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View Full Version : Anyone know much about Red Heelers?


pr_capone
04-29-2006, 01:33 AM
A friend of ours has offered us a full bred Red Heeler puppy. She was born on our wedding day (March 25th of this year) so she still has about another 4 weeks that she has to be with her momma.

She usually sells these dogs for $400+ each, but decided to give this one away since it was the only one that survived out of the litter.

I went to see the pup today and absolutly fell in love. :D She is the cutest damn thing I have ever seen.

I have been reading up on them but nothing compares to first hand experience. Anyone here have one? Any tips?

This isnt a picture of her... but it might as well be her twin.

http://www.firesidesoapworks.com/108-0888_IMG.JPG

luv
04-29-2006, 01:36 AM
I don't know if Red Heelers and Blue Heelers are similar, but I know that a Blue Heeler needs a big yard. They are a herding dog, so they love to run.

pr_capone
04-29-2006, 01:39 AM
I don't know if Red Heelers and Blue Heelers are similar, but I know that a Blue Heeler needs a big yard. They are a herding dog, so they love to run.

They are the exact same dog sans color. lol

We have a medium sized back yard but live next to a HUGE park that I can take her to on a daily basis. Let her wear herself out and all. :D

KcMizzou
04-29-2006, 01:51 AM
That's a really cool dog. I'd love to have one.

CrazyHorse
04-29-2006, 03:05 AM
A friend of ours has offered us a full bred Red Heeler puppy. She was born on our wedding day (March 25th of this year) so she still has about another 4 weeks that she has to be with her momma.

She usually sells these dogs for $400+ each, but decided to give this one away since it was the only one that survived out of the litter.

I went to see the pup today and absolutly fell in love. :D She is the cutest damn thing I have ever seen.

I have been reading up on them but nothing compares to first hand experience. Anyone here have one? Any tips?

This isnt a picture of her... but it might as well be her twin.

http://www.firesidesoapworks.com/108-0888_IMG.JPG

I have a blue healer. She's 11 years old. She has been a good dog. Very vocal, a trait I have noticed in most healers I've seen. Almost all of them have been barkers. She is stocky through the chest and the seems to have a natural hearding mentality. I see it in her though she has never been on a farm in her life. When I walk her she walks from side to side in front of me. A dog that zig zags like that is said to be a hearding type dog. I dont know how true it is.

She's been a great dog. She is very pretty. But she seems like a more emotional breed than the other dog I have.

I am sure this has done little to help you get an idea about healers. But I thought I would just post up about a faithful ol friend of mine.

They need excersize or they get fat. That stocky build easily gains weight without excersize.

pr_capone
04-29-2006, 03:08 AM
Perfect!!!

Several questions for you...

Is your Heeler an inside or outside dog?

Did you take her to any obedience training?

Has she been around kids? If so, how is she with them?

What about other animals? Does she interact well with them?

Frankie
04-29-2006, 06:53 AM
A friend of ours has offered us a full bred Red Heeler puppy. She was born on our wedding day (March 25th of this year) so she still has about another 4 weeks that she has to be with her momma.

She usually sells these dogs for $400+ each, but decided to give this one away since it was the only one that survived out of the litter.

I went to see the pup today and absolutly fell in love. :D She is the cutest damn thing I have ever seen.

I have been reading up on them but nothing compares to first hand experience. Anyone here have one? Any tips?

This isnt a picture of her... but it might as well be her twin.

http://www.firesidesoapworks.com/108-0888_IMG.JPG
I have you alert you to the fact that you've been had. This dog does not have any red on him. I also know a good doctor for color blindness.
:p

farmerchief
04-29-2006, 07:02 AM
Blue Heelers and Red Heelers are the same, just differant "tint" of color. Raised to drive cattle, instinctively bred to do so. All the ones I have been around, will drive cattle from the rear, nipping at their heels, thus the name "heelers". Some are very agressive in that respect. Don't know how ther would be in a differant environment, (sans off the farm/ranch), but they are an agressive dog in nature. I used to have one for work with cattle, they will drive cattle. Also been around other peoples heelers and could be walking through their yard, and the dang thing would come nip at your heels!, always hated that. Very smart dogs, but if I was wanting a dog for a family pet, I think there would be better choices. just my opinion.

Bwana
04-29-2006, 07:34 AM
Blue Heelers and Red Heelers are the same, just differant "tint" of color. Raised to drive cattle, instinctively bred to do so. All the ones I have been around, will drive cattle from the rear, nipping at their heels, thus the name "heelers". Some are very agressive in that respect. Don't know how ther would be in a differant environment, (sans off the farm/ranch), but they are an agressive dog in nature. I used to have one for work with cattle, they will drive cattle. Also been around other peoples heelers and could be walking through their yard, and the dang thing would come nip at your heels!, always hated that. Very smart dogs, but if I was wanting a dog for a family pet, I think there would be better choices. just my opinion.Very good post, right on the money. As far as Blue VS Red, as farmer stated the same dog, kind of like a Yellow and black lab. Both are heelers, just different colored hair. They are great for working cattle, but can be agressive toward strangers and depending on the line, may not be the best around kids if that's a consideration. A great dog for ranch work, but as a family pet, it would be a roll of the dice IMHO. Once again, it all boils down to line, AKA, background for the most part along with how much time you can spend with the dog. If you don't have a great deal of time to spend with that dog, and have any kids, I wouldn't ever consider it.

