM
Well, I assume you are referring to Lolita, but that actually was published in French and was only available in French for several years before it was available in the states.

It was published in France, but written in English. It was only published in France because American publishers refused so he turned to a small French erotic literature publisher.

I don't deny the French influence though. Nabokov was trilingual in French, English, and Russian from a very early age which is part of what makes him so unique. I was just pointing out that he isn't your typical Russian writer even though he was heavily influenced by them. His famous works are almost entirely in English.

Dave Lane
04-27-2006, 01:24 AM
Elaborate please? I don't get to see much TV....:hmmm:


I had this on my thread...

Quote:Originally Posted by Amnorix
If it was ALSO proven to me that he cared about such things, then I would make significant changes in my life with regard to worshipping him, most likely.

But "there IS a God" does not equal "every word of the Bible is true" or even "and he cares that we bow down to him".

Frankly, if I was an omnipotent, omniscient being, I'd be very unlikely to give a rat's ass what pissant humans did.../Amnorix



Well Cartman did when his sea monkeys built a civilisation based on worshipping him. Could it be that god is a little like Cartman? Actually that might explain a lot.

Dave

tiptap
04-27-2006, 06:55 AM
I'd also recommend Solzhenitsyn's Gulag Archipelago, especially the third volume.

Aside from the historical interest, I think you would find his commentary on suffering and spirituality very interesting. It's also got some interesting notions from the "Orthodox" Christian point of view.

He certainly gave this old freethinker quite a bit to ponder.

Why not throw in Tolstoy and have the big three Russian christian apolegists. All loosely based upon Plato's philosopher King concept and of course that would be represented by a Christian philosophy directing the ruler. Now this is the flippant, too short to be fair, overvue. Just realize that the emphasis is on the wise King. I'll take a leaky, contentious, unweildy republic or democracy thank you.

Mr. Kotter
04-27-2006, 07:35 AM
I had this on my thread...

Well Cartman did when his sea monkeys built a civilisation based on worshipping him. Could it be that god is a little like Cartman? Actually that might explain a lot.

Dave
See, to me, that's the biggest mistake of organized religion: they traded rational appeal for fear and power...

It's a trade that has, ironically, empowered critics of organized religion.

NewChief
04-27-2006, 07:44 AM
See, to me, that's the biggest mistake of organized religion: they traded rational appeal for fear and power...

It's a trade that has, ironically, empowered critics of organized religion.

You should read some Francis A Schaeffer. (http://www.rationalpi.com/theshelter/bio.html)

Mr. Kotter
04-27-2006, 07:10 PM
You should read some Francis A Schaeffer. (http://www.rationalpi.com/theshelter/bio.html)

Thanks, NC. I'll add it to my ever growing list of "to reads." :thumb:

BucEyedPea
04-27-2006, 10:18 PM
...and I will freely admit that Dr. Zhivago (the novel, not the film, which I did still enjoy) is one of the few fictions I've read that actually moved me to tears.

When you read the "Lara" poems, I think you will understand.

...a man wrote this?

Not tryin' to hit on you or anything, but you sound like you're a sweet "soul" inside.

MOhillbilly
04-28-2006, 07:47 AM
anyone remember my story about the metrinome?

Mr. Kotter
04-28-2006, 08:38 AM
anyone remember my story about the metrinome?


I must have missed it....:hmmm:


Got a link?

the Talking Can
04-28-2006, 09:32 AM
If god showed up I'd contact the guberment and have him sent to Abu Ghraib.

I'm against illegal aliens.

MOhillbilly
04-28-2006, 10:45 AM
i might have told this on here before i dont know----------


My Father died in the house i live in know i held him as he breathed his last breath in this world.
20 years old

I wasnt working (the grief made me crazy) and needed some cash so i was going to sell his car to the junkyard.
Salvage guy shows up and i cant find the title anywhere(id been looking all morning) so my dad was a teacher and had personality and his students always gave him stuff.
one student gave him a kiln fired bust of himself (we called it Roys shrine to Roy):)
he also played the piano-

anyway im standing there and i ask him.

"ive never asked for nothin and i really need some help"

and at that instant the metronome(sp?) on the bookshelf starts ticking.

underneath it was the title.

now you have to unlatch a metronome or it will keeptime....they dont just automate on there own.

thats real shit right there boys and girls.

i miss him everyday.


( when i say i asked i mean i said it out loud in the house and begging would be more like it pleading even)

Mr. Kotter
04-28-2006, 07:30 PM
i might have told this on here before i dont know----------


My Father died in the house i live in know i held him as he breathed his last breath in this world.
20 years old

I wasnt working (the grief made me crazy) and needed some cash so i was going to sell his car to the junkyard.
Salvage guy shows up and i cant find the title anywhere(id been looking all morning) so my dad was a teacher and had personality and his students always gave him stuff.
one student gave him a kiln fired bust of himself (we called it Roys shrine to Roy):)
he also played the piano-

anyway im standing there and i ask him.

"ive never asked for nothin and i really need some help"

and at that instant the metronome(sp?) on the bookshelf starts ticking.

underneath it was the title.

now you have to unlatch a metronome or it will keeptime....they dont just automate on there own.

thats real shit right there boys and girls.

i miss him everyday.


( when i say i asked i mean i said it out loud in the house and begging would be more like it pleading even)
Wow. Cool story, MO. Spooky, but cool. I know stuff like that happens, despite the protests of so many.

RIP, Roy. My condolences, MO. I can relate, somewhat, as I lost my mom 11 years ago....at the age of 56. Our first son was born 9 months after her funeral--after my wife had been through two miscarriages. Not a day goes by that I don't regret that my mom never got to see her grand kids in this world; she loved kids more than anything in the world, and my kids have missed out on a lot not having her around.

Mr. Kotter
04-29-2006, 12:15 AM
Bump for MO