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the Talking Can
05-10-2006, 08:54 PM
Security issue kills domestic spying inquiry
NSA won’t grant Justice Department lawyers required security clearance


Updated: 8:41 p.m. ET May 10, 2006
WASHINGTON - The government has abruptly ended an inquiry into the warrantless eavesdropping program because the National Security Agency refused to grant Justice Department lawyers the necessary security clearance to probe the matter.

The inquiry headed by the Justice Department’s Office of Professional Responsibility, or OPR, sent a fax to Rep. Maurice Hinchey, D-N.Y., on Wednesday saying they were closing their inquiry because without clearance their lawyers cannot examine Justice lawyers’ role in the program.

“We have been unable to make any meaningful progress in our investigation because OPR has been denied security clearances for access to information about the NSA program,” OPR counsel H. Marshall Jarrett wrote to Hinchey. Hinchey’s office shared the letter with The Associated Press....


Long Live the King

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12727867/from/RSS/

banyon
05-10-2006, 10:20 PM
Well they were from the Justice Department and may have been appointed by Bush. Who can blame them for not trusting them with a security clearance?

WilliamTheIrish
05-10-2006, 10:22 PM
I'll take cry for 1000$, Alex.

the Talking Can
05-11-2006, 12:20 AM
Well they were from the Justice Department and may have been appointed by Bush. Who can blame them for not trusting them with a security clearance?

now I'm laughing and crying....

NSA has massive database of Americans' phone calls
Updated 5/11/2006 12:30 AM ET

By Leslie Cauley, USA TODAY
The National Security Agency has been secretly collecting the phone call records of tens of millions of Americans, using data provided by AT&T, Verizon and BellSouth, people with direct knowledge of the arrangement told USA TODAY.

The NSA program reaches into homes and businesses across the nation by amassing information about the calls of ordinary Americans — most of whom aren't suspected of any crime. This program does not involve the NSA listening to or recording conversations. But the spy agency is using the data to analyze calling patterns in an effort to detect terrorist activity, sources said in separate interviews.

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS: The NSA record collection program

"It's the largest database ever assembled in the world," said one person, who, like the others who agreed to talk about the NSA's activities, declined to be identified by name or affiliation. The agency's goal is "to create a database of every call ever made" within the nation's borders, this person added.

For the customers of these companies, it means that the government has detailed records of calls they made — across town or across the country — to family members, co-workers, business contacts and others.

The three telecommunications companies are working under contract with the NSA, which launched the program in 2001 shortly after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the sources said. The program is aimed at identifying and tracking suspected terrorists, they said.

The sources would talk only under a guarantee of anonymity because the NSA program is secret.

Air Force Gen. Michael Hayden, nominated Monday by President Bush to become the director of the CIA, headed the NSA from March 1999 to April 2005. In that post, Hayden would have overseen the agency's domestic call-tracking program. Hayden declined to comment about the program.

The NSA's domestic program, as described by sources, is far more expansive than what the White House has acknowledged. Last year, Bush said he had authorized the NSA to eavesdrop — without warrants — on international calls and international e-mails of people suspected of having links to terrorists when one party to the communication is in the USA. Warrants have also not been used in the NSA's efforts to create a national call database.

In defending the previously disclosed program, Bush insisted that the NSA was focused exclusively on international calls. "In other words," Bush explained, "one end of the communication must be outside the United States."

As a result, domestic call records — those of calls that originate and terminate within U.S. borders — were believed to be private.

Sources, however, say that is not the case. With access to records of billions of domestic calls, the NSA has gained a secret window into the communications habits of millions of Americans....

USA Today (http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2006-05-10-nsa_x.htm?POE=NEWISVA)

Mohammed
05-11-2006, 12:26 AM
Ha ha ha, the Great Satan is crumbling!

jAZ
05-11-2006, 03:16 AM
More weeping ahead...

http://movies.crooksandliars.com/news_Countdown_Turley_051006.wmv

NewChief
05-11-2006, 06:22 AM
Double plus Good!