Smoke
04-29-2006, 09:11 AM
I agree with most of the last two posts. I've had four heelers ( 3 blue & one red) If you have time to train a pup they are great. They are very smart and fast learning, but if they are not worked with they will get into trouble. I've never seen a openly agressive heeler but 95% of them don't like to be messed with when it comes to strangers.

If you take it, besure to introduce it to lots of people including kids while it's a pup. Nip the biting/chewing trait before it gets the habit started and you'll have a fine family pet.

Frankie
04-29-2006, 09:24 AM
Posting this thread on the "Draft Day" is a bit of blasphemy. Isn't it?

Bwana
04-29-2006, 09:30 AM
Posting this thread on the "Draft Day" is a bit of blasphemy. Isn't it?:spock:

Frankie, switch to Decaffeinated bud. ;) Check the time he posted it.

TEX
04-29-2006, 09:35 AM
I have a 2 1/2 -year-old female Blue Heeler named "KC" and she's the smartest dog I've ever had. She is very well trained and learned everything very quickly. She's one hell of a Frisbie dog as well. She's loyal and is a very good watch dog as she does not like strangers. She pretty much goes everywhere with me.

As others have said, caution should be used in certain situations because these dogs require lots of exercise because of their herding nature. KC gets hers from playing Frisbie and fetch pretty much every day. Also, caution should be used around children as mine flat out doesn't like them (unless they're playing a game of fetch) and will "nip" at them if provoked and left unattended. Nothing serious, but remember these dogs are bred to nip at livestock, if need be, to get their point across.

They make good pets for adults IF you will spend time with them and make sure they get plenty of exercise. Otherwise, if not, you're in for a world of trouble because with nothing to "work" their aggression, it will come out in other ways. And, regardless of the exercise level, I'd always use caution around children with these dogs.

pr_capone
04-29-2006, 01:42 PM
I have a 2 1/2 -year-old female Blue Heeler named "KC" and she's the smartest dog I've ever had. She is very well trained and learned everything very quickly. She's one hell of a Frisbie dog as well. She's loyal and is a very good watch dog as she does not like strangers. She pretty much goes everywhere with me.

As others have said, caution should be used in certain situations because these dogs require lots of exercise because of their herding nature. KC gets hers from playing Frisbie and fetch pretty much every day. Also, caution should be used around children as mine flat out doesn't like them (unless they're playing a game of fetch) and will "nip" at them if provoked and left unattended. Nothing serious, but remember these dogs are bred to nip at livestock, if need be, to get their point across.

They make good pets for adults IF you will spend time with them and make sure they get plenty of exercise. Otherwise, if not, you're in for a world of trouble because with nothing to "work" their aggression, it will come out in other ways. And, regardless of the exercise level, I'd always use caution around children with these dogs.

Excellent information! I was reading up in a Australian Cattle Dog book about how when a baby introduced to the family, the dog will immediately take to it (assuming proper training) and be protective over the child almost to a fault.

I will be playing lots of fetch with her as we have a huge park just next door.... she will not want for excersize. lol

Many thanks for the replies!

luv
04-29-2006, 02:02 PM
My best friend had Blue Heeler. He was really smart. Even though she took him out to run, play fetch, etc, he would still run circles around the back yard. Wore a path around the edge of the yard. Also, he was very aggressive when her nieces and nephews came over. She had to get rid of him. He was just too aggressive around the kids, and he was slowly ruining her yard. She loved him to death, but had to get a different dog. They are smart, so maybe obedience training would help.

Frankie
04-29-2006, 03:32 PM
:spock:

Frankie, switch to Decaffeinated bud. ;) Check the time he posted it.
Oh that was just a toungue-in-cheek post on my part. Didn't mean it with any malice.

BTW, Bwana, looking at your avatar looks like you found him!

Bwana
04-29-2006, 03:41 PM
BTW, Bwana, looking at your avatar looks like you found him!

Heh.............you just never know. :)

BigOlChiefsfan
04-29-2006, 06:53 PM
I love heelers, but don't recommend 'em for most folks. Some of the smartest dogs I've ever been around, but they get bored easily and a bored heeler is trouble waiting to happen. "Giving a heeler unsupervised leisure time is like giving teenagers whiskey and car keys". I could tell you some amusing stories, if I weren't the chump in most of 'em.
They're not really happy sitting around a yard waiting for you to get off work and play. They're really happiest working their own damnself on the job with you. Then they'll stop off for a brewski and a frisbee with you after work, or go for a nice heeling, healing run. They're not really dogs, they're partners. Sometimes, senior partners. Watch what you say at the Office party. CYA.

In my experience, they're often a 'one person dog' and will make a big deal of ignoring your wife (or you, depending on who they 'bond' with)...if they could talk, they'd sound like Cartman saying 'Whatever. I do what I want'. They like to yawn and insult people who aren't in their chain of command (you do know that a big toothy yawn is dogtalk for 'FU and the horse you rode in on', don't you?)
They do not suffer fools gladly, this includes kids who visit (tho' they'll adjust to kids in the home...once they 'own' them they'll happily herd them around). I'm not saying they can't be happy in the 'burbs but you may not be doing them any favors if you don't have a couple of critters for them to herd. Keep 'em occupado and they'll be muy bueno.